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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 25, 2019 7:00pm-7:30pm BST

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this is bbc news i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 7pm. the race to become the new conservative leader and prime minister is under way — matt hancock is the latest to enter the contest. delivering brexit is absolutely mission—critical and it must be done as soon as possible, and it has to be done in this parliament. a british climber dies on mount everest. robin haynes fisher is the tenth person to die on the mountain this season. four children who were "rescued" from a house in sheffield yesterday, have been released from hospital. two boys, aged 13 and 1a, died in the incident. president trump is injapan for the start of a historic four—day state visit. universities in england are told not to ‘scaremonger‘ over finances,
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as a review is expected to call for them to reduce their tuition fees by nearly 2000 pounds per year. and in sport, victory over hearts lands celtic the ‘treble treble‘. more on sportsday at half past 7. good afternoon. the race is on to find the next prime minister — after theresa may resigned yesterday. mrs may said she will stand down onjune seventh — but continue while the leadership contest takes place. five conservatives have already announced
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they will stand — but others may also put their names forward. party bosses expect a new leader to be chosen by the end ofjuly. but will a new prime minister be able to end the deadlock over brexit? 0ur political correspondent, tom barton, takes a look. to serve the country i love. as she prepares to walk away from the top job, the focus now is on who might be the next person to step through the door of number ten as prime minister. he wants the job. so does he. and her. and him. him too. we need a leaderfor the future, not just for now. of course we've got to deliver brexit, and i will, but we need to win the argument for free enterprise and a free society and do all the other things we need to do to make this country a great place to live. anybody who pretends there's some magic solution to brexit is misleading the public.
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if there had been a magic solution, it would have been done already. the reason there isn't a magic solution is it's not about the detailed lines in this deal, it's about the way in which people communicate and negotiate. i've worked in iraq, i've worked in afghanistan, i was a professional diplomat, i negotiate. the field is expected to get bigger. good morning. are you running? although environment secretary michael gove hasn't yet said whether he'll be running. one person who has definitely ruled herself out is amber rudd. a senior cabinet minister and former remain campaigner, she says she is not the right person for the job, right now. i've just decided that it's not for me, i think the party, the members and probably the country want somebody who is more enthusiastic about brexit than i am. theresa may isn't leaving number ten just yet. she'll stand down as tory leader on june the 7th. three days later, the leadership contest will formally kick off. it's expected to take several weeks and she'll hand over the keys to downing street at the end ofjuly.
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the biggest question for the person who eventually moves in, how can they unite parliament and the country around a vision the biggest question for the person who eventually moves in, how can they unite parliament and the country around a vision for brexit when the current occupant of number ten has failed so dramatically? and we'll find out how this story, and many others, are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30pm and 11:30pm this evening on the papers. our guests joining me tonight are the broadcaster, john stapleton, and the political reporter, kate proctor from the london evening standard. officials say a british man died on saturday on mount everest — bringing to 10 the total death toll this season on the world's largest peak. robin haynes fisher reportedly fell ill while descending from the summit. an irish man also died on everest yesterday. there have been reports of overcrowding and climbers have been queuing near the summit.
