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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 28, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: a knife attack on a group of schoolchildren at a bus stop injapan leaves two dead and at least 15 injured. after their disastrous showing in the european elections, conservative leadership candidate jeremy hunt warns a no—deal brexit would be political suicide. hundreds more prisoners will be let out on licence every year to take part in work and training. good morning. while westminster gets itself in a spin over brexit, i am
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in blackpool looking at how family businesses like this industrial laundry plan for what happens next. aston villa are back in the premiership. they held off a derby fightback at wembley to win the championship play—off, a victory worth around £170 million. good morning from greater brockley in lewisham, one of the places competing to be written‘s best walking neighbourhood. it is a chilly start here, but temperatures will pick up quite quickly. today for us all looks likely to be the coolest day of this week, with sunshine and showers, most of the showers in the eastern half of the uk. i will have more details in 15 minutes. it's tuesday 28 may. our top story: a group of schoolchildren waiting for a bus have been attacked by a man with a knife injapan. at least 15 people were injured on a residential street in the japanese city of kawasaki, which is around 12 miles south of tokyo. latest reports suggest an adult and a girl have been killed. police say the attacker died after stabbing himself in the neck. mark lobel has the latest.
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the shocking attack took place during the morning rush hour in kawasaki, just south of tokyo, as schoolgirls as young as six, reportedly from a private catholic college, lined up for the bus. on this street corner, a man started stabbing people queueing, and then, holding a knife in each hand according to one eyewitness, boarded the vehicle, lashing out at those inside as well. ambulances rushed to the scene as people lay bleeding. the injured were taken to hospital, but for some, it was too late. the attacker, in his 50s, killed as 12—year—old schoolgirl and a 13—year—old man.
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police found two knives near the site and save a suspected attacker is in custody, reportedly in a serious condition, having stabbed himself in the neck. the attack took bases japanese prime minister shinzo abe was hosting the us president, donald trump, who had come to drum up trade. on behalf of the first lady and myself, i want to take a moment to send our prayers and sympathy to the victims of the stabbing attack this morning in tokyo. all americans stand with the people ofjapan, and grieve for the victims and for their families. japan's normally safe society has been shaken by several mass knife attacks in the past, but they remain rare. so far, there is no apparent motive for this one. mark lobel, bbc news. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes is at the scene in kawasaki. rupert, what's the latest? as we heard in mark's report, these attacks are rare injapan. as we heard in mark's report, these attacks are rare in japan. yes, very rare. this is a very, very safe country, it has a very low murder
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rate, and i can tell you that when i am cycling or walking around the streets of tokyo in the morning, around my neighbourhood, it is very, very common to see small children as young as four or five years old walking to school by themselves. that is a normal practice injapan because it is so safe. these girls we re because it is so safe. these girls were standing on the corner behind me, you can see the group of journalists milling around, that is the spot where the attack took place this morning. they would have come down here and waited for the bus in this very quiet residential neighbourhood here. and we have been talking to a few people around here in the last hour and they are just saying this is so shocking because this is such a safe place. yes, there have been knife attacks in the past injapan, one about ten years ago in tokyo where seven people were killed. but this sort of violent crime really is very, very rare. thank you for keeping us up—to—date. the conservative leadership candidate jeremy hunt has warned his party will be committing political suicide if they try to push through a no—deal brexit.
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the foreign secretary's remarks come as both labour and the conservatives are trying to deal with a disastrous result in the european elections. our political correspondent jonathan blake joins us now from westminster. jeremy hunt is a significant figure within the conservative party, and this issue with where you stand on no deal brexit is becoming, if you like, the defining element amongst those who would be prime minister. it really is, it is the central argument around which the candidates are positioning themselves, and jeremy hunt leaving people in no doubt this morning with that piece he has written in the daily telegraph saying that trying to deliver a no deal brexit and campaigning on that basis would be political suicide for whichever candidate found themselves in that position. and although he has said that no deal is better than no brexit at all, he says if whoever ends up leading the conservative party and is prime minister actually
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tries to pursue that, they risk a no—confidence vote in parliament, because mps would try and stop it and that is really the only way they can, and he says that would leave jeremy corbyn in number ten by christmas, because the only real result would be a general election. esther mcvey, one of the candidates on the other side of the arguments, said that the real risk to candidates would be not delivering brexit by the end of october. so expect more arguments on either side of this as the race continues. and the shock waves from the european elections having an impact on all parties. talk to us a little bit about labour. well, labour's position is really still up in the air. it depends who you ask, and after that crushing result in the european elections, as you say, for both the conservatives and labour, labour doing a lot of soul—searching, and different members of the shadow cabinet, i've jeremy corbyn‘s top team, coming forward with their spin on what the
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pa rty‘s forward with their spin on what the party's policy should be now. you had the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, saying another referendum is really the only option. you have the deputy leader, tom watson, saying the party clearly got it wrong and needs to move quickly now. jeremy corbyn in a letter to mp5, while saying that he is listening, does say that a second referendum is something which labour will consider, and is ready to hold on any deal. but i think there is a call for clarity from all sides now, and all eyes on jeremy call for clarity from all sides now, and all eyes onjeremy corbyn as to whether he will move to clarify labour's position or change it anytime soon. hundreds more prisoners in england and wales will be allowed to leave jail for a day or overnight to work, undertake training or look after their children, as part of a government strategy to rehabilitate offenders and find them jobs. the changes will apply mainly to female prisoners and those in open prisons. here is our home affairs correspondent danny shaw. he is the convicted killer who murdered a man on day release from prison.
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in 2013, ian mcloughlin stabbed to death 66—year—old graham buck, from hertfordshire. the case prompted the government to tighten rules on the temporary release of inmates. the number let out fell by almost a third in five years but the restrictions are now being eased after research showed prisoners were less likely to reoffend if they had experience working outsidejail. the new release on temporary licence measures were introduced this month. they allow prisoners to do paid work in the community immediately after a risk assessment, and let them stay overnight away from prison earlier in their sentence. the changes apply mainly to those in women's prisons and open jails, which hold men assessed as posing less of a threat. we know that actually having a job, having somewhere to live, having enough money and having family ties are really crucial parts of resettling people as they come out of prison, and ultimately reducing reoffending. and day release plays a really
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important part of that. we should not underestimate how difficult it is for people in the transition from prison back into the community. it is thought the new rules will lead to several hundred more prisoners being freed temporarily every year, but the prison authorities are aware the scheme needs close monitoring to ensure the public are kept safe. danny shaw, bbc news. mountaineers in nepal have described this year's climbing season on mount everest as a death race. 11 climbers have died, nine on the nepalese side of the mountain, two in neighbouring tibet. an american climber died yesterday as he descended from the summit. most of the deaths have been linked to exhaustion and tiredness, exacerbated by crowds and delays. the 15p charge for the police non—emergency number, 101, is to be scrapped from next year. the home office says 30 million people are calling the service each year, and from april 2020, it will become free to use. more customers who have been scammed into transferring money
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to fraudsters will be reimbursed by their bank from today. a new voluntary code means even if customers have authorised the payment, they will be entitled to more protection. some victims have lost tens of thousands of pounds to the scams. the industry has committed to provide initial funding for no—blame situations until the end of 2019. what is believed to be the clearest surviving footage of queen victoria has been discovered in a film archive in new york. the images were taken during a visit to dublin in april 1900, nine months before her death. the monarch can be seen smiling and nodding, and is wearing sunglasses. wasn't it 200 years last week, it
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would have been her 200th birthday, wouldn't it? that footage hasjust been discovered, and remarkably good images, isn't it? i guess that is the point, they are so clear. is it snowing? i am the point, they are so clear. is it snowing? iam not the point, they are so clear. is it snowing? i am not sure if it is snowing? i am not sure if it is snowing or if it is the quality of the video. sally, good morning. snowing or if it is the quality of the video. sally, good morningm isa the video. sally, good morningm is a big week of finals this week. they are coming thick and fast, aren't they? i have hardly any voice left, and it is only tuesday. they call it the richest game in all, because getting in the premier league is bonanza time, you get a huge windfall of cash. it has taken them three seasons, but aston villa are back in the premier league. beating derby county at wembley in the championship play—off final also brought a windfall of around £170 million. but for their fans, including prince william, it's priceless.
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why do you think he supports aston villa? i am not entirely sure, i will find out. something from very early in his childhood. tottenham defender kieran trippier has been left out of the england squad for the nations league finals. they face the netherlands in the semis on thursday week. captain harry kane has been included after an ankle injury. jason roy starred with the bat as england prepared for the cricket world cup with a comprehensive victory over afghanistan in their final warm—up match. england face south africa on thursday. and there was a grand slam breakthrough forjohanna konta. the british number one is through to the second round of the french open for the first time. that is a really good question. why does prince william support aston villa? i does prince william support aston villa ? i know does prince william support aston villa? i know it dates back from when he was really quite little. villa? i know it dates back from when he was really quite littlem anyone knows, get in touch. maybe he liked the kit. a perfectly good reason. it is blue and maroon, isn't it? a very well-known colour combination. we will have a look at the papers in just
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combination. we will have a look at the papers injust a minute, stay whether you —— where you are, sally. carol is taking a stroll in greater brockley this morning with a look at the weather. the sun is trying to come out and it is also quite chilly, so let's talk to somebody who knows a lot more about the reason than myself. tom plant, you are from the ramblers' association. has it changed its name? not changed its name, it is just an abbreviation of the ramblers assocation. they have been campaigning to improve access to spacesin campaigning to improve access to spaces in the countryside, but what is equally important is that people in urban areas can access it. this is about shining a light on the important work which has been done to improve walking and improve people's access to everyday green spaces. the award is for england,
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wales and scotland, not northern ireland. absolutely right, we had 80 nominations and an expert panel of public health professionals, urban designers and transport planners who chose a short list of ten. we are launching those today, they are really exciting. they are completely different, from milton keynes, to cambridge, to scotland, to aberystwyth in wales, but all of them have taken measures to improve walking and access to green spaces. you can go on our website and vote for your favourite. i hope you wind, it is fabulous here. thank you for coming down at 6am, that is dedication to the cause. as i mentioned earlier, a chilly start to the day in london and lewisham and in many areas, last night we even had wintry showers across parts of the highlands, above about 600m or so, but they were there nonetheless. today's forecast starts off on a fairly cloudy note, and you have to excuse that we have no graphics just
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yet, so i will talk you through it. cloudy across the whole of the uk, the cloud within and break and we will see sunshine coming through. the sunniest skies are likely to be in the west. at the moment we have showers across southwest england and wales, they will fade, the sun will come out and it will be fairly pleasant. a few showers remaining across the north—west highlands, but the bulk of the showers today are going to be across eastern areas. now, they are showers, so not all of us now, they are showers, so not all of us will catch one. through the afternoon most of them will be confined to eastern england. you could catch the odd heavy one and it could catch the odd heavy one and it could be thundery. but in between them we will also see some bright skies and some sunshine. today is likely to be the coolest day of this week, with top temperatures getting up week, with top temperatures getting up to maybe 18 or 19 degrees, 19 for
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example around the bristol area, but cooler as we travel north, may be only about ten as we push into northern scotland. tonight many of the showers will fade but then we have another weather front coming in across southwest england and wales. that is going to bring some rain. again, quitea that is going to bring some rain. again, quite a cloudy note for most. there will be some clear skies, and tomorrow we start off on a bright note for many areas with some sunny skies. however, that ran coming in from the south—west is going to be travelling northwards. but behind it it is not going to be as cold. we will still be in the cold air in the northern half of the country, but in the southern half temperatures will bea the southern half temperatures will be a bit higher, we could be looking at up to 21 or 22 tomorrow. but if you like your whether that bit warmer, as we head towards the end of the week, temperatures will continue to rise. by the time we get to saturday, we still think across parts of the south—east we could hit 25 or 26 but widely between about 18 or 22. it sounds great, doesn't it? you are going to be doing a lot of rambling, andi you are going to be doing a lot of rambling, and i don't mean your own forecast, but talking to ramblers. let's be fair. thank you, we didn't
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see that one coming at all.|j let's be fair. thank you, we didn't see that one coming at all. i am trying, carol, iam see that one coming at all. i am trying, carol, i am very trying. let's take a look at today's papers: the daily mail's front page is a story about the labour party. the paper claimsjeremy corbyn is "cornered" about labour's brexit position and faces intense pressure from senior party figures to guarantee another eu membership referendum. a picture of the brexit party is the image on the front of the times. the paper says its success at the european elections means that four of the conservative party's leadership contenders are prioritising leaving on 31st october over avoiding a no—deal scenario. writing in the telegraph, the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt, warns that embracing a no—deal scenario could result in a general election and risks the party's extinction. mr hunt says he would prefer to seek
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a new deal with the eu. we will be speaking to the is front page also focuses on speaking to mr farage. its headline "now i'm aiming for westminster" appears over a picture showing mr farage and brexit party members in a celebratory scene following the election results. the champions league final they were
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glenn had a heart attack in he first aid by this is them come this is they are looking forward...m aid by this is them come this is they are looking forward... it is it is going
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sometimes what happens is you get to the final and everyone is quite nervous, so i hope it is not that. i hope it is as exciting as that, but let's hope that they stay calm, for all of us. they don't want to get stressed on the way there, with delays at the airport. so we have one of these charts, maybe you are about to go off on your holidays, and where is the worst place to leave ? and where is the worst place to leave? telling us which airports are the worst to leave from? only on the basis of delays. the average flight, which doesn't mean much, across all of the airports in the uk is 16 minutes. london sta nsted of the airports in the uk is 16 minutes. london stansted emerges with the longest average delays, according to this report, of 25 minutes. are you interested in this list? is anyone interested? yes, i
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am interested. stansted, luton, birmingham with 90 minutes, then we get to gatwick, manchester 16, jazzy 16. are you just reading the list, charlie? yes, i thought i would read the whole list. i think everyone is enjoying it. would you like to know about heathrow? 13 minutes, heathrow. the worst is stansted, the best is l5 city. smaller airports are the best, normally. gatwick and heathrow come out fairly well. what is interesting is automatic compensation, and operators say it is things like weather factors and air traffic controller strikes. just before... have i got time for one more thing?
