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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  May 24, 2019 10:00am-11:01am BST

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steve baker, grateful to you for 0k, steve baker, grateful to you for yourtime, 0k, steve baker, grateful to you for your time, thank you forjoining us live from high wycombe. meanwhile, here in downing street, as you can see, the lec turn is there ready and waiting behind me in the sunshine, waiting behind me in the sunshine, waiting for the prime minister to step out of number ten and outline, we think, the timetable for her departure from downing street. you're watching a bbc news special with me ben brown in downing street — where the prime minister is expected to make an announcement this morning about her future. our headlines... ministers expect theresa may to announce a date for her resignation today, after a backlash by her own mps against her latest brexit plan. the stage is being set in downing street for an imminent announcement by the prime minister. the 10th june is widely expected to be the start of the leadership contest. boris johnson, andrea leadsom, esther mcvey and rory stewart have all already confirmed they will run — but senior conservatives insist it's an open field.
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all kinds of things could happen. the favourite doesn't usually win — that is, the person expected to win hasn't won one of these for a very long time. a 10thjune timetable would mean theresa may will still be in office for donald trump's state visit at the beginning of the month. good morning from downing street with the sunshine pouring in. the stage is set with the lectern just behind me and sound engineers busy working away preparing for an
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announcement, an official announcement, an official announcement in the next few seconds. it's expected theresa may will be about to reveal her timetable for her departure from number ten after almost three years as prime minister. it's thought that around 9am this morning she met the head of the party's backbench mps, the 1922 committee, sir graham brady, who has been with her, telling her she effectively doesn't have any choice but to leave. we are seeing some party officials, including the prime minister's husband, philip may, and her press secretary, at the end of downing street, so i think the statement is imminent. i will step aside, as we ta ke imminent. i will step aside, as we take a look at the lectern. this is a moment that has been very much forced on the prime minister. her
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leadership has been questioned, not only in the party at large around the country, but also on conservative backbenchers where she has haemorrhaged support. the home secretary and foreign secretary both went to see her yesterday. all after the latest proposals for getting her brexit deal, her withdrawal agreement bill through parliament, and there was widespread anger about that and backlash against it with a lot of conservative mps and members of the cabinet saying, enough is enough, it's time to go, you have run out of road. she has been in office as prime minister for almost three years but will always be defined as the brexit prime minister who couldn't get brexit through. who tried time and time again to try to get her brexit deal through parliament, but after a disastrous snap election she never had the numbers on her own side to push that
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brexit deal through the house of commons. she has spent her entire premiership, really, negotiating with the european union, to try to get a brexit deal agreed with them, her own mps, and more latterly with labour mps her own mps, and more latterly with labourmps in her own mps, and more latterly with labour mps in cross—party talks, trying to get a different route through the house of commons. none of them in the end were successful. there is a saying, all political careers end in failure. theresa may steps out from number ten to announce her plans. ever since i first stepped through the door behind me as prime minister, i have striven to make the united kingdom a country that works not just for united kingdom a country that works notjust for a privileged few, but for everyone. and to honour the
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result of the eu referendum. back in 2016, we gave the british people a choice. against all predictions, the british people voted to leave the european union. i feel as british people voted to leave the european union. ifeel as certain today as i did three years ago that ina today as i did three years ago that in a democracy, if you give people a choice, you have a duty to implement what they decide. i have done my best to do that. i negotiated the terms of our exit and a new relationship with our closest neighbours that protects jobs, our security and our union. i have done everything i can to convince mps to back that deal. sadly, i have not been able to do so. i tried three times. i believe it was right to persevere, even when the odds against success seemed high. but it is now clear to me that it is in the best interests of the country for a new prime minister to lead that
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effort. so i am today announcing that i will resign as leader of the conservative and unionist party on friday seventh june so a successor can be chosen. i have agreed with the party chairman and the chairman of the 1922 committee that the process for electing a new leader should begin in the following week. i have kept her majesty the queen fully informed of my intentions and i will continue to serve as prime minister until the process is concluded. it is and will always remaina concluded. it is and will always remain a matter of deep regret to me that i have not been able to deliver brexit. it will be for my successor to seek a way forward honours the result of the that referendum. to succeed, he or she will have to find consensus in parliament where i have not. such a consensus can only be reached if those on all sides of the debate are willing to compromise.
