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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 21, 2019 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm carrie gracie. the headlines at eight: theresa may says mps have one last chance to deliver brexit and promises them a vote on another referendum, if they back her bill. the government will therefore include in the withdrawal agreement bill at introduction a requirement to vote on whether to hold a second referendum. and this must take place before the withdrawal agreement can be ratified. but the labour leader jeremy corbyn says his party would not support the bill, and says he can't see how it would get through parliament. we can't support this bill because it's basically a rehash of what was discussed before, and it doesn't make fundamental moves on market alignment or the customs union or indeed the protection of rights. also on the programme british steel
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workers wait to hear if a government rescue deal can save their company from collapse. the firm which employs almost 5,000 people is seeking an emergency whitehall loan, to help it deal with what it calls "brexit related issues". a thousand jobs are lost atjamie 0liver‘s restaurant chain, as it goes into administration the celebrity chef says he's deeply saddened. and a warning that english councils could face a funding shortfall of more than 50 billion pounds, unless extra cash is made available. theresa may has told mps they have "one last chance" to deliver a negotiated exit from the eu — as she set out what she described as a "new brexit deal".
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in an effort to win support for the withdrawal bill coming before parliament — she's promised mps that if they pass it — they will then get a vote on whether the public should get a say — in a referendum on the deal. there was also the promise of a vote on future customs arrangements. in the last hour some of the mps the prime minister was hoping to win over, have said they will not be voting for the bill. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg's report contains some flashing images. a strange —looking world. any sign of progress? a tory cabinet. any statement? do you think mps will buy with what you have agreed? trying to get them on side. do you have concessions that will tempt labour mps to vote for the deal? to breath life into an exhausted plan and an exhausted administration.
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are you still in the cabinet? after nearly three years it is so late in the day. was it a bumpy meeting? always fascinating. when her plan comes to a vote, few believe it is anything other than her last shot. the majority of mps say they want to deliver the results of the referendum so i think we need to help them find a way and i believe there is now one last chance to do that. today i am making a new offer — a new brexit deal. giving mps the say on the fraught issue of customs and acknowledging many of them want a chance to vote on another referendum. i do not believe this is a route we should take but i recognise the genuine and sincere strength of feeling across the house.
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the government will include in the withdrawal agreement bill at introduction a requirement to vote on whether to hold a second referendum. the prime minister cannot pretend. she might never be able to keep her promise of taking us out of the eu. i have compromised and now i ask you to compromise. we have been given a clear instruction by the people we are supposed to represent. so help me find a way to honour that instruction. move our country and our politics forward and build a better future that all of us want to see. you have had nearly three years. the opposition parties have already said they will not vote for this deal. isn't it simply too late for you to be offering a compromise? many mps simply do not want to listen.
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wait and look at the details of the bill and think about the importance of delivering brexit because this is the way that we can ratify an agreement and ensure that we leave the european union. theresa may's last efforts to win over parliament have been a parallel universe to what is playing out around the country. the european elections is in a matter of days. 0nly happening because the government has failed. tories and labour dangling with nerves. the smaller parties pushing clarity not compromise, standing to gain. parliament's melt down the back drop. labour will not give number 10 a way out. we will not support this bill because it is a rehash of what was discussed before and it does not make any fundamental moves on market alignment or the customs union or protection of rights. the commitment to give
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mps another vote on a referendum is not enough for those on that side. it senses the deal agreed by the cabinet would take scotland and the uk out of the european union and also out of the single market and the snp will not vote for a deal that does that. we will be voting against this. we want people to be able to stop brexit by having a people's vote. it is a compromise too far for those on the other. it is a hodgepodge of proposals, but the fundamental flaws remain. we have a remain prime minister saying to leavers we should make compromise towards a remain parliament. it is brexit in name only. it is something i will not be supporting. the vote is still more than a week away. the prime minister will not give up and minds could still change but rejection of this bundle of new measures may already have taken route.
