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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 30, 2019 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: universities in england are told to cut tuition fees by up to £1,700 a year. at least seven people have died after a tourist boat on the river danube in budapest capsizes — 19 others are still missing. highly processed foods such as burgers and crisps are linked to poor health and early death. chelsea thrash arsenal in the europa league final. they win 4—1 in baku, but star man eden hazard hints that he's on his way out of the club. a major mobile updgrade or a waste of money? a new superfast service is launched
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in six uk cities today. 56 will allow films to be downloaded in seconds. i'll be asking if its coverage is fair and good value. how driverless cars could revolutionise the lives of future pensioners. a cloudy but mild start to the day. some heavy rain in the north, brightest skies in the northern isles, and the south—east will feel quite humid. it's thursday the 30th of may. our top story: university tuition fees in england should be cut by £1,700 a year, according to a government review published today. it also suggests that students from poorerfamilies should receive grants to cover living costs. but there are concerns that extending the period over which graduates pay back loans from 30 to a0 years could reduce the benefit of any fee—cut. here's our education correspondent, frankie mccamley.
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six students at one college, each with a different plan for their future. some want to go to university, for others apprenticeships are on the cards. for francesco, money is a big part of her decision. i care for somebody, they can't afford to work because they are disabled. so it makes it harder to then think, i will go off to university and have this 40 will go off to university and have this a0 or will go off to university and have this 40 or £50,000 will go off to university and have this a0 or £50,000 debt. will go off to university and have this 40 or £50,000 debt. they lowered the fees without make a difference? i believe you can't put a monetary value on education, so whether it be seven and a half thousand 9000, if the quality of the education is significant enough. lauren chose to do an apprenticeship, but would have liked to have more support like those at university. i have a family household to run and i am on the basic rate of pay are as a 16—year—old doing an apprenticeship.
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i think 16—year—old doing an apprenticeship. ithinka 16—year—old doing an apprenticeship. i think a bursary or alone would be more attractive to apprenticeships. the outgoing pm, theresa may, commissioned a review looking at post 18 education in england. it is recommending a of £7,500 on university fees, and grants for living costs brought back for the poorest students, and tuition fee loa ns poorest students, and tuition fee loans available for everyone doing advanced qualifications. but with change at the top of government, some are concerned that this latest review could be ignored. which still leaves uncertainty for future stu d e nts leaves uncertainty for future students when deciding what path to take. at least seven people have died after a cruise boat carrying tourists capsized in the hungarian capital, budapest. the south korean government says 33 of its citizens were on board the boat on the river danube, and 19 are still unaccounted for. gareth barlow reports. the incident happened late on wednesday evening aound 10 o'clock local time on a popular part of the river so close
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to the hungarian parliament. the mermaid, when it collided with another boat and sank. they found the same boat on the danube river so they found the details in the little parts of the boat. all of the river is closed and more than a00 people working for the rescue. boats, spotlights and radar scanning the river for several kilometres downstream. police and paramedics lined the riverbank as divers searched the water. child ren's ambulances ready on stand—by. translation: president moon jae—in
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requests every possible means be put into the rescue operation together with the hungarian government. the river is flooding, and strong winds and heavy rain are hampering the search. in the centre of budapest tonight, the search for those lost in the river continues but as a new day dawns, the search for the answers to what caused the disaster will get under way. gareth barlow, bbc news. eating highly processed food such as crisps, sugary cereals and ready meals, puts you at higher risk of heart problems and an early death, according to new studies in the british medicaljournal. researchers say people should eat fresh produce to reduce the risk, but as a our health correspondent, james gallagher, reports, some scientists warn the findings are too simplistic. this is processed food. they are foods that have been through the most industrial processing and often have a long list of ingredients on the packet. it includes popular
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items like fizzy drinks, chicken nuggets and breakfast cereals. researchers regularly assessed the diets of 100,000 people and recorded what happened to them foods. —— hell. they found that those who ate the most ultra— processed foods tended to have the most heart problems and die earlier. more work is still needed to explain what it is still needed to explain what it is about ultra— processing that might have a detrimental effect on oui’ might have a detrimental effect on our bodies. what we actually need to know is what is behind these associations. is it the ultra— processed foods? is it the nutritional content? is it some kind of additive in them, or to do with people ‘s lives, the people who are eating more of them, and rather than jumping to conclusions we need to find out a bit more about it. authors of the studies say there is 110w authors of the studies say there is now mounting evidence that ultra— processed foods may be harmful, and this comes out hot on the heels of trials that show these types of foods make us eat more and put on
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weight. but the health advice is very familiar. a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, nuts and seeds also happens to be one form of unprocessed foods. the proportion of low—paid workers in britain — those on less than £8.52 per hour — has fallen to its lowest level since 1980, according to a new report. the resolution foundation, a think tank focusing on people on the lowest incomes, found that the number of low—paid workers dropped by 200,000 last year and suggested low pay could be elimiated all together by 2020. the uk has a long—standing lope problem, but which is being eroded thanks to the higher minimum wage that was introduced in 2016. at the moment there is a political consensus it seems in favour of pushing the rate higher, it is good news because it would further reduce the number of people on low pay. but going into uncharted territory we
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need to be careful about how we make that change. chelsea have won the europa league after thrashing arsenal a—1 in the all—english final in baku. only about 5,000 fans of both sides travelled, leaving the stadium appearing to be half—full, and a rather eerie atmosphere. is itfairto is it fair to say it was a fashion? yes, it was. it was all in the second half. the second half was very different to the first. the first half, i have to say, was really bizarre. 0—0, very tense. the thing that was clear last night, and huge congratulations to chelsea, but it was a strange atmosphere. two and a half thousand miles away, 5000 fa ns a half thousand miles away, 5000 fans travelled. how many were there? i think we might be able to share with you some of the stills of the stadium. there we go. 0h! that's bad! it's not very... it doesn't create the best atmosphere. bad! it's not very... it doesn't
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create the best atmospherem bad! it's not very... it doesn't create the best atmosphere. it is a big stadium, too. not only that, the crowds are a long way from the pitch, so lots of people on social media saying, i could have seen this a lot better, mike kelly is closer to this. so, things were a bitjumpy and nervous. eden hazard, he was instrumental, that is 0livier giroud, soa instrumental, that is 0livier giroud, so a completely different second half to the first half. we spoke to some fans coming out after the game, listen to what they said. i wonder if even they feel a bit flat. they are not quite ready for us, so here we go. a long way to come but if you don't come and you when you will regret it. i have been to every final since i was it. i have been to every final since iwas ten it. i have been to every final since i was ten years old, so a good reason to come. it was a bit of a
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track but you can't buy memories like that. a pretty dodgy first half but i am buzzing now.|j like that. a pretty dodgy first half but i am buzzing now. i am devastated, eight flights, it is just a reflection on the season, really. it has been a hard season, i thought we could come here tonight and we might be able to do it, but it is proved that chelsea was the better team. you have got to feel for them. travelling all that way. arsenal have rebuilding to do, they have players they need to buy and restructuring that needs doing. chelsea, with maurizio sarri, they are used to those emotional outbursts... in his baseball hat, thatis outbursts... in his baseball hat, that is all part of it for him, it will be interesting to see what happens to him next. there is some suggestion that he might not be there much longer. i suppose if he has done this. he is 60 and it is his first trophy. i didn't realise
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that. it is a slightly different situation, lcr notorious for getting rid of a manager quite quickly, and there is alsojuventus to see. —— chelsea are notorious. the uk's first 5g network — which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds — is being switched on today. ee is starting the service in six major uk cities, with ten more locations due to come on line by the end of the year. our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones reports. the first new masts have been fitted out, the network has been switched on. now, 5g can make mobile network reach everyone and everything a lot faster, at least that is the promise. you will be able to enjoy much faster speeds, which means you can download things like box at ten seconds rather than minutes. it means you will be able to do multiplayer gaming in augmented
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reality. at first, ee isjust switching on the network in six cities across the uk, and even there, coverage will be patchy. for now, speeds will be roughly five times as fast as ag, but the network will connect millions of things as well as phones to the network. everything from driverless cars to dustbins. the very few people who have one of these phones on launch day may find the revolution gets off toa day may find the revolution gets off to a bit ofa day may find the revolution gets off to a bit of a slow start, but at least the uk is at or near the front of the pack with this technology. there is, however, one problem. ee is dependent for some of their equipment on one controversial chinese company. while way, according to the americans, poses a security threat, and they are urging the uk government to ban it from involvement in 5g —— huawei. this a nalyst involvement in 5g —— huawei. this analyst is an outright ban would have a serious impact.|j analyst is an outright ban would have a serious impact. i think it will be very negative for the uk. it
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means we will lose a leadership position in europe for 5g, and it will slow everything down. that is disappointing for the networks, and asa disappointing for the networks, and as a consumer i would be disappointed as well. the 56 revolution is getting under way, but even without bumps in the road it will be three years before it stretches right across the country. take a look at this extraordinary footage of russian astronauts out on a spacewalk. they're doing maintenance work on the international space station, which is 250 miles above the surface of the earth. the event marked the 85th birthday of alexey leonov, the first person ever to spacewalk. is at him in the picture? i think it is. it is a remarkable thing, i really do admire those people. fantastic. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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good morning, carol. this morning, starting on a cloudy night, but milder than it was foremost yesterday. it will continue to warm up. some of us seeing highs of 27 by the time we get to saturday, but if you don't have that, the temperature will still be higher than it has been for you. you can see warm air coming up from the azu res. can see warm air coming up from the azures. it won't be bone dry, there will be some rain in the north and the west. today, starting on a cloudy night but a milder one than yesterday for the bulk of the uk. we also have some rain across part of scotland, northern england, wales and northern ireland. that will pep up and northern ireland. that will pep up across and northern ireland. that will pep up across northern ireland, and scotland, and the west of england throughout the day. brighter skies will be across the northern isles and into the far south—east. a
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breezy day, gusty at times across western areas, and temperatures today getting up to about 23 across the far south—east, for example. even in east anglia we could see 23. under the rain looking at 15 in glasgow, and even looking at sunshine in lerwixk. we are looking atafair sunshine in lerwixk. we are looking at a fair bit of cloud producing some drizzly bits and pieces —— lerwick. possibly some fog around as well, with temperatures of between 5-1a. a well, with temperatures of between 5—1a. a mild night ahead of us. we have fronts in the north and the west, with low pressure built in. a mild but cloudy note for the weekend. all this rain produced,
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quite a lot, particularly in the hills of western scotland. we will start to see some breaks develop in the cloud, especially for the south, and they will come in from the west, through wales and the south—west, and afine through wales and the south—west, and a fine evening across the south—east. as we go into saturday, it will be drier across the board, but nonetheless there is still some rain in the forecast, particularly coming across the irish sea and in towards north—west england. temperature wise, higher than we have seen of late. 26, possibly 27, in the south—east. in the north, even though we have lower values, they are still going to be higher than they have been. saturday and into sunday, a change comes our way. this next system bringing in some rain, some of it showery. the timing of that could change. this is what we think at the moment but it could slow up or speed up. it is slow at the moment, as we have, highs of 25,
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1a-16, the moment, as we have, highs of 25, 1a—16, as we push up towards scotland. so a bit of a change afoot, but a short lived one. you see, you give with one hand and you take away with the other, you could have just left it at that but you had to say it was short lived. bless you. she will send me an e—mail later saying stop it. let's take a look at today's front pages. the metro leads on borisjohnson being ordered to appear in court over claims he lied by saying the uk gave the eu £350 million a week. his lawyers have called the private prosecution a stunt. the guardian carries a picture of the queen with the england cricket team ahead of the world cup, which starts at the oval later. it also claims the uk government has spent £97 million on advisers over brexit. the times leads on the story we're bringing you today on that tuition fees report.