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jenny kumah has the story. taken just two days ago, this photo shows the queues of people ascending everest, in what's been one of its most deadly weeks. ten people have died in recent days, climbing the world's tallest peak. among them, 44—year—old british man, robin haynes fisher and 56—year—old kevin hynes from ireland. record numbers are making the ascent, trying to take advantage of a window in the weather conditions. 381 permits have been issued, costing around £9,000 each. but there had been calls for the number of permits to be limited and criticism of the trek operators. the ice wall is a very treacherous part of the mountain, low down it is the first thing you get to coming from base camp. you know, what are they even doing there, who has taken them, who's said to them, it's ok? this week's death toll is higher
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than the whole for the whole of last year and calls for improved safety are rising. joining me now is rebecca stephens mbe, the first british woman to climb everest. i don't know if you saw those pictures on that ledge, what do you make of that? yes. i think that is more extraordinary than anything i've seen before, it is difficult to imagine on that summit, which is very narrow, how you can have people moving into directions. and, it must be, i tell you moving into directions. and, it must be, itell you it moving into directions. and, it must be, i tell you it is extremely narrow and that i will be dangerous to manoeuvre that. but the worrying thing is twofold, as slow as you are climbing everest, you want to be able to keep moving and just standing still, there are people in front of you, it means he can get:
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incredibly fast and that is a problem and then the other thing is if you want to make the decision to move down you cannot do that, that does create a very dangerous situation. what some of the emotions that you go through as a climber? because the physical strain must be incredible. yes, but i think, i've a lwa ys incredible. yes, but i think, i've always thought the biggest fear of summit fever, where the emotional drive is so strong that you can lose any sense of rationality and failed to turn around when you should and it is so strongly want to keep going and i'm pretty sure i was and that motivational bubble but we have plenty of time, so was not really pushed to where i need to get going longer than they should have. but it remains a dangerous place and it a lwa ys remains a dangerous place and it always will be. extreme altitude, not much oxygen in the air you're
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not much oxygen in the air you're not meant to be there most of us can only get there with oxygen tanks you only get there with oxygen tanks you only take as much as you need because it's too much to carry. and your body is not strong enough to resist the cold, chances are very small. in terms of training from a climbers perspective, what is the worst case scenario climbers perspective, what is the worst case scenario and how do you prepare yourself for that? well, he can probably think of a few but the most common one is can probably think of a few but the most common one is that. is the 3000 feet or thousand metres of the mountain, notice the death zone which sounds very dramatic but it is true that people because they are too high. and it could be a very u nsta ble area too high. and it could be a very unstable area of ice where the section could collapse at any time
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and statistically, to talk about that, it did not used to be regarded as the danger zone, but as a number of people have been killed in that area it gained that title. do people underestimate the dangers of art everest? it is very easy to do so, andi everest? it is very easy to do so, and i am guilty of doing that myself as well. the problem is, going through there is extremely, high on the mountain, that adrenalfight through there is extremely, high on the mountain, that adrenal fight or flight the mountain, that adrenal fight or flight reaction doesn't happen because it does not look particularly dangerous, you don't see the lack of oxygen in the air you're not really functioning at 100% because of that. it is easy to make bad decisions at that altitude. president trump and the first lady melania have
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arrived injapan this morning for the start of a four—day state visit. mr trump will be the first foreign leader to meet japan's new emperor and he's also presenting a trophy at a sumo wrestling tournament. 0ur correspondent in japan hywel griffith looks ahead to his visit. this is a trip really tailor—made for president trump. we will see him tomorrow playing golf, we know that's one of his favourite pastimes, later on a trip to sumo wrestling. we know that he was quite a fan of wrestling back in the states, a different type, but he'll be there with a front row seat to an important competition in tokyo. and all those pictures of him will be projecting a sort of close friendship with the prime minister of japan, shinzo abe. the two men have been close and meeting and speaking over the phone a0 times we are told since president trump came to power and their relationship is key for both men possible future for both men's possible future
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success, both have elections on the horizon and so they need to show as two world leaders, they work together closely. also on the menu over the next few days will be nailing down the details of a bilateral trade deal betweenjapan and the us. the us wasn't keen to be part of the multilateral deal, the transpacific partnership that donald trump rubbished, he wanted something one—on—one and so over the last few months and years, we have seen them working closely with teams in the background, hammering out the details. there are concerns around the japanese economy as to whaat donald trump might want to do over the steel industry here. there are also concerned of the future of the automotive industry, companies like toyota have a big presence in the us, donald trump, however, wants to champion american car—makers. so in the back rooms, maybe the conversations and meal times, may be able to discuss is one other vital employee engagement, donald trump will become the first international leader to meet the new emperor. emperor naruhito. this is a new imperial reign, the time of reiwa, therefore,
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i think that will play to his status and sense of importance as a global leader with being the first person invited to come here to meet the new emperor.
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good evening. the race is on to find the next prime minister after theresa may's resignation yesterday. mrs may has said she will stand down on the 7th ofjune but she'll continue while the leadership contest takes place. five conservatives have already announced they will stand but others may add their names to the list. a new leader's expected to be chosen by the end ofjuly, as our political correspondent, chris mason, reports. look into the camera if you want to be prime minister. the contest is on. this man is keen... and so is he.
