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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 15, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: there's been a stark rise in the number of complaints against payday lenders — nearly 40,000 new cases were brought last year. the government announces another brexit vote in earlyjune. but there are no signs that cross—party talks are making progress towards a deal. good morning. 0nlya good morning. only a quarter of women struggling with the menopause feel comfortable telling their bosses. we are at a clothing manufacturers adds alperton asking how they open the conversation with current legislation goes fast enough. brilliance from bairstow sets
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the tone in bristol, as england ease to victory in their third one—day international with pakistan. good morning from stjames‘s park in london, where it is a beautiful start to the day, but it is a cold one. that can be said for many parts of the uk this morning. and as we go through the day the sunshine continues, as does the warmth, with temperatures a little bit higher than yesterday. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. it's wednesday the 15th of may. our top story: complaints about payday lenders have more than doubled in the space of a year with up to nearly 40,000 cases brought last year according to the financial 0mbudsman service. an annual review found that dissatisfaction with all financial services has hit a five—year high. here's our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz. with a loan from wonga.com... wonga collapsed partly because of the weight of compensation claims. if it hadn't failed, there might have been even more gripes from borrowers, saying no—one checked
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if they could afford a loan or they weren't given the right information. the financial 0mbudsman service said it had 40,000 complaints about pay—day loans in the year to march, up 130%. it's also concerned about fraud and scams, up 40% to 12,000 complaints, including a sharp rise in people tricked into transferring money out of their bank accounts. meanwhile, the most complained about financial product ever, payment protection insurance, or ppi, saw a slight fall to 180,000. for a lot of people, it's about them being lent money that's unaffordable and that's unsustainable over time. it's actually unusual to see people who had only one or two pay—day loans, most people coming to us have ten or 20 and we've even seen instances of people with 100 loans that they've taken out, so that's obviously really concerning. sometimes your payjust won't stretch far enough... the company behind quickquid topped the league of the most complained about payday lenders with the owner
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of lending stream next and wonga after that. the firms blame claims management companies for bringing what they say is a flood of unjustified complaints. but at the ombudsman service, where many of the complaints end up, they describe the figures as startling and say too many people have been left struggling with debt. simon gompertz, bbc news. we'll be speaking to the chief ombudsman, caroline wayman, in just over an hour. mps are to be asked to vote in early june on the bill that would pave the way for brexit, despite an apparent lack of progress in talks between labour and the government. the prime minister will try to rally support for her planned exit deal before parliament breaks up for the summer. let's get more from our political correspondentjessica parker. good morning to you, jessica. in terms of significant developments, where is this one? what theresa may is trying to do is set a deadline to
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try to get parliament to finally maybe pass the legislation that is neededin maybe pass the legislation that is needed in order to secure the uk's exit from the european union. now, jeremy corbyn and theresa may met last night in westminster for an hour. that is where the prime minister told the leader of the 0pposition of the plans to bring forward what is known as the withdrawal agreement bill in early june. earlyjune will be shortly after those european parliamentary elections. perhaps the hope might be that if both major parties take a drubbing in those elections it will focus minds and allow the impetus for mps to get some kind of a deal over the line. but as things stand labour leadership is saying they have seen enough guarantees from the government, they haven't seen enough compromise, either. so theresa may still has a mountain to climb stop while she is trying to claim that mountain, incidentally, she is fighting a rearguard action as a number of her backbench tory mps tried to get her to set out a clear
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departure date for her time to end at number10. departure date for her time to end at number 10. incidentally, as well, that we can earlyjune is the same week as we are expect being a visit from a certain donald trump, the us president. it could be quite a busy one. 0k. a selection of dates for the diary. thank you, jessica. british steel is asking for more money from the government to help with what it describes as "brexit—related issues". tx the company, which employs four and a half thousand people in scunthorpe, cumbria, north yorkshire and teesside, reportedly needs a loan of up to 75 million to keep trading. it's already borrowed £100 million from the government to pay an eu bill. family courts are putting children at risk by ordering them to spend time alone with parents who have convictions for domestic abuse, mps and charities have warned. they've called for an independent inquiry, as an investigation by the victoria derbyshire programme reveals four children have been killed since 2014 by an abusive parent after a family court in england allowed access. the ministry ofjustice said "where there is evidence of domestic
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abuse, the courts are bound by law to consider potential harm to the child and this over—rides any presumption of parental involvement". pressure is growing on itv to axe thejeremy kyle show after the death of a man who appeared on the programme. downing street called the death of steve dymond, who was 63, "deeply concerning". and the commons media committee will meet today to discuss whether to order an inquiry into the running of reality television. 0ur media editor amol rajan reports. for 14 years, the jeremy kyle for 14 years, thejeremy kyle show has turned the innermost anguish of its guests into a public spectacle. 0n hardy perennial of the show is the lie detector test. lying, cheating, horrible person. 63—year—old steve dymond underwent one of these in an episode filled the week before last. its broadcast was cancelled in the wake of his death. as former fiance told the sun
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that they went on the show to see if he was unfaithful. i knew he was going to fail it. because they held his hand and there was just nothing there. everyone felt the mood change. a student in manchester was in the audience for the show that got pulled. he was crying from the very beginning. and he was so convinced he would pass this test and that everything would be fine. and then, you know, they introduced themselves, tell us about what has happened, and then jeremy themselves, tell us about what has happened, and thenjeremy brings out the lie detector test and he asked the lie detector test and he asked the audience who thinks he is going to pass? 99% of the audience with their hand up, including myself, and then he said he had failed. and you just saw him collapsed to the ground, absolutely just couldn't believe what he had heard. and he was begging his fiancee for forgiveness. having taken the show off airand forgiveness. having taken the show off air and removed archive from its catch up service, itv reiterated that staff was shocked and saddened
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at the news of the death of a participant in the show. ina participant in the show. in a competitive environment, jeremy kyle's show is a rating success. the question is, at what price? amol rajan, bbc news. age uk is warning that "care deserts" are beginning to emerge in england, as the system for looking after frail older people begins to fail. analysis commissioned by the charity shows large parts of the country now have no care home beds at all, affecting more than 1 million older people. the government said plans to reform the way care is funded would be published soon. senators in the us state of alabama have approved a bill that would ban nearly all abortions. if it's signed off by the state governor, terminations will only be allowed when the woman's health is in danger, giving alabama the strictest anti—abortion laws in america. 16 us states have already tightened abortion restrictions this year. bafta is calling for tv shows to have more plot lines and references to climate change, to help raise awareness of the issue. the academy analysed 40 uk channels and found that it was mentioned
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about the same number of times as rhubarb and zombies. laura foster reports. it was seems like this from blue planet to that changed the way we think about plastic. and soap operas are think about plastic. and soap operas a re often think about plastic. and soap operas are often praised for raising awareness of difficult social and health issues stop and now bafta says it's time to put the spotlight on climate change. we live on this planet and if we ignore that then we are not being authentic with our audiences. also, there's sojeopardy and climate change, it's right to tear apart and climate change, it's right to tearapart in and climate change, it's right to tear apart in comedy and drama. charlie brooker is one writer who has not been afraid to use climate change for stories as part of his show black mirror. you tend to get things like game of thrones, where the whole, dead at the wall, winter is coming, it was playing out like a metaphorfor is coming, it was playing out like a metaphor for climate change with everybody warring and getting caught
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up everybody warring and getting caught up in theirown everybody warring and getting caught up in their own political squabbles while facing sort of annihilation. there is a very, very tough nut to crack a. this isn't a call to make more documentaries about climate change and our planet, it's about taking our planet and putting it into every single piece of output on television, into the soap scum into the comedies come into the dramas. these writers say it is about showing more sustainable ways of living on screen. we are beginning to see the real—world effects of climate change on people who have no choice but to bear the brunt of it. and i think if drama and television are not reflecting that we're not doing ourjob properly. the aim is for the future of our planet to become a natural topic of conversation, while at the same time keeping audiences entertained. laura foster, bbc news. a man has broken his own record for the most ascents of mount everest, the tourism department of nepal has confirmed. sherpa kami rita, who is 49 years old, reached the summit of the world's highest peak
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for the 23rd time a couple of hours ago. he first scaled everest at 24, and has also climbed neighbouring mountains including k2. was an amazing thing to have done with your life. that is a proper record. what have you done with your life? exactly. i have been up kilimanjaro. but only once. he had to drop that in there. what have you done with your life? i have been up kilimanjaro, what about you? we are having a reunion this weekend. it is not up kilimanjaro. i have done quite a lot of my life, just living it, but 0k. quite a lot of my life, just living it, but ok. i have got here. we are doing 0k. it, but ok. i have got here. we are doing ok. we made it up this morning. we are happy with that. and
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we are here. it is only 11 minutes past six. well done to us. and well done to that man behind you. jonny ba i rstow is done to that man behind you. jonny bairstow is having a good...|j thought bairstow is having a good...” thought he was going to win it. they are the favourites. feeling pretty confident.” feeling pretty confident. i listened the other day. now you are convinced. it will happen! we will find out who is definitely in that squad next week. all the players at the minute are vying for their place and are having to perform. and jonny ba i rstow and are having to perform. and jonny bairstow did. he truly did. it is clear why england are the favourites when you look at the performance yesterday against pakistan. their third one day international. it was this man who set the tone. johnny bairstow‘s century helping them to a six—wicket victory in bristol, taking a 2—0 lead with two to go. aston villa reach the championship play—off final at wembley with a penalty shootout win over west bromwich albion.