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it says one option being considered is for students to pay loans for a0 years after leaving university. and conservative leadership hopeful esther mcvey has written in the daily express to set out her vision for the uk. she says a decade of police cuts have broken the relationship between the tories and police officers. we can ask her about that when she joins us here at 8:10am. she will be sitting pretty much where sally is sitting right now, a little bit later. you warm that seat for her. this is interesting in the times today, talking about 5g being rolled out, and there are two camps when it comes to technology and innovation, people who think it can enhance life and others who are worried about technology and their information being harvested. and
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amazon wants that... i am reluctant to say alexa, because it activates it. i will not have that in my house. because of this? no way, absolutely. my phone gathers enough information about me, i am not having one of those things. so you are in that camp, so amazon are developing alexa so that... why don't wejust wind developing alexa so that... why don't we just wind anyone up who has a alexa this morning and just say alexa and just ask a random question. alexa, how many dates are in turkey? just going to wind eve ryo ne in turkey? just going to wind everyone up. does it work through the tv? yes, it hears everything. evenif the tv? yes, it hears everything. even if it doesn't recognise the difference between a real and recorded voice? yes, because ben has got in trouble for using the word alexa. so you could be contemplating something and saying what do you think, alexa, and it will tell you the answer, but it will record even
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more information and it will be up to you to delete it on a daily basis. what does that say to you? why would you have one, whether it is electronic or any other gadget. to be honest, it doesn't matter whether it is something like a phone which is listening to you, everything is listening to you. and the cricket world cup starts today, never mind all of that. was having a nice chat. that was her outside in the garden. —— the queen was having a nice chat. well done to the telegraph, who have done this pullout section, but it is a bit of a mess. this is the queen meeting the captains yesterday, spot prince harry in the background. he will be attending a couple of the matches. i just want to draw your attention to the first piece in this pull—out for the first piece in this pull—out for the telegraph. good old geoffrey boycott, we love a bit of geoffrey boycott, we love a bit of geoffrey boycott a nd boycott, we love a bit of geoffrey boycott and his opinions in the morning. because england are the
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favourites. england are the favourites. england are the favourites to win the world cup, but they have to be where overconfidence, complacency or believing they are invincible. that can be dangerous. who are their key rivals? australia, south africa. australia especially are incredibly, incredibly dangerous. jeffrey goes on to say here that england have assembled a murderer ‘s row of the top five —— geoffrey there are a mix of players from different backgrounds, much more representative in terms of a cricket tea m representative in terms of a cricket team than they have ever been before. it has been a very posh sport for a long time, hasn't it? and in the daily mail, they have a picture story, but the headline rates itself. jason donovan, who is delightful, many people know that, he wasjogging along delightful, many people know that, he was jogging along near his delightful, many people know that, he wasjogging along near his home and someone had fallen over, and he
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stopped. they had a little chat, made the 999 call, and took a moment to help out. so that's nice, isn't it? and you know for sure, he would have done that anyway, it wasn't because the cameras were there, he knows it is one of those moments. and this in the times is brilliant. the champions league final, meet these two. this is abby norman and jamie alexander, tottenham hotspur supporter, they are getting married on saturday. i am getting very nervous, says abby, not about the murder, —— marriage, butabout nervous, says abby, not about the murder, —— marriage, but about the game. iam murder, —— marriage, but about the game. i am worried, not about the wedding, but his smug face. a national scandal — that's how 0fsted has described support for children with special educational needs. today, thousands of parents across england and wales will march
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to demand that the government take action. campaigners say the latest budget has left vulnerable children in limbo, and in an unprecedented move, are taking the education secretary and the chancellor to the high court. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been speaking to one of the families involved. this is when she was hours old. born at 2a weeks, dakota was so small she fit in mary's hand, so small she weighed less than a bag of sugar. they really fought to keep her alive. yes, and she fought to stay alive, and now i'm fighting for her. mary is one of thousands who will march in protest today. dakota is now ten and needs help with every aspect of her life, from washing to dressing and eating. this is john, oui’ cameraman. dressing and eating. this is john, our cameraman. hello. at her mum tells me the fight for even basic special needs support has been a co nsta nt special needs support has been a constant struggle. day in, day out.
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a fight. every day. we have had to fight for the right support, fight for the right education, physio, 0t, speech and language, and fight for the right home to school transport. what do you think of this system? it's unacceptable. in a month, she and two other parents will take theirfight even and two other parents will take their fight even further, to the highest court in the land. you are taking the chancellor of the exchequer and the secretary of state for education to the high court. yet. three years ago, i wouldn't have said do to a goose, but in the challenges that we faced, i am da kota's challenges that we faced, i am dakota's advocate. if i don't speak to her, no—one —— speakfor her common no—one else is going to. and things have to change. the government says it is spending record sums to support children like da kota, record sums to support children like dakota, with special needs, with £350 million in extra funding, but
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in england worn they face a £50 billion black hole in the next few yea rs, billion black hole in the next few years, and the most vulnerable are already paying the price. send provision is failing, even 0fsted describes send support is a national scandal. this is why dakota's mum and others will march. i'm marching because my school doesn't have enough money. two i am marching because currently the education system is broken. i'm marching for all children with special educational needs, to ensure that we meet our responsibilities. the process around the country are unprecedented, as is next month's legal action. it is very rare to bring a case against central government in relation to funding decisions, but our clients thought that, because of the severity of the crisis, as they see it, they have no option but to bring this case, even the impact that they are seeing on
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their children and children across their children and children across the country with send. so you don't blame the schools, and you don't blame the schools, and you don't blame the schools, and you don't blame the local authority? no, not at all. they can't do anything if there is no money to fix it. fight isa there is no money to fix it. fight is a word many parents with special needs children say they are all too familiar with. that fight spills onto the street today, and into the high court at the end ofjune. the department for education say it has increased high needs funding to £6.3 billion this year, compared to £5 billion in 2013, and is consulting on how to make the funding system more effective. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. a major driver of knife crime in the capital is the belief that it will go unpunished. that is according to the deputy chairman of the london assembly, tony arbour. it comes as new figures suggest two thirds of robberies at knifepoint go
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unsolved every year. a freedom of information request found, of the 10,000 or so incidents recorded in england and wales last year, nearly 70% resulted in no suspects being identified. historic england says a london—wide approach is needed in planning new skyscrapers in london to preserve the character and environment of our city. more than 500 buildings of more than 20 storeys are being planned or built across the capital, which is a record number. many of them will be in the outer boroughs, and it is feared local councils have different ideas about how best to build high. as you've been hearing, chelsea have beaten london rivals arsenal in the europa league final, which took place in baku last night. we caught up with some chelsea fans who didn't make it out to azerbajan, but enjoyed that victoryjust as much.
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before the game, i didn't think about it at all. i thought we were the underdogs, arsenal had a lot to pay for. how we came out on top, i did not expect it. everyonejust came together, the fans love each other. couldn't be more happy. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there are severe delays on the picadilly line, and a good service on all other lines this morning. 0nto the roads, and northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from blackwall lane. northbound traffic on the m25 is slow from j2 at darenth towards the dartford river crossing. and in the city, there's no right turn from old street into the southbound city road at the old st roundabout due to the new two—way traffic system. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. compared to
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yesterday, it is a very mild start to the day. we've got temperatures in the mid—teens already this morning. now, we're into some much warmer air. you're really notice it over the next couple of days or so, particularly when the sun eventually comes out. it will brighten up a bit later on through the afternoon, but it is quite a cloudy, misty, murky old start to the day. there are a few spots of drizzle over the higher ground for a time this morning. it's fairly brisk south—westerly wind lowing, will keep that throughout the day, really. temperatures will get up to 22 or 23 celsius. but it will brighten through the afternoon and there will probably be a few spells of sunshine as well. now, overnight tonight, again it is going to stay very mild. yes, there will be simply clear spells at first, but it will cloud over, some rather misty conditions developing into tomorrow morning and all that mild air. lows of around 12— 1a celsius. now, tomorrow, despite the cloudy start, we will eventually see the sunshine breakthrough, so it will hopefully lift the temperatures, 23, 20 four celsius. p get 27 or 28 celsius for some places, perhaps, on saturday.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: we'll find out why the driverless cars of the future could help pensioners be more independent. after 8:30, she's one of the uk's most successful female solo artists —jess glynne is here, fresh from touring with the spice girls, to tell us about her new single. and from the andes to africa, we'll take a bird's eye tour of the world with tv presenter gordon buchanan, as he tells us about capturing these extraordinary pictures for his new documentary.
