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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  May 22, 2019 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond 100 days. theresa may is tonight holed up at downing street, but how much longer can she call it home? all day, the house of commons has been filled with rumours and suggestions that the time for her to step down is now. she's put off meetings with cabinet members, and it looks like she's trying to stay. but even she acknowledges it won't be for much longer. while i am here, i have a duty to this house, i have a duty to be clear with the house about the facts. if we are going to deliver brexit, we are going to have to pass the withdrawal agreement bill. it was a pretty wild day in american politics, too, with president trump marching out of a meeting with top democrats,
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saying he can't work with them any more. instead of walking in happily to a meeting, i walk into look at people that have just said that i was doing a cover up. that have just said that i was doing a coverup. i that have just said that i was doing a cover up. i don't do cover—ups. also on the programme: voters in the uk prepare to head to the polls for the eu elections. we'll look at how brexit issues have spilt across the channel into france. huawei finds itself in the middle of a trade war between the us and china as more companies refuse to deal with the chinese tech giant. hello, i am katty kay in washington. christian fraser is at downing street in london. theresa may's premiership is on the brink tonight amid a full—scale revolt within her party over her new brexit bill. throughout the day, a series
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of previously loyal conservative mps said they would vote against it. by this afternoon, there were over a0 names on the list. that doesn't even include the 3a conservatives who already voted against her deal at the last vote. she is going backwards. the trouble is very few mp's now believe theresa may has any power left to cash the cheques she is writing. and as the credit dries up, there's no incentive for any group, least of all those on the labour benches, to support the compromises she is offering. this afternoon in a tense session in parliament, the prime minister seemed to acknowledge her days in downing street are numbered. in time, another prime minister will be standing at this dispatch box. while i am here, i have a duty to be clear it with the house, i have a duty to be clear with the house about the facts. if we are going to deliver brexit in this parliament, we are going to have to pass a withdrawal agreement built and we will not so without holding votes on
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theissues will not so without holding votes on the issues that have divided us the most. that includes votes on customs arrangements and a second referendum. we can pretend otherwise and carry on arguing and getting nowhere. but in the end, ourjob in this house is to take decisions, not to duck them. we are told three survey is tonight with the queen, not to offer her resignation but there for her regular wednesday evening audience. but plenty going on in the house of commons. let's cross to our correspondentjonathan commons. let's cross to our correspondent jonathan blake, and therefore us. tell us what happened in the committee tonight. what do we know about julian smith's in the committee tonight. what do we know aboutjulian smith's visit the chief with, what he say to them?m is been extraordinary here in westminster. as i speak him of the executive secretary of the 1922 committee is still in the room above
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us committee is still in the room above us here on the main committee court or presumably deciding what to do next. but we know the immediate sequence next. but we know the immediate sequence of events because sir graham brady, the chairman of the 1922 committee it, will meet theresa may on friday to assume either here and offer of resignation from the prime minister or as the executive of the committee will meet on that day as well, to make clear to her that they intend to change the rules of the leadership contest for the conservative party so she may well face a vote of very soon. but it was unclear for some time because as you say, the chief whip in charge of party discipline came to the house of commons here and went into party discipline came to the house of c1 committee. and went into 5545'— ff ,, f party discipline came to the house of c1 committee. only went into 4444— 44 4 4 party discipline came to the house of c1 committee. onlyvi couple » 4444— 44 44 4 party discipline came to the house of c1 committee. onlyvi couple of'444 44 44 4 1922 committee. only a couple of minutes letter, he came straight out again and we know that he told the backbench mps that theresa may was not going to resign, and so he presumably went back to downing street to convey that message to
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her. and so after rumours and claims that theresa may would make some sort of statement, talk of meeting requests from cabinet ministers unhappy now about the contents of the withdrawal agreement built, trying to meet the prima district and told they could not, theresa may will spend tomorrow campaigning for the european elections that she never wanted to hold. i'm sure she will have a photo taken, we will see her casting her ballot and she lifted by another day but it is now friday that she will have to make a decision. meanwhile, members of her own cabinet so they wanted to hold meetings with her this evening. stu d e nts of meetings with her this evening. students of history will recall that it was cavett ministers delving into margaret thatcher as saying you have to go that forced her out the door. she has decided to keep the door shut to them in dentistry and not even seeing them tonight. she is having none of it. she refused as requests for meetings and as you say, the prime minister has gone to buckingham palace this evening for her regular weekly audience with the queen. he would always be fastening to bea
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queen. he would always be fastening to be a fly on the wall in that discussion but it always remains entirely private. tonight, even more so. entirely private. tonight, even more so. you can only imagine what the two of them will be discussing after such an intense 24 hours or so here at westminster. but, yes, it seems as one former cabinet minister put it to us out of the committee room upstairs, this effort is up against the door in dentistry and she is staying there and not going anywhere for at least the next 24 hours and if she survives to friday, the next 48 hours. i think the european elections that some mps at least, a lot of anger elections that some mps at least, a lot ofangerand elections that some mps at least, a lot of anger and frustration in the i’ooiti lot of anger and frustration in the room upstairs amongst backbenchers but some at least understand they have to get that process out before making the next move. but if there cannot be a vote of no—confidence unless a party changes its rules there cannot be, cannot be, it is cabinet ministers who have to make a move, go to theresa may and say you cannot command oui’ move, go to theresa may and say you cannot command our support any more, it is time for you to step aside. yes, ican it is time for you to step aside. yes, i can assure you that the door here is opening and closing freely,