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wolves plan to install rail seats at molineux this summer so that fans who refuse to sit can stay safe. they're the first premier league club to do so and it's part of a major redevelopment of the ground. rory mcilroy says he's ready to represent ireland at the olympics in tokyo next year. he missed out on rio. another man who says he might be going to tokyo as tiger woods. it was great in rio. roy mcllroy talking at the time saying he would not watch it. the olympics have come around very quickly, which is good news. are you ready for it? i love watching it. it is a real detriment to everything i do. how does work out for us? tokyo, a long time ahead. not great. it'll be the
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middle of the night.” ahead. not great. it'll be the middle of the night. i will be waking up in the exciting stuff is happening. good for breakfast. it is 30 minutes past six. would you like to see what the weather is like in london this morning. most of us don't live in london. it was another glorious sunrise. carol is at st james's park with a look at today's weather. i am guessing it is chilly at the beginning. it isa it is a cold start to day and if you are waiting for public transport you will notice the chill. temperatures will notice the chill. temperatures will rise and as just said i am will notice the chill. temperatures will rise and asjust said i am in saintjames will rise and asjust said i am in saint james ‘s park will rise and asjust said i am in saintjames ‘s park in london, a lovely start to the day. saint james ‘s park is not named a king but after a leper hospital. and you can see the canal behind us, 350 years
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ago it was dug out and king charles ii used to swim here in the summer and he would skate here in the winter. it is surrounded by three palaces, probably the best—known being buckingham palace and many pa g ea nts being buckingham palace and many pagea nts ta ke being buckingham palace and many pageants take place here such as trooping the colour which is taking paysin trooping the colour which is taking pays in june this trooping the colour which is taking pays injune this year. —— taking place. a chilly start this morning across the board with some of us having temperatures close to freezing than others. mostly sunny and quite warm for the time of year. yesterday the top temperature in the uk was in the highlands where it reached 24 degrees. today we could hit 25 stop high pressure is dominating our weather and has drifted a little further northwards so you can see the direction that the wind coming around is moving in a clockwise direction. still breezy across the english channel and that isa across the english channel and that is a chilly breeze. a cool breeze coming in off the north sea but
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inland the temperatures are higher up inland the temperatures are higher up after a cool start with mist patches that will lift quickly a dry and sunny day. mostly because there is more cloud bubbling up across northern england in southern scotla nd northern england in southern scotland this afternoon with an isolated chance of a shower. temperatures across the north of scotland, particularly in the north—west could hit 25. for most of us north—west could hit 25. for most of us generally it will be between 18 and 22 but always cooler on the north sea coastline and the channel coasts. as we head on through the evening and overnight we still have high pressure in charge so there along clear spells with mist and fog patches and a bit more cloud over the next clinic scotland. —— cloud over scotland. that leads us into tomorrow. tomorrow the best of the sunshine will be on the north and there will be more cloud as we
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comfort the and there will be quite a brisk north north—easterly wind is high pressure continues to drift further north. generally temperatures are not as high. the highest temperature looks like it will be around edinburgh stop as you move into friday, while the best sunshine again will be across the north—east and for the rest of the uk it will be cloudy. some sunshine at times but for now we will start to pull in some rain or some showers from the north sea and that will drift west as we had through the course of the day. if you like it warmer, sunday into monday looks like temperatures will start to recover. it will remain cool as we go through the weekend. so save the gardening until then. 0k. how nice is it there in saintjames ‘s park. let's take a look at today's papers. the main story in the daily telegraph is the trial of a man accused of fabricating allegations about a vip paedophile ring. and the picture is of actress
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elle fanning, at the opening of the cannes film festival. the times leads with a warning from the police to the prime minister, that new rules designed to identify islamophobia could hinder investigations into terrorism. the paper also has a story about retailers blacklisting shoppers dubbed ‘serial returners'. concerns about thejeremy kyle show, following the death of a guest, continue to dominate the front pages. "kyle on trial," says the sun's headline, as the paper reports the prime minister is "deeply concerned". the mirror goes with the same lead story. they quote the comments of a psychiatrist, who described the show as a "theatre of cruelty". i was listening tojeremy fine yesterday and they had an mp on who chairs the committee for suicide prevention. i was passionate about the programme saying thatjeremy kyle should be taken of the air and
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jeremy fine wanted to know what you would say to the people who like to watch that sort of show. he was not happy with that question and he left stop it has caused quite a debate. let me show you this. look at this. this is, honestly, a stunning garden and this couple spent a lot of money on it. £15,000. and two hours every day. tony and marie newton and they love their garden. this is a view from the house and the view above as you can see it is just forgers. from the house and the view above as you can see it isjust forgers. i love this garden. it is listed as an unofficial tourist attraction. 14,000 people have visited. amazing. that will never be said of my garden. i spent two hours there yesterday and it still looks the
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same. so they meticulously planned the layout to create a four seasons affect. carol is talking about being nice this week. let's have a look at this. i want to go to this garden. you can't go now. we have some work to do. but look at this, the sun is officially wearing a hat. where is that? what caused that? meteorological stuff causes that. let me read it while you talk. return to me about that. and quite a few papers today, this is about alton which has gone into administration and 400 staff have been that low. people are talking about the fact have had to open their own food bank which is just
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unheard of for a football club. that is for staff who have not been paid. exactly. for their staff and their families. they felt they had a responsibility to make sure the families could have a dinner on the table but is horrendous to think of how horrific that story is for bolton. and manchester in the headlines again for all the wrong reasons. players allegedly filmed singing about liverpool fans and the one line that people are criticising is the fact that they talked about liverpool fans getting battered in the streets. we have seen videos like this a lot of various football chants and things but when we see it on the players they do have a responsibility so people are criticising them today. let's talk about jellyfish chips and criticising them today. let's talk aboutjellyfish chips and cricket burgers. have you ever had jellyfish chips? no. then how do you know if
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you don't like them. wouldn't they bea you don't like them. wouldn't they be a little floppy? an organisation is predicting that by 2025 here in the uk we believe more insects in dishes and instead of coal and haddock we will be eating banana blossom which tastes like fish when frightened battered. algae milk will become popular as well. they predict a real change in the kind of food that we will be eating in the future. why?! they are getting resourceful. it is about running out. later on i need to talk to you about banning cake. remind me. that will be taken near inverness. a popular dolphin watching spot. we will try and get some clarity on
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that from carol. coming up, a pop back with added drama here on the sofa to tell us why they are back. all that to come but this week on brea kfast we all that to come but this week on breakfast we have been talking about the menopause. today we're focusing on how attitudes are changing in workplaces, including the police. all 43 forces in england and wales are about to receive new guidance on how to support female staff and officers as they go through the change. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has spent time with one officer who's used her own difficult experience to help change her police force for good. 26, 27 years service. i was responsible for international police development. positive about life. and then suddenly i started going to work and my decision—making was
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shocking. i was quickly in effect if at work and i could not understand why. —— ineffective at work. just the two of us. at 46, helen had it all. happily married, holidays abroad, a successful sun. this is in the middle east. and a brilliant career, here advising the prime minister of qatar on world cup policing. you are confident and successful and then. bam! and then life started to change.” successful and then. bam! and then life started to change. i have never suffered any kind of anxiety and then suddenly i began going into work and i would leave tasks half done and do another six tasks and go back to the other. there were co nsta ntly a back to the other. there were constantly a thousand thoughts in my mind adding to this buildup, really, of anxiety stop helen went from advising heads of state to being overwhelmed on the supermarket. and there was a fear that if she told
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her work how she felt she would be seen as weak. you almost took the decision to quit. 0h, seen as weak. you almost took the decision to quit. oh, yeah. it was that bad. the thing that stopped me looking after myself so long, the thing that, like, ground me into the ground was me worrying about other people ‘s perceptions. ground was me worrying about other people 's perceptions. helen did not quit. she did take time off and she got a diagnosis. it was extreme but treatable perimenopause and today she is back. new role, new station, new team. new you. definitely. my decision—making is back. being organised and problem—solving is back. sometime my words come out in the wrong order but that is just my character now. was not a weakness, just the change. and helen has gone
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on to help change the force for others. she is now a menopause ambassador here at greater manchester police where there is mandatory training and menopause policy. we can now go off with menopause illness. just as you can with pregnancy, you can go off with menopause symptoms. to be able to call it for what it is? menopause —related illness. call it for what it is? menopause -related illness. it is huge. and 43 forces across england and wales are about to receive a new menopause guidance. i am about to receive a new menopause guidance. iam not about to receive a new menopause guidance. i am not weak. about to receive a new menopause guidance. iam not weak. i had some tough time. i took time out to rebalance and it was the best thing i have ever done. inspiring to hear from her. you can hear more from helen on bbc radio manchester on 23rd may, when they'll be talking about the menopause throughout the day. the question is what would help you at work? what would make the
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difference? some people have to leave the job difference? some people have to leave thejob or are difference? some people have to leave the job or are so uncertain about things that that is how they feel. let us know what you think. yes, your comments have been coming in throughout week. the hashtag to use is there on the screen. get involved on social media and we will try and get through as many of those as we can through the course of the programme. and we have had so many responses so thank you. we you nervous about how much information was divulged and are you happy with the response? i had no idea that if i describe my feelings that many people would feel the same way full i knew i was not alone now i really know for sure so thank you so much. it is so much appreciated. time now for the news, the travel and the weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. more than half of children in some london boroughs are growing up
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in poverty prompting calls for the government to renew efforts to tackle the issue. a study, published by end child poverty coalition found tower hamlets fared the worst with an estimated 57% of children living in depravation. the government said the study was based on estimates — and that they are supporting families to improve their lives through work. around 70 firefighters are tackling a large blaze at a warehouse on the north circular road in neasden. there's a lot of smoke in the local area and residents are being advised to keep their doors and windows shut. we'll have more details on how that's impacting travel in that area — injust a moment. a wellbeing expert from essex is encouraging people not to edit their social media photos — as part of mental health awareness week. sadie hopson says the constant societal pressure to be perfect is leading to issues with stress, anxiety and depression. she's encouraging people to go edit—free — and promote a positive body image instead. we wa nt we want to promote a message of body
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positivity and body empowerment where people feel comfortable in the skin they are in. so we created a campaign, hashtag no filter needed and we are encouraging people to upload photos without a filter or edit. the charity that looks after london's eight royal parks is recruiting volunteers. following the launch of the volunteer ranger service — the royal parks charity is launching another recruitment drive in bushy and richmond parks. successful applicants will talk to visitors about the history of the park and safety of being around deer. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. the a406 north circular is closed in both directions between staples corner and neasden lane because of the fire i mentioned earlier. people are being instructed to avoid the area. four bus routes are on diversion and there are already delays approaching the closure. upper thames street is closed
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eastbound for emergency repairs between blackfriars bridge and southwark bridge. now the weather. good morning. a chilly start out there this morning with clear skies overnight last night that has led to a clear start this morning. blue sky and sunshine although maybe one or two mist patches around first thing but they will live to a gentle easterly breeze but it will still have a little impact out along the essex coast. a little cooler there but further away inland looking at some of 20 degrees. uv levels are they at this time of year as well so something to bear in mind in that glorious sunshine today. 0vernight it stays clear and dry and once again the temperature drops. a reasonably chilly night and the minimum down to five or six celsius out in the suburbs. a bright start first thing on thursday but the high pressure that has given us the lovely sunshine gradually starts to slip away so we will start to see more cloud feeding in tomorrow with
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temperatures a touch layer and aggressively more unsettled towards the end of the week and cooler and breezy for friday. showers expected through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: the footballers who tackled their own mental health — with some help from their sporting heroes and the duke of cambridge. teaching 15 and 16—year—old lads. you say it doesn't end here. and they say, "why is miss all red in the face?" we'll have help on hand for the latest in our wake up to the menopause week. today we've got advice on how to cope with the menopause at work.
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and as the actor martin clunes is criticised for riding an elephant, we'll ask if animal tourism can ever be cruelty free. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. let us get you up—to—date with all the news. complaints about payday lenders have more than doubled in the space of a year, up to nearly 40,000 disputes, according to the financial 0mbudsman service. an annual review found that dissatisfaction with all financial services has hit a five—year high. the firms blame claims management companies which advertise widely and, according to the lenders, have brought a flood of unjustified complaints. mps are to be asked to vote in early june on the bill that would pave the way for brexit, despite an apparent lack of progress in talks between labour and the government. the prime minister theresa may hopes the commons will back the withdrawal agreement bill — which is the legislation to implement any exit deal — in a bid to pave the way for britain to leave the eu before parliament breaks up for the summer. british steel is asking for more money from the government
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to help with what it describes as "brexit—related issues". the company, which employs four and a half thousand people in scunthorpe, cumbria, north yorkshire and teesside, reportedly needs a loan of up to £75 million to keep trading. it's already borrowed £100 million from the government to pay an eu bill. family courts are putting children at risk by ordering them to spend time alone with parents who have convictions for domestic abuse, mps and charities have warned. they've called for an independent inquiry, as an investigation by the victoria derbyshire programme reveals four children have been killed since 2014 by an abusive parent after a family court in england allowed access. the ministry ofjustice said "where there is evidence of domestic abuse, the courts are bound by law to consider potential harm to the child and this over—rides any presumption of parental involvement". pressure is growing on itv to axe thejeremy kyle show after the death of a man who appeared on the programme. downing street called the death of steve dymond, who was 63, "deeply concerning" — and the commons media committee will meet today to discuss whether to order an inquiry into the running of
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reality television. itv is currently carrying out a review of the show. age uk is warning that "care deserts" are beginning to emerge in england, as the system for looking after frail older people begins to fail. analysis commissioned by the charity shows large parts of the country now have no care home beds at all, affecting more than one million older people. the government said plans to reform the way care is funded would be published soon. senators in the us state of alabama have approved a bill that would ban nearly all abortions. if it's signed off by the state governor, terminations will only be allowed when the woman's health is in danger, giving alabama the strictest anti—abortion laws in america. sixteen us states have already tightened abortion restrictions this year.
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this is a story about tails. a town in canada is being plagued by wild peacocks. the birds have flocked to sullivan heights, in the western province of british columbia, in such large numbers that some residents say living with them has become unbearable. authorities have tried to remove the peacocks but locals say it's not working. they do make that extraordinary sound. it is shrill. idon't they do make that extraordinary sound. it is shrill. i don't think! have seen a peacock in the flesh for 20 years. one of my cycle routes in the leafy lanes of cheshire, quite a lot that live in a house. they make that sound a knife remember that they are there again. it is pigeons that i have to worry about. the
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thing about peacocks is that you cannot have a black car near peacocks because they see their reflection and they try to pack at it. that is niche peacock knowledge. i will not go near them on my black bike as well. since i have not seen one in 20 years at does not matter. speaking of peacock in... one man who should be feeling pretty confident after his performance yesterday isjonny bairstow. as england put on a show of strength to beat pakistan in the third one—day international. they were set a challenging target of 359 in bristol but then the jonny bairstow show started. he smashed it around the ground scoring 128 runs. england won it with six wickets and over five overs to spare and they're two up in the five match series with two to play.