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do you rememberwhen do you remember when serena williams wanted to play in a cat suit. she wore a hero cape with a zebra style to peace. never dull. ithink wore a hero cape with a zebra style to peace. never dull. i think she is just fantastic. we will see you later on. more with the waiter later on. next week marks two years since the terror attack on london bridge, which claimed the lives of eight people. the youngest victim was 21—year—old sara zelenak, who was visiting the uk from australia. sara's mum, julie, and step—dad, mark, are here for the inquest, which started earlier this month. they spoke to breakfast‘s john maguire about her legacy. at just 21 years atjust 21 years old, sara zelenak from australia had the world at her
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feet. the best way to describe is she is a younger, more amazing version of myself, a much nicer person. exactly the same height and weight. she smiled with her eyes, she saw the good in everyone, she was a kind. she was the youngest victims two years ago. her parents are here to raise money and awareness and to attend the inquest. it has been tough. it has been really good and a really bad. i was anxious about it. i could not sleep. listening to the other victims, getting an understanding of how they are coping, also the victims who survived the attack and how they are coping. you connect with these people and you connect with them and you are part of this family, this clu b you are part of this family, this club that nobody wants to be in. people that have been affected.
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club that nobody wants to be in. people that have been affectedm isa people that have been affectedm is a really strong bond. it is. they kind of just release is a really strong bond. it is. they kind ofjust release and let go. i know how they feel and feel for them so much. next month they will for the second year cycle to paris, a city they were due to meet sara zelenak. the ride is entitled, meet you in paris. that is how their daughter signed off their conversations in the weeks before she died. they want to build two centuries, one in australia and one here in the uk. definitely, the process of dealing with the loss of sara isa process of dealing with the loss of sara is a tricky one and difficult to understand but what we are doing isa step to understand but what we are doing is a step positive, a vision of forward , is a step positive, a vision of forward, of trying to make something good of such a terrible situation. it definitely does help us
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individually but we can see we can help others. sara sanctuary is going toa help others. sara sanctuary is going to a place for people who suffered shock after a death. it offers healing services, ranging from yoga to massaging, eating organic food but we will also have doctors and therapists and they can try different things and what works for me does not necessarily work for somebody else. julie and mark say their lives were changed forever on june three, 2017 and their ambition now is to keep their daughter's name alive, to create something wonderful from something so terrible. that is an extraordinary reaction to the most appalling of circumstances. they are really positive, a
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thoughtful and positive reaction. sara zelenak‘s parents there. it is 625a.m.. we sara zelenak‘s parents there. it is 625 a.m.. we have sent sean to an industrial launderette, taking a look at the fallout from the european elections. we are having a look at how family businesses away. express linen, crucially it is a family own, second—generation. this is susan and her robotic folding machine. all kinds of innovations. but a bit of a concern for family businesses, is the productivity high enough, is it the innovation big enough. 80% of companies in the uk are privately owned by families. we look at the pros and cons but first i look at the news and weather where
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you. good morning from bbc london news, i'm geeta pendse. one of london's biggest nhs trusts is trialling the use of cargo bikes for transporting blood and tumour samples between sites. the scheme by guys and st thomas' aims to reduce dangerous emissions whilst speeding up the distribution process. it could also help the trust save money, as they'll avoid paying for ulez, the mayor's toxic air charge. asa as a hospital, we receive about 40,000 truck deliveries every year and generate 5000 deliveries between each hospital site and into the wider community so this initiative is to see how we can use alternative means of transport. london stansted was the worst uk airport for flight delays last year. departures were an average of 25 minutes late in 2018 according to data from the civil aviation authority. the airport said bad weather and air traffic control issues were to blame.
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luton was ranked second worst for punctuality, while gatwick was fourth. london stansted was the worst uk airport for flight delays last year, an investigation has found. some of london's best known landmarks and memorials may look a bit different today, as they're being covered with bootprints. it's all part of a campaign, marking 75 years since the d day landings, highlighting the efforts of british servicemen and women and the thousands who are now unemployed. the aim is to raise awareness and funds to give veterans more support. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning a look at the cameras and there's no woolwich ferry service due to industrial action. on the road at kings cross, euston road is down to one lane for roadworks eastbound past st pancras towards pentonville road and the a10 stamford hill has temporary traffic lights and water mains work at the junction with manor road.
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a new road layout at the old street roundabout converted to 2—way traffic. now the weather with lucy martin. todayit today it looking like the coolest day of the week with temperatures are set to rise over the next two days. temperatures in the low to mid 20s. today a day of sunny spells and showers. showers particularly into the afternoon could be heavy and possibly thundering. if you catch on, you could see a large amount of rainfall ina on, you could see a large amount of rainfall in a short amount of time. through this evening and overnight, the showers will tend to ease. perhaps one or two lingering as we move into the early hours. patchy cloud and temperatures in the low
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teens. patchy rain moving in later. temperatures are set to pick up as we move through the rest of the week and into the weekend. by the time we get to saturday, highs of perhaps 24 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it is 6;30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. a group of schoolchildren waiting for a bus have been attacked by a man with a knife in the japanese city of kawasaki. reports say an adult and a girl have been killed and at least 15 others are thought to have been injured. police say the attacker died after stabbing himself in the neck. the conservative leadership candidate jeremy hunt has warned his party will be committing political suicide if they try to push through a no—deal brexit.
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the foreign secretary's remarks come as both labour and the conservatives are trying to deal with a disastrous result in the european elections. labour's deputy leader, tom watson, yesterday pushed for the party to officially back a further referendum very, very quickly. hundreds more prisoners in england and wales will be allowed to leave jail for a day or overnight to work, undertake training or look after their children, as part of a government strategy to rehabilitate offenders. last year, 7,700 people were released from jail temporarily. the changes will apply mainly to female prisoners and those in open prisons. ministers say the move will help inmates secure immediate employment on release. mountaineers in nepal have described this year's climbing season on mount everest as a death race. 11 climbers have died, nine on the nepalese side of the mountain, two in neighbouring tibet. an american climber died yesterday as he descended from the summit. most of the deaths have been linked to exhaustion and tiredness, exacerbated by crowds and delays.
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claims for car thefts in the uk are at a seven—year high. 16,000 claims have been made across the uk in the first three months of this year. the association of british insurers says the rising use of new technology, including keyless entry systems, are thought to be behind the increase, and there are calls for manufacturers to step up security of their vehicles. the theft of keyless cars is a major contributor to the unwelcome rise in car crime that we have seen in the last five years. we'd like to see manufacturers do even more than they are already doing to make vehicles as resilient as possible to ever more clever and sophisticated car criminals. a canadian amateur photographer says he is overwhelmed by the response to a picture he took of a bird of prey. this is bruce the bald eagle, whose intense stare and piercing eyes have captured the attention of wildlife lovers around the world. steve biro took hundreds of photos of bruce, posting the best one online. the image, with its perfect
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symmetry, has since gone viral. it isa it is a magnificent bird, isn't it? absolutely. it looks like a bird photo shoot, quite a few people taking pictures. i think it must be used to being photographed. anyway, fantastic celebrations yesterday for aston villa fans. derby were close but just not aston villa fans. derby were close butjust not quite good enough. they called it the richest game in football for very good reason. aston villa are back in the premier league after a three—year absence. they beat derby county 2—1 in the championship play—off at wembley. patrick gearey was watching. roll up, roll up, for wembley‘s big bank holiday giveaway. one lucky winner of derby county and aston villa gets a trip to the premier league, and with it at least £170 million over three years.
