Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  May 28, 2019 10:40pm-11:01pm BST

10:40 pm
believe he is flip—flopping on a no—deal brexit. we will begin with the financial times, matt hancock the health secretary who is one of the candidates, he is the latest to distance himself from boris johnson. matt hancock declared on saturday and theresa may announced she was quitting on friday and there are already ten candidates and two of the most prominent candidates are in a bitter row and this is about comments boris johnson made a bitter row and this is about comments borisjohnson made when he was foreign secretary and in response to criticism of the government was mike brexit starts from business he reportedly said f business. —— the government's brexit starts. some would say the tory
10:41 pm
leadership battle is getting better but also surreal. the no deal fault line has totally emerged, with those who are saying we can have no deal and those who say we can't. jeremy hunt says he wants a consensus deal and not no deal. there are nuances but roughly speaking that is where the fault line is, you have bolster —— borisjohnson the fault line is, you have bolster —— boris johnson and the fault line is, you have bolster —— borisjohnson and dominic robin esther mcvey who say they will leave with no deal if there is no deal by the slst of october —— dominic rav and esther mcvey. jeremy hunt says he's not afraid of it but it is not something that is necessarily deliverable, then you have people like matt hancock and rory stewart who have said explicitly that they think they no—deal brexit is a bad
10:42 pm
idea. the independent, tory leadership hopefuls get real on brexit, this is becausejean—claude juncker has rejected any renegotiation of the deal, and some people would say that is obviously their overall position, but faced with a new prime minister, they may make a few tweaks? in general there has been a failure amongst some to recognise that this is a negotiation with the eu are notjust a domestic situation with the uk says what it once and it happens, and that will be the case during the conservative leadership election. —— says what it wa nts. leadership election. —— says what it wants. in the eu they are talking about who will succeed jean—claude juncker and donald tusk, the main two positions, that in itself is a reminder of how limited a time there is to renegotiate. you have lots of candidates. they say they will go
10:43 pm
back to the eu and renegotiate but the main leaders of the eu, their time is basically over and the success time is basically over and the success ofjean—claude juncker will not take over until november, which is after the uk is meant to have left the eu, so there is a question of when the renegotiation will ever ta ke of when the renegotiation will ever take place. jessica, the daily mail, there is a picture at the top, michael gove's wife saying he can't load the dishwasher but there is one job she thinks he could do. we know what she means by that. a lot of debate about political wives isn't there? yes, people have started a blog, the wives of westminster, and it is interesting that people want to write a blog about their lives but this sits uneasily for some of us. but this sits uneasily for some of us. i don't know how many dishwashers michael gove actually has... one of the interesting things
10:44 pm
is, the daily mail was one of the papers that came out against michael gove when he did the knifing of borisjohnson and gove when he did the knifing of boris johnson and they said this is the reason why it must be theresa may because she is the only sensible consensus may because she is the only sensible consensus candidate. this is a softer approach from the daily mail which may be thinks you are more —— they are more interested in giving him their support. do you know what levels of support the front runners have? obviously not everyone is declaring. it is hard to know because all of the campaigns have different strategies and some campaigns will take a big bang approach and as they launch say, we have the support of this many mps and theresa may did that very successfully in 2016, launching with dozens successfully in 2016, launching with d oze ns of successfully in 2016, launching with dozens of conservative mps she was suddenly inevitable. this time it looks like there is a top tier in terms of declarations, jeremy hunt, dominic raab, boris johnson
10:45 pm
terms of declarations, jeremy hunt, dominic raab, borisjohnson and michael gove, jostling around 20 mps, but to come prime minister they will need more than 20 mps so it is aa will need more than 20 mps so it is a a falls game —— but to become prime in the survey will need more than 20 mps so it is a difficult game to predict —— but to become prime minister they will need more than 20 mps. if i was sajid javid i would be a bit worried with only two. and also andrea leadsom. more people will declare? penny mordaunt might declare, graham brady the chair of the 1922 committee says he is thinking about a run, and steve baker, one of the hardline eurosceptics, he baker, one of the hardline eurosce ptics, he could baker, one of the hardline eurosceptics, he could declare. pretty patel as well. surely some of these will have to drop out? —— priti patel. you are right, but it will become clear who is actually
10:46 pm
viable. 0ne will become clear who is actually viable. one person said the other day at westminster, the reason they are all running is because they don't have a clue who is going to win because it is easy to all run and then see who will be the winning candidate because the dynamic is so different to any previous leadership election. it is very hard to know. one of the things, we expect a lot of candidates will drip away in the first contest but if there are people, six or seven hovering around the same numberof people, six or seven hovering around the same number of mps, they might think about why should i drop out? you might even get ten who have roughly the same number of mps and therefore we might have five drop away but then you still have ten people in the race and they don't see any reason why they should drop out. will we logically end up with a no deal candidate and a remain deal candidate, if that makes sense, so
10:47 pm
there's a balance, or is that unpredictable? it is unpredictable, but there are basically two lanes in this contest, basically the people who have tried to make it work from within the cabinet and think the uk should not leave without the deal but maybe should be prepared to countenance no deal and then you have the harder brexiteers which is borisjohnson have the harder brexiteers which is boris johnson and dominic have the harder brexiteers which is borisjohnson and dominic raab and baby borisjohnson and dominic raab and ba by steve borisjohnson and dominic raab and baby steve baker, they talk about relegation but they may be think they will be fine and they are willing to countenance no deal —— and maybe steve baker. they are the streams we are talking about. let's move on to the labour party because they have hit the headlines today. the telegraph says shamefuljim marie —— jeremy corbyn faces mutiny.