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it's great to do it when you're chasing 360, that's a huge thing for me to do that in a high—scoring game when you've got to get off to a good start and continue and win the game. to knock 360 off the overs left was pleasing for us as a group. aston villa are though the championship playoff final after a dramatic win on penalties against ten—man west bromwich albion. tammy abraham scored the winning penalty for villa after the match was level on aggregate after extra time. villa keeperjed steer saved two penalties. they'll play either leeds or derby, who play in the other semifinal tonight. the final takes place at wembley on may 27th. wolves are to become the first premier league team to replace existing seats in their stadium with safe standing rail seats. scottish premier league champions
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celtic currently have the largest section of rail seats in the uk. new guidance allows clubs to install seats with barriers if strict conditions are met. wolves managing director laurie dalrymple says it's about keeping fans safe. i don't believe that the evidence supports and, again, this is my opinion, that the evidence supports that standing a football grounds is inherently dangerous. but i am pleased that this revision to the guidelines allows us to do something that permits the fans to be in the stadium and, should they wish to stand, that they are doing so in a safe environment. but whether that law changes overall in future we will have to wait and see. double 0lympic gold—medallist jadejones will look to complete her set of major titles at the world taekwondo championships in manchester this week. jones is part of a 15—strong gb team for the event — the first time it has taken place in the uk. jones, who has european, youth olympic and grand prix golds,
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has taken silver and bronze at previous world championships. for me, lo, the olympics has always been the pinnacle. so i can't help but just switch on been the pinnacle. so i can't help butjust switch on that little bit more for the olympic games. but before i retire i want to have on all three. so, you know, i need to get this one otherwise i can't retire. britain's cameron norrie has been knocked out by croatia's borna coric in the second round of the italian 0pen. in the first round, australian nick kyrgios was once again again the centre of attention. kyrgios produced underarm serves during his match against daniil medvedev. judy murray said he was a genius the last time he did it. rafa nadal said it showed a lack of respect. he did it on the very first point of the game. kyrgios produced plenty more flashy shots on the way to a three set win. rory mcilroy says he's ready to represent ireland at the 2020 olympic games in japan, despite previously being critical of golf‘s place at the olympics.
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mcilroy opted to represent ireland at rio in 2016, but later pulled out because of concerns about the zika virus. but yesterday he said it was "more likely than not" he would play injapan next year and it would "be a great experience". masters champion, tiger woods, also said he would like to represent his country for the first time in tokyo. the pair were talking ahead of the us pga which starts tomorrow in new york. and you might want to keep an eye out for another man — john daly. we don't see it very often but the 1991 champion has been given special dispensation to use a buggy because he suffers from arthritis in his knee. casey martin was the last player allowed to use a cart at the 2012 us 0pen. but this man — tiger woods — famously won the 2008 us open at torrey pines while playing with a stress fracture in his left leg.
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as far as as farasjd as far asjd taking a cart, well, i walked with a broken leg, so... i would not mind that. that would be 0k. he did i would not mind that. that would be ok. he did win on one leg. only he could do it with one leg, one arm tied behind his back. a very interesting quote date. the messaging service whatsapp promises total security, but those promises have not protected some users from a major hack. the company, which is owned by facebook, says surveillance software was remotely installed, allowing attackers to access their victims' phones. we don't know how many users have been affected, but over one and a half billion people use the messaging app. each of those sending 65 million messages per day. it's believed specific people, including human rights activists, were targeted by the hack, but the company is advising
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all users to update the app. we can speak now to technology journalist kate russell. good morning to you. the thing about whatsapp, two things, those numbers are staggering, and it was meant to be, wasn't it, one of the safest ways to communicate. so how have they got in? absolutely. this is what is particularly worrying for the communities that are being targeted, those human rights activists they use the platform because of the end to end encryption. it is supposed to be incredibly secure. what happened as an exploit was found, a vulnerability, that basically allowed hackers to deploy, inject surveillance spyware on people's phones just by making a whatsapp call. and you didn't even have to a nswer call. and you didn't even have to answer the call. this is the step forward that is worrying for people, that it required no interaction from the big them to deploy that spyware.
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facebook is saying this has now been fixed and everybody needs to update the app. it has ripples. people will be very concerned. if you have been targeted, would you know? well, the thing is, the vast majority of the 1.5 billion plus users, they are not going to be a target. this was not a wide scale spyware attack. it was basically targeted surveillance. the company who is suspected, facebook itself has said it bears all the hallmarks of a company that creates a spywa re hallmarks of a company that creates a spyware that is used by governments to supposedly, governments to supposedly, governments around the world, supposedly to track and intercept terrorists and criminals, but of course there are some bad players on the global stage you are using it, it would seem, this exploit to try and track, finding context, to calls, you can turn on the microphone and the camera, specifically for these interest
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groups, activists, a human rights lawyer was one person infected, and amnesty international researcher, so the people who use the app because a security means a life and death for them, those communities are going to be very worried right now. but for the vast majority of the rest of us you are not going to be a target for up you are not going to be a target for upjust you are not going to be a target for up just updating whatsapp to the latest version will make sure you do not become a target. the only way you would have been able to tell is basically missed calls through whatsapp, which could later on be, they were going back and changing they were going back and changing the call logs. so it is a very worrying, generally, for the cyber security community, because it is a virtually invisible deployment of this is. briefly, you gave us an indication there, mine is sitting here dan is sitting with his, they go everywhere with us, so much personal information on there. just, generally, what kind of things
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should we be doing to make sure they are looked after and protected? we call them our external brains now because we saw all this information and we don't remember phone numbers anymore and things like that generally. so they are vitally important. don't panic, though. as long as you are taking some important steps you can keep yourself safe. make sure you always update to the latest operating system is. when your app sources to update something there is a fix that is possibly security related. i also use additional software. i have an additional malware catcher that operates in real time. i am, perhaps, more of a target as a technology reporter. that is why i elevate my security risk. for the vast majority of the 1.5 billion users, so long as you have updated whatsapp and keep your phone up—to—date you don't have anything really to worry about. that is reassuring to hear. thank you very much. really interesting to hear all of that. depending on where you are
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waking up this morning it is quite nice. the sun is out in most places. and i show you what is going on in glasgow this morning. it is so come on the weather. —— river. bye for now. good morning, carol. good morning everyone. in st james's park london surrounded by wildlife and birds. i'll show you what i'm talking about. there are swans, pigeons, ducks, squirrels. we have a lot in this lovely tranquil scene. we are in front of dark island, originally built back in 1665. over the years changes have been made to the park. king james the first upon this ascension to the throne he changed it to cater for an exotic menagerie. and here the park that sat on
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marshall and, during the landscape and moved in camels, crocodiles and elephants. but not that we have seen any of them but what we have seen is any of them but what we have seen is a beautiful start to the day. it is cold and if you are outside first thing you will notice it. but quickly today the temperature will pick up full of the forecast is a dry one, a sunny one and it will be quite warm for this time of year. the top temperature in the land was in the highlands yesterday, 24 degrees. somewhere in the north—east of scotla nd degrees. somewhere in the north—east of scotland could hit 25. and if that happens it will be the warmest day of the year so far in scotland. high pressure is dominating our weather things are fairly total. cloud up to the west and at times that will turn the sunshine hazy in the west not particularly spoil it stop some fog patches lifting readily this morning through the afternoon a bit more cloud will bubble up across southern scotland and northern england. you could see
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the odd shower but they will be isolated and it will be breezy on the coastline and through the english channel. widely the temperatures today are 18—22. in the north—west, 24 or 25 and down the east coast and english channel coastline, right on the coast it will be lower than that, probably the mid—to—high teens if you are lucky. through this evening and overnight high—pressure is still with us. bridger will fall away and it will be a clear night for most but we will see some low cloud and mist and fog lapping in from the north sea across the far north—east of auckland and in the west it will bea of auckland and in the west it will be a thick cloud, thick enough possibly for drizzle. that leads us to tomorrow. 0nce possibly for drizzle. that leads us to tomorrow. once again the best of the sunshine will be in the north. elsewhere we will see areas of cloud and cloud through the day coming in from the north sea across parts of southern england as well as a brisk north north—easterly wind. not quite as warm as it will today. on friday
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there will be a lot more cloud around and bright skies across the far north of scotland stop elsewhere there will be a lot of cloud was showers and rain coming in from the east drifting as we go through the call -- east drifting as we go through the call —— course of the day. some sunny skies but sunday into monday we start to see the temperatures pick up once again. iam i am mesmerised iam mesmerised by i am mesmerised by the birds behind you this morning. thank you very much, carol. we're talking about the menopause all this week — and today we're looking at what employers are doing to look after their staff. nina is at a clothing factory in derbyshire. good morning to you. i am. good morning to both of you. we know that this is something that all women will go through if they reach that time of life and almost all women recently surveyed who had been through all we got through menopause
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said it affected their capacity and yet only a quarter of women feel co mforta ble yet only a quarter of women feel comfortable talking to their bosses about it. and why are we having these conversations? they are having them here at this clothing manufacturer. 85% of the women here are over 40, 80 5% of the staff here are over 40, 80 5% of the staff here are women over 40. talk to me about what those symptoms were like and how it affected you in the work base? i work at an academy school down the road from here and the main thing i noticed was my memory loss. i need to make sure i have a notebook with me all the time because i have become quite forgetful. mood swings i have noticed but in working with children you have to remain upbeat and positive. so i treat it like a sense of humour. we have a lot ofjokes about it and you need to have a sense of humour and there is no point beating yourself up and getting down about it. we make a joke of it and i have good
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collea g u es joke of it and i have good colleagues so we happily talk about it and colleagues so we happily talk about itand are colleagues so we happily talk about it and are quite supportive and for you, carol, it was more. you spoke to your manager and said you needed a moment? and the fact that you can tell somebody that if you are open about it, i just tell somebody that if you are open about it, ijust need a minute. you try to think of a word in the words won't come to your mind. you get anxious because you can't think of the word and then your concentration goes and it becomes a spiral downwards. if you don't take a breath and think about what you are doing it all comes back and be much more confident full but you do need the support and you need friends. more confident full but you do need the support and you need friendsm that camaraderie but also having a frank conversation with the manager and saying this is why i am tired and saying this is why i am tired and struggling. this is not necessarily happening everywhere. david has worked with thousands of companies to talk about the menopause. it is not always to have that make it easy to have a conversation. no, it is not easy and this employers can really helpful.
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starting to normalise the station. they talk about it openly here full but just starting the they talk about it openly here full butjust starting the conversation, getting the right awareness, support and education in place makes the world of difference. and you are talking to the likes of pepsi, hsbc, does that imply that these big companies are taking it more seriously and they recognise the importance? yes, it does. there are many organisations will start at the conversation who appreciate how important it is. so where we are today, 15 minutes down the road is nhs sherwood forest hospitals who launched their awareness guide last 0ctober launched their awareness guide last october and have continually been talking about it with their colleagues. and the police were the first police force in the uk to launch a policy and that was over two years ago. so it was starting to look at what organisations are actually doing this and demonstrating the difference it
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makes and it is something that all organisations can learn from. heather, we will come to you because it is not just heather, we will come to you because it is notjust about making women feel comfortable. these women are often at the top of the game who have a lot to give the industry they are in and companies cannot afford to lose that. absolutely. they need to lose that. absolutely. they need to be attracted into their organisation. ijoined to be attracted into their organisation. i joined pwc last to be attracted into their organisation. ijoined pwc last year but what is interesting is that we have made it a business decision for the so we are educating all of our people, our men, women, our leaders and the most important thing for us is that if we are doing that right so we have a toolkit launched last week and a series of seminars about giving people the information they need so they can be aware of what this means for them in the work place. for me that is around leadership and management and also about making sure we start to educate leaders about this and that this is actually real life. it is
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not an illness, it is real life and happens to us. there are men with daughters, wives, sisters, mothers. that is the key thing, bringing men into the conversation. women over 50 is is the fastest—growing sector of the uk workforce with over 4 million of them as we have said all week is does matter, getting it right in the workplace. thank you so much. so many people are joining this conversation this it is absolutely fantastic stop please use the hashtag. and we have been out and about as well. yes. we've been asking about how normal these conversations are. quite normalthis week. we are making it normal. this we went to liverpool to find out what these women thought thought of discussing "the change" in the workplace. we are based in liverpool and we have just over we are based in liverpool and we havejust over 100 we are based in liverpool and we have just over 100 drummers, we are based in liverpool and we havejust over 100 drummers, the majority are women and that makes
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for interesting, many women who have had experience with the menopause and coming from different walks of life and lots of experience in different workplaces.” life and lots of experience in different workplaces. i had a hot flush in the kitchen. ijust blamed it on the ovens. the company i worked for were really good because they will give you a fan if you need one and it makes such a difference full this it makes a big difference when you know it is there and you can plug it in. i thought adolescents, teaching 15, 16—year—old boys and it starts here and comes up and they are looking at you. why is she already in the face quest you have to take it in your hands and laugh at yourself stop some places need an area to cool off, where you canjust some places need an area to cool off, where you can just go and let a breath out and breathe.”
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off, where you can just go and let a breath out and breathe. i work in an at gallery and it is a very male based environment where i am. everyone is supportive but i would not have anyone to speak to when i go through the menopause.” not have anyone to speak to when i go through the menopause. i am lucky because i am surrounded people who either have gone through it all know people who have gone through it. either have gone through it all know people who have gone through itm is sunny sometimes but it can also be quite serious for people that if you are trying to do yourjob, people being aware that sometimes you will be uncomfortable.” people being aware that sometimes you will be uncomfortable. i work in a female—dominated industry but that does not seem to be a lot of discussion and people discuss it in hushed tones to each other and it is something kind of secret. wake up to the menopause! this i wondered why we had that big mother there. we are certainly doing that. waking up to the menopause.