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if you stay up for one season, that becomes £300 million. it makes the £6.6 million going to next weekend's champions league winners look like peanuts. so who wants to be a multimillionaire? villa buzzed first. on the brink of the break, anwar el ghazi the scorer with his shoulder. it's where it ends up that counts. derby's boss, frank lampard, won almost everything as a player, but the touchline could be a helpless place. he could only watch his goalkeeper, kelle roos, do this. and it's going to go! own—goal — beyond anyone's plan, beyond anyone's control. derby had 20 minutes to save their season. they gave it all they had. jack marriott's shot, touched in by martyn waghorn, took this to the wire. villa lost this match last season. it was written on the face of even their most famous fan. but the equaliser never came. for all the talk of money, the play—off final is about so much
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more than that. for a few moments, even a prince saw these men as kings. so aston villa, one of the best—known names in english football, are back in the big time. the gap between the football league and the premier league has perhaps never been bigger, but villa have leapt across the chasm. patrick geary, bbc news, at wembley. i know what it means to these aston villa hands, and after the heartbreak they have had, arsenal in the final and last year against fulham, it is just rewards for them, andi fulham, it is just rewards for them, and i am glad they are going home happy. well, in that match report, we saw villa's most famous fan, the duke of cambridge, celebrating their win. the club later tweeted this mock—up picture of prince william giving their manager a knighthood. they said, "he led us back to where we belong, in front of royalty. arise, sir dean smith!" tottenham defender kieran trippier has been left out of england's 23—man squad for the nations league finals. manager gareth southgate said it was as hard a decision as he had
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had to make, especially after trippier had such a brilliant world cup. captain harry kane is included despite not playing for seven weeks with an ankle injury. england face the netherlands in the semi—finals a week on thursday. scotland's women are playing at hampden park this evening for the first time in seven years. they take onjamaica in their final match ahead of the world cup, and manager shelley kerr is hoping to smash their attendance record. take away the performance side of it, we've always set ourselves a target, inspiring the nation, and i think it would be fantastic for the players if we were to get that, you know, 10,000 or more. england thrashed afghanistan in their last match before their take on south africa in the opening game of the cricket world cup. jofra archer set england on their way, with two early wickets, before afghanistan were all out forjust 160. openerjason roy starred with 89 not—out, as england won by nine wickets, with more than 30 overs to spare. they are ready for the start
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of the world cup on thursday. strangely, i think i was ready before these two practice games, after the pakistan series i think we we re after the pakistan series i think we were ready to just dive in them. obviously it is nice to play at the oval where we're going to start, so we can get used to conditions and everything like that. we know how to play here, we have in the past, but ithink... yes, excited, excited for the world cup, can't wait now. at the fifth time of trying, british number one johanna konta is through to the second round of the french open. she said she stopped herself from overthinking in her straight—sets win over antonia lottner of germany. konta has been in good form on clay recently, reaching two tournament finals. she next plays the american lauren davis. there was a certain work that i needed to put in, certain things that needed to happen, for it to i guess go my way a little bit. but i am definitely pleased to be playing
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the level i'm playing out. obviously it's nice that it's happening over the clay this year. britain's other number one, kyle edmund, will have to finish his match against home favourite jeremy chardy later. they were 5—5 in the final set when play was suspended because of bad light, much to the disappointment of the crowd. serena williams was banned from wearing the black catsuit she donned at last year's tournament that she said made her feel like a superhero. so instead, for her warm—up before she beat vitalia diatchenko, she wore a cape decorated with messages in french. it says queen, it says champion, and it says mum, and those are things that mean a lot to me, and reminders for me, and for everyone, that wants to wear it. just remind everyone that they can be champions and our queens. so i love that about it. and
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i don't know, my superpower today was just hanging in there, i don't know, my superpower today wasjust hanging in there, you know, and just staying positive, for once. i think we can all associate with that bit, can't we? staying positive. i know she struggles, and she is very open about her struggles, but i always see her as a really positive role model. she has a level of sporting aggression and competitiveness like nothing i have ever seen, its incredible. competitiveness like nothing i have everseen, it's incredible. but competitiveness like nothing i have ever seen, its incredible. buti think since she has had her daughter she has allowed herself to become a little bit more vulnerable, so maybe we are seeing things like the superhero cape and her need to show people how powerful she is as her way of reminding herself, she is not telling us that, she is reminding herself, basically. and because she is not playing as much tennis, she focuses in on these big events, and that probably helps. we will have the weather with carol coming upa we will have the weather with carol coming up a little bit later. in 2013, convicted killer
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ian mcloughlin stabbed a man to death while on day release from prison. the case prompted the government to tighten rules on the temporary release of inmates. but now, the restrictions are being changed so prisoners can spend a day doing paid work or looking after their children. we're joined now by helen berresford from the socialjustice charity nacro. thank you very much for talking to us thank you very much for talking to us this morning. so what will this look like? when people hear that more prisoners will be released on day release or overnight, what will it look like in this country? firstly just to say that nacro we support the efforts to increase the use of day release for people who are in prison, because it can make a real difference to somebody‘s resettlement in the community and ultimately reducing the reoffending. what we hope is that this is the government sending a clear message that actually, in future, day release becomes a much more embedded pa rt release becomes a much more embedded part of release planning across the prison estate. what we know from the evidence is that day release, people
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who go out on day release into work placements, are less likely to reoffend when they are released from prison. so really we are looking at how we release two reduce the high and stubborn rates of reoffending in this country. when we introduced this country. when we introduced this interview, we mentioned ian mcloughlin, who was jailed for life in 2013 after murdering someone on day release. these are the stories that stick in people's mines. how can the concern about something like that happening again be put aside or soothed? that's right, and the example that you showed is a real tragedy, and what we need to do is make sure that all cases are risk assessed, and that is part of what happens at the minute and will happens at the minute and will happen in the future. but this really is about how we look at in the future preventing future victims of crime by reducing reoffending. we know that having a job, having somewhere to live and having family
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ties are all really important parts of reducing reoffending when somebody comes out of prison, and day release plays a really big part in that. starting to get somebody used to what it is like being back in the community again, and i think we shouldn't underestimate how difficult the transition between prison and the community can be for some people. i was talking to somebody recently that nacro support on release from prison who were saying how difficult and how stressful he found that period in the run—up to the release from prison, and that actually these kinds of things can really start to make that more easy, and actually ease the transition, so that when they come out, things are settled, and therefore they are less likely to reoffend in the future. so let's look at the kind of checklist, i suppose, that is gone through for somebody to be allowed to be released on day release. you mentioned family ties, you mentioned any to be the prospect of a job.
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what does that list look like, and what kind of people are we most likely to see released? well, at the minute, the people who are most likely to go out on day release are people in open prisons and women prisons, who have already been assessed as being of very low risk to the public. and actually what that looks like in terms of the day is that they will have a risk assessment in place, and it might include them going out into a workplace. they will be learning skills while they are in prison, doing training while they are in prison, but then will actually spend a day perhaps of a week in a workplace, to put those skills into practice in a normal workplace. it might also include in the short term, ahead of release from prison, going out and starting to spend time with family again. obviously a long period away from family in prison
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can make those family relationships quite difficult, and this is about trying to build those back up again so that the release from prison doesn't come as so much of a shock, and actually all of those things can be sustained to give people the best chance of resettling within the community and reduce reoffending. thank you forjoining us, helen, from the charity nacro. you do not have to live in the middle of nowhere to be able to appreciate green spaces, and that is pa rt appreciate green spaces, and that is part of what carol is talking about at her location in lewisham this morning. good morning and it is lovely here this morning at greater brockley. why? let me introduce you to a man who knows more about it than i do. you work out but also work for the ramblers. what is this project? it is about making sure we celebrate amazing walking all across the country including here in greater
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brockley. you also nominate this area. what is it so special about it? it is fantastic you have parts where you can walk through between places with great independent shops, the hospital and school. they walk through green spaces every day of their lives. it is a safe area for children and adults? yes, you can go down to the river and kids can play in the river. there is a sculpture there. a fun place for people to come and enjoy the green space. i walk through here every day, from the station. i come here to read and wander around. it is a nice place to be here. it is today that the judging starts? we have ten fantastic finalist but i think eve ryo ne fantastic finalist but i think everyone should be voting for greater brockley! it has been a pleasure talking to you. it is
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lovely here this morning in lewisham. the forecast is one of sunshine and showers and some showers likely to be heavy and also thundering but they are showers so by no means will be all c1. parts of the northern parts of the east. as we seem up the northern parts of the east. as we seem up to scotland, showers in the north—west and south—east. the rest of scotland, dry start with some sunshine developing. similar story in northern ireland and north—west england. largely dry start with sunshine. from the midlands into east anglia, this is where we are looking at some showers. although there is quite a bit of cloud around, and a chilly start, the cloud thinning and breaking with brighter skies in the north—west of scotland and in the west. in central and eastern areas,
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more prone to the showers. this morning some wintry showers across the far north of scotland. temperatures today, probably the coolest day of the week, temperatures climbing up to 90 degrees at best and that will be around the bristol area. closer to ten as we push north. many showers fading. clear skies developing and by the end of the night, a weather front from the south—west introducing rain to south—west england, into parts of wales and fringing into parts of northern ireland. temperatures in the north, 3- ireland. temperatures in the north, 3— five. it will be colder than that in rural areas. tomorrow, it will start off on a dry, bright and sunny note for many. we have the weather front end of the west. it is a warm front. it will bring in a range slowly moving eastwards. behind it,
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we will start to see milder conditions. temperatures up a notch tomorrow. down a notch if you are in bristol. if you like your weather warmer, progressively it will get warmer, progressively it will get warmer and by saturday, widely, high teens into the low 20s and for some into the mid— 20s. have you seen many people rambling this morning? they have been a few, a few cyclists as well because there are a few cyclists as well because there a re lots of a few cyclists as well because there are lots of parts. people walking their dogs. even at this time of day, a bit of activity. someone else is up apart from us. it is the first day back to work after the bank holidays.
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we've sent sean to an industrial laundrette in blackpool, where he's talking to family businesses about the impact politics has on them. what is going to happen next? and also family businesses, many thriving, of course? if you think family businesses are there for decades and decades if not centuries. we are in a laundry, an industrial one, in blackpool. all these sheets will be going to hotels in the north—west. how are family businesses going to deal with the changing in the vote in the eu elections? the brexit party doing well, 43% of the vote here. you run the business. you have expressly man. you are second generation, the
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bossin man. you are second generation, the boss in charge. let's talk brexit first, probably not the thing you would want to talk about. the brexit party winning, the referendum, what do you make of it all? ijust feel that the future is so uncertain, the country has realised this but we need to make sure that we need to supply our customers the way we have done for many years. do the weekend headlines make any difference?- this point i don't know. we make sure we do what we do best. elizabeth, you are from the institute of family businesses. we are talking about business plans. bricks and planning is something talking about every week. is it any different to any other business?
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family businesses plan for the long—term so what is really important here is a certainty and clarity to understand what they are in so they can plan. we talk about family businesses, they do not plan for the next quarter but the next quarter—century. for the next quarter but the next quarter-century. does that make the brexit decision more important or less ? brexit decision more important or less? it is just brexit decision more important or less? it isjust the clarity of knowing. that is what they are telling us that they are keen on. third generation of this business. you could have chosen many different careers, i guess, what was it about staying in the family business? careers, i guess, what was it about staying in the family business7|j have staying in the family business?” have always thought i would head to the family business when i left school. it seemed like a good idea. the whole brexit thing, do you chat about it with your brakes? no, i would not really talk about brexit.
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—— with your mates. would not really talk about brexit. -- with your mates. what do you see as the future of the business? you in charge? that's the plan. i would definitely be happy with that, i would be relaxing a bit more. how straightforward that is and we will be talking about what is going on in the brexit situation. ramadan is the holiest month of the islamic calendar for the 1.8 billion muslims around the world. the month long festival involves not eating or drinking from sun rise to sunset. but fasting for 18 hours can be difficult, especially for muslim health workers on the front line of the nhs. that's why one chef has decided to deliver food to london's hospitals in time for staff breaking their fast.
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monika plaha reports. it is 10am and this woman will not be eating or drinking anything for nearly nine hours but that is not stopping her preparing food for others. during ramadan, food becomes more sacred. when you go through this period when you do not have any, your realisation that so much of what you take for granted, clean running waterfrom of what you take for granted, clean running water from the tap, food you can eat all the time, it is such a privilege. fasting is one of the five pillars of islam which form the basis of how muslims live. others include faith, prayer and a charity. as well as giving to the homeless, this ramadan she has made it her priority to provide food to the thousands of nhs workers observing the holy festival across london. they are doing a very difficultjob,
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not drinking water, not eating and they often do not get a chance to ta ke they often do not get a chance to take a break during their shift so i am sending it to a hospital in east london, i will send am sending it to a hospital in east london, iwill send it am sending it to a hospital in east london, i will send it one by one a different hospitals. the sun falls. now is the time for muslim families and friends to come together and break their fast. traditionally by eating dates than a meal. for nhs staff working around the clock, this can be difficult. this is why special deliveries and events like this bring the true spirit of ramadan alive. kieran is a paediatric worker working night shifts. i think something like this is vital for nhs workers. we work really long hours, the nurses, doctors, cleaning staff, porters and it is exhausting because we are front—line staff.
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it is exhausting because we are front-line staff. ramadan is emotionally and physically taxing. i was in the theatres today and once the adrenaline finish, you realise you have been standing around for a long time and you really feel thirsty. | long time and you really feel thirsty. i do long day shifts working with patients. having something special like this really brings the community together and also makes us all excited because this doesn't actually happen. hospitals across the country can expect more of these school parcels before ramadan comes to an end next week. this is all about saying thank you. iam week. this is all about saying thank you. i am so indebted to the nhs. i think they are amazing people and i wa nt think they are amazing people and i want them to know that i am grateful for her they. lovely community feel and the good food has made us a bit hungry. lovely community feel and the good food has made us a bit hungrym definitely has that effect.
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time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm geeta pendse. one of london's biggest nhs trusts is trialling the use of cargo bikes for transporting blood and tumour samples between sites. the scheme by guys and st thomas' aims to reduce dangerous emissions whilst speeding up the distribution process. it could also help the trust save money, as they'll avoid paying for ulez — the mayor's toxic air charge. as a hospital, we receive about 40,000 truck deliveries every year and generate 5000 deliveries between each hospital site and into the wider community so this initiative is to see how we can use alternative means of transport. london stansted was the worst uk airport for flight delays last year. departures were an average
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of 25 minutes late in 2018 according to data from the civil aviation authority. were to blame. the airport said bad weather and air traffic control issues were to blame. luton was ranked second worst for punctuality, while gatwick was fourth. london stansted was the worst uk airport for flight delays last year. some of london's best known landmarks and memorials may look a bit different today, as they're being covered with bootprints. it's all part of a campaign, marking 75 years since the d day landings, highlighting the efforts of british servicemen and women and the thousands who are now unemployed. the aim is to raise awareness and funds to give veterans more support. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning a look at the cameras and there's no woolwich ferry service due to industrial action.
