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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 18, 2019 3:00pm-4:00pm BST

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this is bbc news — i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 3pm. the shadow brexit secretary, labour's sir keir starmer, says to break the brexit impasse, the government should include a public vote in any eu withdrawal agreement. in australia, prime minister scott morrison's liberal—led conservative coalition are on course for victory in the country's general election, after the labor leader, bill shorten concedes. prince william opens up over the pain he suffered after the death of his mother, diana, the princess of wales, in a bbc documentary about mental health. when you are bereaved at a very young age, any time really, final preparations are under way for the 64th eurovision song contest in tel aviv, with michael rice flying the flag for the uk.
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good afternoon. australia's conservative government look to have secured a surprise victory in the country's general election to remain in office. let's go to sydney, where prime minister and leader of the liberal party, scott morrison, is speaking. awarning, a warning, there is some flash photography. i am standing with... how good is australia?
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and how good are australians? this is... this is the best country in the world in which to live... and it is those australians that we have been working forfor is those australians that we have been working for for the last five and a half years, since we came to government back in 2013. it has been those australians who have worked hard. they have their dreams, they have their aspirations, to get a job, to get an apprenticeship, to start a business, to meet someone amazing... to start a family, to buy amazing... to start a family, to buy a home, to work hard and to provide the best you can for your kids. to
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save for your retirement and to ensure that when you are in your retirement, that you can enjoy because you have worked hard for it. these are the quiet australians who have won a great victory tonight. thank you. because it has always been about them. it has always been about, for those of you watching this at home tonight, for me and for my government, for all of my team, it is all about you, tonight is not about me, it is not about even the liberal party, tonight is about every single australian, who depends on the government to put them first.
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and so, friends, that is exactly what we are going to do. our government will come together after this night and we will get back to work just as we this night and we will get back to workjust as we got back to work in new south wales just a few months ago. and that is our task. that is my undertaking to australians from one end of the country to the other. isaid one end of the country to the other. i said that i was going to burn for you and diane. every single day. so, let me talk about some of our other miracles tonight. melissa mcintosh. phil thompson, at the aryan townsville in herbert.
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__ up —— up there in townsville. terry youngin —— up there in townsville. terry young in brisbane. sarah richards. but in saying that, can i also say thank you to some great service and i hope... thank you to some great service and ihope... can thank you to some great service and i hope... can i start off by saying, thank you to tony abbott for your service to this country. and to sarah henderson... we still have votes to count. i thank them for the ha rd votes to count. i thank them for the hard campaign they have fought. to
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all of those in the seats that we held going into this campaign who had to work hard to ensure that as a result of their incredible efforts they were able to be returned tonight. can i particularly thank jason and michael, david coleman, lucy in robertson. pretty much the whole state of queensland. how good is queensland?! i never thought i would hear that in new south wales, i have got to tell
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you. all of our queensland members. i wa nt to all of our queensland members. i want to thank you. and we have got some great new members coming in as well. doctor fiona martin is here with us. professor celia hammond. and angie bell on the gold coast. i wa nt to and angie bell on the gold coast. i want to thank all of my candidates. all of my members. all of you who have worked so hard to get them where we have been able to come to tonight, on behalf of all of those australians that we have worked for and we serve and we do it humbly and we do it in great appreciation. i wa nt to we do it in great appreciation. i want to thank a number of people who
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have been instrumental in tonight's result. i want to start... i want to start by thanking stephen marshall... that is the leader of the conservatively the part —— the conservative liberal party. the count has not finished yet. a day night of miracles is how he has described it, paying tribute to the ha rd described it, paying tribute to the hard working australians, quiet australians, who have won victory tonight on this reallyjust coming off the back of the concession speech by the labour leader, bill shorten, who said that to be honest, we are not going to be in power this time around. the question now is whether it will be a majority or a minority led government. we are