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keep your comments and questions coming through. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. a large warehouse fire has closed major roads in north london, prompting warnings of severe disruption to morning rush—hour traffic. the north circular in neasden is closed both ways near to its junction with the m1 as about 70 firefighters tackle the blaze at a commercial building. residents are being advised to keep their doors and windows shut. and you can see because of the road closure — the north circular is completely empty between staples corner and neasden lane. there are already long delays in the area and four bus routes are on diversion. more than half of children in some
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london boroughs are growing up in poverty prompting calls for the government to renew efforts to tackle the issue. a study, published by end child poverty coalition found tower hamlets fared the worst with an estimated 57% of children there living in deprivation. the government said the study was based on estimates — and that they are supporting families to improve their lives through work. a wellbeing expert from essex is encouraging people not to edit their social media photos — as part of mental health awareness week. sadie hopson says the constant societal pressure to be perfect is leading to issues with stress, anxiety and depression. we want to promote a message of body positivity and body empowerment where people feel comfortable in the skin they are in. so we created a campaign, #nofilterneeded, and we are encouraging people to upload photos without a filter or edit.
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a quick look at the rest of this morning's travel now. it's all looking good on the tubes at the moment but there is a part suspension on the overground. and in the city: upper thames street is closed eastbound for emergency repairs between blackfriars bridge and southwark bridge. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a chilly start out there this morning with clear skies overnight last night that has led to a clear start this morning. blue sky and sunshine although maybe one or two mist patches around first thing but they will live to a gentle easterly breeze but it will still have a little impact out along the essex coast. a little cooler there but further away inland looking at 20 degrees. uv levels are high at this time of year as well so something to bear in mind in that glorious sunshine today. 0vernight it stays clear and dry and once again the temperature drops. a reasonably chilly night and the minimum down to five or six celsius out in the suburbs. a bright start first thing
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on thursday but the high pressure that has given us the lovely sunshine gradually starts to slip away so we will start to see more cloud feeding in tomorrow with temperatures a touch lower and aggressively more unsettled towards the end of the week and cooler and breezy for friday. showers expected through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: there's been a stark rise in the number of complaints against payday lenders — nearly 40,000 new cases were brought last year. the government announces another brexit vote in earlyjune — but there are no signs that cross—party talks are making progress towards a deal.
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good morning. making the most of the menopause artwork. we are at a clothing manufacturer is asking what can employers do to support a staff. brilliance from bairstow sets the tone in bristol, as england ease to victory in their third one—day international with pakistan. good morning frame stjames's park in london where the sun is beating down. the temperatures rising quite quicklyjust back from. it will be another dry, sunny, and one for the time of year. the outside chance of a shower in scotland in southern england. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. it's wednesday the 15th of may. our top story: complaints about payday lenders have more than doubled in the space of a year with up to nearly 40,000 cases brought last year according to the financial 0mbudsman service. an annual review found that dissatisfaction with all financial services has reached its highest level for five years. here's our personal finance
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correspondent, simon gompertz. with a loan from wonga.com... wonga collapsed partly because of the weight of compensation claims. if it hadn't failed, there might have been even more gripes from borrowers, saying no—one checked if they could afford a loan or they weren't given the right information. the financial 0mbudsman service said it had 40,000 complaints about pay—day loans in the year to march, up 130%. it's also concerned about fraud and scams, up 40% to 12,000 complaints, including a sharp rise in people tricked into transferring money out of their bank accounts. meanwhile, the most complained about financial product ever, payment protection insurance, or ppi, saw a slight fall to 180,000. for a lot of people, it's about them being lent money that's unaffordable and that's unsustainable over time. it's actually unusual to see people who had only one or two pay—day loans, most people coming to us have ten or 20 and we've even seen
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instances of people with 100 loans that they've taken out, so that's obviously really concerning. sometimes your payjust won't stretch far enough... the company behind quickquid topped the league of the most complained about payday lenders with the owner of lending stream next and wonga after that. the firms blame claims management companies for bringing what they say is a flood of unjustified complaints. but at the ombudsman service, where many of the complaints end up, they describe the figures as startling and say too many people have been left struggling with debt. simon gompertz, bbc news. we'll be speaking to the chief ombudsman, caroline wayman, in just over an hour. mps are to be asked to vote in early june on the bill that would pave the way for brexit, despite an apparent lack of progress in talks between labour and the government. the prime minister will try to rally support for her planned exit deal before parliament breaks up for the summer. let's get more from our political correspondentjessica parker.
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good morning to you, jessica. another vote. publicly what it is about? yes, it will be on the withdrawal agreement bill. we finally have a date, a deadline for a political showdown in westminster. an attempt will be made to try to get mps to support the legislation that could secure the uk's withdrawal from the european that could secure the uk's withdrawalfrom the european union. now theresa may and jeremy corbyn met last night in westminster, they met last night in westminster, they met for one hour. that is where the prime minister told the leader of the opposition of her intention to bring forward this withdrawal agreement bill in earlyjune. this will happen in earlyjune in the wa ke will happen in earlyjune in the wake of the european parliamentary elections. so perhaps there is a hope that you both main parties take a bit ofa hope that you both main parties take a bit of a drubbing hope that you both main parties take a bit ofa drubbing it hope that you both main parties take a bit of a drubbing it will focus minds and provide an impetus to get the deal over the line. i think mps will be warned that if they don't vote for this deal than they could be heading for either a no deal or a no brexit in october. but as things stand, the labour party are far from
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signed up to any kind of agreement. they want further compromise and further guarantees from government. so theresa may still has a political mountain to climb. and while she is climbing the mountain she is fighting off a rearguard action from a number of her own mps who wanted to be much clearer about when she might depart downing street. and, incidentally, this date in early june when we will get this political showdown in parliament happens to be the same week there will be a rather high—profile and potentially controversial visit from us president, donald trump. lots of things going on. thank you very much. british steel is asking for more money from the government to help with what it describes as "brexit—related issues". the company, which employs 4,500 people in scu nthorpe, cumbria, north yorkshire, and teesside, reportedly needs a loan of up to £75 million to keep trading. it's already borrowed £100 million from the government to pay an eu bill. family courts are putting children at risk by ordering them to spend time alone with parents who have convictions for domestic abuse,
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mps and charities have warned. they've called for an independent inquiry, as an investigation by the victoria derbyshire programme reveals four children have been killed since 2014 by an abusive parent after a family court in england allowed access. the ministry ofjustice said whether is evidence of abuse they are bound by law to consider harm to the child and it overrides parental involvement. pressure is growing on itv to axe thejeremy kyle show after the death of a man who appeared on the programme. downing street called the death of steve dymond, who was 63, "deeply concerning" — and the commons media committee will meet today to discuss whether to order an inquiry into the running of reality television. 0ur media editor amol rajan reports. all right, sweetheart? nice to see you. for 14 years, thejeremy kyle show has turned the innermost anguish of its guests into
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a public spectacle... 0ne hardy perennial of the show is the lie—detector test. lying, cheating, horrible person! 63—year—old steve dymond underwent one of these in an episode filmed the week before last. its broadcast was cancelled in the wake of his death. dymond's former fiancee told the sun they went on the show to do the test to see if he was unfaithful. i knew he was going to fail it, because i held his hand and there was just nothing there. everyone felt the mood change. babette lucas—marriott, a student in manchester, was in the audience for the show that got pulled. he was crying from the very beginning, you know, and he was so convinced he would pass this test and that everything would be fine. and then, you know, they introduced themselves. "tell us about what's happened." and thenjeremy brings out the lie—detector test. and he asked the audience, "who thinks he's going to pass?", and 99% of the audience put their hand up, including myself, and then he said he'd failed. and you just saw him collapse to the ground. absolutelyjust couldn't believe what he'd heard. and, you know, he was begging his
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fiancee for forgiveness. having taken the show off air and removed archive from its catch—up service, itv reiterated that staff were "shocked and saddened at the news of the death of a participant in the show". in a competitive environment, jeremy kyle's show is a rating success. the question is, at what price? amol rajan, bbc news. age uk is warning that "care deserts" are beginning to emerge in england, as the system for looking after frail older people begins to fail. analysis commissioned by the charity shows large parts of the country now have no care home beds at all, affecting more than 1 million older people. the government said plans to reform the way care is funded would be published soon. senators in the us state of alabama have approved a bill that would ban nearly all abortions. if it's signed off by the state governor, terminations will only be allowed when the woman's health is in danger — giving alabama the strictest anti—abortion laws in america.
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16 us states have already tightened abortion restrictions this year. this piece is here by popular demand. a town in canada is being plagued by peacocks. so we have more. the birds have flocked to the area, in british columbia, in such large numbers that some residents say living with them has become unbearable. a warning that you are about to see some peacock poux. caroline rigby has more. with stunning plumage, peacocks are often seen as symbols of vanity and pride but, for one community in british columbia, these noisy birds are increasingly seen as pests. "fowl" in more ways than one. rumoured to have escaped from a rural property more than a decade ago, they now overrun sullivan heights. so within the next two or three
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weeks, you're going to see lots of eggs everywhere around the house. that's what happens this time of the year. at times more than 100 peafowl have been reported in the area and with spring they appear to be on the march again. last year, the city council agreed to trap and remove the birds. we have had success with residents who've offered up the garages, for the birds. we set up some food in the garage. we wait for the birds to enter, shut garage. but many continue to evade capture. yeah, they're smart. they are really smart. that has led some locals to question the effectiveness of the plan and even take matters into their own hands. 0ne resident faced fines for cutting down this healthy tree without a permit because he grew tired of the birds nesting in it. noisy, messy, and at times aggressive, for some peafowl
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are clearly a nuisance, but others here count them as feathered friends and, as long as they continue to divide opinion within this community, they are sure to carry on raffling feathers. caroline rigby, bbc news. that noise can really get through... ican that noise can really get through... i can see. peacock issues. that noise can really get through... ican see. peacock issues. no. you are watching breakfast. good morning to you. we get back to our main story. far too many people are still being given unaffordable and unsustainable payday loans. the financial 0mbudsman service says it's dealing with record numbers of complaints from people who have fallen into the trap of taking out multiple loans. it's also concerned about fraud and scams. the head of the service, caroline wayman, joins us now from london. thank you very much for coming on this morning. let us try to get through some of these things and give our viewers a bit more information. how serious has the jump information. how serious has the jump been with specific reference to these payday loan complaints?”
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think really serious. last year was around 40,000 people come to us about payday lender complaints. we are upholding about half of them. that is really quite significant. we are seeing people and some really distressing situations. most of these tend to be financial firms, so businesses, people are saying this has not been done or dealt with in the right way. i think that is right. we are concerned about the fa ct right. we are concerned about the fact that we are upholding so many cases. we are seeing lots of insta nces cases. we are seeing lots of instances of people being lent money that they simply can't afford to pay back. they are borrowing money not for discretionary things but to feed the kids. but is obviously really concerning. so payday lenders need to see some improvement. response from some payday lenders have been to say that it is about claimant management firm to bring unjustified claims, not all of them, but the incredible rise. it is true that claims management companies are bringing the complaints, but we are
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finding in favour of the consumer in a very large proportion. so that does not support the suggestion that these are not justified. does not support the suggestion that these are notjustified. i am afraid that i do think there needs to be some improvement from the payday lenders themselves, they need to look at their processes and think not about how their lending but how they are dealing with the complaints. remember, they get a chance to deal with them before people come to the ombudsman. how much you think the lending system generally, and the fact that there are many people, even watching today, to feel the need to go to these companies? i think it is important that people have access to finance when they needed. 0f important that people have access to finance when they needed. of course, these companies have a responsibility make sure that the lending is sustainable over time. what we often see is people getting trapped in a cycle of debt. i think i would also say is that where people find themselves in trouble to speak up and get some help. you can a lwa ys speak up and get some help. you can always call the ombudsman and we can see what we can do to help. there are dead charities we can refer people to as well. —— debt.