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good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. university tuition fees in england should be cut by £1,700 pounds a year, according to a government review published today. it also suggests that students from poorer families should receive grants to cover living costs. here's our education correspondent, frankie mccamley. six students at one college, each with a different plan for their future. some want to go to university, for others apprenticeships are on the cards. for francesca, money is a big part of her decision. i care for somebody, they can't afford to work because they are disabled. so it makes it harder to then think, i will go off to university and have this £ao-50,000 debt. if they lowered the fees would that make a difference? i believe you can't put
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a monetary value on education, so whether it be 7,500, 9,000, if the quality of the education is significant enough. lauren chose to do an apprenticeship, but would have liked to have more support like those at university. i have a family household to run and i am on the same basic rate of pay as a 16—year—old doing an apprenticeship. i think a bursary or a loan would be more attractive to apprenticeships. the outgoing pm, theresa may, commissioned a review looking at post—18 education in england. it is recommending a cap of £7,500 on university fees, grants for living costs brought back for the poorest students, and tuition fee loans available for everyone doing advanced qualifications. but with change at the top of government, some are concerned that this latest review could be ignored. which still leaves uncertainty for future students when deciding what path to take.
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at least seven people have died after a cruise boat carrying tourists capsized in the hungarian capital, budapest. bad weather is hampering rescue efforts. the south korean government says 33 of its citizens were on board the boat on the river danube, and 19 are still unaccounted for. eating ultra—processed food such as crisps, sugary cereals and ready meals, puts you at higher risk of heart problems and an early death, according to new studies in the british medicaljournal. the research, by scientists in france and spain, says people should eat fresh produce to reduce the risk, but some have warned the findings are ‘too simplistic‘. what we have to take from these studies is that they are large studies is that they are large studies but they are largely circumstantial. is it the nutritional content, some kind of additive, or something to do with
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the people's lives of the people who are eating more of them? before we make any changes orjump to conclusions we need to find out a bit more about it. the proportion of workers in britain on less than £8.52 per hour has fallen to its lowest level since 1980, according to a new report. the resolution foundation think tank has found that the number of low—paid workers dropped by 200,000 last year and suggested there could be none at all by the mid—20205. israel is to hold fresh elections after the prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, failed to form a new coalition government. the september vote will be the second this year, an unprecendent event in israeli politics. mr netanyahu's attempts to put together an administration were hampered by differences between secular and religious parties. the boss of boeing has apologised to the families of 3a6 people killed in two separate crashes, involving the 737—max aircraft. the lion air and ethiopian airways flights crashed within five months of each other, leading to the entire fleet to be grounded.
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speaking to cbs news, dennis muilenburg said he was sorry for the impact on families, and insisted the company is "committed to safety for the long run". we apologise to the families who have been affected. we apologise more broadly to the travelling public, confidence has been affected. we have impacted our airline customers. we regret that as well. and so we are stepping up, we are taking responsibility, we know we have improvements we can make, and we will make those improvements. the uk's first 5g network — which should allow users to download entire films in seconds — is being switched on today. ee is starting the service in six major uk cities, with ten more locations due to come on line by the end of the year. other networks will follow with competitor vodafone launching it's 5g network in around five weeks' time.
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those of the main stories. sally is going to bring us up—to—date. the first half last night wasn't particularly joyful, the first half last night wasn't particularlyjoyful, in fact it was an awkward, tense affair, and... we we re an awkward, tense affair, and... we were talking about you interviewing jurgen klopp yesterday, and obviously you have the champions league final this weekend, it is a big week forfootball, league final this weekend, it is a big week for football, and talking about the performance at how tense it will be. it is not surprising that this was a tense atmosphere for the teams, and they were quite tentative. interestingly, he said it was all about the energy, the energy in the stadium, from the cloud, and if the cloud can lift their energy it boosts the players. was there a cloud? the stadium wasn't empty, and the seats were a long time from the pitch, as you are about to see. chelsea thrashed arsenal to win the europa league in baku last night. eden hazard was the star man, but straight after the match he hinted that he could be on his
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way out of the club. david 0rnstein reports a season of highs and lows finishing with a flourish. even in turbulent times, chelsea know how to wind and certainly how to celebrate. two teams separated by a a0 minute drive across london meeting 3000 miles away in azerbaijan. the result, an unusual atmosphere. but still there was plenty at stake. arsenal were playing for the added bonus of champions league qualification. they made the better start but couldn't find a breakthrough. chelsea's superior continental pedigree began to tell. as a local time ticked past midnight, the sparse cloud needed awakening, and 0livier giroud duly obliged. the former arsenal striker scoring against his old club. when eden hazard extended the lead further, chelsea were in cruise
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control. arsenal scored arguably the goal of the game to threaten a comeback, then eden hazard scored again in what could be his final chelsea appearance. arsenal were humiliated, their dream ending in tea rs. humiliated, their dream ending in tears. the blues adding more silverware to the collection. if the game was dominated by things of the pitch, the game itself will be dominated by what happened on it. chelsea annihilating arsenal to live their fifth europa chelsea annihilating arsenal to live theirfifth europa league trophy. a night of contrasting fortunes, emotions and repercussions. two goals then for eden hazard — he's been heavily linked with a move to real madrid, and speaking after the match said he thinks last night was a goodbye to chelsea. the 28—year—old says he's now waiting on both clubs to arrange a deal. and this was the scene
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in the chelsea changing room. plenty of champagne and selfies. chelsea skipper cesar azpiliqueta in charge of the trophy, soaked with champers, and oranges. that looks like fun. that sounds like a great night. johanna konta has become the first british woman since 1992 to reach the third round of the french open. she had to deal with illness as she beat american lauren davis — she says she's had a heavy cold since sunday, and had to blow her nose between points. may be more information than we needed. you underestimate how bad you feel when you have a cold. she plays slovakia's viktoria kuzmova next. rafa nadal is aiming for a record extending 12th men's singles title at roland garros. the 17 time grand slam champion
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swept the german qualifier yannick maden aside. roger federer is also through. double 0lympic champion caster semenya is appealing against a ruling that she must artificially reduce her testosterone levels. the court of arbitration for sport rejected the south african's challenge against the new rules that have been brought in by the iaaf, which runs athletics. the 28—year—old said: "i am a woman and world—class athlete. the iaaf will not drug me or stop me from being who i am." it's a really big day for cricket. the world cup kicks off at the oval this morning, as england — the hosts and favourites — play south africa. steve elworthy is director of the world cup for the icc which is cricket's governing body. good morning, and i see you have some company there! yes, the fantastic trophy that someone is going to lift on the 1ath ofjuly. it has been outstanding, the buildup, and we are really excited,
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it is about time for the cricket to start. it is yourjob to make sure we all watch this, go to as many matches as possible, that we talk about it as much as possible. why should we be interested in this world cup? well, it is one of the biggest global sporting tournaments in the world, cricket. and, the demand we have seen, and the anticipation, from all quarters. beard the spectators, the ticket sales have been absolutely outstanding. it is just a sales have been absolutely outstanding. it isjust a huge tournament for cricket and i think it isa tournament for cricket and i think it is a huge milestone. the last time it was hosted in this country was 1999, so it is 20 years on. you really get these opportunities of global sporting tournaments this big. we have an opportunity to engage with so many different people. we are seeing fantastic pictures of the opening ceremony,
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all the captains lining up, it looks glossy and glamorous. you say your target is to get more under 16 is into the game. how do you do that? yes, we have made a commitment to that, and i know it is particularly from an attendance point of view. we said we want at least 100,000 under 16s. said we want at least 100,000 under 165. in the women's world cup years ago we saw a young player watching and one day playing for england and winning the world cup. that is just one of the elements, but we have a fantastic schools programme developed with the england and wales cricket board, and a hugely successful clu bs cricket board, and a hugely successful clubs programme, where at least 3000 clubs will be world cup clu bs least 3000 clubs will be world cup clubs during the course of the tournament. those other ways we want tournament. those other ways we want to get to the audience. sorry to
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interrupt you but we are running out of time. i wanted to ask you about a story in the paper this morning about buying replica shirts. they are saying that there are only about 1000 england shirts available for sale across the 11 venues for the whole of the tournament. the icc is responsible for ordering merchandise and when it was first ordered there we re and when it was first ordered there were no women's shirts and no kids shirts ordered. surely you want the kids to go out and buy the shirts and wear them, playing cricket in their local clubs and in the street. isn't that part of it? absolutely, and it should be, it is. the icc work with their licensing and merchandising partner, and the kids shirts are gender neutral, from 2—12 yea rs shirts are gender neutral, from 2—12 years old, so there are shirts that they will be able to get. i hope they will be able to get. i hope they have ordered enough for the tournament, because as you say it is important that they can wear and they can follow their team. 6reat
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important that they can wear and they can follow their team. great to talk to you and we are looking forward to a fantastic tournament. we should check on those shirts are. it sounds extraordinary. a great opportunity, as they are saying. maybe engaging people who haven't been interested in the past, and you see your hero in the top, you want to be like them. we will see. and we'll speak to commentator and former england international jonathan agnew after 7:30. it is 16 minutes to seven. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning everyone. it is a fairly cloudy start for some of us,