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going to be speaking to our correspondence there later and he will be bringing us all the latest, including reaction and surprises and u psets including reaction and surprises and upsets taking place in australia's general election. stay with us on bbc news for that. labour's brexit spokesman, sir keir starmer, has accused cabinet ministers of "torpedo—ing" his party's negotiations with the government, which collapsed yesterday. he's called on theresa may to put a promise to hold a further referendum on the face of her eu withdrawal agreement, when it's presented for a final time next month, before she steps down as prime minister. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, reports. an awkward and lacklustre launch for a european election campaign theresa may never wanted to fight. but the prime minister argued yesterday that only the conservatives could deliver brexit. if parliament had backed our brexit deal, we could already have left the eu. but parliament has not, so what chance does
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the prime minister have of getting mps to support her deal when they vote on it again next month? at least one in her party does not fancy her chances. it has failed three times. you can watch the movie titanic 100 times but i'm afraid the ship sinks every time, so if you are going to bring back this deal, and it still has the backstop, the dup will not support it and an increasing of conservative mps, even those who voted for it the second and third time, are saying enough is enough. this man wants mps to vote on holding another referendum. the labour shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer, says that after talks with the government to find a way forward broke down, it would be one way to break the deadlock. the prime minister has the option of going back to the eu and seeing what changes they would make. there's no point in that, is there? well, the political declaration, i think they would make changes. the withdrawal agreement might be another option. or of course, they could seek to break the impasse by putting a confirmatory vote on the face of a bill, but whatever happens,
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they have to find a way of breaking the impasse. when parliament votes in a couple of weeks' time, it will be another chance for mps to shape brexit somehow, but for the prime minister, it will be her last chance to deliver brexit with her deal on her terms. jonathan blake, bbc news. well, i spoke tojonathan blake, and i asked him how likely another eu referendum actually is. there are still a lot of mps who would like it to happen but not so far at least a majority in parliament. it is not government policy and i think it is safe to say there is no chance of it becoming government policy in the near future. a downing street source has said in response to what keir starmer said in the piece, asking the government to put it into the withdrawal agreement bill, that there are many mps who want a second referendum and it is that source's view that they are simply trying to find a way to stop brexit but mps will have a chance to amend
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the withdrawal agreement bill to try and force a public vote on either the terms or outcome of the deal, leave or remain or whatever the question may end up being, if there is a majority in parliament for that. a suggestion that when this bill comes become before parliament to the next couple of weeks, not only is it a straight vote on theresa may's brexiteer, it is a series about potentially on legislation that will put that deal into uk law and give mps the chance to tinker around the edges and possibly shape brexit to their liking. this question continues, how likely is it that theresa may's deal will get through? if it does not, what happens? if it does not, i think we will see her stand down and set a timetable for her departure straightaway.
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i think there is a feeling this is the last chance she has to get through her deal and get brexit delivered on something like her terms and that deal was obviously reached with the eu several months ago now, she has put it before parliament three times and it has been rejected on each one of those occasions. but there is time for the government to offer things alongside that deal as part of that legislation package that is going to go through parliament that could bring potentially labour mps and more conservative mps on board and persuade them to vote for it. and bubbling away in the background, she is going to stand down, one way or another, the unofficial tory leadership is beginning to really warm up now and we are seeing those contenders jostling around. yes, this conservative leadership contest is not officially under way but it has been rumbling on for weeks now. there is a yougov poll of conservative activists which puts borisjohnson as by far and away the frontrunner in that contest, with 39% of the vote. dominic raab in second place and then several more
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on single figure percentages. and we have seen matt hancock the health secretary in an interview with the daily telegraph, saying whoever takes over should avoid calling a general election and that could lead labour into power and kill off brexit indefinitely. theresa may tried to get her bill through parliament and you have the likely contenders to replace her circling and trying to assert their vision for brexit on their terms of potentially what they would look to do when they come to office. the duke of cambridge has spoken about the pressure of working as an air ambulance pilot and the strain it placed on his mental health. in a bbc documentary, he says he was left with the feeling that death was always around the corner. prince william also said that losing his mother, diana, princess of wales, when he was a child,