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are dead charities we can refer people to as well. -- debt. what about being better prepared, in terms of that before seeing the debt charities. it is better not to bury your head in the sand. and it can be difficult to make things right. whatever situation you are in seek help. lenders have a responsibility and they do need to treat you positively and sympathetically if you do find yourselves in difficulty and if you don't think you are being treated fairly come to the ombudsman, we can help. do you think, in terms of how to deal with the whole system, is more regulation needed, do you think? there have been increases in regulation in this territory. we will see improvements for that. we are seeing complaints about things that have happened in the past as well. i think it will need ongoing focus to make sure that the improvements do happen and people stay really focused on doing what is right for customers. do you think, in terms of what you have seenin think, in terms of what you have seen in the last year or so, that huge rise, do you think that will continue or the fact that this is such a stark rise will actually make
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people think carefully about what they are doing and, from both sides of this, both the payday lenders and those having to make those claims? people are needing to make the claims because they have been issues. i think what we hope to see issues. i think what we hope to see is that payday lenders and others will learn from the complaints that we see and the cases we look at and make the improvements. so hopefully it won't continue to go up. i think we can expect to see problems for some time to come. caroline wayman, thank you very much for that interesting information this morning on one of our lead stories, talking about that huge rise in complaints about that huge rise in complaints about payday lenders. we both noticed, a beautiful morning this morning. lovely sunrise. we can look outside the studio. look at that. that is quite nice. carol is at st james's park in london with a look at this morning's weather. look at all the different ducks and birds. and there is a heron right
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there beside you. amazing. absolutely right. 17 different species of birds down here in saint james ‘s park. they are spectacular and it looks like someone has popped into shot to feed them. we have been posting photos on twitter this morning of that heron and it looks spectacular. you not only see him but his reflection as well. and in the foreground you can see egyptian geese, more hands, ducks, many of which i don't know the names of. look at the colours, there is one around here somewhere that has a really bright red beak. i had no idea this was going on. i must say, it isa idea this was going on. i must say, it is a beautiful start to the day. when we arrived it was cold but now the temperature is starting to pick up the temperature is starting to pick up and if you stand in front of the sunshine, well, it does feel pleasant. you could say that about most parts of the uk this morning. it has been a chilly start on the
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temperature is now starting to pick up. mistand temperature is now starting to pick up. mist and fog is starting to lift. the forecast for us all today isa lift. the forecast for us all today is a mostly dry one. the chance of a few showers this afternoon across parts of northern england but there will be fairly isolated. temperatures also are in seasonably high. yesterday the top temperature was in the highlands, 24 celsius. today we could see 25. high—pressure is still in charge of the weather so we have very conditions out to the west a little more cloud. at times in the west sunshine will be hazy but not spoiling it. this morning, a lot of dry weather and sunshine around and quite breezy as well, particularly through the english channel. also breezy along the north coastline. the breeze will peg back the temperature. 0n the coast we are looking and perhaps the mid— teens. inland, widely, 18— 22 degrees but in north—west scotland we could hit
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24 or 25 degrees. as we head through the evening and overnight with high pressure still with us we are looking at long clear spells with mist and fog patches performing as well. low cloud and mist and fog lapping in from the north sea across north—east scotland. the cloud in the west will produce some drizzle. the rest of us it will remain dry. tomorrow we still have a lot of sunshine across the north—east and to start the day across many areas but we find tomorrow that more cloud we re but we find tomorrow that more cloud were developed, coming in from the north sea across southern counties. also there will be quite a brisk north—easterly breeze as the high pressure starts drift further northwards. a cooler day tomorrow but still temperatures are in the mid— high teens. as we head on into friday there will generally be more cloud around and bright skies across north—east of scotland. for the rest of the uk we are looking at the cloud producing some showers or some
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rain, initially coming in from the north sea and drifting westwards as we head on through the course of the day. temperatures again will be down to touch. into the weekend, cooler with more cloud and showers. by the time we get to sunday, monday, temperatures will be starting to climb once again. thank you so much, carol. i think you did so well with all those different species of birds. absolutely lovely. carole, did you plan that fellow with the pink socks come to take a photograph just as you were talking about it?” did not. i am sure he is a lovely man but he ruined the shop stop i'm sure many people will help us in naming the birds as well. every time she goes on an outside broadcast she a tt ra cts she goes on an outside broadcast she attracts lovely wildlife. she might attracts lovely wildlife. she might attract cats as well. probably not the best idea around those birds.
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now earlier, i mentioned cakes and buns. this is to do with the leicestershi re buns. this is to do with the leicestershire women's institute who have proudly been supplying cakes to a local hospice for over 40 years. no—one has had any issues at any stage but they have been told they now have to stop providing cake because environmental hills officials are stepping in and they tell the women that they are in breach of hills and safety laws and the baking must stop. what a shame. they say they were told that unless volu nteers they say they were told that unless volunteers register their home kit and is as food outlet did. disappointing, isn't it? they have been doing it for 40 years. they bake the cakes, they freeze them and when a family comes into the hospice they get a cake to share with whoever is there. quite disappointing. and in the future, a p pa re ntly disappointing. and in the future, apparently according to future food, we may not eat cake, we may eat
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things like cricket burgers. instead of fish, banana blossom and a p pa re ntly of fish, banana blossom and apparently these are t—shaped flowers at the end of clusters of bananas that are meant to have a similar texture and taste to fish when battered and fried. but we may even when battered and fried. but we may eve n grow when battered and fried. but we may even grow our own meat. a lab grown aisle at the supermarket where people can pick up cultured meat and kit to group meet at home. meet as we know it today start to be a luxury product and also, jellyfish chips. changes could be afoot.” cannot get my head around a jellyfish chip. because chips, by their nature. but you won't know until you try. you would think that a jellyfish chip would just flop. we had insect food he wants a new refused to eat it. it tasted a
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little like smokey bacon crisps but a little more crunchy. 21 minutes past seven. this week on breakfast, we've been talking about the menopause. today we're focusing on how attitudes are changing in workplaces, including the police. hello. hello? please, come back. all 43 forces in england and wales are about to receive new guidance on how to support female staff and officers as they go through the change. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has spent time with one officer who's used her own difficult experience to help change her police force for good. 26, 27 years service. i was responsible for international police development. very positive about life. and then suddenly i started going to work and my decision—making was shocking. i was quickly ineffective at work
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and i could not understand why. this is a proper adventure. just the two of us. at 46, helen had it all. happily married, holidays abroad, a successful son. this is in the middle east. and a brilliant career, here advising the prime minister of qatar on world cup policing. you are confident and successful and then bam! and then life started to change. i have never suffered any kind of anxiety and then suddenly i began going into work and i would leave tasks half done and do another six tasks and go back to the other. there were constantly a thousand thoughts in my mind adding to this buildup, really, ofanxiety. helen went from advising heads of state to being overwhelmed at the supermarket. and there was a fear that if she told her work how she felt she would be seen as weak. you almost took the decision to quit. oh, yeah. it was that bad.
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the thing that stopped me looking after myself so long, the thing that, like, ground me into the ground was me worrying about other people's perceptions. helen did not quit. she did take time off and she got a diagnosis. it was extreme but treatable perimenopause and today she is back. new role, new station, new team. new you. definitely. my decision—making is back. being organised and problem—solving is back. sometime my words come out in the wrong order but that is just my character now. this was not a weakness, just the change. and helen has gone on to help change the force for others. she is now a menopause ambassador here at greater manchester police where there is mandatory training
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and menopause policy. we can now go off with menopause illness. just as you can with pregnancy, you can go off with menopause symptoms. to be able to call it for what it is? menopause—related illness. it is huge. and 43 forces across england and wales are about to receive a new menopause guidance. i am not weak. i had a tough time. i took time out to rebalance and it was the best thing i have ever done. all thanks to helen for talking to us. you can hear more from helen on bbc radio manchester on 23rd may, when they'll be talking about the menopause throughout the day. coming up on breakfast this morning. waking up to the menopause at work. nina's on the road to find out how employers are supporting female staff.
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good morning. this is an's fan. that is one of these small measures that employers can put in place to make women feel more comfortable. we know women feel more comfortable. we know women feel more comfortable. we know women feel their body temperature fluctuate a lot. increased working from home, flexible working to diminish anxiety full. let's speak to christopher because one of the problems with normalising menopause conversation is that women are worried that men don't get it. it is not an option for you because 85% of your employees are female. you have to be understanding because we all lived together and we work together. a nice thing about a family business as we can do that. we rub along together and look after each other. 0ur together and look after each other. our staff stay here on average over ten years. a lot of men will be
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watching and thinking my goodness, you are brave. it makes me feel uncomfortable when we talk about women's issues. what would you say austin mark we are about women here. —— what would you say? all the sewing machines here are run by women, our management of women. we are women, our management of women. we a re fortu nate women, our management of women. we are fortunate to be surrounded by capable and excellent women. we will talk to them a little later about the symptoms of menopause but looking more generally at whether current legislation goes far enough to protect women going through those symptoms. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. a large warehouse fire has closed major roads in north london, prompting warnings of severe disruption to morning rush—hour traffic. the north circular in neasden is closed both ways near to its junction with the m1
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as about 70 firefighters tackle the blaze at a commercial building. police are telling people to avoid the area as it's going to be some time before it's clear and residents are being advised to keep their doors and windows shut. and this is what it's looking like on our live travel camera — you can see because of the road closure — the north circular is completely empty between staples corner and neasden lane. there are already long delays in the area — including on the m1 southbound and four bus routes are on diversion. more than half of children in some london boroughs are growing up in poverty prompting calls for the government to renew efforts to tackle the issue. a study, published by end child poverty coalition found tower hamlets fared the worst with an estimated 57 percent of children there living in deprivation. the government said the study was based on estimates — and that they are supporting families to improve their lives through work. a well—being expert from essex is encouraging people not to edit their social media photos —
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as part of mental health awareness week. sadie hopson says the constant societal pressure to be perfect is leading to issues with stress, anxiety and depression. we want to promote a message of body positivity and body empowerment where people feel comfortable in the skin they are in. so we created a campaign, #nofilterneeded, and we are encouraging people to upload photos without a filter or edit. a quick look at the rest of this morning's travel now.... and in the city: upper thames street is closed eastbound for emergency repairs between blackfriars bridge and southwark bridge. good morning. a chilly start out there this
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morning with clear skies overnight last night that has led to a clear start this morning. blue sky and sunshine although maybe one or two mist patches around first thing but they will lift. a gentle easterly breeze but it will still have a little impact out along the essex coast. a little cooler there but further away inland looking at 20 degrees. uv levels are high at this time of year as well so something to bear in mind in that glorious sunshine today. 0vernight it stays clear and dry and once again the temperature drops. a reasonably chilly night and the minimum down to five or six celsius out in the suburbs. a bright start first thing on thursday but the high pressure that has given us the lovely sunshine gradually starts to slip away so we will start to see more cloud feeding in tomorrow with temperatures a touch lower and aggressively more unsettled towards the end of the week and cooler and breezy for friday. showers expected through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. complaints about payday lenders have more than doubled in the space of a year, up to nearly 40,000 disputes, according to the financial 0mbudsman service. an annual review found that dissatisfaction with all financial services has reached its highest level for five years. the firms blame claims management companies which advertise widely and, according to the lenders, have brought a flood of unjustified complaints. i think it is important that people have access to finance when they needed. companies have responsibility to make sure that the lending is sustainable over time. we often see people getting trapped in a cycle of debt. i would say that when people find themselves in trouble, speak up to get some help, you can always call the ombudsman and we can see what we can do to help. there are dead charities that we can refer people to as well ——
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debt. mps are to be asked to vote in early june on the bill that would pave the way for brexit, despite an apparent lack of progress in talks between labour and the government. the prime minister theresa may hopes the commons will back the withdrawal agreement bill — which is the legislation to implement any exit deal — in a bid to pave the way for britain to leave the eu before parliament breaks up for the summer. british steel is asking for more money from the government to help with what it describes as "brexit—related issues". the company, which employs 4,500 people in scu nthorpe, cumbria, north yorkshire and teesside, reportedly needs a loan of up to £75 million to keep trading. it's already borrowed £100 million from the government to pay an eu bill. family courts are putting children at risk by ordering them to spend time alone with parents who have convictions for domestic abuse, mps and charities have warned. they've called for an independent inquiry, as an investigation by the victoria derbyshire programme reveals four children have been killed since 2014 by an abusive parent after a family court in england allowed access. the ministry ofjustice said "where there is evidence of domestic
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abuse, the courts are bound by law to consider potential harm to the child and this over—rides any presumption of parental involvement". pressure is growing on itv to axe thejeremy kyle show after the death of a man who appeared on the programme. downing street called the death of steve dymond, who was 63, "deeply concerning" — and the commons media committee will meet today to discuss whether to order an inquiry into the running of reality television. itv is currently carrying out a review of the show. a tree frog from costa rica has been found in a box of bananas at a nottingham supermarket. the creature was discovered in a branch of lidl, more than 5,000 miles away from its rainforest home. named lloyd by staff, he's now being looked after by a vet who specialises in exotic species.
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you would be a little bit surprised if that little fellow came out at you. i am glad it is being looked after and assay. good morning, holly. —— and his say. after and assay. good morning, holly. -- and his say. he is definitely not a little frog. it looks quite... if that was on a ba na na looks quite... if that was on a banana i would be pretty scared. they were little fingers. no, it was his whole hand. no, that is a finger. it would be my whole hand. it is not a full hand. it is not like your hand, is it? that is a big difference. it is about two inches. i could deal with that. slightly worried there. we will talk about the cricket.
