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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  May 16, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am, and these are the main stories this morning. the government announces a major shake—up of the probation service — the supervision of thousands of offenders is to be largely renationalised after past failings. we should build on those reforms and move to a new system that still has involvement of the private and voluntary sector, a really important role for the private and voluntary sector. but when it comes to this offender management function, i think a unified model will work better. theresa may faces senior conservative mps shortly as pressure mounts for the prime minister to agree a timetable for her departure from downing street. president trump declares a national emergency — banning american companies using telecoms from what he calls "foreign adversaries".
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researchers say a revolutionary new approach to cancer treatment could make it a manageable condition within the next decade. with just a week to go until the european elections — we'll take a closer look at what the parties are saying and what it all means for you. the uk has one of the fastest rates of growth in the availability of opioid painkillers, according to a new report. and it's derby's day at wembley. after another dramatic comeback sees frank lampard's side come from two goals down to stun leeds and reach the championship playoff final. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the supervision of all offenders in england and wales is being taken over by the government after a series of serious failings
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with the part—privatisation of the system. the national probation service will be given back control of low and medium—risk cases which were given to private providers five years ago. danny shaw has more. he promised it would transform rehabilitation for offenders. chris grayling was the architect of the biggest probation shake—up in decades, allowing private firms to supervise former prisoners and people serving community sentences who pose a low or medium risk. but now, the reforms are being scrapped. the nail in the coffin was a report from dame glenys stacey, the chief probation inspector. she said the model of pa rt—privatisation was irredeemably flawed, and people would be safer with the public sector in charge. under the new system, all offenders will be monitored by the national probation service, based in 11 regions. the private and voluntary sectors will provide unpaid work and drug
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misuse programmes for offenders. but there will be no payment by results, a key element of chris grayling's approach. it was a mistake, and chris grayling has to share responsibility for that. he thought it was the greatest thing since sliced bread. we pleaded with him not to do it, or at least pilot some of the schemes first. he flatly refused, pushed it through to satisfy his own political agenda, and has cost the taxpayer millions and millions, hundreds of millions of pounds. david gauke, the currentjustice secretary, says the new system will increase public safety. it will be introduced in wales this year and across england in 2021. danny shaw, bbc news. thejustice secretary david gauke says, despite difficulties over the last five years, there are some positives to build on. i think there was a need to reform the probation system in 2014. there are some things that have happened that i think were very hard to anticipate, for example, the way
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that the caseloads have switched, so that we have now got more, if you like, high—risk, serious offenders relative to the quite significant fall in terms of the low—risk and medium—risk offenders. that has been one of the factors that has meant this model has not worked particularly as was expected. actually there are aspects of these reforms that have improved the system, but there are other aspects that have not worked as we wanted them to work, and i think we should build on those reforms and move to a new system that still has involvement of the private and voluntary sector, really important involvement of the private and voluntary sector, but when it comes to the offender management function, i think a unified model will work better. the shadow justice secretary richard burgonjoins us now from our westminster studio. good morning. you must feel like this is an open goalfor good morning. you must feel like this is an open goal for labour. good morning. you must feel like this is an open goalfor labour. you have been calling for this for some
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time. when chris grayling ignored everybody including the labour party and ploughed on with this disastrous privatisation despite having risk assessments saying what the cost, economic and otherwise, could be if he ploughed on with this ideological plan, he ignored us. since then we have been arguing private is —— probation should be brought back in—house to protect the public, rehabilitation, turning nice round, not at pursuit of profit. we welcome this even though it has taken years, we are pleased it is a step in the right direction from the government, but those plans need to be scrutinised in parliament today and going forward, to make sure they don't allow these private corporations that have failed our probation service, allowed through the back door. we expect david gauke to speak about this in the house. do you give him
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credit for the move. he is part of a government that believes it is always private sector good, public sector bad. he has inherited a mess from the current transport secretary chris grayling who has made a record which is a disaster in relation to legal aid, prisons and probation, and making a mess of transport. if chris grayling was in a labour cabinet, would he still be in a job? ido cabinet, would he still be in a job? i do not think chris grayling should be in the cabinet whatsoever, he has failed across the board. he ignored the evidence, ignored risk assessments. there has been a social cost through reoffending rates not being reduced. and an economic cost, the government had to give around half £1 billion of public money, he is failing —— to these failing private companies. it may be chris
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grayling the prime minister but in any grayling the prime minister but in a ny eve nt grayling the prime minister but in any event he is not a credible or effective government minister.m privatisation and nationalisation an exact science? national grid has said it is the last thing needed and it will slow down the uk's plans to become a leader in terms of green energy. it is not an exact science. there has been huge pay—outs to shareholders in relation to energy today. we do believe tackling climate change and delivering affordable energy for people isn't best pursued by the positive —— profit motive. when it comes to probation, this is crucial, people are referring to the very important remarks on the subject, the key thing is, before he ploughed on with
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this, chris grayling and therefore the conservative government, had documentation setting out the risks they were undertaking in a blinkered way pursuing this. the only reason they pursued it is because they have an ideological attachment to big business and the private sector when it comes to public services. in transport it has failed, in probation it has failed. today is a step in the right direction but we wa nt to step in the right direction but we want to hold the government to account to make sure their deeds match their words. do you think labour has an ideological attachment to nationalisation, to renationalise, 01’ nationalisation, to renationalise, or do you accept in some sectors there may be a role for private sector involvement? of course we believe in a mixed economy. there are certain things in oui’ economy. there are certain things in our society which should not be run for the profit motive, our national health service, our prison service, oui’ health service, our prison service, our probation service. notjust
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left—wingers or socialists who agree on those issues. what we have had, the government ignoring the evidence. they didn't have to plough on with this. david gauke, his announcement today is a step in the right direction, but the government did not need to get itself in this position making this humiliating u—turn, it didn't have to be this way. if only they had listened to the labour party and to the experts, and to the objective evidence. thank you very much. i'm joined bow by anne fox, chief executive officer of clinks, the umbrella body supporting the voluntary sector in the criminaljustice system. thank you forjoining us, tell us a bit about what you do? the voluntary sector in criminal justice is about 50 to 100 charities and social enterprises across england and where is providing all sorts of services to people at any point in their contact with the
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criminal justice system. point in their contact with the criminaljustice system. it has a very proud history, about 300 years. there are people who would say the nature of the modern day probation system actually comes from our sector. 0ur role is to speak for them, speak with them and support them, speak with them and support them in matters like this. you are working with offenders, former offenders and their families. 0ur organisations we work with do on a daily basis. what have the five past years under these changes brought in by chris grayling be like? really difficult for people to get the support they need. people on probation are leaving prison or serving community sentences. they quite often bring with them a range of issues, social problems, mental health problems, addiction, domestic violence, homelessness, issues that disadvantaged people in our local communities face. probation services provide part of what they will need to not go back to prison or to be
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before the court again. in the last five years, these services have been squeezed out if they are provided by volu nta ry squeezed out if they are provided by voluntary organisations. we have heard about probation officers having to speak to offenders on the phone rather than face to face. can you give any other exa m ples face to face. can you give any other examples how the service has changed asa examples how the service has changed as a result of those reforms brought in by chris grayling? 0ne in by chris grayling? one of the great things about good probation support has always been where there is a mixture of formal probation service and people who will help you with practical things, housing advice, support, getting backin housing advice, support, getting back in contact with your family, having the right relationships, abstaining from drugs and alcohol. these reforms intended to drive the money and resource into administration rather than face—to—face support. people have gotten less. are you
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happy about the news today, and if so, how long will it take for changes to filter through? we see some positive changes. we welcome today, and it couldn't have continued, we welcome the government has listened to those who felt increasingly squeezed out and unable to help people. we think it would ta ke to help people. we think it would take a little bit of time. but with good effective listening and local structures, listening to small and specialist organisations who work with women, with people from black and minority ethnic communities who are disproportionately affected by ourcriminal are disproportionately affected by our criminaljustice system, these changes can be put in place quite quickly. thank you very much. some breaking news we'vejust received — that the former australian prime minister bob hawke has died at the age of 89. in 1983, he led the australian
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labour party to the first of four successive election victories, and became internationally renowned for his love of beer, cigars and cricket. 0ur sydney correspondent, hywel griffith, looks back at his life. charismatic, unconventional, bob hawke was what australians like to call a larrikin. his boisterous playful as 90 came coupled with a sharp political brain. as prime minister, he knew the public loved his antics, especially when, after australia won the america's cup, it gave them all an official day. any boss who sat anyone for not turning up—to—date is a bum. bob hawke started his political career in the trade unions before entering parliament in his 50s. within a month of taking over the leadership of the labour party in 1983, he secured the first of four general election victories.