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for many years, the great humanitarian sir nicholas winton, who saved the lives of hundreds of children by arranging their evacuation from nazi occupied czechoslovakia through the kindertransport, was my constituent in maidenhead. at another time of political controversy a few years before his death, he took me aside ata before his death, he took me aside at a local event and gave me a piece of advice. he said, neverforget that compromise is not a dirty word. life depends on compromise. he was right. as we strive to find the compromises we need in our politics, whether to deliver brexit or restore devolved government in northern ireland, we were must remember what brought us here. the referendum was just a call for us to leave the eu, but for profound change in our country. a call to make the united
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kingdom a country that truly works for everyone. i am kingdom a country that truly works for everyone. iam proud kingdom a country that truly works for everyone. i am proud of the progress we have made over the last three years. we have completed the work that david cameron and george osborne started. the deficit is almost eliminated. our national debt is falling and we are bringing an end to austerity. my focus has been on ensuring that the good jobs of the future would be created in communities across the whole country, not just in communities across the whole country, notjust in london and the south—east, through a modern industrial strategy. we have helped more people than ever enjoy the security of a job. we are building more homes and helping first—time buyers onto the housing ladder so young people can enjoy the opportunities their parents did. and we are protecting the environment, eliminating plastic waste, tackling climate change and improving air quality. this is what a decent, moderate and unpatriotic conservative government, on the common ground of british politics,
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can achieve. —— and patriotic conservative government. even as we face the biggest peacetime challenge any government can face. i know the conservative party can renew itself in the years ahead, that we can deliver brexit and serve the british people with policies inspired by our values. security, freedom and opportunity. those values have guided me throughout my career. but the unique privilege of this office is to use this platform to give a voice to the voiceless, to fight the burning injustices that still scar our society. that is why i brought forward properfunding our society. that is why i brought forward proper funding to our society. that is why i brought forward properfunding to mental health into the heart of our nhs long—term plan. it's why i am ending the postcode lottery for survivors of domestic abuse. it is why the race disparity audit and gender parity are shining a light on inequality so it has nowhere to hide. it is why i set up the
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independent public enquiry into the tragedy at grenfell tower, to search for the truth, so nothing like it can ever happen again. and so the people who lost their lives that night are never forgotten. people who lost their lives that night are neverforgotten. because this country is a union. notjust a family of four nations but a union of people, all of us. whatever our background, the colour of our skin or who we love, we stand together, and together we have a great future. our politics may be under strain but there is so much that is good about this country. so much to be proud of. so much to be optimistic about. i will shortly leave the job that it has been the honour of my life to hold. the second female prime minister, but certainly not the last. i do so with no ill will, but
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with enormous and enduring gratitude, to have had the opportunity to serve the country i love. the prime minister there, clearly very emotional, at the very end of that statement almost in tears. saying that it had been the honour of her life to serve the country as prime minister, as the second female prime minister, as the second female prime minister, as the second female prime minister, she said, but certainly not the last. she stood there in the sunshine of downing street, announcing the details of her long—awaited departure. she said
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she would resign as leader on the 7th ofjune, having agreed it with the conservative party chairman, and chairman of the 1922 committee of backbench mps, sir graham brady, who she met with earlier this morning, and who was making it very clear to her that she had effectively lost the support of her backbench members of parliament. when she has stepped down as conservative party leader, thatis down as conservative party leader, that is when the process of finding the new leader can begin. she says she deeply regrets that she has not been able to deliver brexit. she talked about how trying to really enact the will of the voters had been her challenge and it was with deep regret to her that she had not been able to make that happen. i
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have done my best to do that, she said, i have done everything i can to persuade members of parliament and have tried three times to get her brexit deal through parliament, but failed, and she said that was for her a deep regret, that she had not been able to deliver brexit. she also outlined other areas of her premiership and other areas of her government, some of the things she thought this government has achieved. our assistant political editor norman smith is with me and was listening to that. on a personal note, the prime minister at the end, understandably very emotional. it's a huge moment, and she was close to tea rs a huge moment, and she was close to tears at the end when she talked about how it would always have been an honour to serve as prime minister, welling up at the end. a hugely emotional moment. her husband philip watching on, as were close advisers from downing street. i
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thought it was a dignified statement, but also quite a defensive statement, saying that she tried her best, tried her best to get it through parliament, done it three times. i thought it was interesting as well, a clear message to her successor, compromise is not a dirty word. i think that will be seen as a a dirty word. i think that will be seen as a clear warning to those aiming to succeed her who are perhaps thinking, let's go for it. her take is, perhaps thinking, let's go for it. hertake is, no, you perhaps thinking, let's go for it. her take is, no, you have to bring people with you and if you want to get this through you will have to compromise. i think that was a clear message. likewise, she talked about the compassionate centrist tory ground, in the centre ground. again, i think, a ground, in the centre ground. again, ithink, a message ground, in the centre ground. again, i think, a message to whoever succeeds her, don't go bolting off to the right, that's not where the tory party should be. a number of different elements. she wanted to talk about her record and what she
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achieved, fulfilling the work of david cameron in getting the deficit down and ending austerity. she talked a bit about her race disparity unit, but inevitably all roads come back to brexit. as we suggested beforehand, her pitch was, look, i've gone as far as i can. i have tried my hardest to convince mps, but in the end it's beyond me. that message to whoever replaces her, slightly earlier than we thought, june seven, that contest beginning, she has said, don't think you can do this by being hard brexit or hard to remain. compromise is not a dirty word. we can listen again to the end of that statement we have just heard from theresa may, the prime minister, outlining her departure from downing street. she says she will resign as prime minister on friday 7th ofjune. says she will resign as prime minister on friday 7th ofjunelj will shortly leave the job that it has been the honour of my life to
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hold. the second female prime minister, but certainly not the last. i do so with no ill will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country i love. that was just the end of the prime minister's statement. as norman smith was saying, really welling up with emotion at the end of that statement, in which she outlined the timetable for her departure from downing street, friday 7th ofjune is when she will officially resign, but she will stay on as caretaker prime minister until a successor is found. we can get reaction immediately now. conservative mp garethjohnson joins us now — he resigned the government whip earlier this year in protest at the pm's brexit deal. he joins us via webcam from kent.