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the world cup isjust around the corner. we're well into the summer season with the sport. the cricket is at the end of may. team selection is at the end of may. team selection is happening soon. we'll find out who will make the final squad next week. one man who should be feeling pretty confident after his performance yesterday isjonny bairstow, as england put on a show of strength to beat pakistan in the third one—day international. they were set a challenging target of 359 in bristol but then the jonny bairstow show started. he smashed it around the ground scoring 128 runs. england won it with six wickets and over five overs to spare and they're two up in the five match series with two to play. it's great to do it when you're chasing 360, that's a huge thing for me to do that in a high—scoring game when you've got to get off to a good start and continue to try and win the game. to knock 360 off the overs left was pleasing for us as a group.
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aston villa are though the championship playoff final — after a dramatic win on penalties against ten—man west bromwich albion. tammy abraham scored the winning penalty for villa after the match was level on aggregate after extra time. villa keeperjed steer saved two penalties. they'll play either leeds or derby, who play in the other semi final tonight. the final takes place at wembley on may 27th. wolves are to become the first premier league team to replace existing seats in their stadium with safe standing rail seats. scottish premier league champions celtic currently have the largest section of rail seats in the uk. new guidance allows clubs to install seats with barriers if strict conditions are met. wolves would become the first premier league side to have them. i don't believe that the evidence supports, and again this
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is my opinion, that the evidence supports that standing a football grounds is inherently dangerous. but i am pleased that this revision to the guidelines allows us to do something that permits the fans to be in the stadium and, should they wish to stand, that they are doing so in a safer environment. but whether that law changes overall in future we will have to wait and see. britain's simon yates remains second in the giro d'italia after fighting back following a crash in stage four of the race. it was a chaotic end to the stage and there were several crashes in the final few kilometres. one of them involved yates but he managed to recover and limit his losses in the stage which was won by ecuador‘s richard carapaz. double 0lympic gold—medallist jadejones will look to complete her set of major titles at the world taekwondo championships in manchester this week. jones is part of a 15—strong gb team for the event — the first time it has taken place in the uk. jones, who has european, youth olympic and grand prix golds, has taken silver and bronze
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at previous world championships. for me, like, the olympics has always been the pinnacle. so i can't help butjust switch on the extra bit more for the olympic games. but before i retire i want to have won all three. so, you know, i need to get this one otherwise i can't retire. britain's cameron norrie has been knocked out by croatia's borna coric in the second round of the italian 0pen. in the first round, australian nick nick kyrgios was once again was again the centre of attention. kyrgios produced underarm serves during his match against daniil medvedev. judy murray said he was a genius the last time he did it. rafa nadal said it showed a lack of respect. he did it on the very first point of the game. kyrgios produced plenty more flashy shots on the way to a three set win.
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rory mcilroy says he's ready to represent ireland at the 2020 olympic games injapan — despite, previously being critical of golf‘s place at the olympics. mcilroy opted to represent ireland at rio in 2016 but later pulled out because of concerns about the zika virus. but yesterday he said it was "more likely than not" he would play injapan next year and it would "be a great experience". masters champion, tiger woods, also said he would like to represent his country for the first time in tokyo. the pair were talking ahead of the us pga which starts tomorrow in new york. another talking point ahead of the event was jon daly and his buggy. the 1991 champion has been given special dispensation to use a buggy because he suffers from arthritis in his knee. the last time we saw one used was casey martin at the 2012 us 0pen. however, tiger woods didn't need one when he famously won the 2008 us 0pen while playing with a stress fracture in his left leg — and he seems well...unimpressed.
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as far asjd taking a cart, well, i walked with a broken leg, so... that says it all. i am sorry for missing yourjoke earlier. a lot of people have got in contact to say you said little instead of little. i am sorry. “— you said little instead of little. i am sorry. —— lidl. ask a group of men to start a conversation about football, and there's a good chance they'll oblige — often at some length. getting them to talk about their mental health, however, is a trickier task. a new bbc documentary is using football to help men to open up. it features our own dan walker, not to mention the duke
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of cambridge, who teamed up with some former premier league players to highlight the issue. let's take a look. i think dies in generalfind it very difficult to open up and find it very difficult to talk about their feelings —— guys. i think guys see feelings —— guys. i think guys see feelings as weaknesses sometimes. always need to get it right. there isa always need to get it right. there is a lot of mail pressure around that sort of thing. suicide, for instance, is one of the highest killers of young men under the age of 45. that is an appalling statistic. the guys, there should be a turning point where we should really maximise the reach only potential for everyone involved to pass that message on to guys that it is ok to talk, to speak about mental health. everyone has got to have mental fitness. everybody needs mental fitness. everybody needs mental health. it will normalise the whole conversations. we need more role models coming out and talking about it because in the nonsporting
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world, you know, trying to get corporations involved, see on chief executives big companies coming forward and saying despite my mental health issues i am still see of this enormous company. it is a success story. there are plenty of ceos are plenty of people who are in prominent leadership positions or positions of responsibility who have mental health issues. wejust positions of responsibility who have mental health issues. we just don't talk about it. he is certainly talking about it. an amazing all—star cast there. tell us about the conversation. it was pretty incredible, really. the duke of cambridge, to something he talks about with a great deal of passion and something he takes really seriously. we managed to assemble this incredible group of people, gareth southgate, thierry henry, danny rose, peter crouch, jermaine jenas, they are all talking about not necessarily things like depression and anxiety, danny rose has spoken about that, butjust generally talk about things they face in their careers and then, for the first time, opening up about how it made them feel. terry henri talks
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about the handball against ireland and how that affected his family —— thierry henry. peter crouch talks about body image growing up. it is fascinating to hear them in conversation with the duke of cambridge who talks at length about bereavement and thinks he has been through as well. it is just not a conversation that men often have. through as well. it is just not a conversation that men often havem is so brilliant that that was happening. we'rejoined now by tom paget and paul reynoldson, two of the football fans who took part in the show, opening up about their own mental health struggles and also enjoying a kickabout with those legendary players. it is lovely to see you. what a fantastic thing to have been part of. absolutely. the sun came out as well. cambridge united, i don't want to ruin everything, you will see it, you did not know exactly what would happen and you ended up taking part ina happen and you ended up taking part in a football match with some of these guys. what was that like for you, tom, being there and, again, you, tom, being there and, again, you had not met paul before or steve or mark the others who took part, to
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actually speak openly about things you have been struggling with, how difficult was that for you to start with and how much did a day like this actually help? i think, it seems completely alien to me talking about mental health but i have been doing it of late. to assemble four men to talk about it is completely alien to the tv as well. good on you. you have had mental health issues. tell us what sort of things you have been going through.” issues. tell us what sort of things you have been going through. i stop smoking and i put on weight. as a result of the weight gain, just ballooning and ballooning, my body image was absolutely abhorrent. as a result of that, started spiralling down into depression and because many, down into depression and because any down into depression and because many, many issues with my own family and everything else. and did lots of
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silly things. spending money that i didn't have on things like that. the amazing thing about paul as well is that he was a psychiatric nurse. so you are dealing with people who are going through really serious issues and unable to talk about the thing you are struggling with. absolutely, absolutely. we're trying to get employers to understand the employees needs. in this room also where i am in. i let my registration lapse because i felt that was in. i felt it was game over. that you would bejudged felt it was game over. that you would be judged specifically because you were a psychiatric nurse. absolutely. the problem was and it was said to me about transference. right. how can you counsel somebody who has mental health problems when you have mental health problems
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yourself. some people might argue yourself. some people might argue you understand them. absolutely! absolutely. it was quite cold. you understand them. absolutely! absolutely. it was quite coldm was different for tom. you were a promising young sportsman who had a serious accident. tell us about how that affected you and dealing with not being able to do what you're able to do before. my car accident set me back. i went from feeling almost indestructible to having a car accident and being set back. i spent a year having operations and i did not realise that the time i was suffering from mental hills issues will drop someone pointed out to me, however, that i was not acting myself. i felt quite low at that point because i was that i was not acting myself. i felt quite low at that point because i was stuck that i was not acting myself. i felt quite low at that point because i was stuck within that i was not acting myself. i felt quite low at that point because i was stuck within four that i was not acting myself. i felt quite low at that point because i was stuck within four walls. that i was not acting myself. i felt quite low at that point because i was stuck within four walls. i that i was not acting myself. i felt quite low at that point because i was stuck within four walls. i could not do anything and it was a difficult time. what helped you? talking. that definitely help. . i think ithink we're i think we're losing many men who
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are with loving families and with successful careers because we're not listening. we need ask if you are 0k, and can i help. listening. we need ask if you are ok, and can i help. they are huge questions. short questions but they do makea questions. short questions but they do make a difference. i'll tell you more detail about where you can see this programme but in terms of spending the day speaking to people like the duke of cambridge and danny rose the i gary , gary southgate, what did they do for you? it was amazing. you see them in the public light and you don't think anything is wrong, you think everything is hunky—dory for them. it is only when they release things like that from their own private life that you realise they have the same trials and tribulations that we do. and that is
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refreshing full of i think there are certain people who talk about mental health a lot on the television as you look at people like danny rose and they are the last people you would expect to struggle. itjust shows that whether you are an average man or a premier league footballer, you can be struggling with your life and opening up can be the best thing for you. again, the assumption is that wilful whatever it might be insulates you but that is not the case. no. it certainly does not. i am at the bottom of the pecking order but you assume that when you are down there that people are there with lots of money are ok. but it is not. mental health, basically, it covers everything. so
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good to talk. i have learnt that this week. you are a brilliant example. both of you. thank you very much indeed for coming to speak to us. there is a brilliant part in the documentary where these two fellows are having a kick with peter crouch and he does a lovely thing where he flicks a ball up and chests it and volleys it in from miles away. and he just says under his breath, you don't see that from danny rose. a royal team talk: tackling mental health is on bbc one at 10:30pm on sunday. thank you to both of you. coming up to ten minutes to wait. carol is out and about at saintjames park. to ten minutes to wait. carol is out and about at saint james park. let's talk to somebody who knows a lot about it. mike turner, the assistant park manager here. first of all, we
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have seen a lot of wildlife morning can you identify any of them? we know some are egyptian geese but what about the quiet one sitting down? behind us we have collection birds full of a shelduck and the small one there is a sneer. there area number of small one there is a sneer. there are a number of birds we keep in our collection here that are not wild birds but add colour. you would not normally see them in the centre of london. including pelicans. why are there pelicans here? we have had pelicans in the park since 1664 when they were donated by a russian czar and we have kept a population of pelicans going ever since. we currently have three. islay, tiffany and dougie.