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on the road at kings cross, euston road is down to one lane for roadworks eastbound past st pancras towards pentonville road now the weather with lucy martin. today it looking like the coolest day of the week with temperatures are set to rise over the next two days. temperatures in the low to mid 20s. today a day of sunny spells and showers. showers particularly into the afternoon could be heavy and possibly thundering. if you catch one, you could see a large amount of rainfall in a short amount of time. through this evening and overnight, the showers will tend to ease. perhaps one or two lingering as we move into the early hours.
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patchy cloud and temperatures in the low 7—10 celsius. patchy rain moving in later. temperatures are set to pick up as we move through the rest of the week and into the weekend. by the time we get to saturday, highs of perhaps 24 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
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our headlines today: a knife attack on a group of schoolchildren at a bus stop injapan leaves two people dead and at least 15 injured. after their disastrous showing in the european elections, conservative leadership candidate jeremy hunt warns a no—deal brexit would be political suicide. ten mps have now put themselves forward to be the new tory leader and prime minister. we will talk to the latest candidate, housing minister kit malthouse, in the next few minutes good morning. as westminster gets itself into a spin over brexit, i am in blackpool looking at how family businesses like this industrial laundry plan for what happens next. aston villa are back in the premiership. they held off a derby fightback at wembley to win the championship play—off final, a victory worth around £170 million. it is tuesday 28 may. our top story: a group
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of schoolchildren waiting for a bus have been attacked by a man with a knife injapan. at least 15 people were injured on a residential street in the japanese city of kawasaki, which is around 12 miles south of tokyo. latest reports suggest an adult and a girl have been killed. police say the attacker died after stabbing himself in the neck. mark lobel has the latest. the shocking attack took place during the morning rush hour in kawasaki, just south of tokyo, as schoolgirls as young as six, reportedly from a private catholic college, lined up for their bus. on this street corner, a man started stabbing people queueing and then, holding a knife in each hand according to one eyewitness, boarded the vehicle, lashing out at those inside as well. this lady says the people she saw we re this lady says the people she saw were bleeding. this woman heard kids
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screaming and crying. she says children and adults at the scene looked too shocked to do anything. she didn't know what to do either. ambulances rushed to the scene, and the injured were taken to hospital. but for some, it was too late. the attacker, in his 50s, killed a 12—year—old schoolgirl and a 39—year—old man, and wounded at least 13 others. police say the suspect died in custody, having stabbed himself in the neck. the attack took bases japanese prime minister shinzo abe was hosting the us president, donald trump, who had come to drum up trade. on behalf of the first lady
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and myself, i want to take a moment to send our prayers and sympathy to the victims of the stabbing attack this morning in tokyo. all americans stand with the people ofjapan, and grieve for the victims and for their families. japan's normally safe society has been shaken by several mass knife attacks in the past, but they remain rare. so far, there is no apparent motive for this one. mark lobel, bbc news. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes is at the scene in kawasaki. i see the crowds behind you, a shocking attack in a place which is normally so safe. that's absolutely right, charlie. when we do very occasionally, very rarely, get this sort of crime happening injapan it isa sort of crime happening injapan it is a huge shock because this is such an extremely safe society. guns are pretty much outlawed injapan, it is pretty much outlawed injapan, it is pretty much outlawed injapan, it is pretty much impossible to own guns here, so gun crime is very low, but this sort of violent crime of any
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sort is extremely unusual. and in the neighbourhood i live in tokyo, it is very common to see extremely small children, five years old, walking by themselves to school every morning, because people feel the community, the areas are safe enough for people to do that. so when the attack took place behind me, and you can see the spot where the attack took place, that is where the attack took place, that is where the group of schoolgirls were waiting to get onto their morning bus, when this sort of thing happens, people are very, very shocked indeed. for the moment, thank you. the conservative leadership candidate jeremy hunt has warned his party will be committing political suicide if they try to push through a no—deal brexit. the foreign secretary's remarks come as both labour and the conservatives are trying to deal with a disastrous result in the european elections. our political correspondent jonathan blake joins us now from westminster. and this really is a day of reflection for the main parties. yes, after the disastrous results for the conservatives and for labour
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in the elections, they are scrambling to redefine their brexit policy and try and turn things around, and jeremy hunt, the foreign secretary, is the latest to set out his stall, pitching himself as the anti—no deal brexit candidate. he is anti—no deal brexit candidate. he is a former remainer who has committed to delivering brexit, but he has strong words for the other candidates, some of whom have talked about pursuing a no deal policy come what may, with that deadline of 31 octoberfor britain to what may, with that deadline of 31 october for britain to leave the european union. jeremy hunt writes this morning that trying to deliver no deal through a general election is not a solution, it is political suicide, and he writes that it will probably putjeremy suicide, and he writes that it will probably put jeremy corbyn suicide, and he writes that it will probably putjeremy corbyn in number ten by christmas. he says that because although it is the legal default for britain to leave by that deadline if a deal has been agreed by then, parliament may try to stop it bye calling a vote of no—confidence in the government, and
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a general election is probably the only way they can do that. and he is one of ten candidates who have themselves up to take over from theresa may's leadership of the party. it is starting to sound like a crowded field, and aside from the no deal brexit issue, which really has to be the central fault line of this campaign, rory stewart, the international development secretary, says he wants a national listening exercise, and the environment secretary, michael gove, says he would allow eu nationals in the uk at the time of the referendum to stay for free, and at the time of the referendum to stay forfree, and hit at the time of the referendum to stay for free, and hit malthouse at the time of the referendum to stay forfree, and hit malthouse is the new name and the rest —— kit malthouse. he says it can't be about the same old faces and as housing minister is pitching himself as the new face, with fresh ideas. i know you will be hearing from him on the programme shortly. just a quick word on labour, it is no easierfor them, jeremy corbyn under pressure to clarify his party's policy, and he
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wrote to mps yesterday saying the party is ready to support a public vote on any deal. and we will be speaking to kit malthouse in a few minutes. hundreds more prisoners in england and wales will be allowed to leave jail for a day or overnight to work, undertake training or look after their children, as part of a government strategy to rehabilitate offenders and find them jobs. the changes will apply mainly to female prisoners and those in open prisons. here is our home affairs correspondent danny shaw. he is the convicted killer who murdered a man on day release from prison. in 2013, ian mcloughlin stabbed to death 66—year—old graham buck, from hertfordshire. the case prompted the government to tighten rules on the temporary release of inmates. the number let out fell by almost a third in five years. but the restrictions are now being eased after research showed prisoners were less likely to reoffend if they had experience working outsidejail. the new release on temporary licence measures were introduced this month. they allow prisoners to do paid work
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in the community immediately after a risk assessment, and let them stay overnight away from prison earlier in their sentence. the changes apply mainly to those in women's prisons and open jails, which hold men assessed as posing less of a threat. what we hope is that this is the government sending a clear message that actually, in future, they release becomes a much more embedded pa rt release becomes a much more embedded part of release planning across the prison estate. what we know from the evidence is that day release can actually — people who go out on day release into work placements are less likely to reoffend when they are released from prisons. it is thought the new rules will lead to several hundred more prisoners being freed temporarily every year, but the prison authorities are aware the scheme needs close monitoring to ensure the public are kept safe. danny shaw, bbc news. a 34—year—old—woman will appear before sheffield crown court today
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charged with murdering her two teenage sons. sarah barrass is accused of killing tristan and blake, aged 13 and 14, following an incident at their home. 37—year—old brandon machin is also accused of murdering the two boys and will also appear in court later. the 15p charge for the police non—emergency number, 101, is to be scrapped from next year. the home office says 30 million calls are made to the service each year, and from april 2020, it will become free to use. mountaineers in nepal have described this year's climbing season on mount everest as a death race. 11 climbers have died, nine on the nepalese side of the mountain, two in neighbouring tibet. an american climber died yesterday as he descended from the summit. most of the deaths have been linked to exhaustion and tiredness, exacerbated by crowds and delays. the worst uk airport for flight delays last year was london stansted, according to data from the civil aviation
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authority. passengers were kept waiting on flights for an average of 25 minutes. the airport blamed adverse weather and air traffic control issues. belfast city recorded the best performance, with an eight—minute average delay. and it is that time of year. now let's take a look at some pictures from the annual british cheese—rolling competition, which takes place in the gloucestershire countryside. the event attracts thrillseekers who chase a wheel of double gloucester cheese down a steep slope. this year a new champion, max mcdougall, was crowned because veteran cheese—roller chris anderson, who has won the title 22 times, was away on holiday. iam not i am not sure you fully get the ratio of just how i am not sure you fully get the ratio ofjust how steep that is. i am not sure you fully get the ratio ofjust how steep that ism looks ridiculously steep. one or two managed to run down, but mainly you tumble down. so i have questions, i
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do remember this story but i don't remember the details. how big is that she is, what shape is the and how do you say that she's rolls down the hill? there are loads of bits to get caught up in. i could show you how big the cheeses, it is like that, a double gloucester, so it is that, a double gloucester, so it is that size. the size of your head. know, bigger than that. that size. the size of your head. know, biggerthan that. given that size. the size of your head. know, bigger than that. given the steepness of the slope itjust charges off. so it is a round ball? no, it is the shape of a cheese, a wheel. so not like a football, it rolls down, chase after it, everyone gets hurt and i laughed. you win the cheese, and presumably you eat it afterwards. that is the prize. that is the latest cheese news from bbc brea kfast. as the dust settles on the conservative party's worst ever election result, mps in the running to become the next leader are spelling out their plans for brexit. ten have now thrown their hat
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into the ring to be the next prime minister. the latest is housing minister kit malthouse, who joins us now from westminster. very good morning to you. good morning, charlie. so do you want to finish the sentence, i should be prime minister because...” finish the sentence, i should be prime minister because... i should be prime minister because we need three steps, really, to get us out of this jam. first of all the conservative party has to unify, secondly we have to produce a brexit plan that will get us out on 31 october, and thirdly, then move onto a really compelling domestic agenda that will attract the kind of support we need to win a general election. now, the first two, the unity and the brexit plan, i have already proved i can do, we did it injanuary already proved i can do, we did it in january with what became already proved i can do, we did it injanuary with what became known as the malthouse compromise, and i believe i can do it again at this time. that is going to be my primary appeal, beyond as i say this really
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compelling domestic agenda focused around children, schools and investing in the future. it is a good pitch, so the malthouse compromise, if it was that good, it would have worked. yes, i think at that time the people's view was that the prime minister's deal, theresa may's deal, would have gone through. if it had, we might be in a different situation now. times have changed because the prime minister's deal is obviously not going to pass, so we need a new approach. my view is we have to unify around a brexit plan that will get us out on 31 october. people are looking at the election result at the weekend and are interpreting it in all sorts of different ways that suit their view. what it does show us is that the country remains hopelessly divided still on this issue, and critically that we still have a mathematical problem in parliament. and unless the conservative party can find a way to get together as a whole,
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deliver a majority for a plan and ta ke deliver a majority for a plan and take us over the line on 31 october, then we will remain in this jam. i am the only candidate who has proven that we are able to do that, proven it back in january, that we are able to do that, proven it back injanuary, and i think i should have a go. are you popular? well, i certainly think i have a large amount of trust amongst my colleagues, the ability to bring nicky morgan, jacob rees—mogg, rhone backlin, was greeted with some astonishment by my colleagues, and i like to think i am a bit of a straight shooter. i try and build trust and friendship, because in the end, a parliamentary party is exactly that. it is a group of friends who have come together on a collective political vision. that is what we need to regain, that trust and unity, if we want to get things done. straight shooting, it is an excellent phrase, isn't it, so let's try a bit of that now. will you guarantee, kit malthouse, as prime minister, they will be absolutely no
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extension under any circumstances to the 31 october deadline? so i think an extension would be extremely difficult. i am sorry, here is the point, if i may. this is where we test the things you have just said. you are a straight shooter. i have asked you a very, very straightforward question. so let's go for it again. can you guarantee that there are no circumstances under which, as kit malthouse, as prime minister, we would go beyond october 31? and the point of that question is, and i know you will understand it, is that the very criticism, maybe from you amongst others, was that theresa may broke promises. so what are you going to tell us? it comes down to the question of no deal and my view on this is that we make a mistake, we delude ourselves if we think no deal is entirely in our control. president macron said just last week that he would not allow us to go beyond the 31st of october in any circumstances that we have to prepare for no deal on the
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basis that eu may choose it on our behalf. my primary object of, the most important thing on what the most important thing on what the most majority of the one, is get a deal which will unite us and get out before the 31st of october. if you get to that date, it may be the eu may choose an idea on how behalf and the choice will be taken against us. but if you have the choice?” the choice will be taken against us. but if you have the choice? i think an extension would be very undesirable and i would not voluntarily chosen. here is the difference, you can say as a non— prime minister he would not like that to happen but if you are prime minister, that is when everything changes and why we need clarity. that's right but you are ignoring the mathematical problem in parliament. theresa may paid a price for this, she found herself in a situation where the majority in
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parliament formed against against no deal. we need to get to the 31st of october ready to take a no deal if we wa nt october ready to take a no deal if we want to. we need to have honest conversations about the industries that are going to be effect had. thus far we have been deluding ourselves. people who say that it would be a catastrophe, no deal, a wrong but also are they who say it will be a walk in the park. we need to get small business are ready but in particular the sensitive industries that are affected and talk to them about how to support them. if the eu chooses no deal on our behalf and there are signs they are preparing for that. the conservative party is running scared at the moment. jeremy hunt is alluded to this, to go to a general election would be a disaster. do you agree? it is generally the case that
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the votes would scatter and who knows where the votes will be. the critical issue for anyone who is interested in the future of the government and making sure we can keep the conservative party on track as we unify, hammer out a brexit plan and presented to europe. we recollect nice that you may choose an ideal, we want a deal but we will be ready for it. the positive plan for both of us to thrive in the future. seeing you and hearing how you talk, can you give me one answer replied to something. can we give it a try? as long as it is not she's rolling. more tricky than that, borisjohnson? rolling. more tricky than that, boris johnson? the idea rolling. more tricky than that, borisjohnson? the idea was one word. boris johnson. i love borisjohnson? the idea was one word. borisjohnson. i love my borisjohnson? the idea was one word. boris johnson. i love my time working with borisjohnson.