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no furniture behind it but she is not here, she is with the queen so she does not need to lock them out. go bang on the door when she gets back. maybe she will move the desk behind it. what i understand a striving frustration among senior cabinet colleagues is they have been ina reading cabinet colleagues is they have been in a reading room today reading a d raft in a reading room today reading a draft version of the withdrawal agreement bill and there are things in that bill that they felt had been discounted at the cabinet meeting yesterday. that destined to be what is emerging. cavett ministers of the right to read to the detail of the withdraw argument beverages but in the works for some time and kept tightly under wraps until now. we had more of an idea of broadly what was going to be in it when the prime minister made her speech yesterday. we we re minister made her speech yesterday. we were told she cleared it with the cabinet at the meeting yesterday morning of her top ministerial team, but now it seems as a day has gone oi'i but now it seems as a day has gone on and her senior ministers have had a chance to pour over the detail line by locking with things and
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emerge that as far as some are concerned at least particular the home secretary, to do with the promise of a vote on holding a for the referendum, they are not entirely and happy with and it is not as smart as they are concerned what was agreed. if you cannot command their support for that withdraw argument bill, there is no legislation to make brexit happen at her premiershipl legislation to make brexit happen at her premiership i think is all but over. 0k, thank you very much. come back to us if you get any more news. one of those nights where everything is moving quite quickly. as all goes on,... back in april, donald tusk warned uk politicians to not waste this time, after granting a second extension to article 50. that was after the original brexit date of march 29th.
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tusk‘s comment referred to the six months extension the eu then granted the uk to try and come to a consensus over the withdrawal deal. we're now almost two months on since the uk was originally supposed to leave the eu, on the eve of european elections that theresa may had vowed the uk would never participate the uk parliament is now scheduled to vote on a withdrawal and implementation bill to ratify the deal on the week ofjune 3rd. coinciding of course with president trump's state visit to the uk. if the deal fails to gain mps' approval, as is expected, it leaves less than five months until the uk is scheduled once again to leave the eu. and questions tonight about whether she will not get her bill through and even if she will be able to present it. it has been extraordinary. the scenario this morning at lunchtime or she was standing at the despatch for prime
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minister's questions and andrea ledge and was not there, she was in the meeting with other brexit cabinet colleagues. there were other rumours swirling where the mps have offices that may be she would be gone by tonight. but we know she is nothing if not stubborn and she is digging in again tonight, looking is if she will try to get to the other side of the recess. we havejeremy hunt, the scottish secretary and the home secretary all asking for meetings tonight. there'll be no meetings tonight. there'll be no meetings and she will not seek graham the 1922 committee chairman, until friday. she will toughen out until friday. she will toughen out until the following week when of course donald trump will be in town for that state visit. she is the premise or who never leaves. everything we think she is about to 90, everything we think she is about to go, she is still there at the end which is why christian is at downing street, too. british voters heading to the polls for the european elections and disco and brexit has been inseparable.
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it's the eve of british voters heading to the polls for the european elections and this vote and brexit has been inseperable — both throughout the negotiations and during campaigning. tomorrow, the uk will give their thoughts at the ballot box but today france's minister for european affairs warned britain not to export its political crisis over to the europe union. the comment came from nathalie loiseau — she's spearheading emmanuel macron‘s european election campaign. the president's en marche party is second in the polls behind the marine le pen's national rally party. ros atkins is still on the eu election trail — tonight, he's in paris. i want to get your thoughts on the end of this trip around europe, what is driving the root vote there. is it reform people want or is it national politics in each of these countries it is driving the boat? very briefly, it is national politics. it has been striking as i move from italy to poland to germany and here to france just how distinct
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the debates are in these different countries, whether the culture war we talked about in warsaw a couple of days back, whether it is big debates about climate change policy in germany or here. well, it is really a rerun of the 2017 presidential election between emanuel mccraw and marie in the pen, and ina emanuel mccraw and marie in the pen, and in a strange way, both are framing this as such. i interviewed an mp from the republican party who said it is not about these two only, there are others of us here as well but the two biggest parties according to the polls are both saying there is a clear choice here and how we want to see france and have a want to see the european union evolve. . essentially, macron favours much greater integration with the eu. he wants to see things like tax harmonization, a european army, courted that it for honest cybersecurity and marine le pen is saying no, we need to assert the nation state, deal with what she calls unregulated globalisation and
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more national protections for our economy. so distinctions between the countries art relate pronounced and it is all driven by national considerations. let's talk a bit more about france. just one point difference therebetween marine le pen's party and president macron‘s party. to what extent do the european union elections portend what might happen in national elections in a couple of years or are they do you think more of a protest vote than a separate from what might happen domestically. those numbers will be viewed very in favour by marine le pen and her party if it came to anywhere near a presidential or parliamentary election. well, on this, i have sifted through quite a few numbers from previous european parliamentary elections and there are a few patterns we can discern. the closer these polymers relations fall within these polymers relations fall within the election cycle in the country, the election cycle in the country, the more likely it is a government
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will suffer. so if you have a new government in spain that has only beenin government in spain that has only been in power for government in spain that has only been in powerfora government in spain that has only been in power for a couple of months, so it according to this pattern has a better chance of performing well while people who've beenin performing well while people who've been in power longer like emmanuel macron and theresa may, two years or more, normally defined the electorate take this chance to send a message. that is one crucial dynamic. i think another thing that also drives it is to what degree people feel their vote influences what happens in europe. what was interesting in poland was overhearing that voters really did not much a connection between casting about in these elections and the big decisions that happen in brussels. but it is different for the friendship of the french are pa rt of the friendship of the french are part of a power couple. germany and france for some people here know how they will affect their president will affect the european union, so their sense of connection is stronger. thank you very much indeed. just to remind you the conservative party running for in