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a stunning view. you're telling us it is protected. what does that mean? it reminds us that we connect, we maintain the views to connect horse guards with buckingham palace either side of the island so that people on horse guards can see buckingham palace and the reverse view back toward the horse guards. it has been a pleasure. thank you for joining it has been a pleasure. thank you forjoining us this morning. the weather here is quite special and the forecast is for sunny and dry. an outside chance of a shower today they will not be plentiful at all. high pressure is still firmly in charge of the weather full high cloud out towards the west which at times will turn the sunshine hazy. that aside, say from the word go. fairweather cloud bubbling up. with
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high pressure in charge the area around it is in the cloud buys direction so it will be breezy along the north—east coastline but especially across the english channel. if you are exposed to those posts it will feel cooler with temperatures reaching the mid—teens. move inland and we are looking widely at temperatures tween 18 and 22. yesterday the top temperature in the land was in the highlands at 24 degrees. today somewhere in the highlands in the north—west could reach 24 or maybe 25. through this evening and overnight high—pressure is still firmly in charge meaning some long spells of clear skies. temperature will drop to between six and eightand temperature will drop to between six and eight and locally in east anglia we could see a little lower, three, four and we will also have low cloud, mist and fog lapping in from the north sea across north—east scotland. little more cloud in the west producing drizzle. tomorrow it is the north—east where we lose that dog and we see the lion share of the sunshine full of it starts on a
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bright note that there will be low cloud coming in from the north sea across southern areas. inland will be cloudier than today. and for friday, a cloudier day generally with rain coming in and showers from the east drifting towards the west through the course of the day. brad skies once again across the five north—east of scotland and temperatures a bit lower than they have been and will be in more of the north, north—easterly breeze by then. cooler weekend but temperatures pick up in the early pa rt temperatures pick up in the early part of next week. thank you very much, carol. we're talking about the menopause all this week — and today we're looking at what employers are doing to look after their staff. louise has been open about it and your openness has encouraged others. i can't thank you enough for all of your e—mails. we are talking about work today and cathy says that the
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uncertainty of an employee being able to work. how to take a day off? i love this one from linger. when i have a hot flush at work i go and stand in the chiller. what a great idea. nina is at a clothing factory in derbyshire. good morning. although stories and your own just how wide and varied the symptoms can be and how much it can impact capacity at work for from five women going through menopause say it will impact them at work somewhere but only one quarter of them feel they can talk their bosses about it and donna and anne have been going through simultaneous hot flushes. donna, you are coming out the other side of menopause and came on because of a hysterectomy. you we re on because of a hysterectomy. you were telling me about your manager playing a key role in coming through it without dealing isolated at work. absolutely. carol went through it herself so every single thing that
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was happening to me had happened to her so nothing was a surprise and i knew i could go to her with my sim ‘s and she would understand everything i was going through. if you needed a late night? absolutely. and your story is common because you are facing an uphill struggle to get are facing an uphill struggle to get a diagnosis was i have been to the dock as a two times with different symptoms and the doctor keeps telling me i am too young to be going through menopause. what did that feel like? at work i have had hot sweats from where it comes from the feet to the head. dizzy spells. i have had mood swings at work but we get a lot of help with fans and air conditioning. perhaps it is not enough. i know. liz, oops, i know you have been through this with someone who ran a multi—million pound company but did not recognise
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menopause was coming.” pound company but did not recognise menopause was coming. i read about health and well—being for over 30 yea rs health and well—being for over 30 years and even perimenopause took me by surprise. it is shocking that women in their late 40s are not getting the help they need full these women are in their prime, huge business assets and we invest in training and experience and to lose these women in their prime is a shop. what we need is concise and proper gp care and support. there is no mandatory training for gp or practice nurses. it is not enough to tell these women to lie down and they will get over it. hrt is fantastic and i love that film clip earlier with the policewoman. she has her life back on track and that is good for business. later we will talk about hrt. some people are massive advocates but it is not for everybody and we will talk about current legislation and how it is not that clear, just an all—encompassing equalities act that does not advocate specifically for
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menopause. and don't forget, contact us on our hashtag if you want to get in touch. specifically, what would make a difference for you at work? and don't forget we will be joined by shakespears sister. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm alice salfield. a large warehouse fire has closed major roads in north london, prompting warnings of severe disruption to morning rush—hour traffic. the north circular in neasden is closed both ways near to its junction with the m1 as about 70 firefighters tackle the blaze at a commercial building. police are telling people to avoid the area as it will be sometime it is clear. and you can see because of the road closure — the north circular is completely empty between staples corner and neasden lane. there are already long delays
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in the area and four bus routes are on diversion. more than half of children in some london boroughs are growing up in poverty prompting calls for the government to renew efforts to tackle the issue. a study, published by end child poverty coalition found tower hamlets fared the worst with an estimated 57% of children there living in deprivation. the government said the study was based on estimates — and that they are supporting families to improve their lives through work. a wellbeing expert from essex is encouraging people not to edit their social media photos — as part of mental health awareness week. sadie hopson says the constant societal pressure to be perfect is leading to issues with stress, anxiety and depression. we want to promote a message of body positivity and body empowerment where people feel comfortable in the skin they are in. so we created a campaign, #nofilterneeded, and we are encouraging
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people to upload photos without a filter or edit. a quick look at the rest of this morning's travel now. severe morning's travel now. dip delays on the overgrouni causing severe dip delays on the overground causing delays for southern in terms link services northbound. and in the city: upper thames street is closed eastbound for emergency repairs between blackfriars bridge and southwark bridge. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a chilly start out there this morning with clear skies overnight last night that has led to a clear start this morning. blue sky and sunshine although maybe one or two mist patches around first thing but they will lift. a gentle easterly breeze but it will still have a little impact out along the essex coast. a little cooler there but further away inland looking at 20 degrees. uv levels are high at this time of year as well so something to bear in mind in that glorious sunshine today.
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0vernight it stays clear and dry and once again the temperature drops. a reasonably chilly night and the minimum down to five or six celsius out in the suburbs. a bright start first thing on thursday but the high pressure that has given us the lovely sunshine gradually starts to slip away so we will start to see more cloud feeding in tomorrow with temperatures a touch lower and aggressively more unsettled towards the end of the week and cooler and breezy for friday. showers expected through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. see you soon. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: there's been a stark rise in the number of complaints against payday lenders. nearly 40,000 new cases were brought last year. mps are to get another vote on brexit next month, even though there are no signs that cross—party talks are making progress towards a deal.
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good morning! making the most of the menopause in the workplace, we are ata menopause in the workplace, we are at a clothing manufacturer's in alfreton, asking how employers maximise their employees at this critical time of life. good maximise their employees at this criticaltime of life. good morning! brilliance from bairstow sets the tone in bristol. england ease to victory in their third one—day international with pakistan. good morning from london, where the sun is beating down, temperatures rising, that is the case across the whole of the uk, we are in for another sunny and warm day but breezy along the coast, more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday the 15th of may, our top story: complaints about payday lenders have more than doubled in the space of a year with up to nearly 40,000 cases brought last year according to the financial 0mbudsman service. an annual review found that
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dissatisfaction with all financial services has reached its highest level for five years. here's our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz. with a loan from wonga.com... wonga collapsed partly because of the weight of compensation claims. if it hadn't failed, there might have been even more gripes from borrowers, saying no—one checked if they could afford a loan or they weren't given the right information. the financial 0mbudsman service said it had 40,000 complaints about payday loans in the year to march, up 130%. it's also concerned about fraud and scams, up 40% to 12,000 complaints, including a sharp rise in people tricked into transferring money out of their bank accounts. meanwhile, the most complained about financial product ever, payment protection insurance, or ppi, saw a slight fall to 180,000. it is important that people have access to finance, but it is their
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responsibility to make sure that lending is sustainable over time. we see people getting trapped in a cycle of debt, where people do find themselves in trouble, speak up, get help, you can always call the ombudsman, we can see what we can do, but there are charities we can refer people to as well, always better to take action when you find yourself in debt. the company behind quickquid topped the league of the most complained about payday lenders, with the owner of lending stream next and wonga after that. the firms blame claims management companies for bringing what they say is a flood of unjustified complaints. but at the ombudsman service, where many of the complaints end up, they describe the figures as startling and say too many people have been left struggling with debt. simon gompertz, bbc news. mps are to be asked to vote in earlyjune on the bill that would pave the way for brexit, despite an apparent lack of progress in talks between labour and the government. the prime minister will try to rally support for her planned exit deal
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before parliament breaks up for the summer. let's get more from our political correspondentjessica parker. so, jessica, good morning to you once again, let's talk about the significance of these, it will make next month quite an important one, isn't it? it certainly will be, it isn't it? it certainly will be, it isa isn't it? it certainly will be, it is a deadline now for what looks like a bit of a political showdown in parliament, an attempt to get mps, as you are saying, to approve the legislation that will secure the uk's exit from the eu. now, this is after theresa may and jeremy corbyn met for an hour in westminster last night, that is where the prime minister told a leader of the 0pposition of her plans to bring the withdrawal agreement bill before parliament. now, earlyjune, of course, will be on the wake of the european parliamentary elections, and perhaps there might be some help from number ten that if both parties don't do as well as they might have like in those european parliamentary elections, it might focus minds and provide an impetus for mps to get
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ideal over the line. mps, provide an impetus for mps to get ideal overthe line. mps, i provide an impetus for mps to get ideal over the line. mps, i think, are going to be warned that if they don't approve a deal that perhaps come 0ctober they will be looking at no—deal situation, or no brexit at all. however, as things stand following these cross—party talks that are set to continue, labour is still not on side, they say they need further compromises, further guarantees from the government. so theresa may has a political mountain to climb in the next few weeks, and all the while she is facing increasing pressure from her own tory mps, a number of them who want to be mates clear about her departure date from number ten. so some will see this upcoming political showdown as something of a last throw of the dice from a prime minister who is fast running out of road. very interesting, thank you very much for that. union officials are urging the government to guarantee the future of british steel, which is seeking further financial support to help it deal with what it describes as "brexit—related issues". the company, which employs 4,500 people in
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scunthorpe, cumbria, north yorkshire and teesside, reportedly needs a loan of up to £75 million to keep trading. it's already borrowed £100 million from the government to pay an eu bill. family courts are putting children at risk by ordering them to spend time alone with parents who have convictions for domestic abuse, mps and charities have warned. they've called for an independent inquiry, as an investigation by the victoria derbyshire programme reveals four children have been killed since 2014 by an abusive parent after a family court in england allowed access. emma ailes reports. when parents separate and they can't agree arrangements for their children, they can end up in the family court. a judge then decides what contact each parent should have. there is a fundamental presumption in law that a child should have contact with both parents, but dozens have told the victoria derbyshire programme the courts have ordered unsupervised
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contact with a violent ex—partner, and we've learned that at least four children have been killed by a parent in the last five years during access allowed by the court. mary's ex—partner was physically abusive and has numerous convictions for violent and drug offences. i was completely naive about the family courts. i assumed that they'd see to enable a violent man to have a relationship with his children, that contact needed to be supervised. i'd already seen him being physically aggressive to have a child when he was a toddler. the court granted mary's ex unsupervised overnight access. she says the children have since been coming home with unexplained injuries. there's this, i think, perception that mothers are preventing contact with fathers, and they're doing that unilaterally, without good reason. and there's this idea that even though there's been domestic violence, she just needs to get over it.