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word. boris johnson. i love my time working with boris johnson. is that as good as it gets. michael gove? strong intellectual, great reforming. dominic raabe. my predecessor and a nice guy. they sound like great candidates, i am not sure you have done yourself any favours. what we hope is that when you go to a leadership election you have a tasty box of chocolates from which to choose from. my pitch is i am the only candidate that has proven to have the ability to unify around a brexit plan to get us out of this jam and that is what i will taking forward to my colleagues in parliament. i. you there. thank you for your time this morning. thanks a lot, chairs. carol is taking a stroll in greater brockley this morning, with a look at the weather.
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good morning everyone. i am good morning everyone. iam in greater brockley, in lewisham because the ramblers association has launched a public vote to find britain's best walking neighbourhood. this is an annual award that celebrates areas for taking positive steps towards green, walking neighbourhood leading to health benefits, social economic benefits and improving for air quality. there are ten nominees. others include brighton city centre, elgin, to name just others include brighton city centre, elgin, to namejust a couple. voting sta rts elgin, to namejust a couple. voting starts today. it is a beautiful here. we're at schools, we have a river running through here where you can go down and safely adult, for example, if you're supervised, of course if you are a child. the forecast for most of us, some
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showers, potentially thundery but not all of us will see them. sunshine in wales, south—west england, around the midlands and northern scotland. nine o'clock in scotland, most of the show was confined to the north—west and also the south—east. loud breaking to allow sunny breaks to develop. northern ireland and western england, areas of cloud, sunny spells developing but for north—east england, you have the showers. as you come down the east coast, sporadic showers of this morning. but equally a lot of dry weather is here in london. the birds are tweeting, the cloud starting to break. the clouds in wales and south—west england also starting to break leading to a sunny afternoon. fair bit of sunshine in western
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areas apart from the north—west. it is the east that would have the heavier showers moving on quite quickly. temperatures up to 19 degrees so not quite as mild as it was yesterday. through the evening and overnight, many of the show was fading. by the end of the night, whether front coming in across the southwest will start to introduce cloud and then some rain. across south—west england, wales and southern parts of northern ireland. 3- southern parts of northern ireland. 3— five in the north, 5—10 in the south. tomorrow, much of the uk starting on a dry and sunny note except for the north—west of scotland. rain from the south—west slowly pushing eastwards through the course of the day. for most of us looking at temperatures a degree above today. around bristol, you may see around 17 degrees. as we head
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onto the weekend, things start to warm up, particularly on saturday. thank you very much and see you later. the spot is coming up with sally later on. next week marks two years since the terror attack on london bridge, which claimed the lives of eight people. the youngest victim was 21—year—old sara zelenak, who was visiting the uk from australia. sara's mum julie and step—dad mark are here for the inquest, which started earlier this month. atjust 21 years old, sara zelenak from australia had the world at her feet. the best way to describe sara is she was a younger, more amazing version of myself, a much nicer person too. we were exactly the same height and exactly the same weight. she smiled with her eyes, she was a kind, she saw the good in everyone, yeah. sara was the youngest victim the night that terrorists struck at london bridge two years ago.
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her parents are here to raise money and awareness for sancturies that will bare her name and to attend the inquest. it's been tough. it has been really good and really bad. i was very anxious about it and could not sleep before i had to do my pen portrait. and listening to all the other victims' pen portraits as well, getting an understanding and how they are coping, also the victims that have survived the attack, watching them and how they are suffering. you just connect with these people. you feel like you know them and you feel like you are part of this aweful family, this club that nobody wants to be in and you just automatically connect and we've connected with all the people that we've met who have been been affected in this attack. it is a really strong bond, without words. yeah, it is. just meet these people, give them a hug and it's an immediate bond. and they kind ofjust release. . .they just let go. i know how they feel and ijust feel for them so much. next month they will, for the second year, cycle to paris, a city they were due to meet sara,
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had she not been caught up in the attacks. the ride is entitled, meet you in paris. it's how their daughter signed off every conversations in the weeks before she died. they are raising money to build at least two sara sanctuaries, as they're calling them. one in australia and one here in the uk. definitely, the process of dealing with the loss of sara is a tricky one. it'svery difficult to understand or find which direction to go, but what we are doing with sara sanctuaries gives us a step positive, vision of forward, of trying to make something good out of such a terrible situation. so it definitely does help us individually but then we can see we can help others. sara sanctuary is going to be a place for people who have suffered shock, sudden death. we're going to offer a five—day holistic healing services, ranging from kinesiology, reiki, mindfulness, yoga
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massage, eating organic healthy food but we will also have doctors and therapists as well, and so they can try all different things and what works for me does not necessarily work for somebody else. julie and mark say their lives were changed forever onjune the 3rd, 2017 and their ambition now is to keep their daughter's name alive, to create something wonderful from something so terrible. john maguire, bbc news, london. it isa it is a very moving to see sara zelenak‘s it is a very moving to see sara zelena k‘s parents it is a very moving to see sara zelenak‘s parents trying to salvage something of the situation, to go forward. something positive. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm geeta pendse. one of london's biggest nhs trusts is trialling the use of cargo
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bikes for transporting blood and tumour samples between sites. the scheme by guys and st thomas' aims to reduce dangerous emissions whilst speeding up the distribution process. as they'll avoid paying for ulez — the mayor‘ toxic air charge. as a hospital, we receive about 40,000 truck deliveries every year and we generate 5000 deliveries between each hospital site and into the wider community, so this initiative is very much to see how we can use alternative means of transport. london stansted was the worst uk airport for flight delays last year. departures were an average of 25 minutes late in 2018 according to data from the civil aviation authority. were to blame. luton was ranked second worst for punctuality, while gatwick was fourth.
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some of london's best known landmarks and memorials may look a bit different today, as they're being covered with bootprints. it's all part of a campaign, marking 75 years since the d day landings — highlighting the efforts of british servicemen and women and the thousands who are now unemployed. the aim is to raise awareness and funds to give veterans more support. let's take a look at the travel situation now... there's a good service on the tubes this morning there's disruption for south—western railway services from woking to london waterloo due to a points failure. on the roads there is a new road layout on city road at the old street roundabout which has been converted to two way traffic. on the roads at kings cross, euston road is down to one lane
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for roadworks eastbound past st pancras. hello, good morning. today looking like the coolest day of the week, with temperatures set to rise as we move through the next few days. we're looking at temperatures in the low to mid 20s by the nd of the week and into the weekend. today is looking like a day of sunny spells and showers. i think the showers, particularly into the afternoon, could be quite heavy and possibly thundering. not everyone is seeing one but if you do catch one, you could see a large amount of rain fall in a short space of time. temperatures today at a maximum of 17—18 degrees celsius. through this evening and overnight, the showers will tend to ease. perhaps one or two lingering as we move into the early hours. some patchy cloud and clear spells with overnight lows of around 7—10 degrees celsius. first thing. the cloud will tend to increase from the west as we move tomorrow then we are looking at the best of the brightness first thing. the cloud will tend to increase from the west as we move through the day, with some patchy rain moving in later. the temperatures are set to pick up though as we move through the rest of the week and into the weekend. by the time we get to saturday,
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we'r elooking at highs of 23, perhaps 24 degreees celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. now though it's back to charlie and naga. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here is a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: a group of schoolchildren waiting for a bus have been attacked by a man with a knife in the japanese city of kawasaki. reports say an adult and a girl have been killed and at least 15 others are thought to have been injured. police say the attacker died after stabbing himself in the neck. the conservative leadership candidate jeremy hunt has warned his party will be committing political suicide if they try to push through a no—deal brexit. the foreign secretary's remarks come as both labour and the conservatives are trying to deal with a disastrous result in the european elections. labour's deputy leader, tom watson,
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yesterday pushed for the party to officially back a further referendum very, very quickly. meanwhile, housing minister kit malthouse has become the tenth mp to announce he wants to join the race to become the next leader of the conservative party. earlier, mr malthouse told breakfast he is keen to clarify his plans for brexit. my my view is we need to get to 31 october ready and able to take no deal if we want to. so for example, we need to have some honest conversations about the industries that are going to be affected. thus fari that are going to be affected. thus far i think we have been deluding ourselves. those people who say no deal is going to be a catastrophe are wrong, but also so are those who say it is going to be a walk in the park. hundreds more prisoners in england and wales will be allowed to leave jail for a day or overnight to work, undertake training or look after their children as part of a government strategy to rehabilitate offenders. last year, 7,700 people were released from jail temporarily. the changes will apply mainly to female prisoners and those in open prisons. ministers say the move will help inmates secure immediate
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employment on release. a 34—year—old—woman will appear before sheffield crown court today charged with murdering her two teenage sons. sarah barrass is accused of killing tristan and blake, aged 13 and 14, following an incident at their home. 37—year—old brandon machin is also accused of murdering the two boys and will also appear in court later. mountaineers in nepal have described this year's climbing season on mount everest as a death race. 11 climbers have died, nine on the nepalese side of the mountain, two in neighbouring tibet. an american climber died yesterday as he descended from the summit. most of the deaths have been linked to exhaustion and tiredness, exacerbated by crowds and delays. claims for car thefts in the uk are at a seven—year high. 16,000 claims have been made across the uk in the first three months of this year. the association of british insurers says the rising use of new technology including keyless
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entry systems are thought to be behind the increase, and there are calls for manufacturers to step up security of their vehicles. gavin and stacey will be back this year for a christmas special, almost nine years after the final episode aired. james corden has announced he has been working on the new episode, alongside co—star ruthjones, and it will air on christmas day 2019. the original cast, including matthew horn and joanna page, who play gavin and stacey, will also return. we have just said christmas, we havejust said christmas, and it is made. for a little bit longer, it is made. for a little bit longer, it isjune is made. for a little bit longer, it is june at the is made. for a little bit longer, it isjune at the weekend. is made. for a little bit longer, it is june at the weekend. we haven't even finished all the football yet, we can't talk about christmas. the richest game in football has happened, because promotion into the premier league is basically the biggest bonus you can get as a foot ballclu b. biggest bonus you can get as a foot ballclub. that is how rich the premier league is, and aston villa
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are back in the premier league. they beat derby county 2—1 in the championship play—off final at wembley. patrick gearey was watching. roll up, roll up, for wembley‘s big bank holiday giveaway. one lucky winner of derby county and aston villa gets a trip to the premier league, and with it at least £170 million over three years. if you stay up for one season, that becomes £300 million. it makes the £6.6 million going to next weekend's champions league winners look like peanuts. so who wants to be a multimillionaire? villa buzzed first, on the brink of the break, anwar el ghazi the scorer with his shoulder. it's where it ends up that counts. derby's boss, frank lampard, won almost everything as a player, but the touchline could be a helpless place. he could only watch his goalkeeper, kelle roos, do this. and it's going to go in! own—goal — beyond anyone's plan, beyond anyone's control. derby had 20 minutes
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to save their season. they gave it all they had. jack marriott's shot, touched in by martyn waghorn, took this to the wire. villa lost this match last season. it was written on the face of even their most famous fan. but the equaliser never came. for all the talk of money, the play—off final is about so much more than that. for a few moments, even a prince saw these men as kings. so aston villa, one of the best—known names in english football, are back in the big time. the gap between the football league and the premier league has perhaps never been bigger, but villa have leapt across the chasm. patrick geary, bbc news, at wembley. i know what it means to these aston villa fans, and after the heartbreak they've had, arsenal in the fa cup final and last year against fulham, it's just rewards for them, and i'm glad they're going home happy. well, in that match report we saw villa's most famous fan, the duke of cambridge, celebrating their win. the club later tweeted this mock—up picture of prince william
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giving their manager a knighthood. they said, "he led us back to where we belong, in front of royalty. arise, sir dean smith!" i was asking earlier why he supports aston villa, the duke of cambridge. apparently, someone looked into this, he didn't want to be part of the crowd, and all his friends were supporting menu and chelsea —— manchester united and chelsea, and one of the first games he went to was aston villa and manchester united. he thought he would be different from all the kids in his class. tottenham defender kieran trippier has been left out of england's 23—man squad for the nations league finals. manager gareth southgate said it was as hard a decision as he had had to make, especially after trippier had such a brilliant world cup. captain harry kane is included
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despite not playing for seven weeks with an ankle injury. england face the netherlands in the semi—finals a week on thursday. scotland's women are playing at hampden park this evening for the first time in seven years. they take onjamaica in their final match ahead of the world cup, and manager shelley kerr is hoping to smash their attendance record. take away the performance side of it, we've always set ourselves a target — inspiring the nation. and i think it would be fantastic for the players if we were to get that, you know, 10,000 or more. england thrashed afghanistan in their last match before their take on south africa in the opening game of the cricket world cup. jofra archer set england on their way, with two early wickets, before afghanistan were all out forjust 160. openerjason roy starred with 89 not—out, as england won by nine wickets, with more than 30 overs to spare. they are ready for the start of the world cup on thursday. strangely, i think i was ready before these two practice games. after the pakistan series, i think we were ready to just
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dive in then. obviously it's nice to play at the oval, where we're going to start, so we can get used to conditions and everything like that. we know how to play here, we have in the past. but i think — yeah, excited, excited for the world cup. can't wait now. at the fifth time of trying, british number one johanna konta is through to the second round of the french open. she said she stopped herself from overthinking in her straight—sets win over antonia lottner of germany. konta has been in good form on clay recently, reaching two tournament finals. she next plays the american lauren davis. britain's other number one, kyle edmund, will have to finish his match against home favourite jeremy chardy later. they were 5—5 in the final set when play was suspended because of bad light, much to the disappointment of the crowd.