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paul's put out today behind the green party with just 7% of the vote. that is unprecedented in a national election. and that could be curtains for theresa may on monday evenif curtains for theresa may on monday even if she sees it to monday. just to say we see no sign of the para meters to say we see no sign of the parameters of this evening but we have just seen the chief with julian smith who was with the marine le pen —— netted 22 committee go through the doors and we are told theresa may is imminent. so reasonably will give us a rundown of what went on at the committee meeting and what the backbenchers are saying. the uk inflation rate rose to its highest level of the year in april. the consumer price index showed an increase of 2.1%, up from 1.9% the previous month. it's the first time this year that the rate has risen above the bank of england's 2% target. the man who became known as the "american taliban", when he was captured by us troops in afghanistan in 2001 will be released from prison tomorrow. john walker lindh was arrested shortly after the 9/11 attacks during a prison uprising which claimed the first american life of the war. he has served 17 years
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of a 20 year sentence. it's been a day of political meltdown on both sides of the atlantic. donald trump and democratic leaders were scheduled to meet to come up with a bipartisan plan to renovate america's seriously crumbling infrastructure. here's what actually happened. the president walked into the room, refused to shake anyone's hand, accused them of bad faith and just three minutes later, walked out again. the trigger for his anger was apparently a comment earlier in the day by nancy pelosi accusing him of a cover—up. mr trump then walked out into the rose garden of the white house to say he won't do any more business with democrats until they drop their investigations into him. i walked into the room and i told senator schumer, speaker nancy below seat i want to do infrastructure. i wa nt seat i want to do infrastructure. i want to do it more than you want to
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do it. i would be really good at that, that is what i do. but you know what? you cannot do it under the circumstances, so get these phoney investigations over with. and moments later, the democratic leaders took to the microphones on capitol hill with their response. i pray for the president of the united states and i pray for the united states and i pray for the united states and i pray for the united states of america. we want oui’ united states of america. we want our congress to perform its constitutional responsibilities and create jobs, create income, constitutional responsibilities and createjobs, create income, create wealth for the average american. we can do both. it is clear the president does not want to do any of that. i'm joined now by elisabeth bumiller, the washington bureau chief for the new york times. thank you for coming in. i am glad you had to sit through our brexit conversation because i see parallels what will happen here and there.
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every single day, we are seeing that. the breakdown and politics and how they should work. you have in britain two sides very hard and over brexit and you have here to size a have said today we cannot work together. they said that today yet again. what is interesting is this has been cast as donald trump had a tantrum because nancy poulos he said earlier in the day on capitol hill but in fact it looked pretty stage when you look closely at it. he had the podium out in the rose garden with the sign already printed, no obstruction, no collusion. it looked a bit like they had planned this. he also... it lasted three minutes only this meeting. he came in and spoke harshly to nancy pelosi and then walked out. what is he trying to do here? it takes a while to print a sign that he had up in the rose garden. if this was all stage, he calls democrats to the white house, does not have the meeting within commit is not shake their hands,
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walks out again into the rose garden to talk to the press, what is the point was meant was he trying to do do? he is trying to keep his base close. the elections next year. he is pushing the message that i did not do anything wrong after this very devastating molar report and also i do not believe him and we do not believe he had a plan for infrastructure. this is been a joke in washington and his been going on since january of 2017. democrats and republicans, the one thing they can work together on was infrastructure, oui’ work together on was infrastructure, our decaying bridges, roads, tunnels. every week has been infrastructure week and this was like infrastructure two minutes or three minutes. we do not think they have a plan and so it was perhaps a stalling technique and a chance for him yet again to make the point that idid him yet again to make the point that i did nothing wrong and stick with me. part of the issue is that of course he is very excited by infrastructure and want to get on that but someone has to pay for it
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and talks about a $2 billion ticket for infrastructure and the democrats would want to raise taxes to do that. and then in an election year. not possible. i think there was earlier taught from the white house about the plan where there would be some public and private investment. it was better that we want different people to pay for coming up the government. there has been no real plan set forth for the white house and that is one of the big problems. ido and that is one of the big problems. i do not think at this point given that the election is not that far away, it is ever going to happen. they were also supposedly about trey, the president wants to push them on the replacement for nafta, them on the replacement for nafta, the us mca, there was no talk of that either. it looks like they're very little will happen in washer between now and november of next year which is a problem for nancy pelosi because we can talk about that later but she is having a terrible time reining in her most liberal members from pushing forward on impeachment when what she wants
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to do is talk about jobs, health which resonates with democratic vote rs which resonates with democratic voters out on the campaign. briefly, so voters out on the campaign. briefly, so who wins on a day like this when the president gets to talk to the press about impeachment and not talking about legislation? again, i think they really both sides. it is the republicans like to hear that, it also itjust keeps the republicans like to hear that, it also it just keeps the the republicans like to hear that, it also itjust keeps the base close that he did nothing wrong. we have to hear that on the campaign trail. there is no talk of the mueller report, people want to hear about jobs in health care. for nancy pelosi, it is another sign of the president not dealing with us and that she... i found her response to the president interesting and somewhat typical. she treats him like a small troubled toddler. and says i pray for you, she is troubled by him up. she has got that down. says i pray for you, she is troubled by him up. she has got that downlj noticed that, to come if you do seem to get under his skin. thank you very much for coming in. that line