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also quite murky, but milder than it was yesterday. we will see cloud hold on today across many areas, some rain in the forecast, but generally through the day it is going to feel warmer than it did yesterday. what's happening is we have got various weather fronts across us, and they are producing some rain which will pick up today across northern ireland and also scotland. quite a breezy day, especially so in the west, where at times the gusts will be between about 35 and a0 mph. but you can see it as about 35 and a0 mph. but you can see itasa about 35 and a0 mph. but you can see it as a damp start in the northern half of the country. as the weather fronts approach, that rain will pick up fronts approach, that rain will pick up in northern ireland, scotland and northern england. further south, we will see some breaks in the are developed, especially in the south—east, and that will allow temperatures to rise. in the west we will hang onto that cloud. some drizzly bits and pieces coming out of it, and wet across northern ireland and scotland, damp across northern england. again, the thicker cloud producing some drizzle, particularly in the north—west. but the northern isles will have some
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sunshine. no heatwave for you, though, only nine degrees in lerwick, top temperatures in the south—east corner at 22 or 23. 0vernight, we will continue with the rain in northern ireland, scotland and northern england, with some brea ks and northern england, with some breaks in the cloud, and quite a bit of cloud around once again, especially on the coasts and hills, which will be fairly murky. temperature is between five and about 1a. this is very mild for the time of year, so no issues with frost. but as we go through friday and into saturday, look what happens. look at these amber colours coming into the charts. we have yellow further north, but even so, we start to see some more amber, so things will continue to warm up, especially on saturday. back to
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friday, another cloudy start with more rain sweeping across scotland, northern england and northern ireland, especially heavy on the hills. for the rest of england and wales, brightest guys developing, articulate through the day from the west across wales and south—west england. temperatures ranging from ten to 23, so in lerwick, the temperature has gone up a degree or so. friday into saturday, we still have a weather front across us. but on saturday it is going to be a fairly wea k on saturday it is going to be a fairly weak affair. it will still produce some rain, though, across parts of england, especially north—west england. either side of it, apart from the odd shower, drier and brighter with some sunshine, and saturday we could hit 26 or 27 in the south—eastern corner, 1a to 17, may be 19, in newcastle. looks great, doesn't it? doesn't it make you feel that summer is kind of on its way? do you know, i love the thought that summer is on its way, because summer is my favourite season. i know not everyone likes it dry and sunny, and farmers and growers especially are screaming out in some parts of the uk for some rain, so this forecast has something for everyone. i think if it rained at night and were sunny during the day every day, that would be perfect, wouldn't it? it would work
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for me. and the launch of 5g, explain. good morning. yes, that's right. 5g is being called the next generation of mobile technology. it launches in six cities around the uk today, and is supposed to make it a lot quicker to get on the internet on our phones. remember when we were all talking about 3g ? it was launched by the company three in 2003, and marked the start of the smartphone revolution. it was the moment our phones became about a lot more than making calls and sending texts. in 2012, the phone networks launched ag, giving us the ability to stream music and watch videos. you might have guessed 5g is the next step up from ag, but it is supposed to be a big step. it could mean mobile internet speeds are up to 100 times faster. ee is the first of the big phone companies to launch it. but you need to live in one ofjust six cities, will pay more, and you will need an expensive phone to get it.
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the other companies launch later in the year. marc allera, the chief executive of ee, joins me from our london newsroom now. a very good morning to you. if i wa nt to a very good morning to you. if i want to get access to 5g, i have to spend 200 quid on a new phone and up my payment every month, what is so good about it? well, this is a really exciting day for the uk, that we are bringing 5g to six cities, as we are bringing 5g to six cities, as we switch it on, very much the start ofa we switch it on, very much the start of a journey. and as you said earlier, this brings much faster internet speeds to customers and businesses' mobile phone devices than they are experiencing over ag. we already have really fast speeds over ag, but 5g can bring up to ten times faster speeds, downloading work and music and working on the
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move is going to get a lot easier for millions of consumers over the next few years as we launch this fantastic new technology. you save millions of consumers, but it is a prohibitive price and only available in london and five other cities. is that fair? well, we have to start somewhere with new technology, any technology launch prioritises the larger cities where millions of customers live and work, and that is where we have started. 5g also helps us where we have started. 5g also helps us in those really busy cities relieve the congestion and pressure our networks are feeling, and we will be rolling out 100 sites a month over the coming years to get to more and more parts of the country, just like we did with ag, it took us seven years to get to 90% of the country covered with ag, and sg of the country covered with ag, and 5g will take us some time as well, but it is great we're starting in six cities, and there will more towns and cities coming every single week. what you say you have 46 right, and people in rural areas have very little coverage at all, others in urban areas who are struggling to tweet and have a moan
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about this, why not get that right before you enhance to 5g? about this, why not get that right before you enhance to 56? we have to do bothjobs. we have to innovate and bring this country right up to speed with other economies as we power forward with the digital revolution, and having a great infrastructure for the country is really important, and mobile is such an important part of that. so it's important that we are launching 5g today, and that is important for consumers and businesses, that we keep up to speed with the latest technologies. and i recognise and the industry recognises that we still have a job to do to cover the parts of the country which are not yet covered. that is increasingly rare as we roll out more and more coverage, and we are working together as operators and the government to cover those parts of the country that aren't yet covered. let's talk about handsets. at the moment ee 5g coverage won't be compatible with apple, which are incredibly popular, does that worry you? i think at the start of any new
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technology you don't have all of the handset ranges and all of the prices covered. that is normal, and in the first few weeks this will be for early adopters and those customers who are really into their tech and gadgets. but the range will expand, and apple we know is working on a 5g phone. we expect to see that sometime next year. we've got a great range to start with and i am already in discussions with a number of other manufacturers and handset vendor ‘s who are bringing new handsets to 5g over the coming months. there is concern about huawei, you said if we don't roll out with huawei, that puts us on the back foot, and yet that has happened. does that worry you?” think it is important we continue to lead, innovate and roll out new technology like 5g. that is really important for this country, for our competitiveness, for the economy, for the ways in which consumer and businesses use mobile. it is important we bring 5g to this
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country, and we will continue to do so. finally, we are talking football today. will this solve what has been described as the football stadium problem, where lots of people are watching a live event and they want to view lots of clips simultaneously? one of the great things about 5g is it helps us relieve pressure in places like stadiums where you have thousands of people using their smartphones, trying to download and upload videos. that is one really exciting thing about 5g, notjust videos. that is one really exciting thing about 5g, not just football stadiums, but train stations, busy places where thousands of people are using their phones. 5g will help us be able to deliver a much more reliable connection for millions of diseases and consumers. many thanks, there you go. 0ther diseases and consumers. many thanks, there you go. other providers will be rolling it out over the coming weeks and months, but as it stands today, only in six cities and only from one provider, for now. two it is interesting, talking about new technology... we often hear about how younger people are embracing the latest
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technology, but could the older generation be the ones to benefit most from driverless cars? scientists think the cars of the future will help pensioners be more independent and less isolated. jon kay has been to bristol, where the new vehicles are being put to the test. where would you like to go today? we'd like to go to the picnic area, please. that would be nice, wouldn't it? yes. maya and jeff are off for a drive... let's go! journey starting. ..but without a driver. 0n the grounds of a retirement village, they are testing a computer—operated vehicle. this is amazing. it really is. because they don't know how much longer they'll be able to drive, could this help them get out and socialise? this is the future. well, it is the future. oh, gosh.
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look we're coming up to. sensors on the pods detect hazards. that was a sharp stop! automatic braking then prevents accidents. was it scary? no, it wasn't, it wasn't. it was exhilarating, rather than scaring. did you trust it? yes, i did, completely. and i was secure, i had plenty of room, i was comfortable. very impressive. yes. it could be years before these vehicles could be on the roads, but the british team of scientists, psychologists and robotics experts say the pods could work now in enclosed, private spaces, giving residents in homes like st monica's more independence. it's cutting—edge technology, and we're making the future right now, and very privileged to have been a part of that. and also, i'm thinking of the future, maybe i will actually benefit from one of these myself. when you're older?
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yes, kind of an insurance policy. journey starting. i went for a ride with 88—year—old monica. turning right. you've made a new friend there. thank you! she is one of 100 older people who have been consulted in the design of these pods. unable to drive, she thinks they have real potential. it can help us to be independent for as long as possible. turning left. they were a bit late saying that. of course, not all care homes will have the space or the money to have this kind of technology. but the developers say older people should be at the forefront of developing driverless cars. jon kay, bbc news, bristol. i wonder if that is a vision of the future, if it works. fancy it? getting to the picnic on time is fine by me. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. a major driver of knife crime in the capital is the belief that it will go unpunished. that is according to the deputy chairman of the london assembly, tony arbour. his comments come as new figures suggest two thirds of robberies at knifepoint go unsolved every year. of the 10,000 or so incidents recorded in england and wales last year, nearly 70% resulted in no suspects being identified. historic england says a london—wide approach is needed in planning new skyscrapers in the capital, to preserve the character and environment of our city. more than 500 buildings of more than 20 storeys are being planned or built across london, which is a record number. many of them will be in the outer boroughs, and it is feared local councils have different ideas about how best to build high.
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as you've been hearing, chelsea have beaten london rivals arsenal in the europa league final, which took place in baku last night. we caught up with some chelsea fans who didn't make it out to azerbajan, but enjoyed their victoryjust as much. before the game, i didn't predict that it at all. i thought we were the underdogs. arsenal had a lot to pay for. how we came out on top, couldn't tell you, but ecstatic. everyone just came together, the fans love each other. couldn't be more happy. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there are monor delays on the picadilly line and 0veround. 0n the trains, thameslink services between st albans and st pancras are running with delays of up to 20 minutes. 0nto the roads, and northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow.