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was a pain like no other. andy moore reports. we've got to relax a little bit and be able to talk about our emotions, because we're not robots. in the documentary called a royal team talk, prince william sits in a changing room and discusses mental health issues with stars of the footballing world who have all come under pressure in their careers. he speaks candidly about the enormous grief he suffered when his mother, princess diana, died in a car crash in 1997. he was just 15. i think when you are bereaved at a very young age — any time, really, but particularly at a young age, i can resonate closely to that — you feel pain like no other pain, and you know that in your life, it's going to be very difficult to come across something that's going to be even worse pain than that. but it also brings you so close to all those other people out there who have been bereaved. he also speaks about the stress of his formerjob as an air ambulance pilot. he said he sometimes found it very
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difficult to deal with his feelings. in some cases, very raw, emotional day—to—day stuff, where you are dealing with families who are having the worst news they can ever possibly have, on a day—to—day basis. mmm. it leaves you with a very depressing, very negative feeling where you think, "death is just around the door everywhere i go." and that's quite a... it's quite a burden to carry and feel. prince william says the best way to share that burden is to be honest and talk openly about the mental health issues that all of us experience. andy moore, bbc news. you can see more of that interview with the duke of cambridge in the documentary, a royal team talk: tackling mental health. it is broadcast on bbc one tomorrow night at 10:30. the headlines on bbc news... counting is under way in the australia's general election, with early results suggesting a good night for prime minister scott morrison's governing liberal—led conservative coalition.
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the shadow brexit secretary, labour's sir keir starmer, says to break the brexit impasses, the government should include a public vote in any eu withdrawal agreement. prince william opens up over the pain he suffered after the death of his mother, diana in a bbc documentary about mental health. and it is a big day for manchester city and watford. we are less than two hours away from kick—off in the fa cup final. saint mirren have won their final match of the season but it is not enough to stop them facing a relegation play—off. and brooks koepka will start his third round with a seven shot lead. i will be back with details on all those
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stories at around 5:30pm. the debate around the future of the irish border has been a significant stumbling block in the brexit process, with the forthcoming eu elections expected to be particularly hard—fought in northern ireland. ahead of the vote next week, our ireland correspondent chris page has been to hear people's views. politics is full of ups and downs. standing for election can be a white knuckle ride, especially during the stop—start unpredictable brexit process. the impact on northern ireland is probably greater than most places because of the land border with the irish republic so it is clear what issue is the main one for voters this week. i think we should have been out years ago but i think we need somebody with strong leadership in the government and we don't have that. we need a second referendum or do something like that because i don't know if brexit is a good idea.
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ijust feel that it's not straightforward to leave any more, i feel that i'm not who we can actually trust now. this is one of the biggest events in northern ireland. more than 100,000 people visit the balmoral show every year and one of the reasons why it is so huge is that agriculture and the food industry are massively important to the economy here. we have an industry here that is in fine fettle and really good form but potentially will be massively affected by brexit if we have a withdrawal without a proper agreement behind it. that could affect us in so many different terms, particularly around the movement of people and the access to markets and the tariffs associated with those. farm animals and farm produce are traded across the border all year round. the invisibility of the frontier helps to explain why 56% of people in this part of the uk voted to remain in the eu. no matter what three politicians are elected as meps on thursday, business people say they need clarity about brexit. we are frustrated because we are
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well—established hit within northern ireland but we would love to get a foothold within southern ireland and at the moment that seems to be far away from us. and people based near the border deeply feel the effect of political decisions or divisions. hopefully it will be a good outcome because otherwise it is going to be very tricky, even getting over and back from the border every day because we are farmers in the north but the road is in the south so logistically it would be a nightmare, let alone for business. from a business point of view, we are based in enniskillen, only 15 miles from the irish border, and to think we could be a situation where there's going to be a hard border and tariffs imposed on businesses, it is just crazy. we are depending on the politicians to get things sorted out. and if it's not sorted out, i don't think there's a politician in the country who could show their face out their front door again.