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ido general election victories. i do swear i will well and truly serve her majesty queen elizabeth ii. he secured the highest ever approval ratings of any australian prime minister. at home he focused on issues like welfare, pensions and deprivation. by deprivation. by1990, deprivation. by 1990, no australian child will be living in poverty. 0n the world stage, his relaxed approach won him new allies, securing trade deals in asia that helped australia prosper for decades. not that he was universally loved. a pensioner who criticised his policies was given typical short shrift. animosity within his own party meant, after more than eight yea rs party meant, after more than eight years in power, he was eventually toppled and his deputy paul keating took over. long after retirement, he kept his place in public life, and in the country's affections. he will
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be remembered across australia as the leader who loved a drink and a joke and made the serious work of politics look like fun. bob hawke who has died at the age of 89. theresa may will meet senior conservative mps today who will demand she set a firm date for her departure from downing street. the prime minister's meeting with the influential 1922 committee of tory backbenchers to discuss her future comes as pressure grows for her to stand aside. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is at the central lobby in the houses of parliament. do you think theresa may will agree toa do you think theresa may will agree to a date and if so will it be made public at this stage? iam public at this stage? i am pretty sure she won't give a date and won't agree to a date but that doesn't mean there might not be huge pressure to try and force her to agree to a date, or risk a possible rewriting or suspension of
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the party rules which could pave the way for another contest. the head of that meeting which kicks off in half—an—hour, more difficult news from the commons with labour clearly signalling they are not going to abstain on her bill when she brings it back to the commons, apparently in the first week ofjune. the brexit century saying if we don't get a deal, we will vote against it. it is patently clear if the deal is put for a fourth time if it is allowed, it will fail as it has three times already. i want to make it clear labour opposes the idea of passing the withdrawal agreement without an agreed deal, that would put the cart before the horse. labour will vote against a second reading on that basis. how on earth does the secretary think a bill to implementa does the secretary think a bill to implement a deal that isn't before the house can pass in two weeks?
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0ne blow for the premier star, and is she facing another one at that time after the 1922 committee have heard what she has had to say. what you think will happen?” heard what she has had to say. what you think will happen? i went to the 1922 committee meeting last night and understand the executive will see the prime minister today and ask for a timetable for when she will leave. they asked for that two weeks ago and they expect an answer today. if they don't get an answer, presumably they will look at alternatives. such as? the obvious thing is to have a vote of confidence in the prime minister. i hope we won't get to that, i hope the prime minister will announce she is going very shortly. my association has written to the premised on saying she has to go by next thursday. i am delivering that letter to downing street today. we do need new leadership. how do you get there, party rules are
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clear, she can't be challenged again until december. the rules at the moment so she can't be changed, challenged until december, but it is an extremely time, with an extra ordinary meeting of conservative associations in the middle ofjune of conservative associations in the middle of june calling of conservative associations in the middle ofjune calling a no confidence in the prime minister. backbench feeling is we need to have a new prime minister. if she won't agree to go, we must have another vote of confidence. that can be arranged, rules can be changed or suspended. do you really need that now? hasn't mrs may given not and its visit date for her departure but we can see the timetable, mainly if ideal goes down when she introduces it first week in june, isn't the assumption that is it, she will have to go? no, i don't think that interpretation is right. she has denied that is the case. we haven't even seen denied that is the case. we haven't even seen this medical bill which is supposed to be debated immediately
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after we come back from recess, when president trump is here, d—day celebrations are on and there is a peterborough by—election, hardly a week when we will have a huge constitutional vote. the bill —— the bill is not published so how can mps study it before debating it? you think it is possible the vote will not take place in that week, it will not take place in that week, it will be delayed. i bet 50p on exactly that, especially now as you say labour had made it clear they will vote against it. is it credible for the prime minister, given the difficulties outlined, the fact the national conservative convention are meeting, credible to think she could go on, who knows, through the summer? it is not credible promising 108 times we will leave the eu on the 29th of march and going back on your word, not credible to say you won't be prime minister after the 30th of june and intending to continue. we
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are past the normal rules that people expect. she has tried her deal, it has been rejected three times by parliament, once by the biggest defeat ever for a government. that should tell the premise that it is time to give someone premise that it is time to give someone else a premise that it is time to give someone else a go premise that it is time to give someone else a go to see if they can get something through. thank you for your time, another crunch meeting for the prime minister and the possibility the 1922 committee will decide there has to bea 1922 committee will decide there has to be a threat of another vote of no—confidence in the primary step by changing party rules. wait with us for a moment if you would. some breaking news, the prime minister's spokesperson asked about huawei has said, we are reviewing the right policy on 5g, and when ready, we'll make an announcement. you will recall in recent weeks the controversy you will recall in recent weeks the co ntrove i’sy over you will recall in recent weeks the controversy over the decision by the
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prime minister to allow huawei to get involved in what were called non—core parts of the uk's 5g data network management. the prime minister's spokesman saying we are reviewing the right policy on 5g and when ready will make an announcement. let us go back to norman at westminster for reaction to that. if there was a change to the uk's policy, that would be very interesting. it sounds like a fairly significant rethink is under way because of the uproar over the huawei decision, not just from politicians, but also from figures in the intelligence community fearful of the risk that that could open up the british communications network to chinese interference, chinese sabotage and so on. ministers have always said no final decision had been taken but it looks, given the reservations of the
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americans, the reservations we know of the former defence secretary gavin williamson and others, in cabinet at that national security council meeting, given the broader unease on the backbenches, that the government is poised perhaps to backpedal. that would be a huge move because figures like the chancellor philip hammond had been very keen on building stronger ties with the chinese because of the potential economic opportunities. but it sounds to me as if the backlash is prompting something of a rethink. thank you very much for that. we will be talking to conservative mp bob seely at 11:30am about huawei. the headlines on bbc news. the government announces a major shake—up of the probation service — the supervision of thousands of offenders is to be largely renationalised after past failings. the former australian prime minister, bob hawke — who led his labour party to four successive election victories —
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has died at the age of 89. president trump declares a national emergency — banning american companies using telecoms from what he calls "foreign adversaries". the use of powerful painkillers increased in the uk by two thirds in the three years to 2016, according to a report by the organisation for economic co—operation and development.
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0ur health editor hugh pym is here. good morning. we are talking chiefly about opioids which viewers may know are the cause of massive problems in the united states. the use and abuse of painkillers has become a huge social problem in the us, the significance of this report is it looks at 25 leading economies, members of the 0ecd club of leading economic powers, and it shows that the uk does have a problem in terms of the growth in the availability, that to third figure over three yea rs that to third figure over three years is over the counter medication, and prescribed medication, and prescribed medication, that was one of the fastest rates of growth in any of these countries apart from israel and slovakia. in terms of
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availability of opioid painkillers, the uk is above the 0ecd average but still behind in terms of total availability of us and germany. what are the guidelines for the prescription of these painkillers, given their addictive nature? it is down to the gp in terms of prescriptions, or the hospital after surgery, prescriptions, or the hospital after surgery, to make the appropriate prescription. this report shows there is a problem with over prescription by doctors, it says it may be influenced by pharmaceutical companies with marketing, doctors are too ready to prescribe. this is are too ready to prescribe. this is a problem across all different health care system is particularly the ones mentioned. there are going to be in england new warnings on the packaging in terms of prescribed medication and over the counter to people receiving them, that it can be addictive. will there be changes to prescription procedure, apart from warnings on packets, might there be
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a review of the prescription of this type of painkiller? public health england are looking at this issue to see if there is over prescription and a problem. you could say if you are addicted you are unlikely to take notice of anything on the box when it has been prescribed by your gp. it won't make much difference. but this is a very wide problem for doctors and patients. the illicit drugs trade is pa rt patients. the illicit drugs trade is part of this, according to the report. it talks about opioid —related deaths owing to overdoses and abuse of opioids, saying the uk is up there in terms of opioid —related death increases, with the uk -- the us, —related death increases, with the uk —— the us, ireland, sweden. saying this is a public health crisis. a spokesman for the prime minister has said the government is reviewing
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the right policy on the uk's 5g data network and when ready will make an announcement. a few weeks ago there was huge controversy within the political and intelligence communities over the government's announcement that huawei would be involved in developing that 5g data network with many saying it was the wrong decision because of security concerns. the government responded by saying huawei would only be involved in the development of non—core parts of the network. president trump has declared a national emergency. president trump has declared a national emergency to protect us computer networks from what he calls "foreign adversaries". the executive order bans american companies from using foreign telecoms that might pose a security risk. it doesn't name any company, but is believed to target chinese tech giant huawei. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes has more. another fight with china. a foreign adversary whose telecom
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giant could pose a national security threat to the us. in a statement from the white house, there is no mention of specific countries or companies but it is clear the trump administration has huawei in its sights. the us will ban transactions posing an unacceptable risk, with the president pledging to do what it takes to keep america safe and prosperous. as the us and other countries develop 5g networks, this is a battle over new technology and security, on top of the trade war which has escalated in recent days. chinese companies can be pressured by the chinese government and the communist party. the question is can customers of those companies around the world build their systems in a way that mitigates those risks, or is itjust too much of a risk? that is really a technical question that will vary from one application to the next. the us commerce department has said american companies will be restricted from selling their technology to huawei