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serena williams was banned from wearing the black catsuit she donned at last year's tournament, that she said made her feel like a superhero. so instead, for her warm—up before she beat vitalia diatchenko, she wore a cape decorated with messages in french. it says queen, it says champion, and it says mum. and those are things that mean a lot to me, and reminders for me, and for everyone, that wants to wear it — just remind everyone that they can be champions and are queens. so i love that about it. and, i don't know, my superpower today was just hanging in there, you know, and just staying positive for once. and right now, quite frankly, i wish i had my own superhero cape, because they have to make a very quick dash away from the studio. because on the subject of embracing characters in sport, and there is one, in football
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we love character in management. so iamoff we love character in management. so i am off right now to meet the liverpool manager, jurgen klopp, they have a big champions league final against spares in madrid, so we're going to go and talk to them and find out how he preparing for it. don't panic, we will also be talking to pochettino, but we're not getting quite so much access him. they are being more low—key, liverpool are letting us in. thing aboutjurgen klopp is if you are not aboutjurgen klopp is if you are not a football fan, there is so much to talk to him about, other than foot pole. and he is a great motivator. i did offer to be your producer, but i was told no —— other than football. we are going to have to do it in the next hour. so you are going to have
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to do my sports bulletin, good luck with serena williams's russian opponent. thank you very much. "electoral catastrophe" are the words used by one senior labour mp to describe the party's disastrous results at the european election. tom watson has told the bbc his party got it wrong on brexit, leading to a landslide of support for parties with clearer views on the uk's withdrawal from the eu. the brexit party won nearly a third of the vote. on the opposite side of the political divide, the liberal democrats increased their share to become the second—most—popular party, with 20%. but it was an embarrassing outcome for labour and the conservatives. both lost huge swathes of support. this those percentages translate to 29 meps for the brexit party, 16 for the liberal democrats, ten for labour, the conservatives have four, while ukip lost all of its seats. political analyst sir john curticejoins us now
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to explain what the results mean next for labour and the conservatives. we spoke to you, didn't we, yesterday to get an idea of the devastation that the conservatives and the labour party were feeling, but they have had a day to think of their strategy. shall we start with their strategy. shall we start with the conservatives, and what next for them? we the conservatives, and what next for them ? we have the conservatives, and what next for them? we have already spoken to one potential leadership candidate this morning, that is what they are thinking about now. as far as the conservatives are concerned, these results have fuelled the debate about how it should now handle brexit. for some, the conclusion they draw from the success of the brexit party, much of that from drawing voters away from the conservative party, is that they should be more willing to embrace no deal because that is the message that nigel farage was putting forward. i certainly would accept the argument for the lesson they should take away from this is that probably the next conservative prime minister is going to have to deliver
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brexit before he or she could contemplate the possibility of going to the country, because i think the idea that a second time around you try to persuade voters who have been voting for the brexit party, before that it was ukip, that they should switch back to conservatives on the ground that there is a promissory note that they are going to deliver brexit, i am note that they are going to deliver brexit, iam not note that they are going to deliver brexit, i am not sure that could be pulled off a second time, theresa may managed to pull that off in 2017, most people thought theresa may would deliver, now that theresa may would deliver, now that theresa may has not delivered, i think certainly the conservatives will not be able to face the electorate until they do. but that does raise the question as to how they are going to deliver, and therefore we are having this argument about whether or not at the end of the day they should be willing to crash out on 31 october without a deal if they have not managed to get something passed the house of commons. what does labour say about this? tom watson saying it is very oughtn't that it pushes for
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a second referendum very quickly, but still no clarity as to which side of the fence labour is on when it comes to remain or leave. there is no doubt this isn't an easy choice for the labour party, because although it is a party where about 70% of its vote comes from remainers, a substantial proportion of its vote comes from leavers, and they are working class voters, predominantly, to whom it has an attachment. but at the day, the remainers are the larger bulk of its support. the evidence from european parliament elections, in line with opinion polls, is the problem with labour attempts to bridge these two groups is it has ended up satisfying neither of them. one of the complaints from labour it was —— was that it was losing votes to the brexit party, representing around 40% of labour voters who voted
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leave. that is not as high a proportion as the tories, they are losing a higher percentage of their leavers, but for every one who switched from labour to the brexit party, there were three who were switching to either the liberal democrats or the greens. it is quite clear that in many cases these are voters who wanted a second eu referendum. so there are no easy choices for the labour party here, but certainly at the end of the day it has to realise that because the remain vote is the largest bulk of its support, that it needs to do something, because it cannot continue to afford to be losing votes to both groups. nigel farage says he wants this to be the end of two party politics. do you see this? certainly, what we need to recognise is that it is the first time the two party system and duopoly has been challenged from both ends of the spectrum at once.
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20% of the votes used to be nothing for the liberal democrats. then with the coalition, the vote fell away. ukip came along and did very well and 2014 and 2015 and then they fell away but now both these parties are doing well so the duopoly is being challenged by both those who want to remain and those who want to leave. labour is divided on this issue. they want to talk about left and right and the size of the state and whether we should try to reduce inequality. if accent continues to dominate our policy, unless labour can come up with a clearer message and deliver on this subject, they are at risk of finding themselves challenged by these parties and away they not previously experienced.
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interesting times. thanks very much. by interesting times. thanks very much. by better for a interesting times. thanks very much. by betterfor a calm, interesting times. thanks very much. by better for a calm, reflective thought than a ramble, a bit of woodland. carol is taking a stroll in greater brockley this morning with a look at the weather. it is lovely here. i am in greater brockley, in lewisham, and i am here because of the ramblers association has launched a public vote to vote for britain's best walking neighbourhood. 80 areas enter the competition and export panel of judges whittled those down to ten. to date you can vote for those that can by going that website. you will see which ten have made it, including this one, and cast your vote. they were looking to encourage you to walk stop in fact, according
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to spot england, something like a third of us in england do not actually reach the recommended daily activity level. that is quite staggering. it is all in a good cause. get into the fresh air and enjoy the surroundings. the weather todayis enjoy the surroundings. the weather today is not too bad for that, actually. there will be showers but many of us will miss them. if you do catch a shower, could be heavy thundery. this morning we have showers draped across parts of england and wales and scotland. dry in northern ireland but not everywhere. in scotland, by nine o'clock the showers mostly in the south—east. northern ireland north—west england, some sunshine developing. north—east england likely to catch showers through the day. as we head south, the showers are hitand day. as we head south, the showers are hit and miss but again they can
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be thundery. in south—west england, showers currently will fade. a dry afternoon coming through. for many of us in the afternoon will be dry, with some sunshine and areas of cloud and times. the showers will more than likely be in the eastern half especially of england. temperatures today to about 19 end of the south—west, around the bristol area. generally between ten and about 15. as we head for the evening and overnight, showers tending to fade, clear skies. the weather front from the south—west introducing cloud and rain across south—west england, wales and fringing into the south of northern ireland. temperatures in the 3— five. in rural areas are lower than this. tomorrow, a bright and sunny note for many parts. don't forget to have the weather front end of the
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west which will slowly be pushing eastwards. it is a warm front so slowly we will start to see warm air coming in behind that. tomorrow's top temperatures up to about 17 but for most it will be a degree also higher than today. it is getting warmerfor higher than today. it is getting warmer for the rest of the week. by the time you get to saturday, widely, 18—22. locally in the south east as high as 26 but it will not last into next week. isn't that a nice scene. sean's talking brexit and family businesses, he's in blackpool this morning. taking a look at both ends. good morning. good morning. a bit of getting
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yourself into a spend but when you speak to business, there is a calmer field because they just speak to business, there is a calmer field because theyjust have to get on with it and it is the same for this business, express linen, where they just have to this business, express linen, where theyjust have to get on with it. i need to resolve this problem, this is empty. i think this is it. i am getting the hand of it. we're looking at how the economy affecting family business as an after the election vote, let's have a chat to a few people. surely, you run a hotel in blackpool. a guest house. what does it feel is going on at the moment? the feel is generally... you mean to do with brexit? when it was first announced, people panicked about not wanting to go abroad so we
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are seeing a significant rise in people staying. however, as time has gone on, people are still going abroad and we find that years and yea rs abroad and we find that years and years ago when children were little and people wanted to come to blackpool, now they go abroad. you work with your daughter, how does it feel to be a family business at the minute? she has helped out. in the beginning, my mum worked with me as well. it feels like... it is very uncertain. it is very uncertain but we need to go with it and see what is going to happen. you are from the institute of family business. how difficult is it for family businesses when you have big players in the world of hotels. big businesses making life harderfor the smaller businesses? we know from the smaller businesses? we know from
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the report we have just launched the competition is one of the issues that family businesses are facing at the moment. i can see that that would be one of the challenges. we have these fancy folding machines behind us, can family business as make the investments needed? when they plan for the long—term, they invest for the long—term. we are for access to finance to be made more easy. it is absolutely vital. they are easy. it is absolutely vital. they a re 85% of easy. it is absolutely vital. they are 85% of businesses, family owned. thank you very much. i will practice my folding a little bit more. i got the laundry out of the basket now i have to make sure it gets nice and packed away and nice and fluffy for people like you heard check into the hotel. dinner how much i complain if the towers are not fluffy.” hotel. dinner how much i complain if the towers are not fluffy. i might have heard it once or twice. as for
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your complaints, charlie! being a nurse or doctor, working 12 hour shifts on a busy ward is hard enough, but imagine that you're also not eating or drinking anything. that's what life's like for thousands of muslim nhs workers currently fasting for ramadan, the holiest festival in the islamic calendar. when ramadan falls in the summer months, there are only a few hours of darkness in which people can eat. monika plaha reports on a community project that's supporting muslim hospital staff and providing an opportunity for them to celebrate together. it is 10am and asma will not be eating or drinking anything for nearly nine hours, but that is not stopping her preparing food for others. during ramadan, food becomes just more sacred. when you go through this period, when you do not have any, your realisation that so much of what you take for granted, clean running water from the tap, food, snack that you can eat all the time — it is such a privilege. fasting is one of the five pillars of islam which form the basis of how
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muslims live. others include faith, prayer and charity. as well as giving to the homeless, this ramadan she has made it her priority to provide food to the thousands of nhs workers observing the holy festival across london. they are doing a very difficultjob, not drinking water, not eating and they often do not get a chance to take a break during their shift so i am sending it to a hospital in east london, i'm going to send it one by one to different hospitals. 8:45 pm in newham hospital, east london. the sun falls. now is the time for muslim families and friends to come together and break their fast. traditionally by eating dates then a meal. this is known as "iftar" but for nhs staff working around the clock, this can be difficult. this is why special deliveries, like asma's, and events like this bring the true spirit
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of ramadan alive. kiran is a paediatric doctor who was working night shifts. i think something like this is vital for the nhs workers. we work really long hours — that's the nurses, the doctors, the cleaning staff, the porters, and it is exhausting because we are front—line staff, we're talking all day and ramadan is emotionally and physically taxing. i was in theatres today and once the adrenaline finish, you realise you were standing around for a long time and then you really feel thirsty. i do long day shifts, working with patients coming directly from a&e. having something special like this really brings the community together here in newham and also makes us all excited because this doesn't actually happen. hospitals across the capital can expect more of these school parcels before ramadan comes to an end next week. for asma, this is all about saying thank you. i am so indebted to the nhs. i think they are amazing people.