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mps on off—side become coming forward to say it hasn't changed my mind, compromise is never easy but we have had a combination of months of mishandling by the government and number ten. but put that together with the swedes of mps who are refusing to give up on their particular dreams come either of a different kind of brexit or trying to stop brexit, a compromise might actually prove completely impossible. it is clear number ten feel this is the right thing to do and really their only option, but it is possible that theresa may it might actually have made things worse. we have been joined now by bronwen maddox, a director of the independent think tank the institute for government. what do you think? has she made things worse? probably, yes. but she has tried her very best, she put her something for everyone in a sense. she has moved to way. the second referendum is definitely a new, that was something she didn't want to
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contemplate at all very long ago. there is language on the customs you again which is pretty obscure and you can see why it didn't go very far to satisfy with the labour mps wanted. —— customs union. the trouble is there in some other places are talking about trying to bind the government to do something about the average backstop, she is giving something that isn't her gift to give, it would depend on the eu agreement. but here she is offering it as part of a banquet of little extras to get it over the line. you mentioned some complexities, we heard from hilary benn about an hour ago on the labour side, he was clearly saying a vote on the opportunity of a nether vote by the people is not enough, government needs to get behind that as an idea. talk us to what this comp government oi’ talk us to what this comp government or referendum, the extent to which the prime minister leaving us. she didn't want to do anything it so it so didn't want to do anything it so it
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soi didn't want to do anything it so it so i think we have to take this with some movement. she into these ten points as she says, changes that would be in the bill. 0ur points as she says, changes that would be in the bill. our commitment that mps can vote on whether or not they want to put this legislation to a second referendum. so that it is some movement. of course it depends on whether mps actually back that in the last time they came to the commons, it was defeated, not by that big a margin, the labour mp... it was the second most popular or least heavily defeated if you like. there was some support for her, but what she is calling for come actively to get behind it and she cannot do that very easily because immediately she said another referendum, all kinds of brexit meaning, mps, got a saying this is abhorrent, this destroys the whole possibility. —— coming out and
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saying. is she at least correct on the point that she made this is the last chance for a negotiated exit? she is and she is in. nothing is black and white in the world of brexit. it is the last time certainly she can bring a bill back. it will be the last time for some time the eu gets involved in negotiations because the eu is going to be grappling with the results of the european parliamentary elections. and then because of that, with the appointment of some of the key jobs with the appointment of some of the keyjobs in the eu, that goes onto a really 0ctober, things like head of the commission, the head of the central bank, all of that. they will not want to touch it. but in theory, commanded the leader could come back, a conservative leader, and a general election may be, and other later coming back and trying to come again. it will not be a lot of appetite for that in brussels. they look to the future and tell us what is the next thing then if this bill
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goes, if this goes down. if it is loaded down. what then? then i think there is enormous pressure for theresa may to step down. —— and voted down. she has not committed to that. she had talked about discussing a timetable but the pressure becomes overwhelming at that point. we would then formally finally be into what has been going on already, a conservative leadership contest. you will get mps from other mps trying to whittle it down to two candidates out of the vast number of who are jostling at the moment. and then the members, they will pick and you in it with a new leader. now, if that person can command a majority in the house of commons, maybe things go on. but if suppose it is borisjohnson, supposing some conservative mp said look, i really do not want to take the conservative whip went boris johnson as leader, as somebody
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indicated, he could find it all too ha rd to indicated, he could find it all too hard to get anything through the comments and you could be into a general election. thank you. we can speak conservative mp 0wen paterson — member of the european research group — and former northern ireland secretary. thank you forjoining us. how convincing did you find the prime minister's argument today. good evening. sadly, herspeech shows that the withdrawal agreement which isa that the withdrawal agreement which is a legally binding document, the international treaty, unchanged, i voted against that at every opportunity. and what this speech shows is that the bill will read carefully when it comes out, hash—tag gone lot of totally unacceptable extras. so we made it very clear in our election manifesto that we would leave the single market, we will leave the customs again, and we will leave the remit of the european court ofjustice. and here we are, looking towards a quote temporary customs union which will become a fixed part of our
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status, and on top of that, i think it is absolutely clear that mps are not going to vote for this, i think 23 mp5 i not going to vote for this, i think 23 mps i have looked at twitter, who voted at the last desperate stage, to get the agreement over the line for the 29th of march, they are now going to vote against it. jeremy corbyn you just saying he was going to vote against it in the scottish naturalist. so this speech will look at the details on the bill is published, it will make a bet agreement worse. i will be voting against it. any chance he prime minister has the last row of the die before early june to minister has the last row of the die before earlyjune to change it a nyway before earlyjune to change it anyway it makes a more acceptable to at least some groups of mps? no, i don't think so. it has all gone the wrong way. tens of thousand of people are starting to vote in the european election against the two establishment parties, the conservative party and the labour party. because they believe they
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have been misled. both of the main party said they would honour the referendum vote to leave. enter take back control. and the conservative party specifically to leave the single market. —— and to take back control. the labour party said similar things. they are not flocking to these meetings. do you think the eu election results will it change anything about what happens in westminster in the first week ofjune? yes, i think if the polls are right, astonish members of parliament. the results are announced by east district council. i'm bank holiday monday, mps can sit down and work out exactly what the pole would've been in their particular patch. i think mps come i said it before, it is after the ear
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and a large comfortable aeroplane, sitting in business class, a glass of champagne, drinking something nice, chatting away, a bit of extra noise as the wind whistled past the window, they don't realise is the engines are being turned off by the leader in this aeroplane is heading for the ground. unless we leave, the european union as we have promised on so many occasions, european union as we have promised on so many occasions, by the latest the 31st of october, i don't think anybody will be listening to the two main parties at all. we have to honour with those 17.4 million people voted for. it is quite obvious that every man parliament, a solid remained house of lords, but a predominantly remain house of commons is continually determined to thwart them. in trying to appease those remain mps as the prime minister has done this evening and we will see will get to read the details of the bill, will not wash. sockis details of the bill, will not wash. sock is one thing, what will happen
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thenif sock is one thing, what will happen then if the bill is defeated? —— shockis then if the bill is defeated? —— shock is one thing. what should happen and what will happen and what will you do to make something happen? there is a clear line and are manifesto stating in black and white, there will be denied by the chancellor tonight, no deal is better than a bad death wasn't what we should do is go back to the wide—ranging offer made by president tuskin wide—ranging offer made by president tusk in march 2018, for a wide ranging free—trade agreement, and to make it very clear that that is the destination to which we would like to go, we can trigger article 24 of the regulation that allows us to leave all existing regulations, tariffs, zero at the er is the moment, and we keep on the table to if they do not agree to that, we will leave at the 31st of october with no deal. that offer is what is attracting tens of thousands of people to an opposition start a party which has been going for five weeks. the two main parties better
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wa ke weeks. the two main parties better wake up to that. the chancellor has said this talk like that is knowingly inflicting damaging know there are potentially risk doing so, and there is a no mandate for a no deal. there clearly is no mandate for no dealfrom deal. there clearly is no mandate for no deal from westminster is there? there was a mandate from 17 point feel million people to leave and to take back control. —— 17.4 million people. the withdrawal agreement extracted and still binding after we have seen the details of this bill, it made even worse by the details announced in this speech tonight, does not take back control. we will have loss imposed by espy 27 countries come if we do not apply that lot to the satisfaction of the commission. —— loss imposed by force of we are out for a limited find by the european court ofjustice. that is not leaving or taking back control. that is being fully rumbled by the british people. that is why the deal is polling so abysmally low.