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which it has concluded is engaged in activities that are contrary to us national security or foreign policy interests. in a statement, the chinese company said — with donald trump describing the impasse over trade talks as a little squabble, this latest clash over technology and security will further test deteriorating us—chinese relations. peter bowes, bbc news. prince harry has accepted substantial damages. photos were taken of his cotswolds home from a
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helicopter. splash, a news and photographic celebrity agency, operating largely in the us in the uk, helicopter in the sky in january, taking photos of the home the duke and duchess of cambridge share in the cotswolds in 0xfordshire. dining area, bedroom, living area photographs. sold to various national newspapers and publish there. the duke used lawyers to claim his right to privacy had been broken and various data protection laws broken as well. a statement was read out in court saying the duke pass that he had been broken, substantial damages had been broken, substantial damages had been paid by this agency, splash, to the duke along with legal costs at the duke along with legal costs at the agency said it would not repeat the agency said it would not repeat the action. splash said it always
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recognised the situation represented an error of judgment. case recognised the situation represented an error ofjudgment. case closed swiftly by the duke and duchess' privacy has been great. they said they were forced to move out of the home because of safety and security concerns. how home because of safety and security concerns. how much home because of safety and security concerns. how much of a continuing battle between agencies like this and the royals? the privacy battle continues and it is one which harry has pursued very hard indeed, whether on questions about commentary about his wife or fiancee, very strong before the engagement of his marriage about the commentary was simply inappropriate, or whether it is more generally with the royals. noticeably, there is a shift in tactics or strategy, which is for a long time the royal family just took it. refused to comment or engage. the younger generation in particular, william and harry, have engaged lawyers and said we are not simply going to take this. with
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quite a lot of success the lawyers have pushed back against agencies like this and news organisations more generally, and they have taken a much more aggressive stance. with a week to go until polling day, we're taking a closer look at the european elections, your guide to how they work and the issues the parties are campaigning on. we'll be walking you through how these elections will affect different areas in the uk too. one of the places gearing up for polling day is the east of england. let's take a look at how that fared last time round. in 2014, voter turnout was about 35%. it sent seven meps to the european parliament — three conservative, one labour, and three ukip candidates. let's cross to norwich now, where our correspondent andrew sinclair can tell us more. if tell us about the make—up of the
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candidates. are you able to hear me? we are having problems, apologies, we will try to sort out the gremlins in the technology and get back to him. now, the weather. simon, slightly earlier than planned! su btle subtle changes in the weather turning cooler compared to recent days. still pleasant enough. this is the scene at the moment in edinburgh, lots of sunshine. cloud increasing across the south east of england, eventually into the midlands, central and southern england into the afternoon. cloud and western areas making the sunshine hazy. increasing cloud, uv levels are still high and
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temperatures pleasant enough but 14-17, temperatures pleasant enough but 14—17, perhaps up to 20 in the north of scotland. through tonight, cloud thickening up across england and wales. some patchy rain starting to move its wane, clearer spells further north and west, temperatures down to around 7—9. during friday, cloudy day again. some are showery outbreaks of rain for england and wales. into the south east of scotland. 0therwise sunny spells and temperatures down a degree or so on today, about 14—16. hello, this is bbc newsroom live with annita mcveigh. the headlines... the government announces a major shake—up of the probation service — the supervision of thousands of offenders is to be largely renationalised after past failings.
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china has condemned restrictions on wireway, accusing bullying. an announcement will be made... theresa may faces senior conservative mps this morning, as pressure mounts for the prime minister to agree a timetable for her departure from downing street. the former australian prime minister, bob hawke — who led his labour party to four successive election victories — has died at the age of 89. manchester city have been referred to the adjudicatory chamber of uefa after an investigation into the club's finances and possible reach of financialfair club's finances and possible reach of financial fair play regulations. if guilty, they could be banned from next yea r‘s
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if guilty, they could be banned from next year's chat is like. we reported this a couple of years ago. u efa reported this a couple of years ago. uefa investigators, some at least, would recommend and push for this european football ban. the recommendation has gone to the next stage. this is all part of the process ? stage. this is all part of the process? yes, and this potentially is the final part of the process but still no outcome. the investigation was opened on the 7th of march into allegations, including the german newspaper. that in 2017 manchester city had breached financial fair play regulations, inflating the value of a multi—million pound sponsorship deal by essentially disguising investment that isn't allowed from their owner as external sponsorship and revenue. manchester city have already been fined for a similar breach by uefa, £49 million in 2014. today, however, the chairman of the investigatory panel
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has as you say referred to city —— city to the adjudicatory chamber. the chairman who made the final recommendation to the chamber but we do not know what the recommendation was, the potential punishment. city could be thrown out of the champions they come unlikely to apply from next season. they could appeal to the court of arbitration for sport as well as uefa, and are also facing as well as uefa, and are also facing a potential punishment from fifa, the fa or the premier league over the fa or the premier league over the signing of youth players. bit of a headache for city. timeframe wise, what are we looking at in a massive week for the cloud, with the fa cup 48 hours away. they are on for the treble. have we heard from them? we don't know on the timescale. ac
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milan are on a similar investigation, going on for months. manchester city for their part say they are disappointed but not surprised. their statement is very strongly worded especially towards the chairman of this investigation and they also hit out at the area lea ks. and they also hit out at the area leaks. they seem particularly confident of clearing their names. they say they have provided irrefutable evidence and hope for a satisfactory outcome to this. chelsea midfielder ruben loftus—cheek is a major doubt for the europa league final later this month. injured his ankle playing a charity match for the cloud. boss sarri had been concerned about the timing of the game for his players ahead of the final in baku. the us
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pga championship gets under way in the next 15 minutes or so. tiger woods due to tee off around lunchtime, going for back—to—back major winds after his masters victory last month. he has not played since that. he pulled out of the pga tour event a couple of weeks ago. i happen to the good, the training sessions have been good —— myi training sessions have been good —— my i have been feeling good. i have been practising not in sweaters so this is a little bit different. i am excited to get out there on the golf course. that's all the for now. follow the us pga on the bbc sport website. more now on our special coverage of the upcoming eu elections,
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in 2014, voter turnout was about 35%. it sent seven meps to the european parliament — three conservative, one labour, and three ukip candidates. let's cross to norwich now, where our correspondent andrew sinclair can tell us more. tell us about the make—up of the candidates. i think superficially the most eye—catching element of these elections is that these south—west can lay claim to the biggest number of so—called celebrity candidates, ann widdecombe, boris johnson's sister, rachel. drilling down into those results in 2014, two notable things to watch for this time, won the meltdown of the liberal democrats, losing their one seat to the greens. 2014 election on the
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tail end of the coalition government. since then, the lib dems have struggled to make a name to it until may. making a comeback in local government. in 2014, the conservatives still failing to claw back territory from ukip. looking at these elections, clearly the conservative party's problems nationally are well documented and here as elsewhere ukip will be facing the new brexit party. at the devon county show, how might agricultural issues affect how people vote in the election?” agricultural issues affect how people vote in the election? i think it is difficult to think of any other sector of the economy which is so enmeshed with the eu and brexit. under the common agricultural policy of the eu, farmers receive
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subsidies, more livestock farmers in the south—west accounting for the living. farmers also consider back tariff free access to the eu single murky. the big beef producer like argentina could see the british murky flooded with cheap foreign beef, is a concern. for most concerned about the controversial issue of immigration. they say they need the government's proposed changes, a crackdown on low skilled labour at the heart of them. more broadly in the community, clearly it isa broadly in the community, clearly it is a important part of the economy. a great emotional attachment to farming. also that can be said for fishing. it is a small part of the economy but people have a huge stake in this iconic industry.
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and as european election campaigning continues, we are putting your questions to all of the main uk parties here on the bbc news channel. at 5.30 this afternoon, sian berry, co—leader of the green party will answer your questions, and tomorrow it's the turn of chuka umunna from change uk. labour says it would install solar panels on nearly two million homes to generate electricity, as part of a new energy policy. the party also plans to re—nationalise the uk's electricity and gas network, saying it would cut the amount paid to the current private sector owners. simon gompertz has more. labour's big increase in solar panels would build on community projects like this in south london, powering the lifts and communal lights in a block of flats
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and promising lower bills. it means some kind of energy and a clean one. local backers like faye say the savings are winning over other residents. some people, full stop, say, "i just want to pay less." if they can also see that in the bill with the solar energy, well, how could they complain after that? labour says one million council and housing association homes would get the panels, saving £117 a year each on electricity bills, and there'd be interest—free loans and grants to help 750,000 other households install them. this is what labour wants its green energy policy to look like. it says that to get this done quickly across the country, that's one of the reasons it wants to re—nationalise the national grid and the local electricity distribution companies
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with the current owners, investors, probably getting back a lot less than they think those businesses are worth. we know that consumers are really, really angry that they've been ripped off for some time. we know these companies have been paying £12 billion out in dividends, at the same time as consumer bills are constantly rising. and they've not been investing enough in the infrastructure that is required to push forward a renewable agenda. we want to make sure that we have the institutions locally and nationally that will drive forward energy efficiency and climate change targets. labour would pay for the grid by borrowing, but cut the amount in line with what it calls asset stripping in the private sector. but the national grid says labour's plans would delay investment and the government argues renationalisation would saddle taxpayers with debt. simon gompertz, bbc news.