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about i pray for you, the problem here is democrats at the juggle needing to legislate, caring on the investigations and donald trump who can be applicable while he is getting onto his base as well but i agree with her, this looks stage to me. it looked that way. yet, it did. go on. any sign of the prime minister? no signed yet but we want to get reaction to what would on across the road in the committee root —— at 1922 committee committee. he is in the middle of the party on the brexit steering committee and i think you were in charge of —— support of the bill, can you start by giving us a flavour of what went on in the committee room this evening? we had a discussion, the prime minister headset because it is in her character to be decent and honourable, that she is going to campaign in the european elections throughout the rest of the day, throughout the rest of the day, through tomorrow and then she is going to meet with the chairman of
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the 1922 committee on friday. and i think that would be a useful and frank discussion between the two of them. obviously there are splits within the executive committee commit we have heard from nigel evans today a regular on our programme who says that she has got to go and go now and he wants to change the rules so they can have another vote of no—confidence. are the rules going to be changed? let see the rules going to be changed? let see what happens on friday. i have made us agreed that i a huge supporter of the prime minister. i think she has done a remark wasjob and almost impossible circumstances. solam and almost impossible circumstances. so i am not one of those calling for her departure but the prime minister is aware of the mood of the party which is why i think she wants to do the absolute right and decent thing and campaign tonight and tomorrow for the european elections and then on friday have a discussion with sir graeme brady, it will be ridiculous if the prime minister on the eve of an election, a european election, to do anything but campaign. she has made the right decision in my mind
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absolutely. whether she goes now or whether she goes in a week or two weeks, what does a change of leadership at the top of the conservative party really do in terms of the parliamentary arithmetic was meant what is a change on the fundamentals? my concern is a number of colleagues who think that when we get an apron minister, somehow something reckless will happen to the arithmetic and the division of it. i do not that it will to be privately honest. i think the conservative party is going to have to ask itself some searching questions over the next two or three or four months as it begins to realise that the top of the party may have changed, the prime minister may have changed, the prime minister may have changed but actually the party in the arithmetic and habit conducts itself probably has not changed. you say it is the right and decent thing for her to campaign on the eve of this european election. many are saying the right and if something is not to put this bill to parliament so she can give her success or a decent chance, a decent
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fist of it when they take over. she met with the 1922 committee last thursday and it was agreed that the prime minister would meet with sir graham originally this was the agreement. once she placeable before the polymer in the first week of june. now the mood of the 22 and the party has changed and there seems to bea party has changed and there seems to be a new agreement in place and the one i described is a chairman will be on friday. i was more than content with what was agreed last thursday and that was the prime minister would have her second reading of her bill on the fifth or 6th ofjune reading of her bill on the fifth or 6th of june and reading of her bill on the fifth or 6th ofjune and then meet with sir graham brady to set out her departure schedule shortly after that. right. thank you very much indeed. one mp said the best thing if she goes out on monday to fit the sting out of the election result. you are watching beyond 100 days.
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this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news britain's second biggest steel—maker goes under. the hunt is on to find a buyer with thousands ofjobs are on the line. more bad news for huawei. we'll look at how donald trump's export ban is affecting how tech companies all over the world can do business with the chinese telecoms firm. hello. for most, it was a dry day today. not much rain at all for the next few days. this picture from staffordshire, the highest in the southeast of england with the temperatures at 21 or 22. not as warm in inverness in scotland we have had much more cloud and maybe some rain as well. some shelter from the highlands where we have seen most of the rain here towards aberdeen sure. a few spots of rain from that cloud across central areas that have been much gone now and clear skies overnight for england and wales. more cloud and a bit of a breeze coming down across scotland and some rain in the far north again so not as cold here as it was last night. typical to temperatures elsewhere of it six or 7 degrees.
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heading into thursday commit many places starting dry with some sunshine and warming up fairly quickly as well. still see more cloud coming down on that fairly brisk wind down across scotland and the rain in the far north not really amounting to a great deal and cloudy over northern ireland and into wells in the southwest through the day. best of the sunshine further east and temperatures hired to today with 23 across london and the home counties and 18 in newcastle, should feel very pleasant. low—pressure keeping it cooler and wetter in the far north of scotland and the centre of the low will push away toward scandinavia so it will not be quite as wet and northernmost ports of scotla nd as wet and northernmost ports of scotland on friday i think. we are left with a northwesterly breeze that will drag down more cloud across scotland and could be quite cloudy in northern ireland and achieved showers as well and those could extend their way to the irish sea and england and wales. a lot of places still dry and more in the way of cloud so to temperatures beginning to drop offjust a little bit. into the start of the weekend, bank holiday weekend of course and showers are going to be very
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fleeting on the whole, a dry day saturday and a fair bit of cloud arriving through the day and maybe a few spots of rain for northern ireland and western scotland later on and to temperatures across the northern half of the uk at 15 or 16 degrees at best so turning a bit cooler. spots of rain on that weather front there, low—pressure building him from the atlantic as we head into sunday and that weather front pushing its way eastwards as well. so as we head into the bank holiday weekend, there may be some sunshine at times, find some rain around mainly sunday and most of that in the north and west and salvation be largely dry and all of turning cooler.