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british people. that is why the deal is polling so abysmally lowm british people. that is why the deal is polling so abysmally low. if the bill is defeated in the first week ofjune, what then should happen in your party? the prime minister must stand down, we need a new prime minister and a new cabinet determined to deliver leaving the european age again at their latest by the 31st of october this year. can it be more clear. thank you. —— could not be more clear. and we'll find out how this story , and many others, are covered in tomorrow's front pages(tx gfx)at 10:40 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are sebastian payne, the whitehall correspondent for the ft, and caroline wheeler, who's the deputy political editor from the sunday times. the headlines on bbc news... theresa may says mps have one last chance to deliver brexit, and promises them a vote on another referendum, if they back her bill. british steel workers wait to hear if a government rescue deal can save their company from collapse — almost 5,000 jobs could be at risk. a thousand jobs are lost atjamie 0liver‘s restaurant chain,
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as it goes into administration — the celebrity chef says he's deeply saddened. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's holly. good evening. we will start with cricket. england fast bowler liam plunkett says the inclusion of barbados born jofra archer in the world cup squad will make the team better. this morning the hosts confirmed their 15—man squad for the tournament, which begins next week. heartbreak for both david willey and joe denly — who miss out despite being named in the provisional team last month. since then, archer has impressed in the recent 0dis against pakistan. speaking at tonight's kit launch, his team mate plunkett says archer performed when he needed to. he was going so well, in terms of the good way, rolling the ball 93 miles an hour, he has really good
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assets and a superstar. just a lot of pressure on him as well, people didn't realise it is so much on him. he will come in to perform well. he does this event. credit to him. he came in he performed. i didn't feel any other of the squads to be honest, it could've been somebody else. but he is in the squad and he makes the team better. tributes are continuing for the three time formula 1 champion nikki lauda who's died at the age of 70. he was one of the best—known figures in motor racing, winning the title for ferrari in 1975 and 77 and for mclaren in 1984. he'll be remembered for his remarkable recovery and return to racing just 40 days after a crash that nearly claimed his life. former world champion sirjackie stewart says the austrian made a huge contribution to the sport. he wasjust a he was just a huge asset. —— a huge accident. built like a mechanical failure. he was trapped in the car in the car was on fire. it had been
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a high—speed accident at the same time. several drivers help to get him out of the car, he was still badly burned, but i think what happened there with the inhalation of toxics as well as he, is because of toxics as well as he, is because of him that no longer being with us. he died twice as i understand. at the time i was around. and he got jump—started twice, here he came through it all, came back to racing, probably with the most brave performance i've ever seen. did a good time to mccain making in i was there when he took his helmet off, he was bleeding badly. he must have beenin he was bleeding badly. he must have been in considerable discomfort and pain. yet, he went back out again and infact pain. yet, he went back out again and in fact raced, two people would have rather done that. —— few people would ever have done that.