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the headlines on bbc news. the government announces a major shake—up of the probation service — the supervision of thousands of offenders is to be largely renationalised after past failings. president trump declares a national emergency — banning american companies using telecoms from what he calls "foreign adversaries". a spokesman for the prime minister says the government is reviewing its policy on the 5g network. theresa may faces senior conservative mps around now as pressure mounts for the prime minister to agree a timetable for her departure from downing street. i'm victoria fritz — in the business news: brexit weighs heavy on thomas cook, as the travel firm blames political uncertainty for a £1 billion writedown on its business. hs2 will short change the north. that's the verdict from a group of peers today as they publish a report into the handling over
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the controversial rail project. 0ut—of—control costs, poor planning and flawed design were just some of the criticisms outlined — all of which the government says it fundamentally disagrees with. tesla is updating the software in its electric vehicles following two cases where parked cars caught on fire. the incidents in shanghai and hong kong came in the wake of a lawsuit filed against the car company in the us injanuary alleging that a defective battery pack in a model s led to the death of a passenger last year. let's return now to that top story. thomas cook — losses have swollen sharply in the first half of its financial year. shares in the group opened down 13% today. the price of its bond maturing in 2022 tumbled to a distressed level. -- 2020. all of this showing just how much investors have marked down their expectations for the compa ny‘s future. the business has been hit by problems common across the industry such as the weakness of the pound, customers holding off booking holidays due to brexit and the effects of warmer summers encouraging travellers to stay at home.
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joining us now is travel expert simon calder. people who have booked holidays already, fights with thomas cook's, will they be concerned ? already, fights with thomas cook's, will they be concerned? now, given the appalling losses that the company has suffered, i would be almost pleased they are getting a bargain. good deals out there. putting this into context, thomas cook lost from october to march £1000 every minute. that was effectively subsidising the people who went on holiday with them. i don't think there's any danger that we will see thomas cook, the oldest brand name in travel, disappearing anytime soon. simply because it has for example besides £1.25 billion of debt, which is quite annoying, facilities to borrow an £300 million to see it through the less
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profitable next winter. and also trying to sell thomas cook airlines, which should earn it quite a lot of cash and allow it to pay down some of that debt. 0ne sector owned by a chinese group and they may well think, actually, once we've got rid of the orion, we will buy the whole lot. —— rid of the airline. i would buy a thomas cook holiday with com plete buy a thomas cook holiday with complete confidence. a litany of issues, whether we are talking about the airline, whether they will find a buyer like lufthansa, another debt lifeline but for how long? none of these things seem to be disappearing soon. luckily, the horizon you and i would have on booking a holiday with thomas cook is unlikely to go beyond certainly this time next year. i can't see anything happening to the company of a profoundly bad nature in that time. the 300 billion —— £300 million they have got is
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certainly only in case things take a turn for the worse. having lost so much money of the winter, they are now going to start making profits because we are getting into the summer season. they will do very well, incidentally, out of the european cup final, champions league in madrid and europa league in baku in azerbaijan. making hay while the sun shines. next winter, not a lot of fun for anyone, particularly a thomas cook shareholder, losing about one eighth of the value of their holding this morning. let's take a lok at some other stories. national grid's are down by almost a third from the year before — following a battering of one—off charges — what's going on? — to the business including the collapse of key reactor projects within the uk's new nuclear programme.
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not a great day for national grid to release its results as the labour party unveils its sweeping nationalisation plan in full. thousands of drivers will be automatically hit by £100 fines and penalty points for ignoring warning signs on a new generation of smart motorways — this is according to the times. new powers will allow police to use traffic cameras to penalise motorists who fail to abide by lane closures on almost 300 miles of the network in england. uefa, european football's governing body, has escalated its investigation into manchester city over alleged breaches of football's so—called financial fair play rules, leaving open the prospect of the english premier league side being banned from the champions league. global stocks were muted on thursday as investors stayed cautious, with the us's move to place chinese telecoms equipment maker huawei on a national security export blacklist adding to the sense of unease over the trade dispute.
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18% down, thomas cook simon saying it is fine if you have booked a holiday, but investors are dumping. that's all the business news. it's long been common in the fashion industry to cast models who are under 18 — and many supermodels started their careers at a young age. naomi campbell began modelling at 15, kate moss was discovered at 14. now, the fashion company kering — which owns several major fashion houses, including gucci and alexander mcqueen — has announced that it will no longer use models who are under the age of 18. the company says it's "conscious of the influence exerted on younger generations" by its images and that the policy will come into effect in time for next year's autumn/winter collections. sara ziff is a model and founder of the model alliance, a nonprofit advocacy organisation for models in the fashion industry.
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she joins us from new york. thank you for taking the time to talk to us. you yourself started modelling at the age ofjust14. what was that experience like for you? well, you know, i had a good career. i also experienced the pitfalls of working on what largely remains an unregulated industry. can you describe the pitfalls? sure. i remember being put on the spot to pose nude. even as a young teenager. very long working hours were common. many of my peers experienced pressures from their agencies to go to extre m es pressures from their agencies to go to extremes to lose weight and suffered from eating disorders. really very adult pressures on these
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young girls. if you were doing it again, obviously it must have seemed exciting, hugely, at 14, but was it too early, in hindsight? yes. put it this way, if i had a 14—year—old daughter, i would tell her to hold off until she had school. you know, there are many reasons why it is better for a there are many reasons why it is betterfor a model to stop there are many reasons why it is better for a model to stop working when she is an adult. models are when she is an adult. models are when they are young teenagers, they have an adolescent physique that is different to when you are 22 or in your 30s. as you grow up in the business, there can be a pressure to maintain that gangly teenage body. which then can result in eating disorders. how significant is this announcement from kering that it is not going to use models younger than
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18? i think kering's pledges a positive step towards eliminating the pressures that models currently face to, again, maintain that adolescent physique and go to extremes adolescent physique and go to extre m es to adolescent physique and go to extremes to lose weight. what is sorely missing from the kering pledge is the mechanism, and a commitment, to actual enforcement of this purported new standard. it is also a very limited pledge in that it does not address the broader issues that models face every day, problems from sexual harassment and assault, the lack of financial transparency, late payment, non—payment. the sample size of the clothing is also an issue. i know the trend towards using adults is
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positive because it presents more realistic ideal, but if you still have those tiny samples, then that pressure doesn't really go away. briefly, unless this becomes an industrywide standard, is it really going to make a difference and really kind of change the way that the industry influences younger generations? thank you for asking. no. standards without enforcement are not real standards. they are aspirational ideals. and that is why over 200 models have been calling on kering and other companies to make a real commitment to enforceable, comprehensive standard. they want to kering and other companies to join the respect programme, driven by and for the models themselves.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. big changes in the weather over the next few days. it is not going to be as warm as it has been over the last few days. look at the fair weather cumulus cloud developing. that is the scene at the moment. in greater london, or cloud compared to yesterday. temperatures not quite as high. going through the rest of the afternoon, cold increasing across east anglia, south east of england, through the midlands and central and southern england, higher core in the west continuing. maximum temperature 14-17, west continuing. maximum temperature 14—17, perhaps up to 20 in glasgow and northern scotland. despite the lower temperatures and more cloud, uv level still moderate to high.