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0n the anticlockwise m25, there is a lane closure just past potters bar following a collision, with delays of 2 miles. and in the city, there is no right turn from old street into the southbound city road at the old st roundabout due to the new two—way traffic system. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. compared to yesterday, it is a very mild start to the day. we've got temperatures in the mid—teens already this morning. now, we're into some much warmer air. you'll really notice it over the next couple of days or so, particularly when the sun eventually comes out. it will brighten up a bit later on through the afternoon, but it is quite a cloudy, misty, murky old start to the day. there are a few spots of drizzle over the higher ground for a time this morning. it's a fairly brisk south—westerly wind blowing, and we'll keep that throughout the day, really. temperatures will get up to 22 or 23 celsius. but it will brighten through the afternoon, and there'll probably be a few spells of sunshine as well. now, overnight tonight, again it's going to stay very mild. yes, there will be some clear spells at first, but it will cloud over. some rather misty conditions again
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developing into tomorrow morning, and all that mild air. lows of around 12—1a celsius. now, tomorrow, despite the cloudy start, we'll eventually see the sunshine break through, so it will help to lift the temperatures — 23, 2a degrees celsius. temperatures could peak at 27 or 28 celsius for some places, perhaps, on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: universities in england are told to cut tuition fees by up to £1,700 a year. at least seven people have died after a tourist boat on the river danube in budapest capsizes — 19 others are still missing. ultra—processed foods such as burgers and crisps are linked to poor health and early death. chelsea thrash arsenal in the europa league final. they won a—1 in baku, but star man eden hazard hints that he's on his way out of the club.
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due a refund — energy, broadband and water customers have been overcharged by around £2a billion over the past 15 years. that's according to a charity which wants the companies to pay their customers back. it isa it is a fairly cloudy day ahead with some sunny breaks. also rain in the north and in the south it will feel quite humid. more details in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 30th of may. our top story: university tuition fees in england should be cut by £1,700 a year, according to a government review published today. it also suggests that students from poorerfamilies should receive grants to cover living costs. here's our education correspondent, frankie mccamley. six students at one college, each with a different plan for their future.
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some want to go to university, for others apprenticeships are on the cards. for francesca, money is a big part of her decision. i care for somebody, they can't afford to work because they are disabled. so it makes it harder to then think, i will go off to university and have this £ao-50,000 debt. they lowered the fees without make a difference? i believe you can't put a monetary value on education, so whether it be 7,500, 9,000, if the quality of the education is significant enough. lauren chose to do an apprenticeship, but would have liked to have more support like those at university. i have a family household to run and i am on the same basic rate of pay as a 16—year—old doing an apprenticeship. i think a bursary or a loan would be more attractive to apprenticeships. the outgoing pm, theresa may, commissioned a review looking at post—18 education in england.
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it is recommending a cap of £7,500 on university fees, grants for living costs brought back for the poorest students, and tuition fee loans available for everyone doing advanced qualifications. but with change at the top of government, some are concerned that this latest review could be ignored. which still leaves uncertainty for future students when deciding what path to take. eating ultra—processed food such as crisps, sugary cereals and ready meals, puts you at higher risk of heart problems and an early death, according to new studies in the british medicaljournal. researchers say people should eat fresh produce to reduce the risk, but as a our health correspondent, james gallagher reports, some scientists warn the findings are too simplistic.
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this is ultra—processed food. they are the foods that have been through the most industrial processing and often have a long list of ingredients on the packet. it includes popular items like fizzy drinks, chicken nuggets and breakfast cereals. the two studies regularly assess the diets of more than 100,000 people and recorded what happened to their health. they should people who ate the most ultra—processed foods tended to have the worst heart health and die earlier. it is not definitive proof of harm and experts have expressed caution. more work is still needed to explain what it is about ultra processing that might have a detrimental effect on our bodies. what we actually need to know is what's behind these associations. is it the ultra—processed foods, and the nutritional content of them, some kind of additive that is in them or something to do with the people's lives of the people who are eating more of them? and i think before we make any changes orjump to any conclusions, we really need to find out a bit more about it. the authors of the two studies say there is now mounting evidence that ultra—processed foods may be harmful and
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the research comes out hot on the heels of trials showing these types of foods make a seat more and put on weight but while the term ultra—processed might be all new, the health advice is very familiar. a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, dish, nuts and seeds also happens to be one full of unprocessed foods. israel is to hold fresh elections, after the prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, failed to form a new coalition government. the september vote will be the second this year, an unprecendent event in israeli politics. mr netanyahu's attempts to put together an administration were hampered by differences between secular and religious parties. the boss of boeing has apologised to the families of 3a6 people killed in two separate crashes, involving the 737 max aircraft. the lion air and ethiopian airways flights crashed within five months of each other, leading to the entire fleet to be grounded. speaking to cbs news,
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dennis muilenburg said he was sorry for the impact on families, and insisted the company is "committed to safety for the long run". we apologise to the families who have been affected. we apologise more broadly to the travelling public, confidence has been affected. we have impacted our airline customers. we regret that as well. and so we are stepping up, we are taking responsibility, we know we have improvements we can make, and we will make those improvements. chelsea have won the europa league after thrashing arsenal a—1 in the all—english final in baku. only about 5,000 fans of both sides travelled, leaving the stadium appearing to be half—full, and a rather eerie atmosphere. here's our sports correspondent, david 0rnstein. a season of highs and lows finishing with a flourish. even in turbulent times, chelsea know how to win and certainly how to celebrate.
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two teams separated by a a0—minute drive across london meeting 3,000 miles away in azerbaijan. the result, an unusual atmosphere. but still there was plenty at stake. arsenal were playing for the added bonus of champions league qualification. they made the better start but couldn't find a breakthrough. chelsea's superior continental pedigree began to tell. as the local time ticked past midnight, the sparse crowd needed awakening, and 0livier giroud duly obliged. the former arsenal striker returning to haunt his old club. pedro doubled the lead. when eden hazard extended the lead further, chelsea were in cruise control. arsenal scored arguably the goal of the game to threaten a comeback, then eden hazard scored again
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in what could be his final chelsea appearance. arsenal were humiliated, their dream ending in tears. the blues adding more silverware to the collection. if the buildup was dominated by things off the pitch, the game itself will be dominated by what happened on it. chelsea annihilating arsenal to lift their fifth europa league trophy. the first for maurizio sarri. a night of contrasting fortunes, emotions and repercussions. a new 5g network will be launched by ee and six cities today. billed as
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the future of mobile internet. at least seven people have died after a sightseeing boat carrying south korean tourists capsized on the danube in the hungarian capital, budapest. south korea's government says 33 of its citizens were on board, and nineteen are still missing. 0ur correspondent nick thorpe is in budapest for us now. nick, what can you tell us about what is happening there? the river danube behind me is eerily empty, it is normally filling up with leisure boats at this time, but because of the tragic accident last night, around 9pm, the river is... inaudible. neck, apologies, we are having problems with your sound. sorry, apologies to the viewers for
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that. —— nick. the search carried on for many of those who were on the boat. the proportion of workers in britain on less than 8—pounds—52 per hour has fallen to its lowest level since 1980, according the resolution foundation think tank has found that the number of low—paid workers dropped by 200,000 last year and suggested there could be none at all by the mid—20205. joining us now from westminster, is the chancellor, philip hammond. in connection with low pay, this is entirely your domain, i believe you are due to make some form of announcement on this. tell us what is happening. i'm going to go along to the resolution foundation's launch today, and the professor who we have asked to do a review on
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minimum wages and employment prospects, he will be there as well, speaking. i said in the spring statement that we had to review what we are going to do after we reached 60% of median pay next year. i said in the spring statement that we want to be ambitious but we also want to be careful and make sure we protect the employment prospects of people on low wages, so we are working with employers, trade unions, academics, to decide how to go forward, and there will be an announcement of the time of the budget in the autumn. my other question was for anyone who is on one of those, in the area, on low pay, they would like to know what the numbers are. can you give us a clue as to — you talk about ambitious, but can you give us some indication about what the areas you are looking at our? next year we will be looking at 60% of average
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pay, median pay, as the national median wage level. the internationally accepted definition of low pay is 66 2/3% of the median average. 0bviously of low pay is 66 2/3% of the median average. obviously there is a huge imperative to see if we could safely push the national living wage up to that level —— 66. 66%. push the national living wage up to that level —— 66.66%. there are several sectors like retail care and hospitality who have very large numbers of workers on the national living wage, and we need to give them proper time to adapt. i said in them proper time to adapt. i said in the spring that we want to be ambitious, we do, but nobody wants to damage the employment prospects of this group of people that we are trying to help. the story this morning is in connection with tuition fees, suggesting they should be lowered. can you talk us through the maths of this, because the money has to come from somewhere. firstly
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it is an independent report, and we are very grateful for the work that has been done on that. we will study carefully the recommendations that he has made ahead of the spending review. this is one of a number of reviews that are taking place before we get to the spending review that will help to inform the decisions we have to make. as you absolutely rightly say, there are choices, and if you put money into higher education, reducing tuition fees, you can't spend that money somewhere else. the good news is that if we can resolve the brexit issue, get the prospect of a no deal brexit of the prospect of a no deal brexit of the table, we will be able to relieve some of the fiscal headroom that we have been holding as a contingency reserve. that will mean that as a nation we will have the luxury of choices. but we will still have to make choices, we won't be able to find every desirable area of
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spending, and some of my colleagues of course are talking about tax cuts as well. we do have to make choices. so, that brings us nicely — you mention some of our colleagues, those running to be pm. give us something nice and clear, is it your intention to run to be leader of your party and pm? well, i am not about to make a declaration of my participation in this contest today, andi participation in this contest today, and i wouldn't hold your breath, if i were you. i am talking to all the candidates who have declared themselves so far, i am seeing some more of them today, trying to understand how they are going to propose to resolve the brexit impasse. why are you being so coy over this? it is like you are still trying to make people think you might. is this a deliberate ploy to, i don't know, unsettle those who have already declared? why don't you just tell us if you are not going to do it? it is very important that the