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the head of the azerbaijan football assoication says he's disappointed that arsenal's henrikh mkhitaryan has decided not to play in the europa league final. it's understood the arsenal midfielder feared for his safety on the pitch in baku due to political tensions between azerbaijan and armenia. fa says the organisation has done everything to ensure his safety. really disappointed to see the statement from arsenal about the armenian player. because we have tried to do our best and on behalf of the government as well as local organising communities, we give all the guarantees to the club and fa but this was a personal decision of the player, with his family. the entry list for the singles at wimbledon has been published this evening — no surprise that andy murray's name does not appear. the two—time champion had effectively ruled out competing in the singles tournament this season following another hip operation in january. he could still receive a widlcard
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entry to the championships however it's more likely the former world number one will compete in the doubles. johanna konta, kyle edmund, cameron norrie and dan evans are the only british players to gain direct entry. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in sportsday at half past ten. thank you. there's a legal challenge today to the way police forces use automated facial recognition surveillance. ed bridges, whose picture was taken while he was out shopping in cardiff, is arguing that south wales police unlawfully violated his privacy. supported by the campaign group liberty, he argues that the lack of regulation around the use of the technology breaches human rights. our legal correspondent clive coleman reports. this is a police demonstration of automatic facial recognition. cameras take a biometric map of the faces of everyone who passes the camera. these are uniquely identifiable to the individual who is then checked against watchlists. the technology has been used by three police forces,
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most notably south wales. in 2017, ed bridges had his image captured. i popped out of the office to go and buy a sandwich, do a bit of christmas shopping and on the main pedestrian shopping street in cardiff was a police van. and by the time i was close enough to see the words automatic facial recognition technology on the van, i'd already had my data captured by it that struck me as quite a fundamental invasion of my privacy. considering the power of automated facial recognition to capture the biometric data of vast numbers of us without our consent as we go about our everyday business in public places, it's remarkable that currently, there is no regulation in place to govern the way that the police use it. so it's just like taking off them without their knowledge or consent, their dna, or theirfingerprint. it doesn't have any
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place on our streets. but many, including this senior former security official, disagree. the police have got a major problem with reducing resources and a growing number of people with terrorist sympathies and also, major criminals on our streets who should be behind bars. it's one tool that will help them put them behind bars and that's what we want to stay safe. the legal challenge seeks a declaration that automatic facial recognition breaches privacy, data protection and equality laws. last year, south wales police said its use was lawful and proportionate. the case now involves the home office and information commissioner and could provide critical guidance on if and when, it's lawful to use the technology. clive coleman, bbc news. we're joined now by megan goulding, ed bridges‘ lawyer at liberty. just to clarify, are you trying to
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get clarity on the regulations or do you want them tightened up? good evening. liberties view is that this technology has no place on our streets. and the reason we say that is because it is inherently disproportionate. so the police say they are using it to look for serious criminals, but that is not really the case. they have to watch list of all sorts of people and for example in the past, they were looking for people with mental health conditions. but even if you are not on a watch list, then you are not on a watch list, then you are still having your biometric data taken from you if you walk past the camera. and that happens without your knowledge or your consent. so thatis your knowledge or your consent. so that is why we say this kind of technology belongs in a police state, and not a democracy like oui’s. state, and not a democracy like ours. to your first point, could the police not argue well, we could be tightened up the regulations around
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the watchlist and make sure that it is just the watchlist and make sure that it isjust a the watchlist and make sure that it is just a watch list for serious criminals, terrorist suspects etc, rather than pickpockets or mild criminal behaviour? but that does not answer the problem of how this technology works. by taking biometric data off of many thousands of people, that is is intention. it is trying to scan large crowds of people come and without their knowledge or consent, taking something akin to the nar fingerprints off them. and there is also another concern around the discriminate leigh discriminatory nature of this technology. studies show that technology mis—identifies a women and people of colour much more often then a white man. and that problem cannot be answered by law or regulation. presumably that problem, we'll go back to the previous problem, that problem could be answered by a greater sophistication for technology. well,
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at the moment, at the way that technology is trained inherent is that if the discrimination, it is trained on white male faces. why couldn't it just be trained on white male faces. why couldn't itjust be trained on the faces of people of colour or on the faces of people of colour or on the faces of people of colour or on the faces of women? the point is that is not happening. the way it is being used now by police forces in the uk is discriminating against women and the people of colour. very quickly come on the previous problem you mention, about the unwitting and unacknowledged taking up people possibly data, if the technology destroyed the image as soon assets to establish there was no with a terrorist suspect or other serious criminal, would you be happy with that christmas the point is that is not is how it is being used the police. there is no law or regulation in place to govern how they deal with your data that once they deal with your data that once they collected. but in any event come as a person walking down my
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high street, i should not have to get over my biometric data and the first place and certainly not without knowing about it or consenting to it. thank you for joining us. thousands of british steel workers are waiting to hear if it can secure a 30 million pound rescue deal from the government. the company — which employs more than 3,000 people in scunthorpe and around 800 on teesside — is on the brink of collapse. another 20,000 jobs in its supply chain — are also at risk. our business correspondent colleta smith reports. alan's got a day off from the blast furnaces today, but work is still the only thing on his mind. we were being told one minute people were losing theirjobs, then the next minute, it's not happening. it's just frustrating, obviously not knowing your future, and obviously if it happens here, what do you have to do? do you have to look to move elsewhere, to try and get a job elsewhere, or do you try and stay here and find a job and just struggle on and survive? i don't know. you've got kids, then, in schools here? yeah. that are settled.