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i've heard judges say, "0h, it'sjust a little bit of dv." now mps from all parties are calling for an independent inquiry into the family courts. the ministry ofjustice says that where there is evidence of domestic abuse, the courts are bound by law to consider the potential harm to the child and that they should override any presumption of contact. emma ailes, bbc news. and you can see more on that exclusive report in the victoria derbyshire show at ten o'clock on bbc two or the bbc news channel. pressure is growing on itv to axe the jeremy kyle show after the death of a man who appeared on the programme. downing street called the death of steve dymond, who was 63, deeply concerning, and the commons media committee will meet today to discuss whether to order an inquiry into the running of reality television. itv is currently carrying out a review of the show. age uk is warning that "care deserts" a man has broken his own record
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for the most ascents of mount everest, the tourism department of nepal has confirmed. sherpa kami rita, who is 49 years old, reached the summit of the world's highest peak for the 23rd time a couple of hours ago. he first scaled everest at 24 and has also climbed neighbouring mountains including k2. that is quite a claim to fame, isn't it? been on top of the world more than anyone else in the world. you are watching bbc breakfast. the actor martin clunes has been dropped as patron of an animal welfare charity, the born free foundation, after he rode an elephant in nepal while filming a travel documentary. he faced fierce criticism after climbing onto the animal during last week's episode of my travels and other animals on itv. from swimming with dolphins to petting monkeys, animals play a part in many of our holidays, but can it ever be entirely cruelty free? this
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is what some of our viewers have had to say. iamor iam oragainst i am or against it than for it. 0verall, fair enough, it is a good idea, it brings in tourism, but the animal sufferfor it, idea, it brings in tourism, but the animal suffer for it, so idea, it brings in tourism, but the animal sufferfor it, so it is not worth it, is it? if it is done humanely, it is part of the local economy, so i have split feelings about it. but i would rather people didn't need to do that in order for the local economy to flourish. there is nothing wrong in that, actually, because these elements are being taken care of, it is not like they are trying to maltreated them, they are trying to maltreated them, they are treated fine, they give them good things, and everybody is happy. i don think i will ever do it, i disagree with people who do it, i hope it gets stopped soon, i guess. let's get more on this now with nick stewart from the charity world animal protection, whojoins us in the studio, and emma brennan from the association of british travel agents, who's in central
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london this morning. what was your reaction when you saw what martin clunis had done? sure, well, i mean, it is pretty appalling, a celebrity who is a patron of an animal charity, clearly an animal lover and patron of an animal charity, clearly an animal loverand an patron of an animal charity, clearly an animal lover and an ambassador for animals, he really should have known better than this. i suppose it shows, in some ways, that even if you are a celebrity, even if you are an animal lover, it is easy to be taken in by this, because much of the cruelty is hidden. in the case of elephants, when an elephant is presented to you as a tourist, it looks happy, but there is a whole story of cruelty behind how the elephant has got into the situation. it involves a very cruel training process of breaking the elephant‘s spirit, which may involve chaining it for long periods, weeks on end, it for long periods, weeks on end, it may involve food deprivation, it may involve the use of sharp tools to establish dominance over the animal. so, really, martin clunes
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should have known better, but it is quite clear that in these situations it is easy, even for animal lovers, and many are motivated by the love of animals, they get taken in by the industry. emma, from your point of view, do you advise travel companies about these sort of animal tourism, and specifically riding animals? absolutely, we have guidelines on animal in tourism which cover a whole range of animals and also activities, but in particular we do discourage any contact with dangerous wild animals, which does include riding elephants, even, you know, if people have the opportunity to take selfies with big cats, stroke tigers, we discourage those practices, we discourage our members from selling them, and we discourage holiday— makers from taking part in those activities as well. many travel companies have stopped selling these activities and are looking at offering a responsible alternative. i just looking at offering a responsible alternative. ijust want looking at offering a responsible alternative. i just want to us, looking at offering a responsible alternative. ijust want to us, as we go on with the interview, a
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response from martin clunes, a statement attributed to him says, i'd like to do whatever i can for born free foundation whenever i am asked, i love the foundation, it steps in when there is animal facing cruelty, abuse of any kind, and he goes on to say it is a unique resort for wildlife conservation with a knowledge based on years of work. you said, didn't you, that it is clearly cut it was important to him to be part of this charity, clearly an animal lover, what other things should people who feel the same way, who are concerned about animals watch out for? so we have a very simple message for tourists or celebrities that are looking to have a wild animal experience. if you can hug it, if you can ride it, if you can have a selfie with it, swim with it, you know, in the instance of a dolphin, it is very likely the animal has been subjected to cruelty and suffering. so our message is to
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avoid that. you know, if tourists avoid that. you know, if tourists avoid paying for these experiences, it will send a clear signal that this is not acceptable, and it will start to encourage change on the ground. if you want to see a wild animal, go and see it in the wild with a responsible tour operator, or go to with a responsible tour operator, or gotoa with a responsible tour operator, or go to a genuine wildlife friendly venue, or an animal sanctuary. go to a genuine wildlife friendly venue, oran animalsanctuary. if go to a genuine wildlife friendly venue, or an animal sanctuary. if a venue, or an animal sanctuary. if a venue is wildlife friendly, that will mean they are offering an observation only experience, whereas asa observation only experience, whereas as a tourist, you can have an experience of watching an elephant be an elephant, what could be better than that? am i so essentially, from your point of view, it is never ethical to ride an animal. any wild animal is having its well being compromised, and if you are doing something like riding with it, interacting with it, if you are swimming with it, it will have been subjected to some kind of cruelty, or it will be suffering in its living conditions that don't provide for its needs. are there emma, other
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activities that you are recommending that travel companies offer? there are lots of things offered as an alternative, including some of the things that nickjust said, being able to experience animals from a safe distance, but we also know that some of our members are working with some of our members are working with some of our members are working with some of the suppliers who currently perhaps offer some of these activities that we wouldn't necessarily support by saying to them, our customers do not want to go to these things, we don't want to sell them, so can we work with you to develop an alternative where the animals are protected, looked after, but people can enjoy them from a responsible distance. thank you both very much. ijust want very much. i just want back to you, nick, very much. ijust want back to you, nick, even swimming with dolphins, out in the ocean somewhere, would you advise against that? ijust ocean somewhere, would you advise against that? i just wanted to ocean somewhere, would you advise against that? ijust wanted to clear that up, people might be thinking that up, people might be thinking that matter a lot i can understand a captive environment. we would always
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advise, both from a health and safety perspective and animal welfare, not to swim with dolphins, evenin welfare, not to swim with dolphins, even in the wild. what might seem like quite a passive or benign activity for your once—in—a—lifetime experience, from my perspective or your perspective, it is 20 minutes in the water, but it is the whole industry around it — once you have gone home, that pod of dolphins may be subjected on an ongoing basis to becoming commercialised, so any number of bouts, any number of tourists, any number of times in a day, for the lifetime of that animal. so it does have animal welfare implications, and we think it also has health and safety implications as well. thank you for clarifying that. it is time for the weather, and carol is out and about in st james's park, weather, and carol is out and about in stjames's park, which is looking lovely, the opportunity to see some beautiful birds. it is stunning here in stjames's park in london this morning, notjust the weather,
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but the wildlife as well, squirrels rolling over adrian, the cameraman, all the beautiful birds behind, the egyptian geese, swans, a heron right at the end as well. now, st james's park used to be a marshland, and it went through various changes, and james i made various changes when he ascended to the throne, mainly to cater for the exotic menagerie that he wanted. the park which sat on marshland, he had drained and landscapes, and he moved camels, elephants and crocodiles into it. there are pelicans here, but i haven't seen any elephants or indeed crocodiles! now, they start to the day was chilly, as it was across many parts of the uk, but for all of us many parts of the uk, but for all of us today it is going to be mostly dry, sunny and warm for the stage in may. yesterday, our top temperature was 24 degrees in the highlands, and
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we could hit 25 again, if it gets above 24.8, it would be the warmest day of the year so far in scotland. all the settled weather is down to dominating our weather currently. towards the west, more clouds turning the sunshine hazy at times, today in the west, but not spoiling it. most of the mist has now lifted, looking at a sunny, dry day, but fair weather cloud. having said that, across parts of southern scotla nd that, across parts of southern scotland and northern england, you mightjust see scotland and northern england, you might just see an scotland and northern england, you mightjust see an isolated shower. it is breezy, particularly through the english channel and the north sea coastline, so temperatures here around the mid teens, but widely looking at 19—22, locally in the north—west highlands, 24—25. high pressure still in charge of a night, so long clear spells, temperatures falling to between 6—8, and we will have thicker cloud in western
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scotland, which could produce drizzle, and at the same time low cloud, mist and fog lapping onshore across the far north—east of the country. tomorrow that will give way to sunshine, we start on a dry and bright note, but through the day a little bit more cloud across the south, again coming in from the north sea. a brisk north north—easterly wind will mean that once again it will feel cooler, cooler than today, with temperatures widely in the mid to high teens, locally just into the widely in the mid to high teens, locallyjust into the 20s in the north. and then on friday, the north—east once again as favourite for the sunshine, for the rest of us more cloud around than we have been used to, and we will see showers or rain coming in from the north sea, drifting westwards as we go through the course of the day. by then, temperatures lower once again. into the weekend, cooler, showers at time, but then the temperature picks up time, but then the temperature picks up again later on sunday and into monday.
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we love it when you get involved in the things we are talking about on the things we are talking about on the programme, just speaking to nick stuart about animal tourism, quite a few people asking about riding horses. we did grab a quick word with him on his way out, but his point is that horses are domesticated and well looked after, thatis domesticated and well looked after, that is the difference between what he was talking about on the sofa about riding elephants, martin clunes' situation. and he was saying because horses are domesticated... and the way they are treated outside of that is very different to the way that elephants are treated. a bbc investigation has found three major high—street stores selling diet pills to an undercover 17—year—old. all the companies broke their own policies they have in place to make sure these products shouldn't be sold to anyone under 18. presenter of watchdog live nikki foxjoins us. nikki, tell us about the investigation.
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we sent a 17—year—old actress into stores of superdrug, boots, and holland and barrett, and she went into the stores to buy diet pills. now, when i first came to this investigation, i thought they would be behind some kind of locked cabinet or there would be some checks in place, but that wasn't what we found at all. what are the rules around diet pills? it is not illegal to sell diet pills to a teenager, but all three companies say they have procedures and policies in place. superdrug said, when the products are sold, a prom should come up at the checkout to say to check for id, or at least get a photo id, but that was not the case in any of the ones our actress went into. holland and barrett said they are now going to take up that procedure, they will have that prompt, and boots have told us it follows all the relevant guidance for the sale of the products in
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question and that it clearly states the recommended age guidance on the products. so what did you find in the investigation? of the 18 stores that our undercover actress went into, she was sold diet pills in 17, so just into, she was sold diet pills in 17, sojust one store, into, she was sold diet pills in 17, so just one store, just one store checked. the world that we live in, the instagram world, you know, it is all body beautiful, it is kind of a bit terrifying if you are a young person. i know! bit terrifying if you are a young person. i know i sound about 105, but there are a lot of pressures on young people, so this is terrifying, soi young people, so this is terrifying, so i spoke to a child psychologist, this is what she said to me. of the 18 stores, she was only denied the slimming pills in one. that is absolutely terrifying. better off having no recommendation, because it gives such a false sense of safety. should stores have a duty of safety. should stores have a duty of care to younger people to not be
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selling these kind of tablets to people under the age of 18? yes, i think staff should be trying that if someone comes in, as they are with an energy drink or alcohol, if someone comes in an energy drink or alcohol, if someone comes in new an energy drink or alcohol, if someone comes in new looks under e, someone comes in new looks under age, ask for id and say no. and you have also spoken with someone who, asa have also spoken with someone who, as a teenager, was able to buy these pills. yes, katie, 21, now has a much healthier relationship with food, but at the age of 14 she was going into stores regularly in his school uniform and was able to buy diet pills every single time, and she said she did looked visibly underweight. yeah, no—one stopped her, like literally no one stopped her. no-one ever in that whole time stopped you and said, hang on a minute, you are in a school uniform? no—one question to me, no—one tried to give me any advice, nothing at all. is we also spoke to a professor
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who is the national medical director of nhs england, and he told us how the products can be harmful physically and mentally if they are sold to young people below the recommended age. we know that these diet pills can cause physical problems on occasions, such as abdominal pain or diarrhoea, but we are particularly concerned about the potential effects on mental health. there is a lot of pressure on young people today, and many of them are particularly concerned about body image, how they look, and that is potentially leading to an epidemic of mental health. we need retailers to ensure that they are not selling products to those that are vulnerable and particularly young people under the age of 18. so what are the shops telling you? they have all said they take their responsibilities seriously, holland and barrett and superdrug said they would be taking action to strengthen their processes, training and customer information around products. superdrug has said it will
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put a shell of signs where the products are sold to make customers aware of its age restriction policy, while holland and barrett is tightening up its age verification process. the group said it would be looking at how its age verification process. the group said it would be looking at how it staff communicate with customers to meet their needs when they buy diet pills. nikki, thank you for coming to see us. the full story can be seen on bbc watchdog live, tonight at 8pm on bbc one. all that to look forward to. coming up on breakfast this morning, waking up to the menopause at work. not all of us! nina's on the road to find out how employers are supporting female staff. how can they help us?! it isa how can they help us?! it is a metaphor, dan, we're all waking up to the menopause this morning! so we been talking this morning! so we been talking this morning about how it can impact your capacity to work. most women who we re capacity to work. most women who were recently surveyed said that in some way they were working to their full capacity. now, that is notjust difficult for those women but for
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their employers, they need better protection. what does it mean for companies when women need to take i out or are not function at their best capacity? it is an important time ina best capacity? it is an important time in a woman's career, so for us it is about making sure we put processes in place that will make the women feel loyal, looked after, and they will want to come back into the workplace. so for me, it is about talent. notjust because it is the right thing to do, but the business makes more money! exactly, and we take men on the journey with us, so all of our senior partners are on thisjourney, us, so all of our senior partners are on this journey, because we manage women, and we have invested quite a lot in making sure that we can keep our talent and make sure that they are protected in what they do. and it means they will be more loyal when they come through the menopause, more likely to hang around. absolutely, and the young people say that we have a menopausal toolkit which is educating everyone
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in pwc, so the purpose of doing that is to make sure that we are all aware of the commercial value of what it means to retain and attract talent. so it makes business sense to wa ke talent. so it makes business sense to wake up to the menopause. we will be talking about what your rights are in around half an hour, but for us are in around half an hour, but for us to be news, travel and weather wherever you are watching this morning. yesterday temperatures are likely to bea yesterday temperatures are likely to be a degree higher than 24 across the uk. it isjust be a degree higher than 24 across the uk. it is just drifting northwards across scandinavia, but for the time being, well, a bit breezy down the southern coast and for many of us we have light winds and lots of sunshine. going into the
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afternoon you can barely see it, but there will be a bit of clout developing across northern england and into southern scotland and elsewhere lots of sunshine and temperatures widely getting into the high teens to the low 20s. 25 celsius possible today in northern scotland. little change really tonight with clear skies but more in the way of cloud and may some mist moving to the final accused of scotla nd moving to the final accused of scotland and the northern isles but with clear skies it could turn chile again towards the countryside, otherwise major towns and cities with temperatures between five and 8 degrees. through thursday, a bright start with sunshine but a few showers starting across western scholars and more cloud moving to east anglia, the south—east, the midlands and a cooler day tomorrow as temperatures start to drop down to about 14 or 18 celsius and it will get cooler on friday. more cloud coming in on the easterly wind across the north sea, more cloud
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during friday and there will be some rain. afew during friday and there will be some rain. a few showers across north—western areas before the rain becomes more confined toward central and southern areas of england and the best of the sunshine will be towards the north—east of scotland, north—east england and northern ireland but a few showers cropping up ireland but a few showers cropping up in the afternoon. a more u nsettled up in the afternoon. a more unsettled day and those temperatures between 13 and 17 celsius and we stay on the cooler side in the weekend before it warms up again into next week. goodbye.
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this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and jamie robertson. china's two biggest and most valuable companies get ready to give us their latest results. what will they reveal about the state of the world's second biggest economy? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday 15th of may. alibaba and tencent are both wealthy and powerful, but they could still feel the impact of china's trade war with the united states. also in the programme. losing face. san francisco bans public agencies from using facial recognition technology.

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