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view that a no deal brexit would be a very bad outcome, and one that we must make every effort to avoid, is put forward. i am sure that collea g u es put forward. i am sure that colleagues who have already declared will be putting that view forward, but i want to reassure myself of the view that i firmly hold will be properly articulated in this leadership contest, and i am talking to the candidates, because the principal issue for me here is that changing the leader of our party doesn't change the arithmetic in parliament. therefore, i need to understand from the various candidates what their strategy is for resolving this impasse, to ensure that we leave the eu with a sensible deal that allows a smooth transition to a new relationship, where we go on trading with the european union, protecting british jobs and businesses, protecting our supply chains. as a senior member of
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the government, is it your position that any of the candidates who would be pm, who are prepared to take us to an ideal scenario, would not have your support? well, i think we can't rule out no deal, because that could be where we end up. with respect, i am going to let you go through your whole thinking on this, but with respect, you are the chancellor. my question in a way, ultimately would be, the new pm comes in and gets us to no deal. that happens, is philip hammond prepared to be our chancellor, whoever it was who at that point was pm? i will not support a policy of no deal brexit isa support a policy of no deal brexit is a choice, but i do recognise that we have to be prepared for the possibility of no deal. for example, the european union may decide that
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we haven't reached that agreement, we haven't reached that agreement, we are not prepared to give any further extension, and therefore we are facing no deal. it is right that we carry on preparing for the possibility of no deal, but in my view it should not become our policy. is it responsible of a would—be prime minister to be advocating that going into an ideal scenario is fine, we will be ok? is that responsible? well, the candidates in an election are responsible for their own statements.” an election are responsible for their own statements. i am asking your opinion. and you are going to get it. my personal view is that it would not be fine, it would not be ok. so is it irresponsible to suggest that? if the person who would be prime minister, who would be in charge, is it responsible? you can't say that, because candidates
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in an election must put forward their own agendas, so long as they are their own agendas, so long as they a re clear their own agendas, so long as they are clear about what they are proposing, and others will be clear about what the consequences will be, thenit about what the consequences will be, then it is of course for people who are voting to make up their own minds. iam are voting to make up their own minds. i am clear that leaving with no deal would be a very bad outcome for the economy. i'm not sure that people necessarily have understood what a risk we would be taking, not only with our economy, but also with the future of our precious united kingdom, if we left with no deal. are there people in the running for the role of prime minister who you have already ruled out? i'm not going to comment on who i'm likely to back or who have ruled out. i'm in the process at the moment of meeting all the serious contenders. i've met several of them over the last couple of days. i got some more meetings lined up today. i really wa nt to meetings lined up today. i really want to hear what they have got to say, and in particular, how they
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a nswer say, and in particular, how they answer the question what will you do to break the impasse that theresa may has been unable to break. to break the impasse that theresa may has been unable to breakm to break the impasse that theresa may has been unable to break. if i may ask one question, you mentioned that some are talking about tax cuts, another looming large, and we will speak to esther mcvey later, it has been brought forward for the police, for example, there is a race on to say who will offer the most. when you look at those numbers, i mean, what light can you shed on that for us about whether that is realistic, and where the money would come from? well, it depends whether we are able to get a brexit deal negotiated. because, as i said in the spring statement, we have a substantial amount of fiscal headroom which we will be able to release if we can take no deal off the table. until no deal is off the
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table, we need to keep that reserve asa table, we need to keep that reserve as a buffer to protect our economy in case of a no deal exit. 0nce no deal is off the table, we can either use it for tax cuts or for additional public spending, or indeed for capital investment in our future. that is a choice that the next government will be able to make. there isn't enough money there to be able to do all the things that all my colleagues are talking about, including tax cuts, so there will still have to be choices, and that is the point of a spending review, to look at all the priorities across government, in education, in defence, in policing, in social care, in local government, and decide what the priorities of the government are and what balance should be between additional public spending and reductions in taxation. a perfectly legitimate exercise, but of all, we need to get the spectre of all, we need to get the spectre ofa no of all, we need to get the spectre of a no deal exit off the table. we appreciate your time this morning, thank you very much.
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here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. good morning, everyone. for some of us it is a lovely, bright start to the day with some sunshine, as you can see from this lovely weather watch a's picture taken in derbyshire this morning. for most of us it is a fairly cloudy start, and will remain so. however, it is going to be a warmer day and a warmer start than it was yesterday. we do have weather fronts coming our way across the north and west. they will produce some rain, some of us have already seen that, but the rain will pick up through the day. and breezy conditions as well, gusty conditions later in parts of the west. so we have the brakes in the cloud, but we will see more cloud through the day. the rain picks up in northern ireland and scotland and we will also have some rain crossing northern england for a time, and later we will see that we can. we also have a fair bit of cloud close to the coast on the hills, and some of that is producing some drizzle, even into the afternoon, and you can see sporadic breaks in the cloud
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here and there was some sunshine coming through. rain in northern ireland and scotland, northern england more likely to be dank conditions, and as we sweep up into the northern isles, you've got the sunshine. but that does not mean it will be warm. in lerwick today, the top temperature will only be nine degrees. further south, top temperature will only be nine degrees. furthersouth, despite the cloud, in any sunshine we could get up cloud, in any sunshine we could get up to 23 in east anglia and also in the london area. now, through the evening and overnight, we hang onto this rain in northern ireland and scotla nd this rain in northern ireland and scotland crossing northern england. for the rest of england and wales, quite a bit of cloud around. 0nce again in the in the case cloud will be thick enough to produce some drizzle. and there will also be some mist around to boot as well. temperatures five in lerwick to a very mild 13 or 1a as become further south. and that mild or warm theme continues, not just through south. and that mild or warm theme continues, notjust through friday, but also into saturday. you can see the ember colours appearing on the charts, so the top temperature on saturday is likely to be 27, but it
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will be milder or warmer wherever you are. one or two brighter breaks, you are. one or two brighter breaks, you can see the rain piling on across northern ireland, northern england and scotland. particular heavy on the hills and the west, and thenit heavy on the hills and the west, and then it will brighten up through the afternoon. initially across south—west england and wales, and that will push eastwards as we go through the day. for some it will be a sunny and to the day. hires up to about 23. a very quick look at friday into saturday. we do have a weather fronts, but it is a weakening affair. 0n weather fronts, but it is a weakening affair. on saturday, it will still produce some rain across parts of northern england. for the rest of us, barring some showers, largely dry. and this is when we will see the highest temperatures occur. we could have 26 or 27 in the sunshine in the south—east, and even though temperatures in the north of the country are lower than that, they are still higher than some of us are they are still higher than some of us are going to see today. thank you very much. could we all be due a refund from our utility companies? a consumer charity thinks we might have been overcharged.
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nina has got more on this one. you can hear people thinking yes, how much can we expect back? yes, this is some work that has been done by citizens advice. they have looked at companies that provide things like energy, water, broadband and mobile phones. they essentially think we have been overcharged. companies are allowed to overcharge us companies are allowed to overcharge us because of expenses they think they will need, and when they have made those projections they got the numbers wrong. this is what they said. one of the most difficult decisions regulators have to make is deciding how much to let companies charge for the infrastructure of our essential services, things like building the pipes and wires that ta ke building the pipes and wires that take energy and water into our homes. it's an incredibly difficult job which involves all kinds of projections about how much this will cost companies, how much they might have to pay to borrow money to build
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this infrastructure. what we think has happened is that they have basically made a series of mistakes when they have made those projections. we looked at how much regulators thought these costs would be against how much they actually have been, in reality, over the last 15 years, and we think there is a gap in excess of £2a billion which in simple terms means we have all overpaid for our essential services. it isa overpaid for our essential services. it is a lot of money, isn't it, when you drill down at the figures. we are talking about a lot of money, too, about £2a billion in total. citizens advice says energy customers have overpaid by £11 billion, water customers have overpaid by £13 billion, and mobile phone and broadband customers have overpaid by £100 million. i will be interested to see how they got to these estimates, but this has to go to the regulator, hasn't it,
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and what is the regulator saying about this? the energy regulator, 0fgem, says it doesn't agree with citizens advice's estimate of excess profits, but also says it is learning lessons from previous price controls it had agreed with companies. the water regulator, 0fwat, says it welcomes this report, but points out that it has been tough when setting price controls. it also says that water bills have been falling. ifi if i were one of those customers who wa nts to ta ke if i were one of those customers who wants to take issue, i might feel like phoning up today and saying have you overcharged me? what do citizens advice say about what happened? they want to be clear about how these projections are made and to make sure that mistakes don't happen, and they want them to think about giving back to consumers. in 2017 they handed $300 —— £300
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billion back to customers. can you imagine being on the end of the phone to charlie asking about it?” would rather not. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. a major driver of knife crime in the capital is the belief that it will go unpunished. that is according to the deputy chairman of the london assembly, tony arbour. his comments come as new figures suggest two thirds of robberies at knifepoint go unsolved every year. of the 10,000 or so incidents recorded in england and wales last year, nearly 70% resulted in no suspects being identified. historic england says a london—wide approach is needed in planning new skyscrapers in the capital, to preserve the character and environment of our city. more than 500 buildings of more than 20 storeys are being planned or built across london, which is a record number. many of them will be in the outer boroughs, and it is feared local councils have different ideas about how best
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to build high. as you've been hearing, chelsea have beaten london rivals arsenal in the europa league final, which took place in baku last night. we caught up with some chelsea fans who didn't make it out to azerbaijan, but enjoyed their victoryjust as much. before the game, i didn't predict that it at all. i thought we were the underdogs. arsenal had more to pay for. how we came out on top, couldn't tell you, but ecstatic. everyone just came together, chelsea fans love each other. couldn't be more happy. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there are minor delays on the picadilly line, a good service on all other lines this morning. 0n the trains, thameslink services between st albans and st pancras are running with delays of up to 20 minutes. 0nto the roads, and in rainham, the a13 is down to two lanes westbound before the ferry lane interchange due to a broken—down lorry.