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we need a leaderfor the future, not just for now. matt hancock playing on his relative youth. he's a0. he reckons he could clear the way to do what theresa may failed to do — persuade the current crop of mps to back brexit. the majority in the house of commons wants to leave europe. there have been disagreements on how. and some of my contenders may say that if they don't get their preferred option, whether it be no deal or something else, then they'll have a general election. and i put it to you that that would be a disaster for the country and it would risk corbyn by christmas. both mr hancock and fellow cabinet minister rory stewart voted remain — though they'll tell anyone who'll listen that brexit must — and, crucially, can - be delivered. but... anyone who pretends there is some magic solution to brexit
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is misleading the public. if there had been a magic solution it would have been done already. the reason there isn't a magic solution is it's not about the detailed lines in this deal, it's about the way in which people communicate and negotiate. and i worked in iraq, i worked in afghanistan. i was a professional diplomat, i negotiated. good morning, mr gove. if distinctive jogging styles are enough to get you thejob, michael gove — who voted for brexit in the referendum — would be a shoo—in. he's yet to say he's definitely in the running. i think it's time for a bagel. so how will this contest work? theresa may isn't leaving downing street just yet. she'll stand down as conservative leader a week on friday. the following week the race to replace her will formally begin. but mrs may will stay on as prime minister until towards the end ofjuly, when her successor is chosen. the former foreign secretary, borisjohnson, is currently seen as the favourite. this former conservative leader hasn't said yet who he will vote for,
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but appears tempted by mrjohnson. i do take umbrage at people going around saying, you know, there's all sorts of stuff and there are problems with boris. you know, there are plenty of leaders with a past... if you can name me one leader who hasn't got a past, who hasn't done things that are sometimes wrong or whatever, you would never have had people like churchill or attlee or anyone else, for that matter, that's ever been elected. so here we go. the topic is clear. and so is the prize. and in these early skirmishes there is already a fault line opening over theissue is already a fault line opening over the issue of a no—deal brexit and whether the next prime minister would be willing to contemplate that. boris johnson would be willing to contemplate that. borisjohnson says he would and so rory stewart, who saw there, said he would not serve in a boris johnson cabinet and he thinks no deal would be a terrible outcome. iain duncan smith suggesting the comment from mr stewart was stupid.
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a reminder of the divisions in the party and how brexit will be the dominating and only topic in this two—month contest. chris, thank you. and there will be more on the leadership contest tomorrow on the andrew marr show at 10am on bbc one. his guests include former brexit secretary dominic raab and the chancellor, philip hammond. a british man is reported to have died on mount everest, bringing the death toll to 10 this season on the world's highest peak. robin haynes fisher reportedly fell ill while descending from the summit. there have been reports of overcrowding and climbers have been queuing near the peak. an irishman also died on the mountain yesterday, located in the himalayas. andy moore has the story. did you see where you were going, robin? i'm going to the top. but i'm going via the ice storm! yeah, it should be a trip to remember. robin haynes fisher was filmed by his partner at everest base camp just a few weeks ago. and this was him four years ago
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on the summit of mont blanc. he had also climbed aconcagua, the highest mountain in south america. he got into trouble on everest on the way down, according to the man who organised the expedition. we've just got to get down now! just at the 150 metre... that's about 8700 metres... he just fell down. and then our sherpa tried to wake him up. but he couldn't. and he tried to give him more oxygen and water. but he didn't respond. these extraordinary pictures were taken just a few days ago as dozens of mountaineers queued to get up and down the final knife—edge ridge to the summit of everest. 0ne experienced mountaineer who was stuck in that trafficjam says the authorities need to do more to regulate numbers. we can make the duration of the summit much longer. by setting up six lines well in advance, so that people can have
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at least six or seven weather windows rather than two or three, where everybody would like to go at that same time. the family of mr haynes fisher have paid tribute to him, saying he was an aspirational adventurer who lived life to the full. andy moore, bbc news. a 37—year old man and 34—year—old woman are being questioned on suspicion of murdering two boys aged 13 and 14 in an incident at a house in sheffield. 0ur correspondent, phil bodmer, is in sheffield. phil, what more do we know about the investigation? this evening south yorkshire police has said that four children have been taken to hospital as a result ofa been taken to hospital as a result of a serious incident in the wrath of a serious incident in the wrath of the city and have now been discharged. emergency services were called to a semi detached home in the shiregreen area of sheffield at
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around 7:30am yesterday morning and neighbours reported seeing dozens of police cars and emergency service vehicles on the street, six children we re vehicles on the street, six children were taken to hospital including a seven—month—old baby and sadly two teenage boys aged 13 and 14 died. today, people living nearby have been taking floral tributes and laying flowers close to the address and police have maintained a close presence in the house remains sealed off today as investigations into the circumstances continue. tonight, i37—year—old man and 34—year—old woman are continuing to be questioned after being arrested on suspicion of murder and we await the results of the postmortem examinations which are due some time over the weekend. thank you. the number of migrants arriving in the uk on small boats this month has reached mo. that's higher than the figure in december, when the home secretary, sajid javid, declared a ‘major incident‘. eight migrants decribing themselves as iranian and afghan were picked up in the channel today by border force officials and taken to dover for health checks and questioning.
