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tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  May 21, 2019 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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tonight at ten — despite theresa may offering what she calls a "new deal" over brexit, labour and some conservative mps, labour and some conservative mps say they won't back her proposals for leaving the eu. she says parliament has one last chance to deliver brexit and offered concessions including a vote on another referendum. to every mp of every party — i have compromised. now, i ask you to compromise, too. we can't support this bill because it's basically a rehash of what was discussed before. mps are due to vote on mrs may's brexit plans, early next month. also tonight... the government is asked to step in again to bail out british steel to prevent a company collapse.
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simple food but made with love. come in and see us. he says he exhausted every option to save his business, but jamie oliver's restaurant group goes into administration. hungary's far right populists leading the charge against immigration, as the eu chooses a new parliament. voters are being bombarded with this message to stop migration. and this is a country where last year, there were fewer than 700 asylum seekers. and — he endured a horrific crash but was back racing just weeks later. now, the world pays tribute to niki lauda, who's died at the age of 70. and coming up on sportsday on bbc news — as arsenal's mkhitaryan decides not to play in the europa league final over security fears, the azerbaijan fa tells us politics and sport should stay separate.
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good evening. despite offering what she calls a "new deal" over brexit, labour and several conservative mps say they won't be backing theresa may's proposals for leaving the european union, with the commons due to vote on her plans early next month. theresa may warned today that mps have "one last chance" to deliver a negotiated exit from the eu, and in an effort to win support, she promised mps that if it passes, they'll get a vote on whether to hold a referendum on the final deal. there was also the promise of a vote on future customs arrangements. and new guarantees on workers' rights. butjeremy corbyn says labour won't support the bill because it doesn't go far enough, while some conservatives say they‘ re unhappy because they believe mrs may's gone too far in making concessions. here's our political editor, laura kuenssburg.
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a strange—looking world... any sign of progress? a tory cabinet, cloistered for hours... any agreement, secretary of state, on what you will offer the labour party? chewing over how much to offer labour to get them on side... foreign secretary, do you think you have concessions that will tempt labour mps to vote for the deal? to try and breath life into an exhausted plan and an exhausted administration... dr fox, are you still in the cabinet? to take us out of the eu by summer. after nearly three years, it is oh, so late in the day. always fascinating. win or lose, few in the political goldfish bowl, or perhaps the audience at this london business, or maybe among you, believe it is anything other than her last shot. the majority of mps say they want to deliver the result of the referendum. so i think we need to help them find a way and i believe there is now one
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last chance to do that. today, i am making a serious offer to mps across parliament — a new brexit deal. newly packaged up together, but familiar promises. extra protection for workers' rights and the environment, giving mps the say on the fraught issue of customs and acknowledging many of them want a chance at least to vote on another referendum. i do not believe this is a route we should take, but i recognise the genuine and sincere strength of feeling across the house on this important issue. the government will therefore include in the withdrawal agreement bill, at introduction, a requirement to vote on whether to hold a second referendum. the prime minister, though, cannot pretend. she might never be able to keep her promise of taking us out of the eu. i have compromised. now i ask you to compromise, too. we've been given a clear instruction by the people we are supposed to represent. so, help me find a way
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to honour that instruction. move our country and our politics forward and build the better future that all of us want to see. thank you. you've had nearly three years. but the opposition parties have already said they will not vote for this deal. isn't it simply too late for you to be offering a compromise? many mps simply do not want to listen. wait and look at the details of the bill and think about the importance of delivering brexit, because this is the way that we can ratify an agreement and ensure that we leave the european union. theresa may's last efforts to win over parliament feel a parallel universe to what is playing out around the country. the european elections in a matter of days. only happening because the government has failed. tories and labour both jangling with nerves as smaller parties,
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pushing clarity, not compromise, stand to gain. voters will give a verdict with parliament's meltdown the back drop. parliament's meltdown the backdrop. labour won't give number ten a way out. we can't support this bill because it's basically a rehash of what was discussed before and it does not make any fundamental moves on market alignment or the customs union or protection of rights. the commitment to give mps another vote on a referendum is not enough for those on that side. well, the deal agreed by the cabinet would take scotland and the uk out of the european union but also out of the single market and the snp will not vote for a deal that does that. we will be voting against this. what we want is people to be able to stop brexit by having a people's vote. but it's a compromise too far for those on the other. it's a hodgepodge of proposals, but the fundamental flaws in the withdrawal treaty remain.