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i want them to know that i am grateful for who they are. monika plaha, bbc news. that is such a lovely story and such a lovely way to bring people together but it has made me so hungry andi together but it has made me so hungry and i know exactly what i am having for dinner tonight!” hungry and i know exactly what i am having for dinner tonight! i know the feeling exactly. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm geeta pendse. one of london's biggest nhs trusts is trialling the use of cargo bikes for transporting blood and tumour samples between sites. the scheme by guys and st thomas' aims to reduce dangerous emissions whilst speeding up the distribution process. it could also help the trust save money, as they'll avoid paying for ulez — the mayor‘ toxic air charge.
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as a hospital, we receive about 40,000 truck deliveries every year and we generate 5000 deliveries between each hospital site and into the wider community, so this initiative is very much to see how we can use alternative means of transport. london stansted was the worst uk airport for flight delays last year. departures were an average of 25 minutes late in 2018 according to data from the civil aviation authority. the airport said bad weather and air traffic control issues were to blame. luton was ranked second worst for punctuality, while gatwick was fourth. some of london's best known landmarks and memorials may look a bit different today, as they're being covered with bootprints. it's all part of a campaign, marking 75 years since the d day landings, highlighting the efforts of british servicemen and women and the thousands who are now unemployed. the aim is to raise awareness and funds to give veterans more support.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now: there's a good service on the tubes this morning. there's disruption for south—western railway services from woking to london waterloo due to a points failure. and there are delays in silvertown on connaught road. that's due to temporary traffic lights and roadworks by london city airport. now the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. today looking like the coolest day of the week, with temperatures set to rise as we move through the next few days. we're looking at temperatures in the low to mid 20s by the nd of the week and into the weekend. today is looking like a day of sunny spells and showers. i think the showers, particularly into the afternoon, could be quite heavy and possibly thundering. not everyone is seeing one but if you do catch one,
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you could see a large amount of rain fall in a short space of time. temperatures today at a maximum of 17—18 degrees celsius. through this evening and overnight, the showers will tend to ease. perhaps one or two lingering as we move into the early hours. some patchy cloud and clear spells with overnight lows of around 7—10 degrees celsius. tomorrow then we are looking at the best of the brightness first thing. the cloud will tend to increase from the west as we move through the day, with some patchy rain moving in later. the temperatures are set to pick up though as we move through the rest of the week and into the weekend. by the time we get to saturday, we'r elooking at highs of 23, perhaps 24 degreees celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: a knife attack on a group
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of schoolchildren at a bus stop injapan leaves two people dead and at least 15 injured. after their disastrous showing in the european elections, conservative leadership candidate jeremy hunt warns a no—deal brexit would be political suicide. hundreds more prisoners will be let out on licence every year to take part in work and training. good morning. as politicians try to iron out their brexit issues, i am in blackpool looking at how family businesses like this industrial laundry plan for what happens next. aston villa are back in the premier league. they held off a derby fightback at wembley to win the championship play—off final — a victory worth around £ 170 million. good morning from lewisham, it is a chilly start to the day but the sun will come out later. but the forecast for much of the uk is one
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of sunshine and showers. most of the showers will be in the east. more details on 15 minutes. it's tuesday the 28th of may. our top story. a group of school children waiting for a bus have been attacked by a man with a knife injapan. at least 15 people were injured on a residential street in the japanese city of kawasaki — which is around 12 miles south of tokyo. latest reports suggest an adult and a 12—year—old girl have been killed. police say the attacker died after stabbing himself in the neck. mark lobel has the latest. the shocking attack took place during the morning rush hour in kawasaki, just south of tokyo, as schoolgirls as young as six, reportedly from a private catholic college, lined up for their bus. on this street corner, a man started stabbing people queueing and then, holding a knife in each hand according to one eyewitness, boarded the vehicle, lashing out at those inside as well.
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this lady says the people she saw were bleeding. this woman heard kids screaming and crying. she says children and adults at the scene looked too shocked to do anything. she didn't know what to do either. ambulances rushed to the scene, and the injured were taken to hospital. but for some, it was too late. the attacker, in his 50s, killed a 12—year—old schoolgirl and a 39—year—old man, and wounded at least 13 others. police say the suspect died in custody, having stabbed himself in the neck. vasey is believed to be a of kawasaki. —— he is believed to be a resident of kawasaki.
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the attack took place as japanese prime minister shinzo abe was hosting the us president, donald trump, on a trade visit. on behalf of the first lady and myself, i want to take a moment to send our prayers and sympathy to the victims of the stabbing attack this morning in tokyo. all americans stand with the people ofjapan, and grieve for the victims and for their families. japan's normally safe society has been shaken by several mass knife attacks in the past, but they remain rare. so far, there is no apparent motive for this one. mark lobel, bbc news. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes is at the scene in kawasaki. rupert, what's the latest? we heard from as report that japan is known as a safe, peaceful country? yes, it really is. very shocking for this community. this is a quiet community just shocking for this community. this is a quiet communityjust to the south of tokyo. the kids gathered on the corner behind me here where you can see a temporary memorial is being
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established. people are coming here and laying flowers and little gifts. the kids gathered here on the corner every morning waiting for the bus to pick them up. something like this would be unimaginable for those children and their parents, as you say this is an extremely safe society. children are used to walking to school in the morning, in the neighbourhood where i live i see children aged five, six and seven walking to school by themselves. japan isa walking to school by themselves. japan is a very safe society, gun crime is almost unheard of because owning a gun is almost impossible, but also other types of violent crime. there have been occasional incidents, there was a terrible incidents, there was a terrible incident in 2016 where 19 people we re incident in 2016 where 19 people were murdered in a care home by a former worker, and in 2008 seven people were killed in tokyo by a street stabbing, but when you live injapan you get used to crime being very injapan you get used to crime being very uncommon, injapan you get used to crime being very uncommon, that is why this is
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so deeply shocking. it really is. thank you, rupert wingfield—hayes. the conservative leadership candidate jeremy hunt has warned his party will be committing "political suicide" if they try to push through a no—deal brexit. the foreign secretary's remarks come as both labour and the conservatives are trying to deal with a disastrous result in the european elections. our political correspondent jonathan blake joins us now from westminster. we have ten in the race, plenty of contenders, what is the big picture? it isa contenders, what is the big picture? it is a crowded field and jeremy hunt is trying to set himself apart from some in the race by establishing himself as the antinode your candidate. in a piece for the daily telegraph he writes that trying to pursue a no deal exit risks a general election and would be political suicide for the conservative party. he is getting a parliament having shown itself prepared to do whatever it takes to
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stop a no—deal brexit means the only real way they can do that now would bea real way they can do that now would be a no—confidence vote in the government, which could trigger a general election, and jeremy hunt says that will putjeremy corbyn in downing street by christmas. another candidate very much on the other side of the argument, esther mcvey, shot back atjeremy hunt last night and said the real political suicide would not be delivering on the referendum result and keeping britain in the eu longer than the deadline at the end of october. so theissue deadline at the end of october. so the issue of whether the new tory leader and prime minister would be prepared to take britain out of the eu without a deal is a central argument in this campaign which, as you say, it's starting to look like a very crowded field with ten candidates in the race. thank you, jonathan. and now let's get the reaction from northern ireland and scotland where results were confirmed late yesterday afternoon. in a moment we'll speak to our scotland correspondent lorna gordon in glasgow, but first, let's speak to chris page in belfast.