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through the night, quad thickening across england and wales, with that showery rain moving its way in. where spells further north and west. temperatures down to 4—7. friday is quieter do it cloudy. patchy rain affecting england and wales. moving east to west. shower was pushing it in north—east england, scotland. best of sunshine in north—west scotla nd best of sunshine in north—west scotland and northern ireland. temperatures down a couple of degrees or so, still perhaps 19 in the north—west, elsewhere, 15 celsius. to the weekend, cloudier comical to start off with, turning warmer as we go into sunday. low pressure dominating the weather over the weekend, bringing in quite a bit of cloud from the east, with that in some showers. many across northern areas during saturday. some showers on the heavy side. ijust areas during saturday. some showers on the heavy side. i just skies
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developing down to the south east, kicking off more showers in the south east. temperature 16—18, fresher for the north again, south east. temperature 16—18, fresherfor the north again, 12—14. into sunday, there could well be showers around, perhaps not as many a saturday. some brighter spells, some sunshine developing. from time to time. temperatures on the rise, across the south east in particular, 19-20. across the south east in particular, 19—20. even across northern areas, the temperatures a couple of degrees higher than saturday. a mixture of the weekend. not the clear blue skies we have had and the warm weather of the last couple of days.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live — these are today's main stories. the government announces a major shake—up of the probation service — the supervision of thousands of offenders is to be largely renationalised after past failings. we should build on those reforms and move to a new system that still has involvement of the private and voluntary sector, a really important role for the private and voluntary sector. but when it comes to this offender management function, i think a unified model will work better. president trump declares a national emergency on what he calls "foreign adversaries". theresa may faces senior conservative mps shortly as pressure mounts for the prime minister to agree a timetable for her departure from downing street. with just a week to go until the european elections — we'll take a closer look
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at what the parties are saying and what it all means for you. the former australian prime minister, bob hawke, who led his labour party to four successive election victories, has died at the age of 89. tennis royalty — the former wimbledon champion sir andy murray receives his knighthood from prince charles at buckingham palace. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the supervision of all offenders in england and wales is being taken over by the government after a series of serious failings with the part—privatisation of the system. the national probation service will be given back control of low and medium—risk cases, which were given to private providers five years ago. danny shaw has more.
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he promised it would transform rehabilitation for offenders. chris grayling was the architect of the biggest probation shake—up in decades, allowing private firms to supervise former prisoners and people serving community sentences who pose a low or medium risk. but now, the reforms are being scrapped. the nail in the coffin was a report from dame glenys stacey, the chief probation inspector. she said the model of part—privatisation was irredeemably flawed, and people would be safer with the public sector in charge. under the new system, all offenders will be monitored by the national probation service, based in 11 regions. the private and voluntary sectors will provide unpaid work and drug misuse programmes for offenders. but there will be no payment by results, a key element of chris grayling's approach. it was a mistake, and chris grayling has to share responsibility for that.
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he thought it was the greatest thing since sliced bread. we pleaded with him not to do it, or at least pilot some of the schemes first. he flatly refused, pushed it through to satisfy his own political agenda, and has cost the taxpayer millions and millions, hundreds of millions of pounds. david gauke, the currentjustice secretary, says the new system will increase public safety. it will be introduced in wales this year and across england in 2021. danny shaw, bbc news. thejustice secretary david gauke says despite difficulties over the last five years, there are some positives to build on. i think there was a need to reform the probation system in 2014. there are some things that have happened that i think were very hard to anticipate, for example, the way that the caseloads have switched, so that we have now got more, if you like, high—risk, serious offenders relative to the quite significant fall in terms of the low—risk and medium—risk offenders.
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that has been one of the factors that has meant this model has not worked particularly as was expected. actually there are aspects of these reforms that have improved the system, but there are other aspects that have not worked as we wanted them to work, and i think we should build on those reforms and move to a new system that still has involvement of the private and voluntary sector, really important involvement of the private and voluntary sector, but when it comes to the offender management function, i think a unified model will work better. theresa may will meet senior conservative mps shortly, and they're expected to demand she set a firm date for her departure from downing street. the prime minister's meeting with the influential 1922 committee of tory backbenchers, to discuss her future, comes as pressure grows for her to stand aside. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is at the central lobby in the houses of parliament.
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that meeting is happening right now. what can we expect and has a little bit of the heat being taken out because theresa may has announced this vote on the withdrawal bill will happen in the first week of june? the truth of it is we don't know and the reason is because the 1922 committee is split. last time when they voted on this, they narrowly decided not to change the rules, paving the way for another leadership contest, they are still split. there are those who believe they had to have the certainty of being able to force mrs may out, they are sceptical she will go voluntarily. some are also sceptical she will actually hold that crucial brexit vote in the first week of june. they surmise may be the prime minister has put up that date as a way of getting around today's meeting. against that, there are others on the committee who believe
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the prime minister should be given the prime minister should be given the space to go in her own time and their thinking is in the aftermath of that vote which most people believe will result in defeat, then, she will go because she will run out of road, number 10 she will go because she will run out of road, number10 has she will go because she will run out of road, number 10 has indicated there won't be another attempt to get the brexit legislation through, and better to let her go with a degree of dignity rather than turfing her out with another leadership contest. that argument has still to play out and i suspect may hinge on how mrs may handles the executive this lunchtime, whether she manages to almost give them a nod and a wink that if the deal goes down, then, she will go. she will have to reassure them. it will come down to an issue of trust. meanwhile, on the floor of the
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commons, mrs may has suffered another setback for her hopes of getting this plan through after the shadow brexit secretary said, if you don't reach a deal with us before you bring the deal back, don't think, don't count on us. it is patently clear if the deal is put for a fourth time if it is allowed, it will fail as it has three times already. i want to make it clear labour opposes the idea of passing the withdrawal agreement bill without an agreed deal, that would put the cart before the horse. labour will vote against a second reading on that basis. how on earth does the secretary think a bill to implement a deal that isn't before the house can pass in two weeks? why that matters is because without official labour support or even unofficial labour support in the form of abstentions, it is very hard
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to see how mrs may has any prospect of getting her plan through, given the level of opposition on her own benches. let us talk about this news from a spokesman for theresa may saying the government is reviewing the right policy on the uk's 5g network, add a lea k policy on the uk's 5g network, add a leak from a top level intelligence meeting suggesting the government had already made a decision to approve huawei's involvement in that. is the government going to change its mind, do we think it definitely had made up its mind because the lea k had made up its mind because the leak suggested it had. there was a presumption huawei would be given a role in part of the non—core 5g network. the final
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decision had not been taken. it is difficult to read that, it could be it is a continuation of the existing position, they are minded to go down this road but haven't finally taken the decision. it could mean the pivot is under way and given the backlash to the decision, really, across parliament actually, and in the intelligence community and in the intelligence community and in the united states, whether the government is now looking to pull back from that initial decision and maybe not go down the road of allowing huawei some role in the 5g network because of the security concerns. the honest truth is we don't quite know what they mean by the word, review, if it is a fundamental rethink or merely a continuation of their current position which is to tentatively
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give the go—ahead without formally and finally signing off on a with huawei. thank you for that. labour says it would install solar panels on nearly two million homes to generate electricity, as part of a new energy policy. the party also plans to renationalise the uk's electricity and gas network, saying it would cut the amount paid to the current private sector owners. we can talk about this now with john pettigrew, the ceo of the national grid — he joins us from the city of london. good to have you with us today. you are saying labour's plants are the last thing needed if the uk is to become a leader in the green energy, why do you say that? good afternoon. what we have set out todayis good afternoon. what we have set out today is our view is to take a company like national grid back into state ownership is not good for
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consumers. the key thing is what is the problem they want to solve? when you look at the facts, you can see the national grid network is one of the national grid network is one of the world's most reliable in safety and reliability, we are investing hugely, £10 billion over the last six years. national grid has a key role, we have made huge progress, last year 50% of all generation in the uk came from a zero carbon sources. we celebrated when we went a whole week without coal being used for generation, the first time since queen victoria was on the throne. there is a long way to go on decarbonisation. when i read the proposals, it took me back to when i started in national grid a few weeks after it was privatised and i remember how difficult it was to get things done, how many committees you had to go through. the energy sector, what it needs, is nimble
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organisations delivering la rge—scale infrastructure, delivering changing technology. the proposals will slow down the decarbonisation agenda and increase costs. are you saying renationalisation would lead to too much bureaucracy? yes, if you look at the proposals, there is a huge number of parties getting involved in trying to deliver large—scale infrastructure. having worked in the industry for 30 yea rs, having worked in the industry for 30 years, you know to deliver multi—billion pound projects, you need nimble decision—making, expertise in engineering, to make sure these projects don't massively overrun. these companies have a huge expense in delivering these projects in the uk and overseas successfully. i'd like your response to the allegations from labour national grid needs to be nationalised because it says you have been using
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the profits not to reinvest in the network but to pay dividends to shareholders. that is not true. if you think about our operating profit, we use it to pay taxes, we are one of the biggest taxpayers in the uk. like any company doing large—scale investment, we raise money either from banks in the form of loans, or investors in the form of shareholders. we do that because it allows us to spread the costs for multiple generations which reduces the costs for consumers. if you're lending money to a company like national grid, you want a return in the form of interest or dividend. we are the same as any other company, our operating profits pay taxes and interest, the rest is ploughed back in into infrastructure and investments. thank you for your time today. more on all of the main stories
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coming up here on the bbc news channel. right now, we said goodbye to viewers on bbc two, thank you for your company. the headlines on bbc news. the government announces a major shake—up of the probation service — the supervision of thousands of offenders is to be largely renationalised after past failings. president trump declares a national emergency — banning american companies using telecoms from what he calls "foreign adversaries". here, a spokesman for the prime minister says the government is still reviewing its policy on the 5g network. theresa may is meeting senior conservative mps as pressure mounts for the prime minister to agree a timetable for her departure from downing street.