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the troubled retail giant arcadia is to close twice as many stores as it had said it would earlier this week. the group, which own brands such as topshop, burton and dorothy perkins, said it would close a further 25 sites on top of the 23 already announced as part of a rescue plan. football now and celtic were attempting to win the treble treble. that‘s winning all three domestic trophies in one season for the third year in a row. they played hearts this afternoon in the scottish cup final. but did they do it? chris mclaughlin will reveal all! the 134th scottish cup final. for celtic, though, three was the magic number. their prize — a treble for the third year in a row. for the men in maroon, a single single would do just fine. the first half was pretty much like the mid—may glasgow weather — all a little bit dull. hearts sat in to soak up
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what celtic had to offer and despite this edouard chance, the champions offered up very little. but shortly after the break, the goal of the game was crying out for. this could be a big moment. it could be a very, very big moment! first blood to the underdogs. but their lead didn‘t last long. celtic pushed, hearts tripped, penalty given. edouard‘s leveller providing relief for those in green and white. it all got a little bit stodgy again until 10 minutes before the end. with history in their sights, edouard once again made hampden roar. i victory, so there were an enough for neil lennon to be offered the celticjob on a permanent basis. it wasn‘t their best performance. the supporters won‘t care about that, but celtic have made world football history. the treble treble is theirs. chris mclaughlin, bbc
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news, hampden park. enjoy! there‘s more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we‘re back with the late news at 10pm. now on bbc one, it‘s time for the news where you are. goodbye. welcome to bbc london news. i‘m charlotte franks. heathrow airport passengers could face a £15 surcharge if they arrive in an older, more polluting car. cells in the rain is been going to the evening or night as well, particularly in scotland, some heavier developing towards the west and northwest of northern ireland, seeing some rain coming back overnight pushing into its western parts of england and wales, later,
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remains drive through east of england with clear spells, maybe one or two fog patches, but it is a mild night going into sunday morning, wet start and scotland, although the heavy rain for many of us still some outbreaks in northern scotland, showery rain for the south across england in males, still reaching southern england, it moves south, elsewhere it will turn dry, bright with sunny spells and will feel cooler and fresher still some spots though towards the southeast into the low 20s, single figures in northern scotland as it will be another cool wet day on bank holiday monday here is where some showers starting to break out with the chance of catching some heavy ones particularly across the side of the uk, some of the showers will spread a bit further east during the day but not made it all towards the eastern side of the slow start of the weekend into the low 20s just in the weekend into the low 20s just in the high teens in the warmer spots,
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and as we take a look at the picture and as we take a look at the picture and to stay it is going to feel much cooler and fresher because notice the winds switching to a northerly, dry weather around the building cloud will bring the chance of one or two showers out there with may of this temperature is being a bit below average for the time of year. so we are entering a spell of cooler and more unsettled weather to come to the rest of the weekend, temperature is gradually coming strain to pick up some rain around and maybe not as much as you would like though in the gardens across southern most parts of the uk, but this is how it looks all the winter next weekend, and by next weekend, it looks like high pressure is building from the south as it starts to turn warmer once again.
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hello this is bbc news with lu kwesa burak. the headlines. another two cabinet ministers, matt hancock and rory stewart, enter the race to become the new conservative leader and prime minister. a british climber dies on mount everest. robin haynes fisher is the tenth person to die on the mountain this season. four children who were rescued from a house in sheffield yesterday — have been released from hospital. two boys, aged 13 and 1a, died in the incident. president trump arrives injapan for the start of a historic four—day state visit. universities in england are told not to ‘scaremonger‘ over finances as a review is expected to call for them to reduce their tuition fees by nearly two thousand pounds per year.

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