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what is your reaction to the news? it was widely anticipated, but she has now gone with tears in her eyes. it's a very sad but arguably inevitable consequence of all that has happened over the last year. understandably, the prime minister wa nts to understandably, the prime minister wants to set out the achievements, and she has had some during the time she has been pm, certainly with the economy and jobs and such. and progress on the environment. but now the conservative party has time to reflect on the statement she has just made and then go on to select a new leader and prime minister of the country. who do you think that new leader should be? there are plenty of talented people out there. personally for me, i think the person that can unite the conservative party, both remain and leave is dominic raab. i think he would be the person best suited to lead to the country at a very difficult time. we hope the contest
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will be open and fair and it will go to the membership of the conservative party, as it should do, to ultimately decide between two people who will lead the country. she was saying in her message, appealing for a spirit of compromise and consensus. is that possible, do you think, within the conservative party or within the country?” you think, within the conservative party or within the country? i think a lot of compromise has already taken place. a lot of compromise has already ta ken place. the a lot of compromise has already taken place. the £39 billion, the implementation period. many of us have been willing to compromise, myself and many others supported her deal on the last occasion because we felt there might not be a brexit if we didn't. there is a spirit to compromise, but we have to leave. the people in 2016 said we were leaving the european union, that's what they wanted and what they demand it from the houses of parliament, so we have to deliver that. we've got to get on with it so
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we can move the other issues. it's not just about brexit. we can move the other issues. it's notjust about brexit. do you feel a measure of sympathy for theresa may? she was close to tears at the end saying she had served her country. as the second female prime minister. yes i do. she has tried her best, she is patriotic, she wanted to lead us she is patriotic, she wanted to lead us through brexit, but she wasn't able to do that. she has made some poor decisions, no doubt about it, and she has paid the price for those decisions. but i feel sad for her personally. this is not a day to celebrate, in any way shape or form, whatever you feel about theresa may, she has tried to do her best and get her way through a brexit deal that she is supportive of. but politics can bea she is supportive of. but politics can be a harsh business and because she hasn't been able to deliver, she
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has had to go. last question, do you think her departure heightens the possibility or even probability that we will have a no—deal brexit come the end of october?” we will have a no—deal brexit come the end of october? i think there is scope for whoever comes in to renegotiate with the european union. we can start afresh. we want to work on the backstop, which has been behind most of the problems of the deal. i think the eu will look afresh at a new prime minister coming in. we now have the chance to leave with a deal that i and most of my colleagues want to see. to coin a phrase, we have to leave, with or without a deal. that must happen at the latest by the 31st october. i think when that is done the country can move on from something that has been hanging over us for quite some time. gareth johnson, thank you for being with us and giving your reaction to the news the prime minister has set out a timetable for
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her resignation and departure as party leader and prime minister, friday the 7th ofjune is when she said ina friday the 7th ofjune is when she said in a statement here a short time ago that she would be stepping down, paving the way for a leadership contest within the conservative party to select another leader and prime minister. we can get more reaction now. let's go to westminster now where i'm joined by peter bone mp. a prominent leave campaign, are you happy she has gone? she has made the right decision given the circumstances. it's a sad day for the prime minister, but i don't think there was any other option. i have always campaigned to change the policy on the eu, but she wasn't prepared to change policy, and i think it was right she had to leave as prime minister and leader of the conservative party. she said she had done everything she could to implement brexit. and that's true, isn't it? she tried and tried again.