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brexit has generated strong words and passionate opinions. the last few days have been all about competitions between farmers but in thursday's contest, voters will decide which political arguments are most clear cut. chris page, bbc news, in county down. ireland correspondent chris page reporting. you can find more details and analysis on the eu elections over on the bbc news website. on thursday, voters go to the polls in the elections for the european parliament. new party change uk, formed earlier this year by mps who have left the conservative and labour parties, were in edinburgh this afternoon campaigning. broxtowe mp anna soubry explained the core beliefs of the new party. we believe that the united kingdom
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is -- we believe that the united kingdom is —— has made a terrible mistake in voting to leave the european union. in scotland, if i may say, you had the good sense to vote to remain in the good sense to vote to remain in the european union. the united kingdom as we all know made another decision and as we all believe, it was a terrible mistake. the other thing that keeps us absolutely together as one is our belief in the need to restore and fix politics in the united kingdom because politics is broken. and next week, we will be continuing our series of interviews with meps and leaders from the main parties standing in the european elections in a special ask this. you can send us your questions to put to them. on monday, we'll speak to conservative mep ashley fox and vince cable the lib dem leader. then on tuesday we're interviewing gerard batten the ukip leader and on wednesday it will be the turn ofjohn healey from labour and adam price, the plaid cymru leader. details of how to get in touch are on the screen.
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thousands of women with down‘s syndrome, who are going through the menopause, might not be getting the help they need because health professionals often overlook their symptoms. the down‘s syndrome association warns that emotional symptoms are sometimes written off as challenging behaviour, caused by a learning disability. jayne mccubbin has been to find out more. right, ladies. what do you all know about menopause? it's the change. the change. it's something what men don't have to go through. there's a reason it's been women given to women — because we can cope. sorry, man in the room! i'm here to be abused — it's fine! this is the award—winning cafe leap in leeds. it's run for and by people with learning disabilities. but this session is to help women prepare and go through the change. feeling sad and tearful, depressed, forgetting things.
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you can get angry. i get quite tearful. you can get quite tearful sometimes. you've got lots of support here. we're all sisters. should we do a group hug? it's something, susan, every woman sat in this table is going to go through, sweetheart. my name is susan hanley and i am 5a years old and i'm going through the menopause. susan is the chair of cafe leap and has had a tough time coping with some of the worst of the symptoms. what do you fancy? but this is where she comes for advice and support and essential tea and cake. a woman needs her cake. nice. not bad. becky told me you were a bit scared at first. i was a bit scared.
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i wasn't sure what i was going through. you weren't sure what was happening. i could get really low but i try to pick up myself. that's all you can do, really. the down‘s syndrome society tell us too many women like susan get late diagnosis and delayed support because symptoms are too often missed by gps. women with down's syndrome, they tend to go through the menopause earlier than the majority so the majority, they tend to say it's 50—plus, whereas with down's syndrome, it can be in your early 405. and there is another reason symptoms can be missed as well. it's called diagnostic overshadowing. often that is when someone is classed as having challenging behaviour, for example, or they're having an emotional outburst. so gps or medical professionals will miss an underlying medical problem because theyjust haven't taken the time to see beyond the learning disability? yeah. for some reason, it never seems
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to get picked up as menopause. please, doctors, nurses, whatever, please help us. don't use long words. don't talkjargon. don't hold it in. get it all out, out of your system. you'll feel great in yourself. one third of women will fly through the menopause, one third will manage the symptoms, but another third will find it hard and women with learning difficulties might need that bit extra help to make sense of what is happening. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. the final of the 64th eurovision song contest takes place in tel aviv this evening, following israel's win last year. eurovision is one of the world's longest—running tv talent shows and the biggest. this year, dozens of artists have called for a boycott, because of israel's treatment of the occupied palestinian territories.