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this is beyond 100 days. with me, katty kay in washington, christian fraser is at downing street in london. our top stories: theresa may is facing growing calls to resign over the way she has repackaged her brexit plan. one cabinet minister told the bbc that it's "the end of the line". donald trump abruptly left a meeting with senior democrats — afterjust five minutes — striking a blow to any non—partisan progress. coming up in the next half hour: as more than 70 business leaders gather on capitol hill to advocate for new climate change legislation — we'll talk to a senator who's working alongside them. and the art inspired by the vietnam war, created by those who experienced it. the exhibition that explores how artists responded during those turbulent years in us history.
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relations between donald trump and democrats took a serious nose dive today after the speaker of the house nancy pelosi accused the president of a cover up and he responded by refusing to negotiate with them and leaving a meeting afterjust a few minutes. they were meant to have negotiated an infrastructure bill but mr trump now says he won't negotiate with democrats about anything so long as they are investigating him. welcome to dysfuntional politics in washington. and instead of walking in happily into a meeting, i walk into look at people who have just said that i was doing a cover—up. i don't do cover—ups. chris coons is a democratic senatorfrom delaware and joins us from capitol hill now.
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what did you make of the president's leaving a meeting, holding a press conference today? president trump's tempertantrum conference today? president trump's temper tantrum following that meeting with democratic leaders, which was meant to be a positive conversation about infrastructure, and turns into the latest display of the dysfunction of american politics leaves me gravely concerned that donald trump doesn't recognise that congressional oversight is a central pa rt of congressional oversight is a central part of the american system of government. his predecessors, barack obama and george bush, learned how to tolerate having unwelcome but assertive oversight by congress, at the same time, they were able to legislate against challenges against our country, infrastructure, health care, national security. ido our country, infrastructure, health care, national security. i do think trump will eventually have to come back to the table, but for today, it is disheartening. lord knows
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american infrastructure does need addressing, the president is being investigated on multiple fronts, and the white house think this is stopping him from doing anything else and sucking up all the oxygen. is there a risk for democrats that you become seen is there a risk for democrats that you become seen as is there a risk for democrats that you become seen as the party that all you do is investigate the president? yes, that is why i am working hard at moving bipartisan legislation in the senate. earlier today, i convened a roundtable conversation with executive ceos from companies that support a carbon price, carbon fee and dividend proposal, and i had a bipartisan group of republicans and democrats from the house and senate who participated. that isjust one small example of many. i do think it is important that we keep legislating ina way important that we keep legislating in a way that addresses the concerns of the average american, whether it
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is around jobs, health care, prescription drug costs, climate change, many issues on the front burner, democrats have to demonstrate that we can do ourjob of oversight and legislate around theissues of oversight and legislate around the issues that matter to average americans. lets talk about that, it is why we wanted you to come on the programme before this bust up. let's talk about this business leaders meeting. they are saying basically, pay now or pay later. you are talking about what effectively sounds like a carbon tax, an idea that has been around for a long time. how would it work and how would you get it through the political system when your republican colleagues have been sceptical for a republican colleagues have been scepticalfor a very long republican colleagues have been sceptical for a very long time about the idea of taxing carbon? at the highest level, it would set a price per tonne for carbon and all the revenue collected would be returned to the american people as a dividend ona to the american people as a dividend on a regular basis. it would start
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relatively low, but then would escalate over years, if we made no progress in reducing emissions. what we heard today from ceos is that business is already pricing carbon fees into their future business models, because they expect that eventually, this will be part of the regulatory and tax framework here in the usa. they think that a long—term signal from the marketplace, a long—term government signal to the marketplace about pricing carbon pollution is the best way to allow the markets to work, to incentivise capital investment, research and develop in, deployment through consumer develop in, deployment through consumer action. there are carbon tax schemes in other places in the world that have accelerated the deployment of carbon neutral, or a lower carbon, forms a power generation and distribution systems, and the ceos we met with today were there to answer probing questions by
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republicans in the senate and the house, who are warming to the idea. it is worth focusing on the companies who came to the congress today. among the 70 companies are names like bp, royal dutch and shell, you had big oil companies who are buying into the idea of carbon taxes. that is right, those very large oil companies are considering their future and recognising that as energy companies, companies that are fully diversified into plain and renewable sources of energy, they have a strong future. if they were just limited to being oil and gas companies, their future is just limited to being oil and gas companies, theirfuture is a somewhat limited, by the way in which climate change is accelerating and isa which climate change is accelerating and is a global concern, it is already imposing enormous costs on the american economy and communities. we have seen record wild fires, hurricanes and tornadoes. the weather in the usa and around the world is beginning to
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impose real costs on farmers, on coastal communities, and on small towns and communities all over the country in rural areas. we see companies large and small willing to step up and speak up about a carbon price. they would rather have a market mechanism than a central government control and mandate mechanism for finding a path forward. thank you forjoining us. good to talk about things that are functioning in politics, people trying to legislate, notjust a political show. the us state department says believes the syrian government is using chemical weapons again in its bid to capture the last remaining rebel held area of the country. specifically, the department says it believes there was a chemical attack in the idlib are on sunday morning. their statement goes on...