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i will have to disagree with that. she could have been a national hero, if she had kept to her word when she said we would leave the european union on the 29th march. i think she said it 108 times in the house of commons. if we left with no deal on 29th march, and it was her decision alone not to do that, she would delivered brexit, and the brexit eve ryo ne delivered brexit, and the brexit everyone voted for. she chose not to do that, and from that point on i think it was inevitable that she would not serve for much longer. she had, as we have said, a tear in her eye at the end of the statement. she was very emotional, saying it was the greatest honour in her life to serve as the prime minister of her country, the second female prime minister. do you have sympathy for her? of course. she did what she thought was right. but when you have the biggest commons defeat ever on
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your major policy, it would have been time for a rethink. when the prime minister didn't rethink and pressed on not just prime minister didn't rethink and pressed on notjust once more, but twice more and was going to try again with the same policy, that was clearly wrong, that was an error of judgment. it was very sad for her that she's had to go. she has done a lot for the country outside the brexit policy, but when you get the fundamental policy wrong, then politics is very harsh and you have to go. there will be people who say people like you have brought her down, have opposed her all the way. the majority in parliament would not vote for the deal under any circumstance. i think the last time it was defeated by 58, 59 votes. she clearly didn't do what the people asked us to do in the referendum, and she didn't do what she said she would do, which is take us out on the 29th march with or without a
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deal. that was the moment... forgive me, but the people said they wanted to leave the european union. they didn't say that they wanted to leave without a deal. everybody knew that under the article 50 process, if you don't reach a deal with the eu... and i don't blame the prime minister for this, i blame the eu for the impossible deal they gave the prime minister, if we don't have a deal then we come out without. when we see the european union election results on sunday night, the conservative party, which i have been an active member of the last 50 yea rs, been an active member of the last 50 years, i fear we been an active member of the last 50 years, ifear we will been an active member of the last 50 years, i fear we will see been an active member of the last 50 years, ifear we will see it been an active member of the last 50 years, i fear we will see it have its worst result ever. who will you vote for as the next leader?” its worst result ever. who will you vote for as the next leader? i think it has to be somebody who believes in leave, that's important will stop i think it has to be someone not associated with the dreadful
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withdrawal agreement. people like esther mcvey, dominic raab, david davis and boris johnson. esther mcvey, dominic raab, david davis and borisjohnson. i think david davis have ruled himself out. but who can also walk into number ten? who has the authority and can step ten? who has the authority and can ste p o nto ten? who has the authority and can step onto the world stage straightaway and win the next general election for the conservative party? do you think borisjohnson conservative party? do you think boris johnson can walk conservative party? do you think borisjohnson can walk onto the world stage? absolutely. he was foreign secretary and knows all world leaders. i absolutely think borisjohnson is the right person but it will be for the party to decide. it's not for the mps. that's the great thing. whoever the party chooses as next conservative leader and prime minister, i will support. theresa may went out of her way to say we need compromise and consensus. do you agree with that, we need a compromise and consensus candidate to follow her? we need somebody to go to the eu and say the deal was compromise on the british side and not on the eu side. the 39
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billion, the transition period, all these things, the requirement to be aligned with standards in the european union. the european court. all these things were just not acceptable. the compromise has all been on the united kingdom's side. we need a leader who will go back and say, let's renegotiate, have a comprehensive free trade agreement, and move forward. i think the person to do that is borisjohnson. and move forward. i think the person to do that is boris johnson. peter bone, thank you. we can speak to another conservative mp. conservative mp pauline latham, who's a member of the european rsearch group, joins me from derby. that's the brexiteer group of tory mps, joining me from derby. what's your reaction to the news of the prime minister setting out her departure timetable? a mixed reaction. relief that the tension is over because we have all been expecting this and it hasn't happened in some weeks. but also
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sadness because theresa may clearly felt she had done the best for the country. she thought she had done the best for the conservative party, but it wasn't good enough. that is a sadness, because she tried, and she believed she had tried as hard as she possibly could. the trouble was, europe would not compromise at all, andi europe would not compromise at all, and i think they let her down and let this country down, and it will now be for a new leader to go out there and see what they can do, which has to unite our country and our party, north and south, east and west. doesn't matter where it is, they have to unite the country first, and the party as well. some people might say, she might say, who knows, that you let her down, the european research group, amongst others. her own conservative backbench mps who were constantly campaigning against her leadership and her policies. no, they weren't co nsta ntly and her policies. no, they weren't
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constantly campaigning against her leadership, they were campaigning against a deal that we all felt was absolutely flawed, that we couldn't support will stop it was people from all walks of life in parliament. the erg is a broad church in parliament, and she was brought down with the biggest defeat ever. you did try to force her out last year. the erg didn't. it was members of the conservative party who did. and they didn't succeed because they didn't win the vote of no confidence. so do you think now that she stayed too long, or is this timetable that she has announced reluctantly, that she will go on june the has announced reluctantly, that she will go onjune the 7th, is that a dignified exit, when she was facing overwhelming pressure from within