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we've got a remain prime minister saying to leavers that we should make compromises towards a remain parliament. it's a brexit in name only trap, and is something i will not be supporting. the vote is still more than a week away. the prime minister won't give up and minds could still change, but rejection of this bundle of new measures may already have taken root. given the concessions and compromises mrs may says she has made to her deal, and given the response to it so far, is it dead before it even gets to the house this time next month?” before it even gets to the house this time next month? i inside no 10, you have to be an optimist of herculean proportions to think that somehow they've made a case which is going to deliver them victory as an when this comes to the commons, probably at the end of this week. and i think today, really, we've seen more and i think today, really, we've seen more evidence of a theme that we have seen so seen more evidence of a theme that we have seen so many seen more evidence of a theme that we have seen so many times during
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theresa may's leadership, that by trying to please everyone, this time including the official opposition and other smaller parties, she's ended up pleasing no—one. and several ministers have said to me tonight, and plenty of other mps have said, that actually this speech today, this package of proposals, makes things worse rather than better. but for numeral, they believe that while it be difficult, this is still the right thing to do. and unless you are someone who is trying to stop brexit, like the protester down behind me, or you are someone protester down behind me, or you are someone who protester down behind me, or you are someone who wants protester down behind me, or you are someone who wants to leave without a deal, well, this is the only way that they see in front of them to do it. it is right that if this bill falls, if it doesn't even get to the later stages of legislation, there is simplya later stages of legislation, there is simply a big question about what would happen next. but i think right now, the risk of more uncertainty does not mean that mps are suddenly going to fall in line. and it would
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bea going to fall in line. and it would be a political achievement of death—defying success for no 10 actually to get their way. laura kuenssberg, thank you for that. thousands of british steel workers, are waiting to hear if the company can secure a £30 million rescue deal from the government. the business, which employs more than 3,000 people in scunthorpe, and around 800 on teesside, is on the brink of collapse unless it receives emergency funding to weather what the company calls brexit related issues. our business correspondent colleta smith is in scunthorpe for us tonight. clive, pressure is only increasing on british steel tonight. we understand they‘ re still on british steel tonight. we understand they're still in discussions with the government in the hope of another bailout. they have already had a cash injection a couple of weeks ago here at this plant. now they want more, to cover a drop in orders that they say is caused by brexit uncertainty. it's impossible to overemphasise just how
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significant this plant is to the town. scunthorpe significant this plant is to the town. scu nthorpe orbits significant this plant is to the town. scunthorpe orbits around these steelworks, and that means for the thousands impacted, no news today means another sleepless night. alan's got a day off from the blast furnaces today, but work is still the only thing on his mind. we were being told one minute people were losing theirjobs, then the next minute, it's not happening. it's just frustrating, obviously not knowing your future, and obviously if it happens here, what do you have to do? do you have to look to move elsewhere, to try and get a job elsewhere, or do you try and stay here and find a job and just struggle on and survive? i don't know. you've got kids, then, in schools here? yeah. that are settled. yeah, i've got a seven—year—old, she's got a six—year—old, and obviously we've got a nine—year—old as well. that's a big impact on the family and all of them, isn't it? it is, it's a massive upheaval for everybody. but then the other thing is, do you look at working away and not see your kids? i don't know. the town's just going to shut down because nobody's going to be in work
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and it's going to be like a ghost town. what are we going to do with the steelworks? turn it into a theme park? companies like yourselves, then, are brought in to do other work... it's a massive knock—on effect for us. we don't even know whether we'll get paid for the job we're doing now, and we've got a lot more work up and coming there. the company had plans to extend their production lines this autumn, but now, that future is far from certain. they've already had one loan from the government, and today they were asking for another. it will buy us some time but it's not a long—term solution. personally, i think the right solution would be a temporary nationalisation. we're not talking forever, but it would give us that period of calm and certainty where we could rebuild the business, get it back on an even keel, make it sustainable and get back to where we were, well, pre—2008 crash, because we've yet to come out of that recession. the government say they've ruled out nationalisation but are still working to try
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and save the company. subject to strict legal bounds, the government will leave no stone unturned in its support for the steel industry. the business say they need the cash to keep the furnaces burning until there's a brexit deal, but that staff will get this month's pay cheque — a small relief to the thousands of families depending on those wages. coletta smith, bbc news, in scu nthorpe. our business editor simon jack is here. simon, given all this, does british steelmaking still have a future? 0bviously, steelmaking still have a future? obviously, there is a hugely proud tradition of steelmaking in this country and scu nthorpe tradition of steelmaking in this country and scunthorpe has been a big part of that. but the truth is, it has been in long—term serious decline. if you look at this graph, it will show you how many people used to be employed in the steel industry in the 19705, and how many are now. it is now 10% of what it was are now. it is now 10% of what it wa5 a0 yea r5 are now. it is now 10% of what it wa5 a0 years ago. part of that is deindustriali5ation over the last