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good afternoon. manchester city have been referred to uefa's adjudicatory chamber following an investigation into the club's finances and possible breaches of the financial fair play regulations. if found guilty they could be banned from next season's champions league. here's our sports correspondent, david 0rnstein. we simply don't know on the timescale, ac milan are under similar investigation which has been going on for months. 0ther suggestions are this will be dealt with quickly. manchester city say they are disappointed but not surprised stop their statement is very strongly worded, especially towards the chairman of this investigation, and they also hit out at the media leaks, but they seem particularly confident of clearing their name, they say they have provided irrefutable evidence, and they hope for a satisfactory outcome to this. chelsea midfielder ruben loftus—cheek is a major doubt for the europa league final later this month. he injured his ankle playing in a charity match for the club in the us.
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they beat new england revolution 3—0. the blues' boss maurizio sarri expressed his concern last week over the timing of the game ahead of the final in baku against arsenal on the 29th. a big win forjohanna konta who has beaten the american sloane stephens by two sets to one to reach the third round of the italian open in rome. the british number one lost the first set on the tie—break 7—3, but konta fought back against the seventh seed and took the second set by six games to four to level the match. the stephens serve promptly collapsed and konta strolled through the decider 6—1. not too much time to recover though — she'll face venus williams later today. the two—time french open champion maria sharapova has withdrawn from this month's touranment because of an ongoing shoulder problem. she hasn't played since january.
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that's all the sport for now. i'll be back at about 1:30pm. the travel company thomas cook has reported half—year losses of £1.5 billion. the firm is taking out a loan of £300 million. but its auditors are warning that there's still real uncertainty about whether thomas cook can continue as a going concern. the company is blaming brexit uncertainty as causing britons to delay their summer holiday plans.
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jeremy kyle is "utterly devastated" after the cancellation of his tv show, according to newspaper reports. (tx he told the sun his thoughts and sympathies are with the show‘s guest, steve dymond, who died shortly after recording an episode. the welfare of contributors on tv programmes will now be scrutinised by both mps and regulators. beijing has threatened retaliation following a decision by president trump to effectively block the import of equipment made by the chinese tech giant huawei into the united states. the executive order bans american companies from using foreign telecoms that might pose a security risk — it doesn't name any company, but is believed huawei is the target. in london, theresa may has affirmed that says the government is reviewing uk policy around 5g and huawei's involvement of the chinese. washington says the decision has been taken to protect us national security. peter bowes has this report. another fight with china. a foreign adversary whose telecom giant could pose a national security threat to the us.
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in a statement from the white house, there is no mention of specific countries or companies but it is clear the trump administration has huawei in its sights. the us will ban transactions posing an unacceptable risk, with the president pledging to do what it takes to keep america safe and prosperous. as the us and other countries develop 5g networks, this is a battle over new technology and security, on top of the trade war which has escalated in recent days. chinese companies can be pressured by the chinese government and the communist party. the question is, can customers of those companies around the world build their systems in a way that mitigates those risks, or is itjust too much of a risk? that is really a technical question that will vary from one application to the next. the us commerce department has said american companies will be restricted from selling their technology to huawei which it has concluded is engaged in activities that are contrary to us national security
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or foreign policy interests. in a statement, the chinese company said — with donald trump describing the impasse over trade talks as a little squabble, this latest clash over technology and security will further test deteriorating us—chinese relations. peter bowes, bbc news. the use of powerful painkillers increased in the uk by two—thirds in the three years to 2016, according to a report by the organisation for economic co—operation and development. the 0ecd says that since 2011, there has also been a surge in deaths related to opioid—based medicines. 0ur health editor hugh pym gave me more details.
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the use and abuse of painkillers has become a huge social problem in the us, the significance of this report is it looks at 25 leading economies, members of the 0ecd club of leading economic powers, and it shows that the uk does have a problem in terms of the growth in the availability, that two—thirds figure over three years is over—the—counter medication, and prescribed medication, that was one of the fastest rates of growth in any of these countries apart from israel and slovakia. in terms of availability of opioid painkillers, the uk is above the 0ecd average but still behind in terms of total availability of the us and germany. what are the guidelines for the prescription of these painkillers, given their addictive nature? it is down to the gp in terms of prescriptions, or the hospital after surgery, to make the appropriate prescription.
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this report shows there is a problem with over—prescription by doctors, it says it may be influenced by pharmaceutical companies with marketing, doctors are too ready to prescribe. this is a problem across all different health care systems particularly the ones mentioned. there are going to be in england new warnings on the packaging in terms of prescribed medication and over—the—counter to people receiving them, that it can be addictive. will there be changes to prescription procedure, apart from warnings on packets, might there be a review of the prescription of this type of painkiller? public health england are looking at this issue to see if there is over—prescription and a problem. you could say if you are addicted you are unlikely to take notice of anything on the box when it has been prescribed by your gp. it won't make much difference. but this is a very wide problem
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for doctors and patients. the illicit drugs trade is part of this, according to the report. it talks about opioid—related deaths owing to overdoses and abuse of opioids, saying the uk is up there in terms of opioid—related death increases, with the us, ireland, sweden and others. saying this is a public health crisis. prince harry has accepted substantial damages and an apology from a news agency. splash news took photographs of his private cotswolds home from a helicopter. buckingham palace say the duke of sussex welcomes the apology. 0ur royal correspondentjonny dymond explained the background. splash is a news and photographic celebrity agency which operates largely in the us and uk put a helicopter up in early january largely in the us and uk put a helicopter up in earlyjanuary and took low altitude photos of the
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cotswolds home. they got photos of the dining area, the bedroom and the living area. those were sold to national newspapers and published. the duke used his lawyers to complain his right to privacy had been broken, and various data protection laws had been broken. today, a statement was read in open court saying the duke of‘s privacy had been broken, substantial damages had been broken, substantial damages had been broken, substantial damages had been paid by this agency to the duke, along with legal costs, and the agency has said it will not repeat its actions. it said it a lwa ys repeat its actions. it said it always recognised this situation represented an error of judgment. always recognised this situation represented an error ofjudgment. it isa represented an error ofjudgment. it is a case closed relatively swiftly although the duke and duchess of‘s pudsey has been reached and they say they were forced to move out of this home because of safety and security
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concerns. how much is there a continuing battle between the royals and agencies like this? the privacy battle continues, it is one which harry has pursued a very ha rd one which harry has pursued a very hard indeed, whether it is on questions about his wife or fiancee, that commentary was simply inappropriate, or more generally with the royals. what is noticeable is the shift in tactics or strategy, for a long time, the royalfamily just took it, refused to comment or engage. the younger generation in particular, william and harry, have engaged lawyers and have said, we are not going to take this, and with quite a lot of success their lawyers have pushed that against agencies like this, and news organisations more generally, and have taken a more generally, and have taken a more aggressive stance. with a week to go until polling day,
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all day on bbc news, we have a special guide to help you understand the eu elections. 0ur political correspondent, chris mason gets to grip with the fine detail of these elections — and their significance for the uk. the european union, a club of 28 countries, and yes, the uk is still one of them. let us head to brussels we re one of them. let us head to brussels were at the heart of the eu are three institutions. firstly, the european commission, it is the executive, it dreams up plans for european laws and implement decisions of two other things, the european council and the european parliament. the council of the eu is where government ministers it up from each member country to discuss, amend and adopt laws and coordinate policy. then, the european comment which meets in brussels and strasbourg in france. it is the law making body of the eu and the one bit that is directly elected by us.
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so, how big is it? there are 751 meps elected from all corners of the eu, with 73 of them coming from the uk. here is the rub with these elections, they only happen if you area elections, they only happen if you are a member of the eu and by now the uk was not meant to be, but it is, and so there are. meps will be elected to represent 12 chunks of the uk, here is how it looked in two bits of the uk in 2014, firstly in scotland, and then in the south—east of england. the election uses a proportional system to work out which parties and candidates are successful. in scotland, wales and england, parties choose a list of candidates from each area and voters just choose a party, or any independent. things are different in northern ireland where voters list candidates in order of preference.
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let us take a closer look at the result last time, five years ago. you kip more seats in the uk than anyone else, followed by labour, then the conservatives. ten parties in total one seats representing different parts of the uk. turnout was 34%. loads has changed since, not least the eu referendum in 2016. we have also seen the collapse of the year kip, 24 seats last time, all the way down to just three when the parliament dissolved. this time around, there are two new parties clamouring for attention, the brexit party and change uk, with opposing views on our departure from the eu. and one final thought, what on earth happens if the uk then leaves? 0ur
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70 something beaming victorious meps might be out of a job before they even start. yes, these elections are just a tad odd, but they could prove crucial in shaping the political weather and determining everything from how long theresa may last as prime minister, to what on earth happens with brexit. and as european election campaigning continues, we are putting your questions to all of the main uk parties here on the bbc news channel. at 5.30 this afternoon, sian berry, co—leader of the green party, will answer your questions and tomorrow it's the turn of chuka umunna from change uk. you can email us at askthis@bbc.co.uk or text us on 61124 or use social media with the hashtag #bbcaskthis. sir andy murray has collected his knighthood at buckingham palace today, more than two years after he was awarded the honour.