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0ur arts correspondent, david sillitto, is in tel aviv. the organisers always describe eurovision as essentially a celebration of inclusivity, diversity and being very nonpolitical, all of which has been challenged by the sheer fact that this year it is taking place here in israel. there have been protests, there are groups who want there to be a cultural boycott of israel because of their actions in the occupied territories and you also have to remember that there's another side protesting — 0rthodox groups within israel who believe this should not be going on, especially on the sabbath. so far, there have been some protests in tel aviv but in the two semifinals there has been remarkably little, but tonight is the big night. i spoke to the boss yesterday who said that, for instance, if any competitors staged a protest on stage, they would be immediately stopped and the performance brought to a halt, and there is very strict security. however, if you are interested in the eurovision song contest,
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the favourites so far are the netherlands, australia and sweden. the united kingdom is way down the odds. remember, michael rice was not even born the last time the united kingdom won the eurovision song contest. earlier, i spoke to diane watson and tara stalla rd. they are "superfans" of this year's uk entry, michael rice, who's from their home town of hartlepool. everybody is really excited and we cannot wait. everything is organised. the big event, where is that? we're having a at hartlepool town hall, it was a ticket event, we're having a party at hartlepool town hall, it was a ticket event, and it sold out immediately. it will be amazing. tell us about michael. he is such a sweet soul.
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everybody loves him. and he is a fantastic singer. how long has he been singing? since the age of 11. how did he get involved in eurovision? he won a singing competition. he has done quite a few competitions. he did all together now, i think that was the biggest stepping stone for him for the eurovision. what do you think of the song? people have been giving it a bit of stick. it is amazing. his song is fantastic. it is about being yourself and not being ashamed of who you are. he has a fantastic focal and people need to watch this space tonight. you have spoken to him from israel? how is he feeling? he is really excited.
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he just cannot wait to get on stage and perform well. living his dream. how did the dress rehearsals go? fantastic. there is a party going on in hartlepool, the ticket of the century. what are the odds for michael? he's got to win. we want him to win. he is going to win. michael rice to win. all the countries vote for each other but hopefully, they will vote for his voice on the song. no gimmicks. it is all about his vocals. we don't want any drama, just your talent tonight. yes, and that is what michael has got. he is an absolute superstar. he will always be a winner in our eyes in hartlepool.
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did hartlepool know about michael before eurovision? yes, he is well known. he is very popular. final message from us? good luck, michael! eurovision super fans. the queen and prince philip were among the guests at the wedding of lady gabriella windsor and thomas kingston. lady gabriella is the daughter of the queen's cousin, prince michael of kent. it was the third royal wedding to be held at windsor castle‘s st george's chapel in less than a year. the duke of sussex attended without his wife meghan, duchess of sussex, or their son archie, who was born earlier this month. an extremely rare roman coin has been found during work to upgrade the a14 between cambridge and huntingdon. it dates from around 269 ad and it was minted for an ill—fated emperor ulpius cornelius laelianus,
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who was killed after reigning for two months. it's believed to be only the second of its kind to be found in england. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there. full of fortune for today. some time has been developing more widely for england and wales, and it has felt warmer. but that warmth has been triggering some heavy showers. further north, in northern ireland and scotland, it has been a lot colder than it has been for quite a while underneath the cloud. temperatures have been struggling 11-13d. into temperatures have been struggling 11—13d. into this evening, we will find some low cloud still affecting mainland scotland. still some drizzle around, too. a fairly gentle easterly breeze. still quite damp across northern ireland, slowly brightening up in the far north of
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england, but still some showers. further south, some sunshine but slow—moving, heavy showers. this evening, a lot of those showers will fade away. we will see it turning misty with patchy fog, low cloud coming in off the north sea. also some cloud continuing for scotland and northern ireland. still a bit damp, and temperatures typically 7-9dc damp, and temperatures typically 7—9dc by the end of the night. india tomorrow, many places should be warmer than today. especially in the sunshine. again, with light winds and slow moving heavy and potentially thundery showers. cloudy for northern ireland and scotland first thing tomorrow, but they will be showers arriving through the afternoon. with sunshine after the morning mist and fog for england and wales, some slow—moving, heavy showers. they may be in a line across the spine of england. temperatures a touch higher. warmer than today. nothing much is changing
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at the moment. we are close to an area of low pressure, and we are close to an area of high pressure. but we are getting these showers developing as we get a bit of heat through the day. a misty start on monday morning, some sunny spells developing, showers arriving. not much wind to move them on. showers further east across england, and temperatures similar to sunday. up to 19 or 2a southern areas. tuesday, wet weather across central and northern scotland. dry elsewhere. any wetter towards the end of next week.