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few yea r5, deindustriali5ation over the last few years, the other reason is very stiff international competition. thi5 stiff international competition. this particular graph will show you china dwarfing... this particular graph will show you china dwarfing. .. thi5 this particular graph will show you china dwarfing... this was 2016. in the last two years, china has produced more steel than the uk has in its entire history. so, that's what you're up against, and it is against that kind of backdrop that the government has a very difficult decision, do you either give taxpayer money, which many people think would be equivalent to chucking it in the furnace, it will burn through in a second... do you let it go bust two days before a european election? 0r let it go bust two days before a european election? or do you nationalise it? i was talking to trea5ury nationalise it? i was talking to treasury officials in the last hour and they said to nationalise it even temporarily, you would have to think you would have a buyer who could ta ke you would have a buyer who could take it on. and given tho5e you would have a buyer who could take it on. and given those kind of statistics, that is very difficult to see. so i'm afraid the future for this plant look5 incredibly precariou5 tonight. this plant look5 incredibly precarious tonight. simon jack, thank you very much. the restaurant group setup
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by the celebrity chef jamie oliver has gone into administration, with the loss of around 1,000 jobs. just three of his 25 restaurants is still operating, after failure to find a buyer. jamie oliver says he exhausted every option to try to save the business, and is deeply saddened. here's our business correspondent, emma simp5on. so, what you get... from the cheeky new chef on the block... look at that! ..to campaigner, tv star and books, jamie oliver has built an empire a5 britain's most successful chef. and he opened dozens of restaurants, too. come in and see us at jamie's italian. nothing was being served up today, though. his restaurant business collapsed, 22 outlets clo5ed with immediate effect. around 1,000 jobs lo5t. in a statement, jamie oliver said... "i'm devastated that our much—loved uk restaurants have gone into administration. i am deeply saddened by this outcome and would like to thank all of the people who have put their hearts and souls into this business over the years." so, what went wrong? itju5t got a bit too chain...
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chainy. chainy. yeah. whereas just around here, there are so many quirky little re5taura nt5, and just one—offs that you can go to. today's news isn't a total surpri5e. thi5 chain almost went bu5t a couple of years ago. jamie oliver put in £13 million of his own money to save it. 12 outlets already clo5ed last year in a restructuring plan. but it's clear that turnaround hasn't worked. it's been tough for lots of other casual dining chains, too. prezzo, byron, carluccio'5, just some of the brands that have had to close outlets, counting the cost of overexpansion. mid—market restaurants are being squeezed at both ends. they are finding it quite hard to make money at this time. if they're not offering exactly what consumers want, then they find they can't make money because the cost of wages, the cost of business rate5 and the cost of running promotions to get people through the door are simply too much. we are going to fry that off... his other businesses may be
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thriving, but it seems jamie 0liver‘5 restaurants weren't able to keep up with changing tastes in what's become an increasingly crowded market. emma simp5on, bbc news. nigel farage has accused the electoral commission, officials from the electoral commission, have visited brexit party headquarters, to review it's online fundraising. no evidence of electoral offences were found, but the commission said there had been significant public concern. the european parliament has confirmed it's investigating donations mr farage received, shortly after the eu referendum in 2016. 0ur deputy political editor john pienaar is at the brexit party hq in central london. what more can you tell us? well, when i spoke to nigel farage early on today, he described the current criticism of the donations and support for him and his party as 5mear5, collusion. yet, as you say, a new front has opened up. the valuable support from arron banks,
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which nigel farage de5cribes valuable support from arron banks, which nigel farage describes as a purely personal, has been referred toa purely personal, has been referred to a scrutiny and discipline committee of the european parliament, where he is a member. he went to provide a driver, a home in london, travel and parties in the usa. if they recommend to the president of the parliament that there was a breach of the rules, potential sanctions are there, from a reprimand to the withdrawal of privileges. meanwhile, at brexit headquarters in central london, cro55 headquarters in central london, cross the road, the electoral commi55ion went in today. they say it was as part of a review, not an investigation into the handling of donations. mr farr raj say5 investigation into the handling of donations. mr farr raj says it is all part of collusion between the commission under party enemie5. will it stay the party or damage the party, or view all part of collusion between the commission under party enemie5. will it 5tain between the commission under party enemie5. will it stain the party or damage the party, orfuel the i5 enemie5. will it stain the party or damage the party, orfuel the is the 5ugge5tion damage the party, orfuel the is the suggestion that nigel farage i5 damage the party, orfuel the is the suggestion that nigel farage is keen to promote this evening.