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the two—time wimbledon champion was given the award by prince charles after being named in the queen's new year's honours in 2016. he said at the time that being known as a sir "sounds a bit strange". the tennis star — who has also won two 0lympic golds — has said "i'm more than happyjust being known as andy". now it's time for a look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom. it is another nice day today, not quite as sunny and warm as yesterday. we still have high pressured, drifting northwards allowing a cooler easterly developing across southern areas, feeding and more cloud. more cloud in the skies this afternoon. across the west, one or two showers, best of the sunshine across scotland and central portions of england. the
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temperatures not quite as high as yesterday. we are seeing some showery bursts of rain and breeze moving into england and wales tonight. some chilly sports under the clear skies of the scottish cla ns. the clear skies of the scottish clans. more cloud and breeze tomorrow, lots of car across england and wales, some showers at times. highest temperatures across western scotland.
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good afternoon. hello, this is bbc newsroom live with annita mcveigh. the government announces a major shake—up of the probation service — the supervision of thousands of offenders is to be largely renationalised after past failings. president trump declares a national emergency — banning american companies using telecoms from what he calls "foreign adversaries". theresa may faces senior conservative mps, as pressure mounts for the prime minister to agree a timetable for her departure from downing street. the former australian prime minister, bob hawke — who led his labour party to four successive election victories — has died at the age of 89. the uk has one of the fastest rates of growth in the availability of opioid painkillers,
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according to a new report. the world's first drugs designed to stop cancer cells becoming resistant to treatment could be available within the next decade — that's according to leading scientists from the institute for cancer research. they say the drugs could make cancer a "manageable" disease in the long term and "more often curable". professor paul workman is head of the institute. viewers will realise that for some time now, for a decade, we have realised some patients are different from others, they have different markers on their cancers which leads to giving different types of drugs, personalised medicines. what is not so well—known and has become very clear through new technology and a breakthrough in thinking as is that even with an individual patient‘s cancer, the genetic make up and susceptibility to drugs changes with time. it is darwinian evolution going on even inside the individual patient‘s tumour, leading to drug resistance and eventual death of the patient.
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in other words, the cancer cells themselves evolve to get around the treatment. the aim of these new drugs is to stop the cancer cells evolving to do that. exactly right. we are now understanding the precise mechanisms, how it works, the machinery in the cell, that leads to these genetic changes inside the cancer, that leads to resistance. we understand some of those mechanisms now, enough to start to design the next generation of drugs that will block the evolutionary process itself, the adaption, and switch off the ability, or limit, the cells getting resistant. how far down the track are you, you are using artificial intelligence, all sorts of methods to come up with this new family of drugs, how far along the track, before we see these
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drugs being widely used? the actual new generation of drugs, we have already started just in the last year or two. we have begun a programme to design new drugs and it will take around five years for those to work through for the first patients to be treated. already, because of the evolutionary principles we understand, we can start to use our existing drugs better. for example, predict using ai, and using complex advanced mathematical models, and sequencing the genomes of the individual cells within the cancer, we can predict how patients are going to likely develop resistance, follow that in the blood of the cancer patient with lab tests in the individual patient, and switch the therapy or use combination therapy that limits the ability to evolve and adapt. let's cross now to the house of commons, where thejustice secretary david gauke is making a statement. about the changes to the probation service, the re—nationalisation of most of the probation service. to
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continue to drive down re—offending. iam continue to drive down re—offending. i am today setting out plans that will see responsibility for the management of all offenders transferred to the national probation service, these arrangements different from those set out for england in the consultation of last summer. however, i believe bringing responsibility for delivery of all offender management within will remove some of the complexities that have cost challenges in the current model of delivery and make it more likely a offender will have continuity of supervision throughout their centres. whilst strengthening processes for managing risk. alongside these changes, we will develop a model for the private and volu nta ry develop a model for the private and voluntary sector for delivering... and provision of these services. each region will continue to have a private or voluntary sector partner, innovation partner, director responsible for providing unpaid
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work and accredited programmes. the nps will be required to buy all interventions from the market, spending up to £280 million a year. contracts will be designed flexibly so individual processes which show results can be quickly identified and spread across the wider system. these interventions such as unpaid work, accredited programmes and resettlement and rehabilitative services are central to delivering the sentences of the courts. subject to market engagement, i look ahead to market engagement, i look ahead to wanting procurement for the services later in the year with competition for unpaid work and accredited programmes. we want to make sure services are responsive to local needs and for re—settlement and rehabilitative services we will create a national dynamic framework which will be accessible to all providers including specialist smaller scale and voluntary sector
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providers. with the expertise to support most complex offenders back into society. this direct relationship will create a greater role for providers in delivering probation services and ensure innovation can be identified and replicated across the system effectively. i am confident this model, based on the arrangements we consulted on in wales, offers the most sustainable approach for probation and is the best option for building on the positive changes made under transforming rehabilitative. and this will continue to break the cycle of reoffending. we have no intention of reverting to the former probation trust model. david gauke outlining in more detail about the government's decision to largely renationalise the probation service. for the vast majority of women, the menopause starts after the age of 45, but for one in every 10,000, symptoms can start before the age of 20. annabelle is 15.
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she's currently doing her gcses, and going through the menopause. we've been to follow her search to find out why. i would draw my own face, but i wouldn't actually give my face inside of it. i don't know what's inside of me right now. it's just a blank space. i'm never going to be able to have children. it's just... it shocks you so hard. it's unbelievable. literally so red! i am sweating! i have daily hot flushes. oh, my god! like, even my arms are red. my chest! oh, my god. itjust makes you feel, kind of, trapped. it's horrible. lovely, thank you, darling. it's been monumental on my parents
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because they've obviously wanted grandchildren. my mum was especially really disappointed. it was a dreadful shock and obviously we both had a cry. we won't be grandparents either, which is a shame, but it's more about annabelle really. today we're at the hospital at uch and we're just getting the results from my past tests from blood tests and my bone density scan, and we're hopefully going to find out why i've been diagnosed with early menopause. it really frustrates me because it's really... inside you're thinking, "well, why me? " really just want to know why it's happened. ifelt very alone. you have no—one to talk to. no—one else has it, so it's really hard at my age.
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when i was diagnosed i didn't know anything about it. for years i didn't actually know anybody that had the condition until ijoined daisy last year, and then i've met so many people through that. to go through that when you're still a child and still a teenager is actually really, really difficult. it was really brilliant to meet annabel and holly because i feel like girls need to speak about it instead of holding everything inside. there's no real reason of why i've got it. it was really disappointing because it's frustrating. there's no real answer to what's happening and it's just this whole big mystery of what's going on inside my body. i don't think i'll ever come to terms with it completely. just trying to make something a positive from a negative because there's always someone going through so much worse.
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to think there is someone going through something worse than me, it makes you feel more lucky than anything. labour mpjess phillips has said she feels "sick" after watching a bbc interview with carl benjamin, a ukip candidate who said comments about raping her were a joke. mr benjamin, who is standing for ukip in the south west in the european elections, tweeted about phillips in 2016 and said "i wouldn't even rape you." let's hear some of that interview with my colleague victoria derbyshire now these are direct quotes from people who watch the video or read the comments. honestly, this makes my stomach churn. how does he find this acceptable? comments like this rights though it might not seem a
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lot to a dog like him, that is from a 31—year—old male survivor, saying it was like a bullet. i respond saying you are misrepresenting what is happening. this man has watched your video. the way you report the comments as farcical. i will reach another one. the lack of empathy from someone seeking public office acidity. rape is not funny. as a survivor, i am angry. there are two sides to every question and i am empathise with the other side. comments like this would have prevented me from telling what happened to me, a female survivor aged 28. you only care about the survivors that bolster your
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narrative, not about the ones to talk to me, who are on my site. you pretend they don't exist. you said you have spoken to one person. in one town. i have spoken to other people in other towns. all survivors? all sexual assault, yes. look, no tops right crisis say this, experiences of rape and sexual violence and abuse are much more common than most people realise, material that normalises, trivialises or attempts to get laughs out of sexual violence can be humiliating or upsetting for survivors. so-called rape jokes are not just insensitive, survivors. so-called rape jokes are notjust insensitive, hurtful or disrespectful, they are damaging.” am aware of the politically correct narrative, but there is another narrative, but there is another narrative that we can call the non—politically correct one that i support. i think it is more empowering not to be controlled by
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jokes. why do you think you have had keepers and milkshakes thrown while campaigning? you are radicalising me by... there is a link between telling lies about someone in the press, you do not seem to have a duty of care, and the things they are trying to do. the relationship between rhetoric and acts of violence? you are not telling jokes. are you? i was telling a joke. it was contextually clearly a joke. this is what you have to de—contextualise it. you sound like a hypocrite. i do not care, it is a joke. when you are the target, you buy newspapers of the media. when you target someone by attaching their name to your rightjoke, that is ok? i am not inciting people. you are inciting people. you are
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normalising... everyone i have spoken to don't understand any of the things you have said about me. people alleging things about me, i can sit there and expend the context. they say, that is not very important. iam normalising context. they say, that is not very important. i am normalising comedy, which is under attack in this country. the headlines on bbc news. the government announces a major shake—up of the probation service — the supervision of thousands of offenders is to be largely renationalised after past failings. china has condemned the united states decision to impose restrictions on the telecoms giant huawei, as president trump declares a national emergency on what he calls "foreign adversaries". theresa may is meeting senior conservative mps, as pressure mounts for the prime minister to agree a timetable for her departure from downing street. one of the areas gearing up for polling day is the constituency
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of the east of england. let's take a look at how that fared last time round. in 2014, voter turnout was about 35%. it sent seven meps to the european parliament — three conservative, one labour, and three ukip candidates. 0ur correspondent andrew sinclair is in norwich with more on what the picture is looking like there. the east of england is often seen as being the home of euroscepticism. it was here that the first anti—eu movements were founded. it was here where ukip began to see its first signs of electoral success culminating of course in douglas carswell winning his westminster seat at clacton. when it came to the referendum, just about every district in the east of england voted to leave. norwich was one of only three places that voted to remain. with brexit such a big issue in this campaign, you might expect people here to be engaging with this election.