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the party and cabinet within the backbenches? i think she made a very dignified speech. i think she will be able to go out with dignity, having tried her level best to get it through. she is very sincere and determined, but she didn't manage it. i think she realises the time has come for her to go, and the good thing is she can see trump and do the d—day landing event and remain as prime minister until we have a new leader, which should be by the summer recess. and new leader, which should be by the summer recess. and then party members will decide by post or ballot. we will put two candidates forward and i hope this time we can put two forward and nobody backs out at the last minute, because it has to go to the membership to make the final decision. a lot of mps want to do thejob final decision. a lot of mps want to do the job and some will fall at the
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first hurdle, but it will then be whittled down to two. thank you, pauline latham, conservative mp. we can recap on what happened here, a dramatic morning in downing street. the prime minister setting out a timetable for her departure from the job she said she loved and had been the greatest honour of her life, to serve as prime minister of the uk, the second female prime minister of this country. but she said certainly not the last female prime minister. there was certainly a tear in her eye at the end of her statement when she said it was the greatest honour of her life. we can listen to a bit of her life. we can listen to a bit of that statement again. ever since i first stepped through the door behind me as prime minister, i have striven to make the united kingdom a
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country that works not just for a privileged few but for everyone, and to honour the result of the eu referendum. back in 2016, we gave the british people a choice. against all predictions, the british people voted to leave the european union. i feel as certain today as i did three yea rs feel as certain today as i did three years ago that in a democracy, if you give people a choice, you have a duty to implement what they decide. i have done my best to do that. i negotiated the terms of our exit and a new relationship with our closest neighbours, that protects jobs, a new relationship with our closest neighbours, that protectsjobs, our security and our union. i have done everything i can to convince mps to back that deal. sadly, i have not been able to do so. i tried three times. i believe it was right to persevere, even when the odds against success seemed high. but it is now clear to me that it is in the best interests of the country for a new prime minister to lead that
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effort. so i am today announcing i will resign as leader of the conservative and unionist party on friday the 7th ofjune so that a successor can be friday the 7th ofjune so that a successor can be chosen. i have agreed with the party chairman and the chairman of the 1922 committee that the process for electing a new leader should begin in the following week. i have kept her majesty the queen fully informed of my intentions and i will continue to serve as her prime minister until the process has concluded. it is and will always remain a matter of deep regret to me that i have not been able to deliver brexit. it will be for my successor able to deliver brexit. it will be for my successor to seek a way forward that honours the result of the referendum. to succeed, he or she will have to find consensus in parliament where i have not. such a consensus can only be reached if those on all sides of the debate are willing to compromise. for many
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yea rs, willing to compromise. for many years, the great humanitarian sir nicholas winton, who saved the lives of hundreds of children by arranging their evacuation from nazi occupied czechoslovakia to the kinder transport, was my constituent in maidenhead. at another time of political controversy a few years before his death, he took me to one side at a local event and gave me a piece of advice. he said, never forget that compromise is not a dirty word. life depends on compromise. he was right. as we strive to find the compromises we needin strive to find the compromises we need in our politics, whether to deliver brexit or restore devolved government in northern ireland, we must remember what brought us here. because the referendum was notjust a call to leave the eu, but for profound change in our country. a call to make the united kingdom a country that truly works for
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everyone. i'm proud of the progress we have made over the last three yea rs. we have we have made over the last three years. we have completed the work that david cameron and george osborne started, the deficit is almost eliminated, our national debt is falling and we are bringing an end to austerity. my focus has been on ensuring that the good jobs of the future will be created in communities across the whole country, not just in communities across the whole country, notjust in london and the south—east, through our modern industrial strategy. we have helped more people than ever enjoy the security of a job. we are building more homes and helping first—time buyers onto the housing ladder so young people can enjoy the opportunities their parents did. and we are protecting the environment, eliminating plastic waste, tackling climate change, and improving air quality. this is what a decent, moderate and unpatriotic conservative government, on the common ground of british politics
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can achieve —— and exotic. even as we tackle the biggest peacetime challenge any government has ever faced. i know the conservative party can renew itself in the years ahead, that we can deliver brexit and serve the british people with policies inspired by our values. security, freedom and opportunity, those values which have guided me throughout my career. but the unique privilege of this office is to use this platform to give a voice to the voiceless, to fight the burning injustices that still scar our society also that is why i put properfunding for society also that is why i put proper funding for mental health at the heart of our nhs long—term plan. it is why i am ending the postcode lottery for survivors of domestic abuse. it is why the race disparity audit and gender pay reporting are shining a light on inequality so it has nowhere to hide. and it is why i