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the inquests into the london bridge attacks in 2017 has heard how a football fan threw glasses and bottles at the attackers, as he tried to save people's lives. giving evidence at the old bailey gerard vowl5 said he started throwing makeshift weapons at them and shouting to warn as many people as possible of the danger. a man who was infected with contaminated blood a5 a child in the 19705 has been speaking of the devastating effects on his life. the public inquiry into what's been called "the worst treatment scandal in the history of the nhs" heard evidence in belfast today. contaminated blood is thought to have caused the deaths of at least 3,000 people across the uk in the 19705 and 805. 0ur health editor, hugh pym, has more. paul says he and his family have always lived under a cloud. a haemophiliac, he got hepatitis c after treatment with infected blood products. he lives in fear of other conditions developing. his brother, also a haemophiliac, died with liver cancer. still cloud5 coming and still a lot
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of unknowns, and it is a fear that will live with me. deep down, i remember saying to my wife, my first objective in life was to outlive my brother. he died at 51. the inquiry‘s come to belfast to hear stories like paul's. it will move on to other cities around the uk. he says he's been mocked about his condition, so speaking out today was a big step. it reinforced the fact you have to be so private about your health and this major decision for me here, do i go...? it's the first time i've told my story publicly. that has been ma55ive. i've worked with good people for 30 years and most of them don't know yet. campaigners say there are still big differences in the financial support available to victims around the uk, and that's unfair and must be urgently addre55ed. the government at westminster made more money available to bring england in line with scotland,
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but northern ireland and wales are still lagging behind. it's an issue that the judge chairing the inquiry wants to see resolved. he and his team will continue hearing personal stories here over the next three days. hugh pym, bbc news, belfast. this week's elections for the european parliament will be a test of the popularity of several nationalist movements across europe, for whom a key issue is immigration. the model for many of these groups has been hungary, where the prime minister, victor 0rban, has enforced a strong anti—immigrant policy, in defiance of eu criticism. at the height of the migrant crisis in 2015, he ordered the construction of a fence along the southern border with serbia and croatia, to prevent migrants getting in. jean mackenzie reports. the gabor family have two passion5, swimming and their prime minister.
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viktor 0rban has won popular support here in hungary, partly by giving financial help to large families. an ardent nationalist, 0rban has waged war on migrant5. hungary wa5 hungary was at the forefront of the refugee cri5i5. although most people we re refugee cri5i5. although most people were just passing through, within week5 were just passing through, within weeks he had built a fence to keep them out. now giant eu election billboards tell people to support the prime minister's plan to end immigration. the5e posters are absolutely everywhere. voter5 are being bombarded with this message to stop migration. and this is a country where la5t year there were fewer than 700 asylum seekers.