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good afternoon. labour's brexit spokesman, sir keir starmer, has accused cabinet ministers of "torpedoing" his party's negotiations with the government, which collapsed yesterday. and he's called on theresa may to offer mps the option of another referendum when they vote on her eu withdrawal agreement for a final time next month before she steps down.
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0ur political correspondent jonathan blake reports. an awkward and lacklustre launch for a european election campaign theresa may never wanted to fight. but the prime minister argued yesterday that only the conservatives could deliver brexit. the big question is how. parliament has blocked a deal three times. next month, they will vote again and some in her own party do not read the prime minister's chances for time around. it has failed three times and you can watch the movie titanic 100 times but the ship sinks every time. if you are going to bring back this deal, and it has still got the bank stopping it, the dup will not support it and an increasing number of conservative mps, even those who voted for it the second and third time, are saying enough is enough. he had a message today, campaigning in cambridge. the shadow brexit secretary, who has long been a supporter of another referendum, called on the government to offer mpsa called on the government to offer mps a say on whether to hold another
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public void. we do need to break the impasse and one way to do that is for the government to put a public vote option on the face of the withdrawal agreement. it proposes to bring the bill back in a few weeks' time. the prime minister has repeatedly ruled out another referendum but a downing street source said mps would have the opportunity to amend the withdrawal agreement bill to allow for one, if a majority of mps would support it. will you be standing for the tory leadership? with the contest to replace theresa may at least on officially under a yougov poll for the times has put borisjohnson for the times has put borisjohnson for the outright favourite among tory activists to be the next conservative leader. before the prime minister stepstone orders forced to resign, theresa may has one last chance to deliver brexit on her terms when parliament votes again ina her terms when parliament votes again in a couple of weeks' time. the duke of cambridge has said
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he felt "pain like no other" after the death of his mother, diana, princess of wales, when he was a child. prince william made the disclosure in a bbc documentary about mental health, in which footballers, including the england player danny rose, have spoken about the pressures they have faced. here's our correspondent andy moore. he is the man who will be king, and his voice carries when he decides to ta ke his voice carries when he decides to take upa his voice carries when he decides to take up a particular issue, in this case mental health. we have got to relax a little bit and be able to talk about our emotions because we are not robots. in the documentary called a royal team talk, prince william sits in a changing room and discusses mental health issues with stars of the footballing world. he speaks candidly about the enormous grief he suffered when his mother, princess diana, died in a car crash in 1997. he wasjust15. i think when you are bereaved at a very young age, any time really, but particularly at a young age, i can resonate closely to that, you feel pain like no other pain,
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and you know within your life it is going to be very difficult to come across something that is going to be even worse pain than that but it also brings you so close to all those other people out there who have been bereaved. england and spurs defender danny rose was praised by the prince when he spoke publicly about his depression but some people were not so depression but some people were not so understanding. in the summer, i was speaking to another club, and they said, the club would like to meet you, just to check you are not crazy. because of what you said? yeah, because of what i had said and what i had been through. prince william spoke about the stress of his formerjob as an air ambulance pilot. he said he sometimes found it very difficult to deal with his feelings. in some cases very raw emotional day to day stuff where you're dealing with families who are having the worst news they could ever possibly have on a face—to—face basis. it leaves you with a very depressing, very negative feeling where you think, death is just around the door everywhere i go. that is quite a burden to carry and feel. prince william says the best way to share that burden is to be honest and talk openly about the mental health issues that
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all of us experience. you can see more of that interview with the duke of cambridge in the documentary a royal team talk: tackling mental health, it's broadcast on bbc one tomorrow night at10:30. a man has died after a fight in a street in rochdale last night. he's believed to be in his early 20s. greater manchester police say a woman, who's 25, has been arrested in connection with the murder investigation. australia's conservative government has pulled off a surprise victory in the country's general election. but with votes still being counted, it's unclear whether the prime minster, scott morrison, will be able to form a majority government. exit polls had suggested the opposition labor party would secure a narrow win for the first time in six years, but their leader bill shorten has now conceded. 0ur correspondent hywel griffith is in sydney. australia are unlikely to be changing prime minister yet again?