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set up the independent public enquiry into the tragedy at grenfell tower, to search for the truth, so nothing like it can ever happen again, and so the people who lost their lives that night are never forgotten. because this country is a union notjust a family of four nations, but a union of people, all of us. whatever our background, the colour our skin or who we have a great future. our politics may be under strain, but there is so much thatis under strain, but there is so much that is good about this country, so much to be proud of, so much to be optimistic about. i will shortly leave the job that it has been the honour of my life to hold. the second female prime minister, but certainly not the last. i do so with
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no ill will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country i love. a tearful prime minister at the end of that statement here in downing street. we can get more reaction to the statement and the timetable she outlined for her departure with at college green. just getting busy here on college green is people digest that
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emotional statement, the prime minister of course emotional with her voice breaking at the end but that statement has been much speculated about, enormous pressure on her to announce her departure. with me is kevin maguire, associate editor of the daily mirror. firstly, your reaction to the statement. theresa may tried to state that compromise had been her weight forward but obviously she failed and enormous regrets forward but obviously she failed and enormous regrets that she has failed to deliver brexit. she said she did her best but it was not good enough. europe, as an issue, has destroyed the last four macro conservative prime ministers over 30 years. she was a very prime ministers over 30 years. she was a very difficult hand, she played it badly, she could not get her compromise deal through the commons on leaving the eu and she would have been pushed if she did notjump would have been pushed if she did not jump because she would have been pushed if she did notjump because she has lost the confidence of her mps and her senior members of the cabinet. and whoever replaces her will find they do not
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have a majority in the house of commons and britain leaving the european union in an orderly way that protects jobs and incomes and security will require a compromise a paralysed parliament is unable to reach. boris johnson is the name everybody thinks is the frontrunner to become the next prime minister. it is only the conservative party, firstly the mps and then the membership, that get to choose the next prime minister. at such a time of enormous political division, is that the right way forward? boris johnson, former mayor of london, briefly foreign secretary, seem to go round the world insulting people, blundered in iran, a british citizen's jail sentence was extended, has been sacked twice in his careerfor lying, he extended, has been sacked twice in his career for lying, he led the campaignfor his career for lying, he led the campaign for brexit in the referendum also a lot of the stuff he saidi referendum also a lot of the stuff he said i would call them lies, other people would say it is disputed, but he is the frontrunner. the right—wing majority, without a majority, the mps picked two names that go to 120,000 members. there will be enormous pressure to hold a general election so the british people decide who is prime minister, rather than a party itself. but
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under the system we operate, it is a legitimate way forward, but will it have political legitimacy and will people accept it? there is a big question over that but he is the frontrunner. in terms of what happens over the next few days, theresa may was very emotional at the end that statement. were you surprised at that? she has held it together and been enormously resilient if nothing else. the vicar‘s daughter is very buttoned up, she rarely shows emotion and she has been compared to a robot but at the end we heard her voice breaking. she was very teary. she knows she is leaving parliament a failure, leaving parliament a failure, leaving the prime ministership as a failure, she did not do what she set out to do, probably an impossible task but she did not achieve it. i think if she had shown more emotion
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earlier in her premiership, people might have thought better of her because she was always coming across as very cold and technocratic and there was no real warmth. was she dealt an impossible hand? could anybody have changed their weight this brexit process was handled? given the numbers in the building behind us don't add up for any majority and the next prime minister, whoever it is, will face exactly the same problem. are absolutely, whoever becomes prime minister, the conservative party will pick them, they will find they do not have the majority in the house of commons and they will find that brexit is an incredibly difficult issue. it is not the easy leave deal that was promised three yea rs leave deal that was promised three years ago. i think she was given a difficult hand but she made two strategic errors. one was holding a general election in 2017 when she thought she would massively general election in 2017 when she thought she would me terrible her majority but ran a terrible campaign and she saw her party lose its majority. the second was she had a hard—line brexit camp in her own
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party instead of reaching out to other parties to see if there was a come from mice and common ground. she courted them. people will have sympathy in one sense for her because she was dealt a very poor hand but she played it badly and in the end, she is the author of her own downfall. are looking ahead, apart from boris johnson, who own downfall. are looking ahead, apart from borisjohnson, who are the key front runners? the tory leadership process is very unpredictable. boris chose to stand aside last time but he was betrayed, aside last time but he was betrayed, as some see it, by his running mate, michael gove. you are the other key figures that could emerge and who has the numbers in parliament? figures that could emerge and who has the numbers in parliament7m the conservative party there is a history of the frontrunner falling for the end of the race and winning. he will be challenged by dominic raab, the former brexit secretary, and again he is very much pro—brexit but there are about 20 conservatives saying they will run. it will be an incredibly big field. a lot will fall quickly. i think it is boris johnson's a lot will fall quickly. i think it is borisjohnson's to lose. but weeks ago he was not in the running