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yeah, i've got a seven—year—old, she's got a six—year—old, and obviously we've got a nine—year—old as well. that's a big impact on the family and all of them, isn't it? it's a massive upheaval for everybody. but then the other thing is, do you look at working away and not see your kids? i don't know. the town's just going to shut down because nobody's going to be in work and it's going to be like a ghost town. what are we going to do with the steelworks? turn it into a theme park? companies like yourselves, then, are brought in to do other work... it's a massive knock—on effect for us. we don't even know whether we will get paid for thejob we are doing now, and we've got a lot more work up and coming. the company had plans to extend their production lines this autumn, but now that future is farfrom certain. they've already had one loan from the government and today they were asking for another. it will buy us some time but it's not a long—term solution. personally, i think the right solution would be a temporary nationalisation. we are not talking forever,
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but it would give us that period of calm certainty where we can rebuild the business, get it back on an even keel, make it sustainable and get back to where we were pre—2008 crash, because we have yet to come out of that recession. the government say they've ruled out nationalisation, but are still working to try and save the company. subject to strict legal bounds, the government will leave no stone unturned in its support for the steel industry. the business say they need the cash to keep the furnaces burning until there is a brexit deal, but that staff will get this month's pay cheque — a small relief to the thousands of families depending on those wages. coletta smith, bbc news, in scunthorpe. now it's time for a look at the weather with mel coles. good evening. it's been a fine end of the day for many places with evening sunshine around but we've also have some quite heavy showers affecting eastern scotland, we had
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reports of thunder here and they are starting to inch their way into north east england gradually fading as the night goes on. we will keep the rain going to swell, northern scotla nd the rain going to swell, northern scotland quite patchy with some more cloud and cloudy zone working into north wales in northwest england in the north midlands. clear skies, quite chilly, missed around perhaps in some spots on wednesday morning. that rain will be quite persistent to the norther aisles, gradually sinking further south with the day and that cloudy zone stretching from north wales over to lincolnshire may produce some drizzle. but many places remaining dry. a little bit breezy up towards northern scotland come elsewhere, the ones will tend to be fairly light, feeling warm in the sunshine once again. particularly down towards the far south and east of england where we will see highs of 21 celsius. hello this is bbc news with carrie gracie. the headlines... theresa may says mps have one last chance to deliver brexit —
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and promises them a vote on another referendum, if they back her bill. the government will therefore include in that withdrawal agreement bill at introduction a requirement to vote on whether to hold a second referendum. and this must take place before the withdrawal agreement can be ratified. but the labour leader jeremy corbyn says his party would not support the bill, and says he can't see how it would get through parliament. we can't support this bill because it's basically a rehash of what was discussed before and it does not make any fundamental moves on market alignment or customs union or indeed protection of rights. british steel workers wait to hear if a government rescue deal can save their company from collapse — almost 5,000 jobs could be at risk. a thousand jobs are lost atjamie 0liver‘s restaurant chain, as it goes into administration — the celebrity chef says he's deeply saddened.
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and coming up, a warning that english councils could face a funding shortfall of more than 50 billion pounds, unless extra cash is made available. let's return to events in westminster — as theresa may tells mps that they have "one last chance" to deliver brexit, urging them to back what she said was a new deal. the prime minister said mps will get a vote on whether to hold another referendum. and a vote on further customs arrangements. as well as guarantees on environmental protections and the northern irish border. if the prime minister goes ahead with another vote on her deal, it'll be the fourth time. she lost the first meaningful vote by 230, a record in recent parliamentary history. the second vote on the 12th march, fell by a smaller defeat of 149. and the most recent vote, on the 29th march, the day the uk were supposed to the leave the eu, lost by 58 votes. let's speak to our political
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correspondent chris mason. chris, it's another extraordinary day and it only seems to be getting worse for the prime minister.m does you are looking at the brutal arithmetic from downing street perspective of the last few attempts to try and get her plan through parliament and you look at it again and you look at the range of reaction there has been to the speech, and the map if anything seems to be getting worried for teresa may. ultimately it boils down to simple calculation, who are the switchers? antedate the answer seems be nobody. not to say that there may not be once people look at the specifics at the detail of the spell and we get hold of the specifics and we see a kind of written down version of the bell, but the simple reality is when you look at those who are being flooded with in this
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speech, the likes of the labour mp who was talked in the past about wanting to see brexit delivery, the prime minister spoke and referred directly to her and the speech and yet she has since said she did not think it added up to adapt to persuade her across that we know the opposition from the labour leader jeremy corbyn and the fnp as well and dup, boston conservative brexiteers who backed it up and in previous those are now saying they will not back it and at the final boat as far as the prime minister is concerned that i think that tonight, looks like shall be defeated and defeated heavily again. possibly, after a defeat at the european elections, later this week. opinion polls suggest it's a great night for the conservatives on thursday, we will not get results until sunday and monday, because at that price if you're our boating thursday through
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sunday, so it is a deferred best delay between our appointment between boxes in the uk financial results, night pay act, opinion polls have to be treated skeptically but that is consistent trend suggesting that labour will not do well at night —— and conservatives would be particularly badly and nigel farage brexit party will do well, perhaps some of those are offering unadulterated pro ems is like the liberal democrats and the fnp. they might do relatively well with a clear proposition of basic, so with a clear proposition of basic, so yeah, the focus at westminster, i must conservative mps is shifting beyond that that boat as we anticipated in a few weeks' time on this which i'll agreement dale, will be that as a race to be in xpm, and the intriguing thing around that is that the next prime minister will face the same at the comments as a current prime minister dies and u nless current prime minister dies and unless they get another general
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election, —— dies, that's a prospect that i hung up parliament is returned again. . the green party mp caroline lucas described my response to the prime minister statement is essentially is that what she is doing is repackaging an old deal. she's reheating the same thing essentially. the bottom line as far mps like myself is that we want to see a people's vote as an absolute integral part of this package. we are not prepared to vote in favour of it on the grounds there may be a people's vote somewhere down the line. what we have to have his democracy built into it, you can't basically put strings attached to democracy. the brexit party leader, nigel farage, has attacked theresa may's latest version of her brexit deal, which she unveiled earlier today. she said mps could vote on holding a confirmatory referendum if they backed her plans next month. mr farage made his comments tonight at a rally in west london for the european elections.