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0n the anticlockwise m25, there is a lane closure just past potters bar, following a collision, with delays of two miles. and the a3 is closed northbound at j10 wisley turnoff, following a three—vehicle collision. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. compared to yesterday, it is a very mild start to the day. we've got temperatures in the mid—teens already this morning. now, we're into some much warmer air. you'll really notice it over the next couple of days or so, particularly when the sun eventually comes out. it will brighten up a bit later on through the afternoon, but it is quite a cloudy, misty, murky old start to the day. there are a few spots of drizzle over the higher ground for a time this morning. it's a fairly brisk south—westerly wind blowing, and we'll keep that throughout the day, really. temperatures will get up to 22 or 23 celsius, but it will brighten up later on through the afternoon,
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and there'll probably be a few spells of sunshine as well. now, overnight tonight, again it's going to stay very mild. yes, there will be some clear spells at first, but it will cloud over. some rather misty conditions again developing into tomorrow morning, and all that mild air. lows of around 12—1a degrees celsius. now, tomorrow, despite the cloudy start, we'll eventually see the sunshine break through, so it will help to lift the temperatures — 23, 2a degrees celsius. temperatures will peak at 27 or 28 celsius for some places, perhaps, on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. university tuition fees in england should be cut by £1,700 a year, according to a government review published today. the panel also suggests that students from poorer families should receive grants to cover living costs. but there are concerns that extending the period over
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which graduates pay back loans from 30 to a0 years could reduce the benefit of any fee—cut. theresa may said she hoped the government would consider the recommendations in the spending review this autumn. at least seven people have died after a cruise boat carrying tourists capsized in the hungarian capital, budapest. bad weather is hampering rescue efforts. the south korean government says 33 of its citizens were onboard the boat on the river danube, and 19 are still unaccounted for. eating ultra—processed food such as crisps, sugary cereals and ready meals, puts you at higher risk of heart problems and an early death, according to new studies in the british medicaljournal. the research, by scientists in france and spain, says people should eat fresh produce to reduce the risk, but some have warned the findings are ‘too simplistic‘. israel is to hold fresh elections, after the prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, failed to form a new coalition government. the september vote will be the second this year,
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an unprecedented event in israeli politics. mr netanyahu's attempts to put together an administration were hampered by differences between secular and religious parties. chancellor philip hammond has warned potential prime ministers to resist making spending promises in order to curry favour. he is refusing to rule himself out of the race.” curry favour. he is refusing to rule himself out of the race. i am not looking to make a declaration of my participation in this contest today andi participation in this contest today and i wouldn't hold your breath if i we re and i wouldn't hold your breath if i were you. but i am talking to all the candidates who have declared themselves so far and i am seeing some more of them today, trying to understand how they are going to propose to resolve the brexit impasse. it is very important that
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the view that no deal brexit would bea the view that no deal brexit would be a very bad outcome and one that we must make every effort to avoid, is put forward. i'm sure that collea g u es is put forward. i'm sure that colleagues who have already declared will be putting that view forward, but i want to reassure myself that the view that i firmly hold will be properly articulated in this leadership contest, and i am talking to the candidates because the principal issue for me here is that changing the leader of our party does not change the arithmetic in parliament. therefore, i need to understand from the various candidates what is their strategy for resolving this impasse. the boss of boeing has apologised to the families of 3a6 people killed in two separate crashes, involving the 737 max aircraft. the lion air and ethiopian airways flights crashed within five months of each other, leading to the entire fleet to be grounded.
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speaking to cbs news, dennis muilenburg said he was sorry for the impact on families, and insisted the company is "committed to safety for the long run". we will have the sport in a moment with sally. but we want to show you these pictures. take a look at this extraordinary footage of russian astronauts out on a spacewalk. they're doing maintenance work on the international space station, which is 250 miles above the surface of the earth. the event marked the 85th birthday of alexey leonov, the first person ever to spacewalk. chelsea, they have a result. we will talk about some of the atmosphere around it, but a good result for them. i am getting in trouble for using a certain word, saying that
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chelsea thrashed arsenal. 4-1! the first half was boring, and then there was a thrashing! chelsea thrashed arsenal to win the europa league in baku last night. eden hazard was the star man, but straight after the match he hinted that he could be on his way out of the club. 0lly foster is outside the chelsea hotel in baku. good morning to you. i know you are having a bit of a chat with the police this morning, so i hope we can continue to talk to you. chelsea we re can continue to talk to you. chelsea were the winners, but a strange night. it was a really strange night. it was a really strange night. wejust night. it was a really strange night. we just had the night. it was a really strange night. wejust had the presidential cavalcade come through, so we had to stop filming, turn the cameras around, it all went eerily quiet, a little bit like a europa league final. official attendance, 51,000. that is at least 10,000 empty seats.
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i think it was a bit emptier than that. i know you were debating over the merits of the final, we were there, and it felt awful. so flat. we have talked for the last couple of days about the travel difficulties, and quite clearly all those arsenal and chelsea fans here from the uk who couldn't make it, they couldn't get rid of their tickets here either. but chelsea we re tickets here either. but chelsea were worthy winners. they were better good drilled and they scored all those goals. it was a very up—and—down evening depending on whether you were wearing red or blue. let's hear from whether you were wearing red or blue. let's hearfrom a couple whether you were wearing red or blue. let's hear from a couple of fa ns blue. let's hear from a couple of fans i spoke to last night. a long way to come but if you don't come and you when you will regret it. i have been to every final since i was seven years old, so i think that is a good reason to come either way. seven years old, so i think that is a good reason to come either waym isa a good reason to come either waym is a bit ofa a good reason to come either waym is a bit of a track but you can't buy memories like that. a dodgy first half but buzzing now. i'm devastated, six flights, it is just
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a reflection on the season. it has been a hard season, i thought coming here tonight we might able to do it, but it just proves here tonight we might able to do it, but itjust proves that chelsea were the better team. chelsea are worthy winners, a—1, two goals for eden hazard, and he wasjust winners, a—1, two goals for eden hazard, and he was just one of the players partying into the early hours with the team. he answered some questions about his future, saying this was the perfect end. it is fully expected he will leave chelsea and head towards real madrid. big questions for arsenal, going into the europa league for the third season in a row, so it had disappointment for them. chelsea on a high, and they will fill an awful lot shorterfor their a high, and they will fill an awful lot shorter for their fans. thank you very much. it's a really big day for cricket. the world cup kicks off
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at the oval this morning, as england — the hosts and favourites — play south africa. jonathan agnew is the bbc cricket correspondent and is there for us now. good morning! a big day for the start of the world cup, really important day for cricket and for england. it is! we are battling a bit with the london rush—hour, which for a country boy is a bit exciting, to be honest. everyone is turning up, the early arrivals are here. this is not just up, the early arrivals are here. this is notjust the start of the world cups, but a whole summer for england. cricket lovers like me will feel that some real momentum has gathered in this world cup that england might do really well in. perhaps even win it. and that momentum rolls into the ashes, which after a ll momentum rolls into the ashes, which after all is one of cricket's great traditions. it should be an unforgettable summer of cricket for england. it is very important, isn't it- england. it is very important, isn't it—we england. it is very important, isn't it — we have seen the opening ceremony, which is glossy and
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glamorous, but it is important that cricket puts on a good show. glamorous, but it is important that cricket puts on a good showm glamorous, but it is important that cricket puts on a good show. it is, and the icc, the efforts they have put in, they want these games to be played in certain conditions, with the white ball being cannon fodder really, you can see all these players who just smash the ball with these big bats. i expect you very high—scoring i was here on monday when england beat afghanistan quite easily. the boundaries were short. it is about game these days, sally, and that is a juggling game as the tournament progresses —— batman's game. they are thinking they might rest mark wood, bring in liam plunkett, and reserves in place for later on. we expect joffrey
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plunkett, and reserves in place for later on. we expectjoffrey are sure to play today, he is only 2a, but already he has made an impact with the bounce. i think the answer for the bounce. i think the answer for the bowlers is to be aggressive themselves. that in itself should make for some fantastic cricket. i'm going to be really mean, but i think it is yourjob to tell us what england's chances arsenal —— chances are. the best they have ever been! you can say that it has been done deliberately to try to put some pressure on england but even england are talking about themselves as favourites. you don't often hear that, they are unbeaten. in their last 11 matches anywhere. if they
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come in as a team to beat, they are breaking new records, setting new standards, can they do it when it really matters? a massive expectation on them, let's see if they can do it. lovely to talk to you, jonathan. take care crossing that busy road. we have been spoiled today! did you hear what he said, it is their best chance ever. nine world cups and this is their best chance. we've been hearing lots about the contest to be the next prime minister over the past week, but there's another leadership race also getting underway in westminster. the liberal democrats are about to decide who'll be their next leader, after vince cable announced he's standing down. ed davey wants the top job and joins us now from our london newsroom. why should you be leader of the
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liberal democrats? i want to build on vince's success in the campaign to stop the accept. we are clearly the biggest remaining party across britain and! the biggest remaining party across britain and i think we are finding a lot of support, and that can really propel us, and i want to win the game. why you? i think i propel us, and i want to win the game. why you? i think! bring propel us, and i want to win the game. why you? i think i bring other skills as a former cabinet minister on climate change, a lot of work in the country, we are now the world leader in offshore wind, and i negotiated at a european level to get europe's targets really ambitious and that made a big difference for the paris climate treaty on an international stage. i can bring that experience and knowledge to bear on the big issue facing our country. the fact that we need to decarbonise capitalism, to make it green, making it the green capital of the world. i think that is the way forward so we can get to grips with the climate emergency.