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and what has happened is the conservative party has done so badly recently that they have got desperate and when you go desperate, you go for your wild card. they feel threatened by nigel farage, the former conservative who now heads the brexit party. one minister said that the way to fight a snake oil salesman is with another. i think thatis salesman is with another. i think that is a wrong analysis and they're making a mistake but that is the thinking. and in terms of what boris johnson could achieve as a prime minister, a lot of speculation about whether he would get moderate support from people like amber rudd and the more centrist conservatives, but ultimately, what would he offer? would he have to offer a second referendum? again, there is no majority to get through parliament. he really blows hot and cold. one moment he will be socially liberal and the next racist and making jokes about muslim women and so on. but he can appeal to the one nation wing, the centrist part of his party. but
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on this question brexit, the only way he can move forward is with compromise and i'm not sure he will be capable of getting a compromise within his party. i'm not sure the conservative party is in the mood to compromise. we seem to be stuck in britain. we know that in parliament mps are against leaving without a deal. october the 31st is the latest deadline, on halloween. but on what terms would they leave? we just don't know and it is probably not there. it is also interesting that conservative mps what yet another vote to elect their own leader and a prime minister but they still pose a second vote in the country, a fresh referendum on brexit. —— they still oppose. thank you. theresa may announcing that she will go by the 7th ofjune which is two weeks today. thank you very much. we have been getting reaction to that resignation statement here in downing street. former brexit secretary who is
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expected to be one of the contenders to succeed theresa may, dominic raab, said she was dignified as ever and showed integrity and remains a dedicated public servant, and loyal conservative. michael gove also heaping praise on her. that was what heaping praise on her. that was what he said, a very moving statement from the prime minister who deserves
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our respect and gratitude. the international trade secretary, liam fox, also saying that the prime minister had acted with equity and honour in pursuit of what she believes to be the national interest, the hallmark of her time in public life. and responding to the prime minister's tears at the end of the speech, heidi allen, saying why do we not see that emotion more? things could have been so emotion more? things could have been so different. reflecting what i think kevin maguire was saying, that perhaps she should have shown a more emotional side in public at an
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earlier stage in her premiership. andrea leadsom, who resigned from the cabinet on wednesday, another one widely expected to run for the leadership, saying on twitter that it was a very dignified speech by theresa may and an illustration of a total commitment to country and duty. she did her utmost and i wish her all the best. we can get more reaction from david mellor, who joins us now from central london. it was quite an emotional speech, especially at the end. did you feel a measure of sympathy for her as she
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announced her resignation? no. someone once wrote about the death of little nell, theresa may should never have been for minister... did not have the qualifications or in terms of temperament or her ability adopt a proper leader and having inherited the conservative party in a mess, because of david cameron's
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antics, she left it in an even bigger mess. denis healy always said, you are in a hole, stop digging but she continued to dig and she has hung on beyond her time. she said she wanted to implement brexit, something i am extremely dubious about. far from that, something i am extremely dubious about. farfrom that, she something i am extremely dubious about. far from that, she was trying to do brino, the sort of things at civil so vince managed to negotiate with you because she did not trust her ministers enough to give them the sort of hand they needed to stand a chance of getting an agreement that are the parliament of the country would subscribe to. i first joined the party the country would subscribe to. i firstjoined the party 55
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the country would subscribe to. i first joined the party 55 years the country would subscribe to. i firstjoined the party 55 years ago, i never thought i would see it in the mess it is now. the mere fact that she goes does not we can see helicopter pictures of the prime minister driving away. we don't know if she is going to see the queen now, to discuss that departure from downing street. we have heard from scottish conservative leader ruth davidson, who has said, as britain's second female prime minister, she has been a role model for girls across the uk, showing there is no glass ceiling for their ambitions, a point to the prime minister made in her
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address, that she had been the second frame —— female prime minister in the country, and certainly not the last. home secretary sajid javid has said, nobody could have worked harder or had a greater sense of duty than the prime minister. this is her car... we will bring more details on the prime minister's movement as they come to us. three years ago, theresa may became prime minister. for many, the only surprise was that she lasted as long as she did. when she first became prime minister, some people said she would last weeks or days. once a reluctant supporter of eu membership, she won the top job in the turmoil that followed the 2016 brexit vote. vicki young looks back on her premiership. theresa may rose to the top job in one of the most turbulent periods in british political history. after the uk bus might vote to leave the
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european union, david cameron dramatically designed, and extraordinary infighting among other leadership contenders left the path clear for mrs may to become the country's second female prime minister. as we leave the european union, we will forge a bold new positive role for ourselves in the world. and we will make britain a country that works not just for a privileged few, but everyone of us. during her first months as privileged few, but everyone of us. during herfirst months as prime minister, she was under constant pressure to lay out her approach to brexit negotiations, but refused to give much away. brexit means brexit and we will make a of it. becoming prime minister had been a long held ambition. the daughter of a vicar, teresa brazier, she then was, was mainly state educated in oxfordshire before studying geography at oxford university. in her third year she met her future husband, university. in her third year she met herfuture husband, philip. after graduating, mrs may went to work in the city but she saw her