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she surrendered virtually everything, signed into customs union, surrounded to single market rules, and the icing on the cake, if you vote for her idea, then a chance at having a second referendum. if there are any conservatives out there are any conservatives out there who are your sceptics and believe in democratic process and we re believe in democratic process and were haft thinking about voting for the conservatives on thursday, and the conservatives on thursday, and the european elections, you have just been told you are not wanted, but i know where they can go, the brexit party. local councils in england could be facing a multi—billion pound funding gap — according to an independent review of their finances. it was commissioned by the organisation representing large county councils and says demand for services such as social care will increase
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in the next few years. unless more money is provided — it suggests that councils could face a shortfall of more more than £51 billon pounds by 2025. even if council tax is increased by almost three per cent — there could still be a 30 billion pound gap over the five years from 2020. the government says this year's local government settlement has included extra funding for services. alex forsyth reports from staffordshire. rona is 91 years old. she moved into this apartment with her husband alf before he died two years ago. when i came here i thought, "this is a new life for me." i'd be really down in the dumps if i had to live on my own where i was. because you didn't see anyone. part—funded by the council, this facility provides extra support and specialist care as it's needed. you can go and play cards and dominoes, and we have social evenings, we have quiz nights.
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it's my world now, it's my life. here, the focus is on keeping people independent as long as possible — in part, to ease pressure on the strained social care system. staffordshire, like councils across england, has had to cut spending while demand for care has grown. above all, what we do really need is a proper adult cross—party debate about the funding, future funding of adult social care. it can't really fall on the council tax payer and the business rate payer of an area like staffordshire. new analysis by the body that represents county councils says even if authorities raise tax, they'll face a shortfall in coming years. the government has given councils more money to help with the costs of social care, and it's working on a new funding system to make things fairer. but this report says unless there's extra funding across the board,
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some authorities will soon have to stop providing anything but the bare minimum. already across the country, community groups have stepped in to support services like libraries and community centres. it's been a long battle... in north staffordshire, with council support, residents plan to reopen and run this sports centre which closed two years ago. there is nothing around here. there is no other community facility in the borough. when you've got an area like kidsgrove that really can utilise and make use of a fantastic facility like this, it's something we've got to invest in. but with more people needing care, budgets are tight. the government says councils have had more to spend this year and it's up to them to manage their resources. that means tough choices about where the support goes. alex forsyth, bbc news, staffordshire. we have now beenjoined by councillor martin hill, who is the leader of lincolnshire county council.
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thank you forjoining us, do you share the experience we heard from staffordshire? very much so, we welcome that a comprehensive and detailed reports that had been done which went into quite a scientific basis, and he clearly shows that u nless we basis, and he clearly shows that unless we are put in a more sustainable funding and more money is put into the local government, we will be in trouble and i think the report also shows county councils in particular, first of all suffered the most of her recent productions and funding and again they are least able in the future to see the way through unless they get a sustainable amount of extra money in the future years and. re-signed stop picture and that report that community groups had been stepping up community groups had been stepping up to provide services that counsellors can load longer manage, is not part of the answer?”
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counsellors can load longer manage, is not part of the answer? i think for example in lincolnshire we have lots of voluntary run libraries now, they did that sort of thing, that we also work with volunteers as well but one of the crisis we are facing as adults and children with very complex needs, they had difficult needs that need intensive support, that sort of thing can't be picked up that sort of thing can't be picked up by that sort of thing can't be picked up by volunteers it has to be done by professional people doing a difficultjob for these by professional people doing a difficult job for these people by professional people doing a difficultjob for these people who u nfortu nately a re difficultjob for these people who unfortunately are not living longer these days it. if it's a clear message that more sustainable funding is necessary, are you knocking at an open door in westminster? i think the trouble is if there is a copy of of the price of government looking defences, they are also looking for extra funding but i think what government accepts and many corridors for local government deliver is very vital services to vulnerable people across the board, and it's very important
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that we've taken a large share of the savings over the last nearly ten yea rs, the savings over the last nearly ten years, and it's time now that sustainable resources are put into local government and county councils in particular. thank you forjoining us. the european parliament is to consider whether nigel farage broke its rules, by accepting money from the businessman and leave campaigner arron banks. the brexit party leader took 450—thousand pounds from mr banks but denies wrongdoing. the celebrity chef jamie 0liver‘s restaurant chain has gone into administration, putting more than a thousand jobs at risk. the company includes 23 jamie's italian outlets, as well as the restaurants fifteen and barbecoa. it had been seeking a buyer in recent months. jamie oliver says he is deeply saddened by the news, as our business correspondent emma simpson reports. so, what you get... from the cheeky new chef on the block... look at that! ..to campaigner, tv star and books, jamie oliver has built an empire as britain's most successful chef. and he opened dozens