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in the border town of kubekhaza, the mayor is one of 0rban's most vocal critics. propaganda tv. this is propaganda tv. this is state tv? yes, yes. most of hungary's media now has some link to the government. and migrant storie5 are constantly in the news. what do you hear on the news about what is happening in western europe? we have asked many times to speak to
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somebody from viktor 0rban's party, fidesz, but they have refused. so we head to one of their campaign eve nts. why is your eu electoral campaign focused on migration when migrants have virtually stopped coming to hungary in recent years? well, it's not a question whether in this timeframe they are coming or not. this is mobili5ing our efforts. that's the reason. that's what we are expected to talk about. concerned by the direction hungary i5 concerned by the direction hungary is heading, a new young opposition party is fighting back. we decided to do party is fighting back. we decided todoa party is fighting back. we decided to do a march, 5tanding party is fighting back. we decided to do a march, standing up for the value5, to do a march, standing up for the values, the european values. how do you feel about the relationship that so no you feel about the relationship that so no viktor 0rban i5 forging with the eu at the moment? well, i think it is the eu at the moment? well, i think it i5a the eu at the moment? well, i think it is a dangerous game. so far he is
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a single freedom fighter, a5 it is a dangerous game. so far he is a single freedom fighter, as he calls himself. however, if his allies get more power as well, he can start a domino effect, which is dangerous. a5 nationalist parties across europe seek to capitalise on migration, for many, viktor 0rban is their hero. hungary their inspiration. jean mackenzie, bbc news. the first female newsreader on bbc televi5ion, nan winton, has died, at the age of 93. born nancy wigginton, she was an experienced journalist who worked on several programmes including panorama. the bbc‘s director of news and current affairs fran un5worth today, called her a "trailblazer". tribute5 have been paid throughout the day to niki lauda — the veteran motor racing driver, who's died aged 70. a three—time formula one world champion, he made an astonishing recovery from a near fatal crash in 1976 — going on to become a successful businessman. 0ur sports editor dan roan looks back on his life and his achievements. niki lauda will forever be remembered as one of sport's
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bravest figures and for one of its most compelling comeback5. having pursued a career in racing against the wishes of his wealthy family and with the help of a bank loan, the steely austrian won his first world championship with ferrari in 1975. he was on course to retain it, but then at the german grand prix, during formula 1's mo5t dangerous era, lauda suffered the terrible crash that almost claimed his life. trapped inside an inferno for over a minute, other drivers had to rescue him from the wreckage. i knelt down and rested his head on my lap. and we were able to talk. he was lucid. he'd suffered severe inhalation of toxic and superheated air from the burning bodywork of his car. and it was that, 2a hours later, put his life into jeopardy. read his last rite5 in hospital, lauda wa5 scarred for life. but in an act of unimaginable courage, ju5t a0 days later, he was back behind the wheel. when that feeling came, you get a big fright. you know, you're really
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worried and frightened that you're going to die. and that means you start everything possible to keep you going. you can't start your body, because the body doesn't react. you only can start the brain. if the brain works, the body 5tarts to work sooner or later. lauda's defiance wa5 fuelled by his great rivalry with british driverjame5 hunt, transforming f1‘5 global appeal and depicted in a hollywood film. speaking from his home in brazil tonight, the man who ran the sport for decades paid this tribute. niki was liked all over the world. i don't think he's done anything bad to anybody. certainly i've known him for many, many years, and all that i heard is people saying what a nice guy he is. he was a super guy. lauda regained the world championship the year after his accident, claiming it again in 198a. an astute busine55man, he launched his own airline and became chairman of mercedes, helping to recruit lewis hamilton, who tonight tweeted. .. "i'm struggling to believe you're
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gone, thank you for being a bright light in my life." decade5 on from his crash, lauda continued to suffer the consequences, undergoing a double lung transplant last year. but he'll always be known a5 f1‘5 legendary 5urvivor. niki lauda, who's died, at the age of 70. that's it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. goodbye.
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hello and welcome to sport5day. he's got the magic — jofra archer's england team mates welcome the all rounder‘s inclu5ion in the world cup squad. "politics and sport should stay separate". the azerbaijan fa tells the bbc it's disappointed in mhykitarian's decision to miss the europa league final. and more tributes to two time formula 1 champion niki lauda, who5e died at the age of 70.
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hello and welcome to sport5day. just over a week to go until the cricket world cup gets under way — and today the 15 man squad has been confirmed. while there was heartbreak for both david willey and joe denly, the inclusion of barbados born jofra archer came as no surprise to many following his performances in the 0dis with pakistan. england are the favourites this year and number the batsmanjoe root say5 they're embracing that position. it excites me and it's a complement to the group because we worked really ha rd in to the group because we worked really hard in the past four years to get into this position and we played big cricket along the way, especially the last few years. and i feel like we are peaking at the right time, so it's about making 5ure right time, so it's about making sure that we carry forward and we enjoy the fact that we are
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favourites and home conditions and we keep going about cricketju5t a5 we keep going about cricketju5t a5 we have done don't take a backward step and change too much, just trying to adapt to conditions in front of us and continue to be positive and how we do things. he is seen positive and how we do things. he is seen when he plays and domestic tournaments are on the road, he has ability to change game on his own he has magic and other plays may not be able to do that he help5 has magic and other plays may not be able to do that he helps and he has more games down the bad they are all good qualities to have and i think he is good qualities to have and i think he i5a good qualities to have and i think he is a brilliant addition to the squad he has earned that through performing under pressure and high profile tournaments and it's a great chance for him now what to say she 5ta rted chance for him now what to say she 5tarted career on. for details of the full 15 man squad you can head over to the bbc website bbc.co.uk/5port where you can also check out the new england kit if you want to as well.

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