10:48 pm
the inquiry into anti—semitism has been called and many people are commenting on the fact that other senior members of the labour party have also not voted labour this time. because of the brexit position ofjeremy corbyn. he is under time. because of the brexit position of jeremy corbyn. he is under siege on three fronts ever since the european elections, firstly the damning announcement that they will be investigated by the equalities watchdog for the way they have handled the complaints of anti—semitism which many labour mps find shocking and they are also facing criticism from lots of grandees for expelling alastair campbell who said that he relu cta ntly campbell who said that he reluctantly voted for the lib dems and many more have since come out, and many more have since come out, and all of these grandees are being dead to be expelled so this is difficult —— all of these grandees are daring the labour party to expel them, so this is difficult. also the
10:49 pm
brexit position in terms of the referendum, so they are also under pressure from the members, so they are very much under the cosh. the daily mail says it is a day of shame for labour. tom watson has called it a truly disgraceful day because of the inquiry. people like margaret hodge saying this has been a difficult time with the expulsion of alastair campbell and she said jeremy corbyn has failed from day one to take it seriously in terms of anti—semitism and he should hang his head in shame. a lot of people say the alastair campbell move was a distraction, to take it away from the anti—semitism issue? distraction, to take it away from the anti-semitism issue? you can basically see all the tensions which have been simmering during his leadership coming to a head at a similar time. with alastair campbell, some people might not have that much sympathy with him being
10:50 pm
expeued that much sympathy with him being expelled for voting for a different political party, essential that bind members is that you also bought the same one, but the more interesting question is if someone as tribal as alastair campbell has only ever voted for the labour party, and charles clarke has only ever voted for the labour party likewise, and of people as this really labour is them are not voting for the labour party, there is the much more interesting question and more fundamental existential question for labour which is this being repeated in large numbers throughout the country? if it is they are in real trouble. in terms of both parties sticking together now, whatever the position ofjeremy corbyn on a second referendum, whoever ends up leading the tory party, both parties risked alienating part of their support base and there is also talk of challenges to the labour leadership, as well. that remains a
10:51 pm
possibility, but labour mps who are critics ofjeremy corbyn and would like to see him replaced are cautious about that and they saw how it went in 2016 which was very badly and the labour membership and labour vote rs and the labour membership and labour voters may have seen the european elections as a free header against jeremy corbyn to vote for another party like the lib dems or the greens in orderto party like the lib dems or the greens in order to show them what they thought about his brexit policy but does that mean they really abandoned this deep affection that a lot of members have forjeremy corbyn as a person and as a leader? one of the ties that really binds members together is not the brexit issue but austerity, that is the thing they really care about, many x public sector workers and teachers, thatis public sector workers and teachers, that is the key issue for a lot of labour voters when it comes to a general election. jeremy corbyn will represent for many of those members
10:52 pm
what they want to see. i think maybe some of them will have voted for other parties at this election but i don't know if that reads over and thatis don't know if that reads over and that is something the labour leadership will be hoping. now the guardian, john bercow saying that he risks the fury of the eurosceptics because he has said he will possibly stay on as the speaker. he did a speech today in the united states. there has been talk of him standing down for a long time and if one position that unite every single tory candidate for the leadership is their loathing ofjohn tory candidate for the leadership is their loathing of john bercow. tory candidate for the leadership is their loathing ofjohn bercow. he will stay on as speaker to frustrate another prime minister. john bercow has become controversial during the more recent part of the brexit process bite he would say enabling mps to have their voice heard —— by. the government would say by enabling
10:53 pm
mps to thwart the referendum result. by mps to thwart the referendum result. by making it easier for mps to block a no—deal brexit. in an interview with the guardian in washington he said he knows people thought he was going to stand out in the summer but he says it would be the wrong time to do it. he says there are momentous events going on and john bercow is going to stick around for the rest of the brexit process. he said it is for the birds to think that parliament could be sidelined in the debate over brexit, it is unimaginable, he says. standing up for parliamentarians is very important for many. yes, and for mps on the other side of the brexit to fight, they feeljohn bercow has givena fight, they feeljohn bercow has given a lot of power to voices in parliament who don't want to see other views overridden by the government which is the way that theresa may one tried to play this strategy. and he has avoided that and he has allowed unprecedented