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so what could the us do in response? with me is former assistant secretary of state for political—military affairs brigadier general mark kimmitt. thank you forjoining us. you came back from iraq just a couple of days ago, we have been talking about iran on the programme, and the situation in syria and escalation and the possible chemical attack have largely gone unnoticed. what is going on? both the syrians and russians had been looking for a resolution for the idlib problem for the last six months, it is the last remaining significant terrorist pocket inside the country. one of the major problems they have is the agreement they have with turkey not to go in there, it is supposed to be a ceasefire zone. turkey obviously doesn't want millions of refugees being pushed out of that area into turkey. at the same time, what we
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are seeing that perhaps the russians are seeing that perhaps the russians are taking advantage of the focus thatis are taking advantage of the focus that is going on in iran and elsewhere, and some cases, the noise we are seeing from washington. elsewhere, and some cases, the noise we are seeing from washingtonm there was a chemical attack, and the state department statement was specific about the timing and place of the chemical attack, if there was another syrian government chemical attack against civilians in this area, what will the us do about it? we need to understand that there was one announcement on sunday by the state department and we haven't heard any follow—ups since then, so i'm not sure the intelligence completely supports the attack, but on the general issue of the significant chemical attack committed by the assad regime, i think the usa and coalition allies must respond, because of the greediest nature of a chemical attack and the impact on the civilians. the us has already struck twice under president trump, with coalition partners against the
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syrian government, in response to chemical attacks. it doesn't seem, that if this is correct, and if he said steering committee is using chemicals, it doesn't stop them. what more can be done? they don't have many other opportunities or choices. for a long period of time, they were backed into a corner. they have the last remaining threat to their country and as long as the world is focused elsewhere, they will use whatever opportunities they had to finish this off, it has been going on too long, it is a threat to syria's regime, and he wants to get it over with, and his supporters in this area, although a dwindling number, wanted to end as well. they don't see chemical weapons in the same way don't see chemical weapons in the same way the rest of the world does. thank you forjoining us. i'm glad we did get an update on syria, we have talked about iran, but i'm glad we could get that update. interesting to hear those comments, but we have some breaking news,
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andrea leadsom, the leader of the house, has resigned. she was angry about the cabinet meeting yesterday, our political editor said that when she came out of the meeting, she had to compose herself to give her thoughts. she obviously didn't like what was discussed and today, they have read the draft of the bill that the prime minister is putting forward. in her letter, she makes a number of points as to why she is going, she says, i do not believe we will be a truly sovereign uk through the deal that is now being proposed. have always maintained that the second referendum would be dangerously divisive, and i do not support the government are willingly facilitating such a concession. she goes on to say that there has been a breakdown of government processes that recent brexit related legislative proposals have not been properly scrutinised and she says the tolerance in those in cabinet who advocate policy is contrary to
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the government's position has led to a complete breakdown of collective responsibility. so a very senior brexit here within the cabinet, who of course, has leadership and potential leadership ambitions, she is one of the first to resign this evening. you are talking about this earlier, because andrea leadsom was not at prime minister's questions, we we re not at prime minister's questions, we were wondering what was happening and why she was absent during that. she is normally there, and this is obviously what she has been working on it today. what impact does this have in the near term on the prime minister, who is still not meeting with members of her cabinet at downing street today? does this accelerate the timetable for the prime minister's departure? accelerate the timetable for the prime minister's departure ?|j accelerate the timetable for the prime minister's departure? i think it is significant that she wasn't on the front bench today, because she normally is sitting therefore prime minister's questions, but she was in the meeting with presumably people like sergey javid, michael gove, others who have signed up to the
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brexit cause, and themselves, have leadership ambitions. does it speed up leadership ambitions. does it speed up the prime minister going? we will see whoever it might walk from the cabinet. david mundell, the scottish secretary, deeply opposed to what is in the bill, because he thinks it opens up the chance of a second independence referendum in scotland. he has told the prime minister he can't vote for this deal, because it would be against his principles. if he is not voting for it, he would have to go, too. michael gove spoke to the bbc this morning, he is brexit here in chief within the environment, he wasn't exactly fulsome in the support of the prime minister. he said people had to reflect, there was no assurance that the bill would come from the vote, so people will have their eyes on him as well this evening. we also know that sajid javid and jeremy hunt have asked for a meeting, but have been told the prime minister is busy. so it is all for the men in suits and ladies in grey dresses who will line up to wield the knife. the