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but here at norwich market, they're not. in fact, everyone we met was very angry and confused about how to vote. we're supposed to vote for representatives to the european parliament. we are coming out of it so what is the sense? will you vote? no. a complete waste of time. i honestly do not understand any of this election, i don't know whether any party is any good. i've just gave up with brexit. it is very boring. iwould rather, lam more interested in harry having a baby boy than i am in brexit. they gave fake promises. so there's nothing really true that comes out of their mouths. do you trust politicians any more? not at all. how will that anger and frustration express itself next week? will there be a low turnout, or will people vote for the new parties which are taking part in this election. change uk held a pretty well attended rally in norwich the other week.
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the brexit party and nigel farage are holding their third rally in the region today. there are seven seats up for grabs here. last time, three went to ukip, three to the conservatives, a sign ofjust how eurosceptic this region is. the east of england will definitely be one to watch. it's long been common in the fashion industry to cast models who are under 18 — and many supermodels started their careers at a young age. naomi campbell began modelling at 15, kate moss was discovered at 14. now, the fashion company kering — which owns several major fashion houses, including gucci and alexander mcqueen — has announced that it will no longer use models who are under the age of 18. the company says it's "conscious of the influence exerted on younger generations" by its images and that the policy will come into effect in time for next year's autumn/winter collections. sara ziff is a model and founder of the model alliance, a non—profit advocacy organisation
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for models in the fashion industry. she began modelling when she was 14 and told me about her experience. well, you know, i had a good career. i also experienced the pitfalls of working on what largely remains an unregulated industry. can you describe the pitfalls? sure. i remember being put on the spot to pose nude. even as a young teenager. very long working hours were common. many of my peers experienced pressures from their agencies to go to extremes to lose weight and suffered from eating disorders. really very adult pressures on these young girls. if you were doing it again, obviously it must have seemed exciting, hugely, at 14, but was it too early, in hindsight? yes.
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put it this way, if i had a 14—year—old daughter, i would tell her to hold off until she had finished school. you know, there are many reasons why it is betterfor a model to stop it is better for a model to start working when she is an adult. models are when they are young teenagers, they have an adolescent physique that is different to when you are 22 or in your 30s. as you grow up in the business, there can be a pressure to maintain that gangly teenage body. which then can result in eating disorders. how significant is this announcement from kering that it is not going to use models younger than 18? i think kering's pledge is a positive step towards eliminating the pressures that models currently face to, again, maintain that adolescent physique and go
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to extremes to lose weight. what is sorely missing from the kering pledge is a mechanism, and a commitment, to actual enforcement of this purported new standard. it is also a very limited pledge in that it does not address the broader issues that models face every day — problems from sexual harassment and assault, the lack of financial transparency, late payment, non—payment. the sample size of the clothing is also an issue. i know the trend towards using adults is positive because it presents more realistic ideal, but if you still have those tiny samples, then that pressure doesn't really go away. briefly, unless this becomes
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an industrywide standard, is it really going to make a difference and really kind of change the way that the industry influences younger generations? thank you for asking. no. standards without enforcement are not real standards. they are aspirational ideals. and that is why over 200 models have been calling on kering and other companies to make a real commitment to enforceable, comprehensive standard. they want to kering and other companies to join the respect programme, driven by and for the models themselves. the former australian prime minister bob hawke has died, at the age of 89. in 1983 he led the australian labor party to the first of four successive election victories, and became internationally renowned for his love of beer,
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cigars and cricket. 0ur sydney correspondent, hywel griffith, looks back at his life. charismatic and unconventional, bob hawke was what australians like to call a larrikin. his boisterous, playful personality came coupled with a sharp political brain. as prime minister, he knew the public loved his antics, especially when, after australia won the america's cup, he gave them all an unofficial day off. any boss who sacks anyone for not turning up today is a bum! bob hawke started his political career in the trade unions before entering parliament in his 50s. within a month of taking over the leadership of the labour party in 1983, he secured the first of four general election victories. i, robertjames lee hawke, do swear i will well and truly serve her majesty queen elizabeth ii. he secured the highest ever
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approval ratings of any australian prime minister. at home, he focused on issues like welfare, pensions and deprivation. by 1990, no australian child will be living in poverty. 0n the world stage, his relaxed approach won him new allies, securing trade deals in asia that helped australia prosper for decades. not that he was universally loved. a pensioner who criticised his policies was given typical short shrift. indistinct comment. animosity within his own party meant, after more than eight years in power, he was eventually toppled by his deputy paul keating. long after retirement, he kept his place in public life, and in the country's affections. he will be remembered across australia as the leader who loved a drink and a joke and made the serious work of politics look like fun. hywel griffith, bbc news.
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now — this is the moment the lift carrying two skyscraper window cleaners in oklahoma city began spinning out of control. the window cleaners were working on the city's tallest building, the devon tower. it's not known how the basket became loose but the two people in it managed to grab a rope and secure it as they swung 50 floors above street level. windows were shattered, but thankfully no—one was hurt. in a moment it's time for the one 0'clock news with ben brown. but first, it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. glorious day yesterday, near unbroken sunshine. warmest towards the east with the light winds. scotland had the highest
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temperature. hottest day of the year so forfor temperature. hottest day of the year so for for scotland. high temperature. hottest day of the year so forfor scotland. high pressure still dominating the scene through today. drifting northwards, allowing a cooler, stronger easterly breeze to develop across the uk. according to develop across the uk. according to central and eastern areas as the afternoon wears on. meanwhile, a weather front close to the west of the uk generating some cloud and some showers. cloud east and west of the country, central areas seeing the country, central areas seeing the best of the sunshine with higher temperatures across scotland. though 20s. there were across england and wales. this evening, losing the showers across the west, thick required, showery rain pushing across the east of england and wales. with the cloud cover, more breeze. some chilly spots across the scottish glens. more cloud tomorrow, showers in england and wales in
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bursts, low cloud, grey weather across the east coast of scotland and england. cutting further into the afternoon. there were temperatures, with the best of the sanction for west of scotland and parts of northern ireland the highest temperatures. this we and, more unsubtle, high pressure, outbreaks of rain, showers which could be heavy across england and wales. breezy across the northern half of the country. you can see outbreaks of rain scattered across the uk thanks to the low pressure destabilising the atmosphere. saturday could be quite wet across parts of scotland and northern england, may be into north wales. into the afternoon, sunny spells generally for england and wales, could see some heavy, slow moving showers, some could be thundery. best of temperatures 18 celsius. cooler across the north sea coast. sunday is similar, outbreaks of rain across the north. sunshine across england and wales setting off heavy,
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slow—moving showers. best of the temperatures in the south east. again, cooler further temperatures in the south east. again, coolerfurther north temperatures in the south east. again, cooler further north and east.
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dramatic evidence at the inquests into the london bridge attacks from a nurse who was stabbed in the neck. she tried to save the life of this man — alexandre pigeard, but he told herjust to run for her life. we'll have the latest live from the old bailey. also this lunchtime... president trump declares a national emergency to protect us networks from firms like the chinese telecoms giant huawei. the government abandons its controversial part privatisation of the probation service. available within a decade — drugs designed to stop cancer becoming resistant to treatment. living with the menopause while you're still at school —

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