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good morning, chris. some surprises from the results? it was a significant result in northern ireland for a number of reasons, there are three meps elected for the first time, all women, and until now the majority of northern ireland meps have been unionist, that is no longer the case. the successful candidates were unionist, diane dodds of the dup, a nationalist, martin andersson of sinn fein, and the leader of the cross community alliance party, naomi long, who identifies as neither unionist nor nationalist. this was the big toe best result this party has ever had, which seems to show voters moving to the centre ground. —— this was the best result this party has ever had. there is a badge of negotiations under way at the moment with the aim of restoring devolved government, those talks will intensify now the election campaign is over. two of
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the three northern ireland meps are strongly anti—brexit, the sinn fein mep and naomi long are standing for voters who want to stay in the eu, the new prime minister will have to bear that in the new prime minister will have to bearthat in mind, the new prime minister will have to bear that in mind, given that northern ireland is the part of the uk most affected by brexit, in many ways. lorna gordon is in glasgow. tell us the picture as the dust has settled ? tell us the picture as the dust has settled? the aftermath is focusing on two parties here, labour and the snp. labour had a dreadful, dreadful result. as one scottish labour mp said of the policy of constructive ambiguity, if you are going to sit in the middle—of—the—road you will be hit from all sides. they had the worst election result here since 1910 and lost both their meps. their leader in scotland is coming under lots of criticism. he has changed his position and says he supports a
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people's vote with a leave and remain option. the snp have always supported a second vote and have a lwa ys supported a second vote and have always wanted to see brexit stopped in its entirety. their clear unambiguous position has set them well, they won 38% of the vote, three of the six available seats. nicola sturgeon, scotland has made first minister, said the snp has worked hard to find compromises and has also given a timescale for a second independence referendum, so she wants to see that in the second half of next year. thank you very much, lorna. hundreds more prisoners in england and wales will be allowed to leave jail for a day or overnight to work, undertake training or look after their children, as part of a government strategy to rehabilitate offenders. last year, 7,700 people were released from jail temporarily. the changes will apply mainly to female prisoners and those in open prisons. ministers say the move will help inmates find immediate employment on release. a 34—year—old—woman will appear
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before sheffield crown court today, charged with murdering her two teenage sons. sarah barrass is accused of killing tristan and blake, aged 13 and 14, following an incident at their home. 37—year—old brandon machin is also accused of murdering the two boys and will also appear in court later. the worst uk airport for flight delays last year was london sta nsted, according to data from the civil aviation authority. passengers were kept waiting on flights for an average of 25 minutes. the airport blamed "adverse weather and air traffic control issues". belfast city recorded the best performance with an eight—minute average delay. claims for car thefts in the uk are at a seven—year high. 16,000 claims have been made across the uk in the first three months of this year. the association of british insurers says the rising use of new technology, including keyless entry systems, are thought to be behind the increase and there are calls for manufacturers to step up security of their vehicles. our business correspondent
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katy austin explains. ca rs cars are more sophisticated than ever, and organised criminals have found new ways to steal them. this footage shows thieves exploiting keyless technology to steal a vehicle in seconds by tricking it into thinking its owner is right next to it. the body representing insurers says methods like this have helped fuel a rise in car crime and claims. between january and helped fuel a rise in car crime and claims. betweenjanuary and march last year, 14,000 car theft insurance claims were made, rising to 16,000 in the first three months of this year, the highest figure since 2012. pay—outs totalled £180 million, up 22% in 12 months. the theft of keyless because it is a major contributor to the unwelcome rising car crime we have seen in the last five years. we would like
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manufactured to do even more than they are already doing to make vehicles as resilient as possible to ever more clever and sophisticated car criminals. a police and government task. in january to try to tackle vehicle crime. but task forces includes the car manufacturers organisation, which says its members are investing billions in security, but technology has helped to bring down theft in the longer term. it is 80 13 it is 8013 am. let's look at the fallout from the european elections. both labour and the conservatives are grappling with how their approach to brexit negotiations affected the results. i'm joined now by professor andrew russell, head of politics at liverpool university. good morning. the big success story of the night was nigel farage's newly—created brexit party — which received the largest share of the vote. we spoke to him yesterday. what we're saying is we have a mandate,
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we're saying is we have a mandate, we should be part now of the government negotiations with brussels, we are in brussels after all, we have the right experience, let's make sure the country is ready on the 31st of october to leave the european union on whatever terms, and if of those rivals to be theresa may's successor want to talk to us, we will be very happy. gervasi thinks he deserves a seat at the table, he is not an mp or in parliament but he thinks he is key to the brexit negotiations?” parliament but he thinks he is key to the brexit negotiations? i don't think he seriously expects to be involved, but what he can do is surf that moral authority and try to influence the westminster bubble from the outside. it is not so much the power from having from the outside. it is not so much the powerfrom having these new from the outside. it is not so much the power from having these new meps but it is about the influence on british domestic politics and the influence on european politics as a
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side issue from that. the momentum is with them and one of the effects they will have, not least in terms of the negotiations with europe, is how they will influence the choice of the new conservative leader. the lib dems did well, pro—brexit parties and the greens. they performed strongly, suggesting plenty of appetite for remaining in the eu? i was pleasantly surprised, it was fairly clear we had momentum and were doing well but i am delighted by the scale of the popular vote and the seats we have won and! popular vote and the seats we have won and i think a bigger picture is if you take the remain parties as a whole, you have had a very strong turnout, a very good result and we are now demonstrating their is a majority of people in the country who do not want to leave the european union. when you are trying to figure it is where the votes have come from and gone to and have been trying to analyse which were remain votes a nd
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trying to analyse which were remain votes and leave votes in relation to the parties. we have to consider that a vote for the conservatives as a vote for leave, so if you add those to the brexit party than the leavers do slightly better than you might have seen some expectations. the lib dems have been flatlining since they entered the coalition into thousand and ten, they look to be back with a vengeance. add this to some impressive local election results and performance of the greens and the european parliament elections and they can sense new enthusiasm for third—party politics. at the last general election we were talking about the impact to two party politics. has that change now? the thing about europe is that it cuts through traditional party lines. that is why we had a referendum not just in lines. that is why we had a referendum notjust in 2016 but in 1975, because the two main parties we re 1975, because the two main parties were split on how to approach
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europe, and that is still the case. and since 2016, the question of our european feature or not is the one dominating british politics. kit malthouse was on about one hour ago, the tenth person to throw his hat into the ring for the conservative party leadership. the term no deal and whether or not the next leader is prepared to take britain out of the eu without a deal, but it'll influence on how they are approaching brexit? one of the key pressures that the brexit party will put on conservative party candidates for the leadership is they have to say something distinctive. the key pressure, it is very hard for them to say they would not be prepared to countenance a no deal, even as jeremy hunt has done, if they said it would be really suboptimal, they
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cannot rule it out. that is a significant change from a few weeks ago when it looked like no deal was off the table completely for the prime minister. this has ratcheted up prime minister. this has ratcheted up pressure on the conservatives, kit malthouse was not even on the list of candidates on the bbc website yesterday and today he has a p pa re ntly website yesterday and today he has apparently said he is the only one with a proven record of delivery. there is still more to come out of the woodwork, it will be a long, drawn—out process. the woodwork, it will be a long, drawn-out process. out of ten, how goodis drawn-out process. out of ten, how good is it being head of politics at liverpool university right now? good is it being head of politics at liverpool university right now7m is fascinating times if you do not expect any easy answers! psyche very much, and you. let's go back to charlie. —— thank you very much. we need to carol kirkwood, a babbling brook and some weather. it is lovely here in lewisham this
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morning. i need to clear things up, the reason we're here is because the ramblers association has launched a public vote to find britain's best walking neighbourhood. for the purpose of this competition they have called the area we are in greater brockley, because it encompasses some of the neighbouring parks. there is not an area called greater brockley in real life, it is just so no fare. we are enjoying it in lewisham, as charlie said the birds are chirping, the brick behind me is babbling away and it is very tranquil, perfect the aeroplane overhead. the forecast is one of sunshine and showers. most of the showers will be in the east, some are in the west end further north—west we will hang on to some showers through the course of the day. there is lots of dry weather and the cloud we currently have wilson and break and we will see sunny spells developing. we have
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showers across south—west england, wales, north—west scotland at eastern parts of scotland and england. if we assume into scotland we will hang onto those showers as we will hang onto those showers as we go through the day, and also parts of the east. but the rest of scotla nd parts of the east. but the rest of scotland is largely try. for northern ireland and north—west england, a dry story with the cloud thinning and breaking. the showers continue across the east of england not just this continue across the east of england notjust this morning but through the day, the showers are hit and miss. in wales and south—west england they will give way to try and bright conditions. we will see a few showers but lots of bright weather. through the corset today, lots of sunshine, with variable cloud. some showers in the east will be heavy and sunny. temperatures raining from ten in the north to heights of about 19 as we push towards the south—west. this evening and overnight, many of the showers will
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fade, it will be clearer skies developing and by the end of the night a weather front from the south—west will introduce to cloud and some rain. living in across south—west england, wales and southern parts of northern ireland. temperature —wise, three to five in the north, five to ten in the south. those are the temperatures intense in cities, it will be colder in rural areas. tomorrow starts sunny for much of the uk but we have that weather fronts in the west which will be moving north—eastward through the course of the day. it is a warm front, gradually we will see warmer air, but it is bringing in some rain. temperatures tomorrow at a degree also for most, in bristol it is down a degree for you, you mightfind, but it is down a degree for you, you might find, but the temperatures will continue to climb through the rest of the week, probably peaking on saturday. studio: thank you,
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carol. it is delightful there. 40,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in england every year. radiotherapy can be a highly effective treatment but radiation can also significantly damage other organs. now, the first of 1,000 patients has been given a new gel implant which acts as a spacer, protecting the rest of the body during treatment and reducing side effects by up to 70%. our health correspondent matthew hill can explain. alan clarke is in no painjust a few days after his operation. i feel great, absolutely wonderful, yes. pleased it's done. wonderful. it was a wonderful team, brilliant. you just couldn't fault it. there's no pain to it, it's all natural. lovely. he first had radiotherapy in 2011. the cancer returned. this puts him at greater risk of getting side—effects of radiotherapy. that's why mr clarke's been selected to be the first nhs patient in the uk to be given the gel. two syringes are mixed together, and once injected it sets within seconds like a jelly.
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it creates a space between the prostate and rectum ofjust over one centimetre. you can see the prostate is here, this grey area's the prostate, and this bit down here is the rectum. and we've created this space, this black area in between the prostate and the rectum and that should mean that the rectum will not get the toxicity from the radiotherapy. this might seem like a small space, but in radiotherapy terms the small space makes a huge difference to the patient‘s quality of life in the long—term. a study of over 200 patients in the united states shows that this treatment reduces erectile dysfunction by up to 40%, reduces damage to the bladder by up to 50% and damage to the bowel by over 70%. there are around 15,000 men who have radiotherapy for prostate cancer each year in the uk. the nhs innovative technology fund will pay for 1000 of these
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procedures over the next year innovative 12 hospitals, at a cost of around £2000 per operation. once the advantages can be demonstrated its hoped everyone will be offered the gel so they can be spared devastating damage. matthew hill, bbc news. we'rejoined now by nhs england's clinical lead for innovation, professor tony young. this is exciting? it is really exciting. the long—term plan for the nhs has set an ambition of how we will become a nation that leads on how we take up the latest, greatest things. it is notjust new gadgets or gizmos, it is advances in treatment and diagnosis, like we had seen here with this space device. prostate cancer is the most common
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cancer affecting men. often they are embarrassed come forward. recently we have had some celebrities trying to promote this. stephen fry and bill turnbull. trying to encourage men to get themselves checked. sometimes men are concerned about the side—effects of treatment, so this new gel which helps lift part of the bowel of the prostrate gland till it is not caught in the radiotherapy field, can reduce quite severe side—effects —— met with the prostate gland. the side—effects may bea pain prostate gland. the side—effects may be a pain or bleeding, it can reduce them by 70% almost so men do not have to fear getting themselves checked anymore. it as much as things like prostate cancer, there is any proton beam in manchester, another therapy where we genetically reprogrammed patients' cells and inject them back into transform how their cancer is treated. there are also gadgets and gizmos, and i have some of them here with me. this
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device is for biopsy in the prostate gland, at the moment that is often undertaken with perhaps 30 samples being taken from the prostate and turn and general anaesthetic. this isa turn and general anaesthetic. this is a new template biopsy system, is a national innovation accelerator and it has taken it from a general anaesthetic in a day case procedure toa anaesthetic in a day case procedure to a local anaesthetic and often outpatient procedure, reducing complications and costs. when those extra patients come forward wanting the test, to be checked for prostate cancer, the nhs is adopting this. going back to the gel, in some ways it feels quite simple, it is literally a barrier, you call it a spacer, it is quite a simple answer to what is a really important issue? absolutely. i am a consultant
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urological surgeon in southend hospital in essex so ideal with men with prostate cancer daily, as well as my role in nhs england. when the hydrogel came through i said this makes surgical sense, removing a tissue out of the radiation field so it is not damaged, as you say, so simple and effective. through our innovative technology payments system we are making that available across the nhs so men can come forward and not necessarily have the side—effects they might have. but prostate cancer is a really important thing, 40,000 patients each year, but there are probably ten times as many men who have benign conditions affecting the prostate that they are afraid to come forward with. at the time is up for now, you have a fascinating job and it is really interesting. thank you, we will talk again another time. professor tony young. find out what is happening where you are this morning. see you in a few minutes.
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hello, good morning. yesterday the temperature got up to 20 degrees in the south—east of england, today, not likely to see the temperatures as high across the uk. for all of us, it will feel cooler today, mixture of sunshine and showers. some showers this morning around western areas of the uk but in eastern parts, central and eastern areas of england, eastern scotland, likely to see the heaviest showers this afternoon. some localised thunderstorms mixed in. further west, largely dry with sunshine, not feeling too bad in the sunshine are generally feeling cooler for all of us, especially around north sea coast, temperatures between 9—11d. through tonight, the cloud increases
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in the west, patchy rain slowly moving its way in. overnight temperatures reaching 3—4d in northern areas, quite a chilly start to wednesday but lots of cloud throughout wednesday, patchy rain spreading across many areas, temperatures rising ever so slightly.
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this is business live from bbc news with tadhg enright and ben bland. how to get europe's economy growing? there's a huge job in store for the next boss of europe's central bank as the candidates get in position in the race for the top job. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 28 may europe is divided over what economic recipes are required to steer the continent back to robust growth — so who will emerge as the winner in the race to run europe's central bank? and president trump may have concluded his state visit to tokyo, but concerns remain over a future trade deal between the us

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