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of restaurants too. come in and see us at jamie's italian. nothing was being served up today, though. his restaurant business collapsed, 22 outlets closed with immediate effect. around 1,000 jobs lost. in a statement, jamie oliver said... so, what went wrong? itjust got a bit too chain... chainy. chainy. yeah. whereas just around here, there are so many quirky little restaurants, and just one—offs that you can go to. not really the kind of place that stands out to me as somewhere i'd want to spend my money. there are so many other great places around, so much competition. today's news isn't a total surprise. this chain almost went bust a couple of years ago. jamie oliver put in £13 million
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of his own money to save it. 12 outlets already closed last year in a restructuring plan. but it's clear that turnaround hasn't worked. it has been tough for lots of other casual dining chains too. prezzo, byron, carluccio's, just some of the brands that have had to close outlets, counting the cost of overexpansion. mid—market restaurants are being squeezed at both ends. they are finding it quite hard to make money at this time. if they are not offering exactly what consumers want, then they find they can't make money because the cost of wages, the cost of business rates and the cost of running promotions to get people through the door are simply too much. we are going to fry that off... his other businesses may be thriving, but it seems jamie 0liver‘s restaurants weren't able to keep up with changing tastes in what's become an increasingly crowded market. emma simpson, bbc news. now, back to british steel, as thousands of workers wait to hear if it can secure a 30 million pound
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rescue deal from the government. earlier i spoke to matthew lesh, from the free market think tank the adam smith institute, and alasdair mcdiarmid, from the community union — i started by asking him why the government should save british steel. well clearly steel is a strategic industry and of vital importance to the uk economy, it sits at the bottom and other industries is automotive air and space 30,000 people employed over thousands and the supply chain is are qualityjobs that pay well, and barren areas of the country where opportunities are relatively limited, it's vital. strong are you and? knowing should be in the way of anyone's job but we have to consider whether we use taxpayer money, what amount to about £37,000 per worker to bail out a private company. if any at a private company can make a profit, it can't
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deliver good by it does best people i 0liver business and that went bankrupt nobody wants to bail out his business so there is no particularly strong argument. the first yell at the point of strategic industry, but is still in total is 0.1% of the economy and their .7% of its manufacturing, it's not a major industry by any sense, it's not still available elsewhere so it's required where people choose to buy. i suppose things small but they are essential. i'm not saying they're bad, if we want date diversify access to stealing ability to trade and get the highest quality still people want not be subsidizing small numberof people want not be subsidizing small number ofjobs. i don't think people want not be subsidizing small number of jobs. i don't think that it's clear to spot academic there but we need to remember is what's the state, 5000 directjobs over 20,000 jobs in the supply chain. the deal would not disappoint because he
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says jamie oliver restaurant are going under, some of thosejobs says jamie oliver restaurant are going under, some of those jobs are at risk, why would we support these jobs and this community and not another if it's a private company should take the hit. i argue intervention we talk about today's excellent value for taxpayer, it's still very possibly deal can be done it is difficult, we are talking about packages of support, approximately 30 million from lenders and government, and talks had broken down a little about how the shareholder and owner is removed from business but alternative to doing that could be disastrous he could be talking about clean—up costs a nd could be talking about clean—up costs and the taxpayer putting the belt to £1 billion. we're talking about redundancy payments wages holiday pay all that sort of thing not to mention regenerating the site after the catastrophe we sell what has happened so we can't let it happen again. all in all when you counted the cost, to take his point that it's a good deal for the taxpayer. let's be clear about where
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this money is going, ill prop up the equity firm that owns british steel i don't think it's a good use of taxpayer money at all, i think we are much better if we want to help the workers to support programmes to retrain and spot programmes for real occasions or retrain and spot programmes for real occasions or even retrain and spot programmes for real occasions or even payments that are nothing typical of the subsidizing of my old dairy industry, when we should talk about getting people intojobs and should talk about getting people into jobs and building should talk about getting people intojobs and building skills should talk about getting people into jobs and building skills for the future not the past. take those points, first propping up capital. we are not talking about direct label b talking about coming to a solution which enables the business could to continue an absence of grey while because i don't think anyone thinks they had the saviours of the industry are part of a long—term solution we are talking about putting in place measures to give us some time perhaps a few months to find long—term solutions to challenges that they face and i don't think. and yet i don't think. and yet second point, if you're going to spend money on these
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communities, spend it on future jobs, on retraining these people are doing something constructive rather than dirty old industry which should be the last. century to start off with, i take exception to the dirty old industry, ithink with, i take exception to the dirty old industry, i think the steel industry is part i —— part of high—tech feature, some of the scale we make is vitalfor things high—tech feature, some of the scale we make is vital for things like car batteries and ultralight car making. but in terms of the point about spending money on retraining rather than propping up industries, look at what's happened at fsr, we lost 2000 direct jobs what's happened at fsr, we lost 2000 directjobs and 5000 in the supply chain, thosejobs directjobs and 5000 in the supply chain, those jobs have directjobs and 5000 in the supply chain, thosejobs have not been replaced, we are talking about very low pay low skill jobs replaced, we are talking about very low pay low skilljobs coming in to replace those jobs and things like call centres and logistics is not the samejob call centres and logistics is not the same job site out there does not work. pecos points matthew, it's not a gaelic consistory is essential in the 21st century and it's not dirty. we know that of christ there is a hard—hitting industry that is known