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yes, we may even get some stability in australian politics. scott morrison took over the job in august because of the canberra coup. many expected him to be a stopgap before labour took over, having led in the opinion polls for 2.5 years, however, the hour, scott morrison, he somehow pulled it out of the bag. he led the campaign largely alone with many of his cabinet colleagues being seen as too toxic to campaign alongside him. he focused on the issue of the economy, australia has enjoyed 27 years without a recession. that seems to have rung a bell with australians, and really resonated with them. when he took to the stage earlier on, he said he believed in miracles. he is known for being a devout christian and all his hard work on the campaign trail over the last few weeks seems to have pulled it off. we do not have
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the final tally but it looks like he will be remaining in government. thank you. austria's vice—chancellor heinz—christian strache has resigned from the government. it's after a video emerged of him apparently promising public contracts in exchange for campaign support before the general election in 2017. mr strache, who's also stepped down as the leader of the far—right freedom party, said he was the victim of a targeted political attack. the final of the 64th eurovision song contest takes place in tel aviv this evening, following israel's win last year. it's one of the world's longest—running tv talent shows, and the biggest. however, there's controversy this year, with dozens of artists calling for a boycott because of israel's treatment of the occupied palestinian territories. from tel aviv, david sillito reports. welcome to the eurovision song contest 2019. eurovision, and thousands have arrived here in tel aviv for what many israelis feel is a chance to show a different image to the world.
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it is very exciting that it has come to our country. my country, israel. some people have got the wrong idea, i believe, and now they have seen that israel can really host true parties without any problems. indeed, here amongst the fans it is very much the traditional eurovision party atmosphere, but there have been protests and there are those who believe this should not be happening in israel. there have been calls to boycott the event around europe, and here in tel aviv, they will continue as the show begins. it is an occupying country, and it is actively denying the rights of the palestinian people, so having the eurovision in israel is supporting that actively and financially. so far there has been little disruption, and organisers are warning that if anything happens on stage tonight, it will be stopped immediately. now all eyes are
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on wembley, where the fa cup kicks off in just over an hour. manchester city are hoping to become the first men's team to win all three domestic trophies in one season. their opponents, watford, may be the underdogs but they will be determined to upset those plans. david 0rnstein is at wembley. david, could watford spoil manchester city's day? they could, anything is possible, especially given the last few weeks we have seen in football. manchester city arrived as the firm favourites, statistics and indicators point to them but they have not been winners of this competition since 2011 and in the interim period they were beaten by wigan athletic in the 2013 final, one of the greater shocks and fa cup final history, so watford may be hopeful, they have only been in one previous final, 1984, when elton john was their chairman. he is at a concert in copenhagen today but his sons will be the watford mascots. manchester city have not had a great
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weekend of the pitch, dogged by speculation they could be handed a champions league ban over breaking financial rules, but they will hope today that they're focuses on their achievements on the pitch but watford will hope to spoil their party. thank you very much. there is more throughout the evening on the news channel. i will be back with the tea m channel. i will be back with the team with the late news at 11:40pm tonight. it is time for the news where you are. goodbye. hello, and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. what do we have this week? we have "john wick three: pa rabellum". keanu reeves prepares for war. birds of passage, a very impressive
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drama from columbia. and beats, a return to ‘90s rave culture. so why‘s it called "parabellum"? because if you want peace, prepare for war. and most of what happens in thejohn wick movies is fighting. this picks up — have you followed the first two movies? no. this picks up at the end of the second one, where he's about to be excommunicated from the secret society of killers, which once he is, everybody will be trying to kill him, and there's a $14 million price tag on his head. he can't trust anyone, except his dog. here is a fairly low—key clip from the film, and it's one of the very few low—key moments. new york public library. you got it.
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change of plan. the continental. can you see that he's received by the concierge? yes sir, mr wick. good dog. so he gets the dog to safety so that he can engage in the main business of the film, which is fighting two, three, ten, 20 people at a time. sometimes in a library attacking them with books, and sometimes in a moroccan bazaar, in which dogs are involved. sometimes in a glass office entirely filled with glass cases, entirely filled with glasses skulls into which people can be smashed at regular intervals.