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future in politics. she became a councillor in south london and after standing for parliament twice, she was elected mp for maidenhead in 1997. the conservative party at westminster was dominated by men but theresa may dared to flaunt her feminine side with a love of fashion and flamboyant taste in shoes which fascinated photographers. as party chairman she made the case for conservative modernisation, telling her party some hard truths during their years in opposition. our base is too narrow, and so occasionally are our sympathies. you know what some people call us? the nasty party. when david cameron became prime minister he unexpectedly promoted theresa may to home secretary in the coalition government with the liberal democrats. despite failing to bring net migration down to the conservative target of the tens of thousands, she was the longest serving home secretary of modern times, but as prime minister she faced an even tougher challenge, steering the uk and her party
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through brexit, triggering article 50, the formal notification telling brussels britain would be leaving the eu. and then this most cautious of politicians became one of westminster‘s biggest risk—ta kers. since i became prime minister i said there should be no election until 2020. i have now concluded that the only way to guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead is to hold this election and seek your support for the decisions i must take. mrs may said she had called the general election to strengthen her hand in the brexit negotiations, but a huge gamble backfired. she lost the conservatives their majority, only hanging on to power through a deal with the dup, a political misjudgment that left her weakened. her attempts to reassert her authority didn't always go according to plan. the message during this important conference
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speech was lost amid a catalogue of interruptions, a prankster, a faulty set, and a persistent cough. after months of negotiations with brussels, mrs may agreed a withdrawal deal, but the compromise to avoid border checks on the island of ireland was not one many in her party, or her partners in government, the dup, could accept. the ayes to the right, 202. the noes to the left, 432. that was an historic defeat in the commons. mps voted against it twice more. mrs may was forced to ask the eu for a delay to brexit. her last throw of the dice was to appeal to labour. weeks of talks got nowhere as she went ahead with a promise to mps that they could decide whether to hold a second referendum. it was too much for many conservatives. they watched as nigel farage's new brexit party
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surged in popularity and finally moved against her. theresa may never wa nted moved against her. theresa may never wanted brexit to define her time in office, but the momentous decision to leave the european union was the backdrop to everything her government did. she was praised for her tenacity, sense of duty in the face of so many setbacks. but critics said she lacked vision and regarded brexit as a damage limitation exercise will stop once more, the issue of europe has ended the career of a conservative leader. vicki young, bbc news, westminster. we have had some reaction from leader of the labour partyjeremy some reaction from leader of the labour party jeremy corbyn. some reaction from leader of the labour partyjeremy corbyn. theresa may stepping down injune the 7th. jeremy corbyn says she is right to resign, and she has now accepted what the country has known for months. she can't govern, and nor can her divided and disintegrating party. whoever becomes tory leader must let the people decide our
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country's future through an immediate general election. the words ofjeremy corbyn. with me to discuss this more is our assistant political editor, norman smith. what do you make ofjeremy corbyn's reaction? not surprising. he has been calling for a general election for some time. it certainly will not happen because in the wake of local elections, european elections, the brexit shambles, the last thing a new tory leader will want to do is go to the country, so i don't think it will happen anytime soon. it's not a complete nonstarter. you could have a scenario where you get a new leaderfaced have a scenario where you get a new leader faced with the same parliament, and they can't get their way through so the only thing to do is to shake up the arithmetic. you could have a scenario where a new tory leader comes in, gets momentum, and thanks, i will call a general election just to see if i can get a majority to push through brexit. i think it's unlikely given mrs may tried pretty much the same trick when she took over thinking she could get a bounce to go into a
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election and the majority blew up in herface. she was kibosh ever afterwards. i don't think it's going to happen, but i find it interesting her now resignation statement, there we re her now resignation statement, there were emotional moments, reflective moments and defensive moments, but i thought the most interesting thing we re thought the most interesting thing were appointed messages to her party and successor which were, bluntly, don't think of abandoning brexit, can't. you have to compromise and you have to stay in the centre ground. there will be some who think she could have learned those lessons herself, and if she had compromised, reached out to labour earlier, she could have got a deal through, but she started to do it too late in the day. norman, thank you. it has been a momentous and historic morning here in downing street. europe consuming another part of leader —— consuming another part of leader ——
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consuming another part of leader —— consuming another conservative party leader. theresa may setting out the timetable for her departure. after huge pressure from her cabinet and backbenchers, she will step down on june seven. you are watching special bbc news coverage. more coverage for viewers in the uk on bbc two and the bbc news channel.
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you're watching a bbc news special with me, ben brown, in downing street on a historic day — as theresa may announces she will quit as conservative leader on the 7th ofjune. our headlines: in an emotional statement, mrs may said she had "done her best" to honour the results of the eu referendum in 2016 — and that it was a matter of "deep regret" that she's been unable to deliver brexit. i do so with no ill will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country i love. her announcement paves the way
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for a contest to decide a new prime minister, who will take on the job

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