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that there, i think on top of that we had the fact that ultimately they're asking for £30 million today we don't know how much it's going to be next week or next year, if they be next week or next year, if they be constant demand for bad light —— spell out and we are going to spend my may try to keep industry life rather than framing people up from out rather than framing people up from our entrepreneur purposes. well he knows when people pay redundancy payments is how high they are the chances people end up starting their own business for example rather than being dependent on the previous business. there are alternatives here. but are there because he seems to be saying if you look of previous examples, the idea that people could be retrained in these communities for as good skill thatjobs is a map. training is only part of the puzzle here that we have to talk about relocation realistically people have not lived in the areas for them alive some people have come to chef port for steel and if it's the end for the future people need to consider moving elsewhere,
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ultimately we do pay, we did that it when get that money and let them decide what the future is rather than trying to keep them trapped in an old job than trying to keep them trapped in an oldjob and than trying to keep them trapped in an old job and it people to build skills that are going to be useful in the future and before he falls down. take that argument. i disagree, it's unrealistic to ask people to relocate. except in the pa rt people to relocate. except in the part of the steel industry around scunthorpe part of the steel industry around scu nthorpe and teesside part of the steel industry around scunthorpe and teesside where those jobs are vitalfor scunthorpe and teesside where those jobs are vital for —— vital for driving up by the economy and asking people to move huge distances is i think impractical. i like to respond also to the idea that what happens next, the taxpayers propping up pretty steely forever in a day and that's not the case. what we are talking about is targeting short—term intervention to help the business get through a particularly challenging period brought by adverse government policy and the failure to resolve brexit and the related difficulties that followed.
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as we head towards next year's tokyo olympic games teams are trying to do all they can to get the best out of their female athletes. there's a focus on something which has been a bit of a taboo subject. periods, and whether or not you're at more risk of injury at that time of the month. as part of the bbc‘s change the game season, natalie pirks reports. jordan would have been one of the first names on the team sheet for this summer while tapping france. instead, injury and in her dream. this summer while tapping france. instead, injury and in her dreamlj instead, injury and in her dream.” heard it pop and the first words where i'm going to miss the world cup. it was the anterior crucial ligament in or near doctor say they wa nt ligament in or near doctor say they want able to let her play again until august was it bad luck or something else? i was really tired that weekend that first day of my menstrual cycle and i think it
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played a huge part in me doing in my knee. high oestrogen levels i think -- i think knee. high oestrogen levels i think —— i think stability and joints making them looser and some study showed major knee injuries like the onejordan showed major knee injuries like the one jordan suffered are showed major knee injuries like the onejordan suffered are more common and specific points of a woman cycle. the next those hormones are powerful and he don't taken into consideration and use them for the opportunities they provide, and address some of the challenges that they're out, you are missing a massive part of the performance jigsaw. many sports and you already see the bigger picture and the lead up see the bigger picture and the lead up to the real 0lympics, that british hockey team used an app to track the periods and adjust their training accordingly. it's not a case of having a day off like that it was a case of actually cheese on day one so let's have an understanding, she's going to train number on the pitch hockey wise but if we reduce may be a few reps in the writing session or kilograms
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that she was list —— lifting, it will benefit her in the long term. more research is needed, a new campaign aims to better understand the menstrual cycle effect on performance before next years it took a 0lympics where for the first time, that same amount that metals will be available for men and women. the mac i'm sure there are many people who have had a huge benefit early in their career and if it's an area we improve on then we can people had that sensational desk about next summer. for so long discussing periods was taboo and malik improve the difference between sporting failure or success. now it's time for a look at the weather with mel coles. good evening. it's a fine end to the day for many places, with some evening sunshine around but we've also have some quite heavy showers affecting eastern scotland, we've had reports of thunder here and they are starting to edge their way into northeast england, gradually fading as the night goes on.
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we will keep the rain going as well for northern scotland, quite patchy with some more cloud and a cloudy zone working into north wales, northwest england and the north midlands. clear skies, quite chilly, some mist around perhaps in some spots on wednesday morning. that rain will be quite persistent through the northern isles, gradually sinking further south in the day and that cloudy zone stretching from north wales over to lincolnshire may produce some drizzle. but many places remaining dry. a little bit breezier up towards northern scotland. elsewhere, the winds will tend to be fairly light, feeling warm in the sunshine once again, particularly down towards the far south and east of england, where we will see highs of 21 celsius.
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hello, i'm ros atkins and this is 0utside source. we're live in berlin. we are moving around the eu all week long ahead of the parliamentary elections. yesterday we were in the old town of warsaw. this evening, the centre are brother in front of germany second house of parliament. we will look at german policy how it fits into european parliaments across the hour. also talking about brexit muh today theresa may confirmed there will be a further vote on her brexit withdrawal deal in earlyjune. the government will therefore include in that withdrawal agreement bill at introduction a requirement to vote on whether to hold a second referendum.

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