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and the interesting thing is — it's very violent but in a movie—violence kind of way. at one point there is an image of harold lloyd. and actually it's like that kind of harold lloyd slapstick, it's physical performance. some people are sniffy about keanu reeves' acting, but he's a great physical actor — if you look at things like the matrix. the fight sequences are choreographed like a hollywood musical. if you ever saw the raid, it's the same — it's like watching a musical dance number that happens to involve the fighting. the same way that sam raimi made the evil dead — he said, "it's not a horror movie, it's a three stooges movie with blood and guts standing in for custard pies." and although it's a film that's full of destruction, it's cinematic, stylised destruction. i must say, i think it was really good fun. be honest, do you get bored of that kind of violence? i did not. in the previousjohn wicks, i have not enjoyed them as much. in the case of the matrix — which started at this really high point and tailed off —
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i actually enjoyed this the most. there's a couple of lulls, a couple of moments where you think you're getting exhausted with the sheer levels of fighting. but actually, one of the things i like about it is it takes its physicality very seriously. they play out in quite long shots. i like martial arts movies anyway, and i like the attention to detail. i like good fighting. i struggle to think of another movie which involved "death by book". it's interesting — there's kung fu, horse—fu, and dog—fu. so it's all the forms of fighting you can imagine. and book—fu? there you go. 0k, birds of passage — about the colombian drug trade? a terrific drama from the makers of embrace of the serpent. it's a film with the epic sweep of the godfather, but also — as with embrace of the serpent — it's about indigenous people. it's about how the emerging drug trade changes the lives
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of the people in northern columbia. it starts with a young man who's asked for somebody‘s with their hand in marriage and told he needs to get the dowry, by which he sells marijuana and discovers he can make a lot of money doing it. but with that wealth comes change, and everything comes at a price. the brilliant thing is it's almost like a tone poem. it has a narrative, but as you watch it, the tones of the film — there's an earthy, natural tone at the beginning, with bright and very vibrant colors. but as the film goes on, those are kind of replaced by garish polyester shirts, the glint of guns, and the sound of gunfire. it's also a film the opens and closes with song. there's a singing shepherd that is singing the story trying to remember this cultural story. much as i was talking before aboutjohn wick owing a debt to musicals, this has a brilliant soundtrack that seeps up from the ground. it's really rich and a really
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richly textured film, 2.5.4, z—xz—rra—rfiez—ff ”7, , about the two people, were you a raver? no. me neither. laughter. school disco, does that count? well, i don't dance at all. it's about two teenagers in 1994 having one last rave—y hurrah before life takes them different ways. timing is very important because 1994 was the criminaljustice act that sought to outlaw illegal raves and referring specifically to impromptu meetings featuring music that consisted of "a succession of repetitive beats".
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that's how the law defined it. let's have a clip. to be governed is to be at every operation, noted, registered, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, authorised, admonished, prevented, forbidden corrected, watched, inspected, spied upon, directed, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, checked. in other words, listeners, sisters, brothers — they want us to get in line, but we won't cover the one is to be afraid of each other but we are not. we are better than this. the only good system is a sound system, and if i can't dance to it, it's not my revolution. this is my revolution, listeners. this one... i dearly hope you will make it yours too. join us. wendy! 0i—oi!
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here, drink that. try to keep it together, all right? right. it's adapted from a stage play and being rewritten by the author, and i thought it was impressively done — not least because i know nothing about rave culture and nothing about the music. i've never been to a rave, but what the film manages to do is — as with birds of passage, it's a love story about these friends that will be torn apart. and on the other hand, it's a wider thing about the changing political landscape. what it does is it manages to show you what's attractive about the rave. you saw that was in black—and—white — there's a section when the music takes over it and goes into this explosion of colour, which reminded me of the hallucinogenic sequences from the ken russel‘s film, altered states, which i love. and it also has the grit of a shane meadows film — you believe in the characters and their lives, they‘ re really well played.
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and also had something to do with — it's set at the end of — 1994 is the dog end of rave culture. so it has that melancholia of withnail & i.
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