10:54 pm
parliamentary tactics to be used by mps, laws to be changed to take control of the order paper, to decide what happens in parliament that day, and if he continues to allow the pushing of parliamentary conventions and constitutional conventions and constitutional conventions it makes it more likely that mps could find a route to stopping no deal. we will end with one story that is not politics, on the front page of the telegraph, a picture of the actress julianne moore revealing she does not get paid as much as male stars despite being one of the biggest names in hollywood. it is remarkable how this question is not going away. there was the focus on equal pay and this year the coverage of the cannes film festival seems to have been about
10:55 pm
quentin tarantino and which films are going to come out in cinemas. it is clearly good that a leading actress has used her platform to remind people that this issue is very farfrom remind people that this issue is very far from solved because people we re very far from solved because people were talking about it for a little bit. these are the things which people still care about day—to—day? yes, and it feels like a less political award season this year, less people talking about donald trump and some of the campaigns like timesup, so it is good that she is still talking about it, but with hollywood really focusing on making a lot of female led films and feminist led films which are doing well in cinemas, it is extraordinary that those stars who are fronting those films are not getting paid the same as a man fronting an action
10:56 pm
film which may not do as well. interesting, interesting. that's it for the papers this hour. henry zeffman and jessica elgot will be back at 1130 for another look at the papers, and don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you — 7 days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers — and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you and goodbye. hello, good evening. it was a bit on the chilly side because of the westerly breeze which brought showers to the eastern side of england with also some heavy showers. further west, the showers faded away, leaving us blue skies
10:57 pm
and sunshine but the weather will look very different here on tuesday. that is because instead of the north north westerly breeze the cooler air will be replacing it with much warmer “— will be replacing it with much warmer —— something much warmer from the tropics which will bring humid airand a deal of the tropics which will bring humid air and a deal of cloud and the cloud will also bring rain especially this lot coming in from the atlantic right now. ahead of that we have clearer skies and there will be a few showers for a while but those are tending to fade away even from eastern parts of england. then we look to the atlantic winds bring in cloud, even a bit of rain by the end of the night, so much milder, and where we have the clearer skies in scotland in rural areas we may have a pinch of frost. sunshine to start the day for scotland, much of eastern england but we have the clout that will continue to push its way east through the day, and it will bring misty weather over the hills in the west and also rain and drizzle over
10:58 pm
the hills of north wales and north west england. northern scotland with some sunshine and showers, a bit colder here with the temperatures typically 15—17. most of the rain is coming on the weather front here and a chunk of that pushes into the north sea tomorrow evening and overnight, but the weather front will get stuck across the northern half of the uk and the warm air is scooped out to the south but the humid airwill contain scooped out to the south but the humid airwillcontaina scooped out to the south but the humid air will contain a lot of cloud and it might be a bit damp and misty around western hills and coasts. most of the rain further north, but as it brightens up through the midlands and the south, temperatures reaching 21—22 and a contrast with the cold air we still have in the northernmost parts of scotland. as we head towards the end of the week. for scotland and northern ireland, temperatures may rise a little bit but there will be thicker cloud and outbreaks of rain in many areas but for england and wales the cloud will be tending to break up more and more with more in
10:59 pm
the way of sunshine and more warmth and by the weekend we could have 27 celsius.
11:00 pm
this is bbc news, i'm geeta guru—murthy. the headlines at 11:00pm: contenders for theresa may's job are split over whether to leave the eu with or without a deal. she says she still wants an orderly exit. always taken the view that the best option for the uk is to leave the union with a deal. alastair campbell, tony blair's former spin doctor, is expelled from the labour party for voting lib dem in the european elections. the family of the ringleader of the london bridge attackers say they reported him to the anti—terror hotline, two years before the killing spree. more trouble for the high street, as boots considers shutting up to 200 stores to cut costs. torn apart by the islamic state group, the yazidi families

8 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on