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important point is that downing street were briefing today that they don't think any of these cabinet ministers will call for her to go, because whoever wields the knife undermines their own leadership ambitions. yes, their own bed. it is one thing to resign add another to say, she has to go. we were showing you the tweet of the leader of the house, andrea leadsom, that she is resigning. i no longer believe our approach will deliver on the referendum result, she said in that resignation letter. another setback for huawei. some of britain's biggest tech firms have now severed ties with the chinese company because of donald trump's banning order. telecommunications companies around the world are trying to figure out how the president's executive order might affect them — and how they do business with huawei. today, the bbc learnt that the cambridge based chip designer, arm, whose chips are used in millions of tablets, smartphones and computers worldwide has told staff to stop sharing its technology with huawei. and in a separate blow —
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the financial times reports four big mobile operators injapan and the uk have now pulled planned launches of new huawei smartphones. so what is the threat and what do companies that deal with huawei do now? let's put that to emily taylor — an associate fellow of international security at chatham house. she's in oxford. clearly, arm making the decision that it cannot, under donald trump av that it cannot, under donald trump as new ruling, do business with huawei. is this what will be what chokes huawei? does it have a serious impact on the world's biggest telecommunications company? i think this is a serious setback. arm might not be a household name, but it's designs for the so—called syste m but it's designs for the so—called system on a chip are actually in the worlds leading mobile phones, whether that is samsung, apple or
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huawei. when the executive order came in and we heard about google earlier this week, huawei was posing as quite confident and saying they had their plan b, but part of their plan b is the production of chips through their high silicon division, and unfortunately for huawei, those chips are based on arm designs. so this is like taking a piece ofjenga out of the bottom of the tower and the whole thing could be very seriously destabilised. how does huawei respond to this? if the future business model, current business model, has now been undermined by regulation from the white house, how does it retaliate? there is still a lot of uncertainty about the scope of this new executive order. the united states
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themselves has actually taken 90 days, or done a delay of 90 days, because i think that with this announcement and the google announcement and the google announcement earlier this week, it isa announcement earlier this week, it is a lot more complex and interfering and a lot more supply chains and effecting jobs in the us and overseas, for a huawei, it is enormous, and overseas, for a huawei, it is enormous, it has 80,000 staff engaged in r&d, and if its statements are to be believed, it has been preparing for this moment, but whether it anticipated it wouldn'tjust be but whether it anticipated it wouldn't just be us but whether it anticipated it wouldn'tjust be us firms it cannot deal with, but others as well, is unknown at this stage. plenty discussed today about the collapse of british steel, they are going into administration, jeremy corbyn are saying that he wants to renationalise the company, donald trump in america has associated steel as a strategic industry. i wonder whether things are changing,
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times are changing, it isn't things like steel, oil and gas that are strategic, but technology and networks, and that is why they are taking the decisions they are on companies like huawei. it might well be, and there are different aspects to technology as well, you have these incredibly interconnected global supply chains and these are a source global supply chains and these are a source of global supply chains and these are a source of revenue. global supply chains and these are a source of revenue. huawei itself buys $11 billion worth of components from us companies alone each year, but it is also what technology enables. if you are a technological superpower and the us has been unrivalled as a superpower and technology in the last 20 years, you have access to information, and perhaps part of the security concerns perhaps part of the security concerns that the us has been voicing in relation to huawei come from its own knowledge of what can be done if you have a low level access and close relationships to
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your domestic technology providers. thank you forjoining us. huawei, a story we have been watching for a while and i suspect we will keep on watching it. this is beyond 100 days. still to come — we'll have more coverage on the breaking news that andrea leadsom has resigned. british steel has collapsed, after talks with the government about a financial bail out broke down. 5,000 jobs and 20,000 more in the supply chain are at risk as efforts to rescue the business get under way. our business correspondent coletta smith is outside the plant in scu nthorpe has more on this story. this steelworks has shaped the landscape and lives here for generations, but that might be about to change. we have been told 110 different things, so we don't know where we are or what is going on. for weeks, everyone here has been living in the hope that the government would step in and bail out british steel. but today came the news
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that wasn't happening. the government has been working tirelessly with the company, with its owner, graybull capital, and lenders, to explore all potential options to secure a solution for the company, but we can only act within the law. and it is clear that it would be unlawful to provide a guarantee or loan on the times requested by the company. so, who is to blame, for a company that made a profit last year, being taken over by the liquidator today? greybull capital bought the business four years ago forjust £1. they say they have spent millions on this site here but needed the government's help just to keep things rolling. but just last week, they spent £40 million buying a french steel company, and everyone i've been talking to wants to know why that money wasn't spent here. the blow is being felt much further afield than scu nthorpe. 30 miles up the river, they‘ re impacted, too. i think it's terrible, the price of a football player, isn't it, really?
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and it's going to be india and places like that as opposed to british steel, scunthorpe steel, where it has always come from. the shape of uk industry is changing, and workers at british steel had hoped to keep their place in that. but everyone on the humber estuary knows you can't fight the tide forever. now to discuss the news that andrea leadsom has resigned we will bring you more reaction to the news in the last few minutes that the leader of the house, andrea leadsom has resigned this evening. she has tweeted a letter that she said to the prime minister, it is with great regret and a heavy heart, she says, that i have decided to resign from the government. let's speak now to jack blanchard, editor of politico's london playbook who's in westminster. what impact does this have on the
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prime minister's fortunes tonight? it comes at a very difficult time for the prime minister, we thought she had seen out one of her hardest days of a rocky premiership, but for this to come so late in the day, it raises questions about how much longer she can stay in downing street. the big question everyone is asking here in westminster is are there more to come tonight? is this there more to come tonight? is this the start of cabinet ministers walking out on the prime minister, may be in a choreographed attempt to force her from downing street, we will have to wait and see what happens over the next hour or two. it is the 36th ministerial resignation under this prime minister. if there was a flurry of brexit req cetaceans —— resignations, if we saw michael gove resigning tonight, without be a bigger blow? of but the prime minister has suffered many things that we thought would be a fatal
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blow. she has shown stubbornness to stay in power regardless. in the normal course of things, given where she is at right now, given we know her brexit plan is doomed to defeat, and she has said she will probably go this summer, you would think that senior members of her cabinet walking out in a coordinated effort would be the end of it. you have to remember, this is happening at an extraordinary time. there is an election happening tomorrow in which the conservative party are expected to do badly. to see cabinet ministers walking out on the eve of elections, shows how bad this has got. has the conservative party wrestled with its leadership? with the eu elections tomorrow and healing the wounds of the party, how conscious our day of the fact that the uk has now used up two of the seven months extension it was given by the eu, and it hasn't really got anywhere in terms of resolving the brexit issue? it is amazing, isn't it? donald tusk said when the extension was granted, do not waste
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this time, that was his message to britain. months have passed and not much has happened. the conservative party would say that changing the leadership and approach, that would bea leadership and approach, that would be a big change the to the dynamic and it very much looks like that is what is now going to happen, if not tonight, maybe on friday, and certainly over the next few weeks. it is impossible to believe that theresa may will still be prime minister ina theresa may will still be prime minister in a couple of months' time. ifa minister in a couple of months' time. if a new prime minister comes in witha time. if a new prime minister comes in with a different approach, perhaps a more engaged approach with a no—deal brexit, then certainly, britain will be in a different place at that point. it strikes me there isa at that point. it strikes me there is a lot of choreography going on on both sides, so the prime minister is looking for an elegant way out, but there is also a lot of consideration for cabinet secretaries here, people who have leadership ambitions. if they vote for the deal, they deal a blow to their own chances, if they wield the knife, that might do for them, if they don't wield the knife,
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many brexit backbenchers might say, you stuck by her. that is all the game they are trying to figure out, how to lose themselves in the most positive position after theresa may is gone. i was speaking to a friend of one of the contenders for the leadership just of one of the contenders for the leadershipjust now, who was saying, it is difficult for ministers who are in the cabinet but want to be the leader, to say to the parties, i believe in a harder form of brexit, when they have supported the prime ministerand her when they have supported the prime minister and her deal for so long. andrea leadsom, having walked out tonight, potentially put yourself in a stronger position with the party membership and she can say, i saw that enough was enough and i drew a line. that puts pressure on her cabinet colleagues who also want to be prime minister, to think maybe they should do the same thing. thank you forjoining us. just to say that the chancellor, philip hammond, has just gone into downing street, the seniorfigures are just gone into downing street, the senior figures are there, the chancellor and the chief whip, julian smith are in there with
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theresa may this evening. no sign of the prime minister, she has been with the queen. lets see if she is still there tomorrow! not much rain at all in the forecast for the next few days, one in the sunshine again, this picture in staffordshire, highest temperatures in the south—east of england, 21—22. not as warm in inverness in northern scotland, much more cloud, even the summer scotland, much more cloud, even the summer rain as well, but some shelter from the highlands, summer rain as well, but some shelterfrom the highlands, where summer rain as well, but some shelter from the highlands, where we have seen most of the rain and towards aberdeen. some spots of rain in central areas, that has gone now. clear skies over night for england and wales. more of a breeze coming across scotland and the far north, so not as cold as it was last night. elsewhere, typical temperatures 647.
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heading into thursday, many places are starting dry with some sunshine and warming up quickly as well. we will see more cloud coming down on the brisk wind, down across scotland, the rain in the far north not amounting to a great deal. more cloud in northern ireland, wales and the south—west during the day. best of the sunshine further east, temperatures perhaps higher than today, 23 in london and 18 in newcastle, should feel pleasant. low pressure will keep it cool and wet in the north of scotland. the low pressure will push away towards scandinavia, so not as wet in northern scotland on friday. we are left with a north—westerly breeze, that will drag more cloud across scotland, it could be cloudy in northern ireland, perhaps a few showers as well, extending into the irish sea and england and wales. a lot of places are still dry, probably more cloud, so temperature is beginning to drop off a little bit. into the start of the weekend, bank holiday weekend, the showers
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will be fleeting, a dry day on saturday, a fair bit of cloud arriving through the day, and may be some spots of rain for northern ireland and western scotland later on. temperatures across the north 15416 at on. temperatures across the north 15—16 at best, so turning a bit colder. spots of rain on the weather front, low pressure building on from the atlantic heading into sunday, and that weather front will push its way eastwards as well, so as we head into the bank holiday weekend, there may be some sunshine at times, there may be some sunshine at times, there may be some rain on sunday, mostly in the north and west, south—east should be dry, all of us turning cooler.
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this is bbc news i'm lukwesa burak the headlines at eight. andrea leadsom resigns from cabinet, saying in a letter to theresa may "i no longer believe that our approach will deliver on the referendum result". is it time to go prime. the resignation adds to the pressure theresa may faces from her party to step down. the feeling is very much there, we've come to the end of the road with this prime minster, we need to turn the page as quickly as possible. the time has come for a change of leader, the deadline of the 31st octover and we need a new leader and a new team to be able to deliver that. the prime minister is to meet with backbench representatives

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