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the reason the lib dems are having a moment now, and it can be described as that, is because of the stop brexit line, isn't it? that is where your success in the european elections has come from. you are right, and we will continue to lead that campaign. we are going to try to reach across the party to make sure we can prevent this catastrophe for britain. we want to give people the final say. i don't think the democrats future should just be about stopping brexit, and that is why i am emphasising the need to be more ambitious on climate change. i also want to make sure we are investing in the nhs, reversing cuts to the schools, putting more police on the beat to tackle the rise in violent crime. if the big issues are what you are thinking about, stopping brexit and tackling climate change must be at the top of the list. you were secretary of... i'm trying to remember. secretary of
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energy and climate. when tuition fees were introduced, when the lib dems were in coalition with the conservative party. you have that history, don't you? that will damage you when it comes to taking dems into another era. we have made it clear we made mistakes in coalition. there are mistakes, and there are absolute u—turns on policy, and then being part of a massive u—turn on policy, which damaged you in the next general election. you have to look forward, and there is a report today about how we should change tuition fees. i'm delighted that they are talking about bringing back maintenance grant for students from low—income backgrounds. in coalition, the democrats had those in place because we wanted to protect people with low income backgrounds. it was the conservatives that scandalously got
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rid of them. they also got rid of the bursary grant for student nurses. i think we can take it forward talking about the issues. i am proud that we have introduced policies helping the most disadvantaged children. liberal democrats stand for big investment in education so we can have quality and opportunity, ensuring that every child has a decent start in life. let's look at the future slightly. let's look at the future slightly. let's say you win this bid to become leader of the liberal democrats. at the moment, the lib dems are enjoying some popularity, we have already spoken about that. and a time comes for you to go into coalition with the conservative party. who would you want as leader of the conservatives that you could work with? i don't see a coalition with either the conservatives or the
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labour party. the party has done it before. but there wasn't such a big issue like brexit before, and therefore i can't see, while they are promoting this right—wing, negative agenda for our country, which will damage our economy, damage our influence in the world, prevent the fight against climate change being so effective, we couldn't really work with a government like that. i also have huge doubts aboutjeremy corbyn, i don't really trust him on brexit. and i don't trust a lot of his economic policies. more people who vote for liberal democrats, the more votes we get, the more votes and mps we get, the more we can advocate our policies, whether they are on climate change, education, orthe need to challenge the problems. ok, rather than who you would like to have a pact with if there was a coalition government, who do you not wa nt to coalition government, who do you not want to see? who do you think would be the worst person to lead the
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conservative party in terms of brexit now? i am no fan of boris johnson. i think he is a very divisive politician, i think he has lied on an industrial scale, i think he has demonised muslims and i think that approach is shocking and unacceptable in modern british politics. i don't think that would be good for the country and i think the key thing now is to heal the divisions, and borisjohnson would make them worse. what i want to do asa make them worse. what i want to do as a liberal democrat leader if i get elected is make sure i policies that reach out to leave communities and voters, showing that liberal democrats care about their future. and one of the big issues i am going on, as! and one of the big issues i am going on, as i said making britain a green economy, and if you do that you can getjobs in the regions and nations that actually have often been left behind by the current capitalist model. when i was secretary of state
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i won massive investment in a turbine factory in hull, which is transforming that city. we have seen investment in places like grimsby and lowestoft on the back of policies we had in government. i think the divisive politicians we are seeing in some of the tory leadership would make that worse. we have to come together as a country. thank you for talking to us this morning. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, both, good morning to you as well. some of us are starting ona you as well. some of us are starting on a sunny note like this beautiful weather watchers picture from derbyshire, but by no means is it like this everywhere. the cloudy start to the day, with rain and the forecast. 0ne start to the day, with rain and the forecast. one common denominator is that it forecast. one common denominator is thatitis forecast. one common denominator is that it is going to be warmer for the bulk of the uk compared to yesterday. the rain is courtesy of these two fronts coming our way, they will pep up through the
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afternoon, so the rain will turn heavier, and on the isobars it is a breezy day, gusty winds later on in the west. we do have breaks in the cloud first thing across the midlands, parts of east anglia. don't rely on them, though, because there is a lot of cloud coming in from the west as well, and the rain across northern ireland, scotland on the far north of northern england picking up through the day. we have quite a bit of the cloud close to the coast and hills in the west, thick enough for some drizzle here and there, some breaks in the cloud here and there as well, so we will see some bright and sunny spells at times. went in northern ireland and the far north of northern england and much of scotland. the far north of mainland scotland in the northern isles will see a fair bit of sunshine today, but it will feel chilly for you, in the west. 0nly nine degrees. further south, chilly for you, in the west. 0nly nine degrees. furthersouth, in chilly for you, in the west. 0nly nine degrees. further south, in any breaks, we could get up to about 23. through the evening and overnight we will still have the rain across the northern half of the country, weakening a touch through the night. 0ne weakening a touch through the night. one or two breaks but still a fair
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bit of cloud around. and again we will see some murkiness coming out of that cloud, some mist, some drizzle, particularly so on the coasts and hills. you can see our next weather front waiting in the winds to bring a small rain. temperatures in double figures for most of the uk. the mild night will lead into quite a warm day, leading into an even warmer day as we head into an even warmer day as we head into saturday, as you can see from the ember appearing on the chart. so we start on a mild note tomorrow. again, quitea we start on a mild note tomorrow. again, quite a bit of cloud around. brea ks again, quite a bit of cloud around. breaks developing here and there during the morning, but heavy rain for northern ireland, parts of northern england and also scotland. but later in the day, breaks will come in from the south—west and wales, and they will be pushing eastwards a cross wales, and they will be pushing eastwards across england and wales through the rest of the day. so some of us will have some early evening sunshine stop lower ten, and 23 as we push once again into the south—east. for friday, we still have a weather front draped across
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us, but it is a weak affair and it will still produce some rain, one or two showers for example across western scotland. but away from these areas, it will be dry and we will see some sunny skies. and this is when we are expecting the peak of the temperatures. so in the south—east, we could hit 27, and even further north, temperatures are not as high. it will still be that bit milder than it is at the moment. it is good to have a good weekend of weather, isn't it? it makes you kind of look forward to finishing the week. we didn't get as far as sunday, so we willjust leave it at that. carol, what is wrong with you? seriously! if i was responsible for the weather, we would have four seasons, and we would have rain at night when it is needed, and it would be nice and warm by day. could eating crisps, sugary cereals or chocolate be putting you at risk of an early death? a new study in the british medical
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journal says people who eat such ultra—processed food are likely to have much worse health than those that don't. however, some scientists are warning the report's findings are too simplistic. joining us now is gunter kuhnle, an associate professor in nutrition and health at the university of reading. good morning to you. can we go through some of the really basic stuff, what is the meaning of ultra—processed ? stuff, what is the meaning of ultra-processed? it is a new classification system which tries to classify food based on how processed it is. it starts with unprocessed foods, so fruit and vegetables which we re foods, so fruit and vegetables which were just foods, so fruit and vegetables which werejust picked, foods, so fruit and vegetables which were just picked, and foods, so fruit and vegetables which werejust picked, and moves on foods, so fruit and vegetables which were just picked, and moves on to more processing, and then has the category of ultra—processed. the problem with the category... so three examples, processed food, i am thinking slices of ham, maybe. that is processed food, is it? from a food scientist's point of view, anything is processing, picking food is processing, so that is a problem with the definition. the definition distinguishes mainly between
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ultra—processed and normal processed, and that makes it difficult. so i understand, if! think of something like chicken nuggets, which have had bad press for various reasons, they would count as ultra processed? fish fingers? they would. this is shocking to me, because they have beena shocking to me, because they have been a stable part of my diet, but you think it is fish, it is not too bad. why is it bad? i wouldn't say it is bad, it is the definition, and the definition of ultra—processed is so wide, it includes food which most people would commonly assume are not detrimental. so is this scaremongering? that detrimental. so is this scaremongering ? that would detrimental. so is this scaremongering? that would be my next question. it is not scaremongering, it is the attempt to try and identify what in a diet could have a detrimental effect on health. this is incredibly difficult because diet is so complex and people eat so many different types of foods. so what is significant about this new finding? 0n the face of it, there might be people
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thinking what we're talking about this morning, ultra—processed foods are linked to things... people might think i think i knew that, i might still eat them, but i think i knew that. where does this new report ta ke that. where does this new report take us? i think the new report confirms what most people would have assumed, that people who eat a lot of food in the ultra—processed category tend to be more unhealthy. but it doesn't really mean that eating these ultra—processed foods are unhealthy, and that is something you see in those two studies, that those people who eat the most of these ultra—processed foods, they tend to smoke, they tend to be less physically active, they are overweight, they all had other behavioural traits which would make them more likely to eat those foods. that makes a lot of sense, because if someone is thinking a lot about their diet already, they are probably conscious of other factors as well. yes. so you brought in an array, and common sense dictates to array, and common sense dictates to a large degree, but talk us through what we have. so what is ultra
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processed here? so from the classification of ultra—processed, probably everything here and over there would fall in the category. so they are kind of wheat things, and they are kind of wheat things, and they are kind of wheat things, and they are ultra—processed, even though we are told they are quite good. they are not the ones with sugar on top. they are in the category of ultra—processed. the category of ultra—processed. the category is vague enough so it is not very clear, so olives in brine, which most would see as not an unhealthy food, would fall into that category. but aren't olives healthy? there will be people literally watching us poised over their breakfast bowls, ready to dive in. is there a breakfast cereal, no brand names, we can't do that, is there a breakfast cereal that is not processed? there is not really one thatis processed? there is not really one that is not processed, in
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porridge... i think porridge oats don't count as ultra—processed foods, so they would be in the non— ultra—processed category. foods, so they would be in the non— ultra-processed category. what about those foods... so many supermarkets now are launching or have healthy ready meals, and i know that sounds counterintuitive, as in lower salt, lower sugar, fresh food, that is processed. it is processed. but it is still good. i think that is the problem with the classification, ultra—processed put things together based on processing steps, and also on the intention to sell it for profit. jam, for example, is ultra—processed. profit. jam, for example, is ultra-processed. it has loads of sugar, that is common sense, isn't it? but it isjust two steps and it has been around for a very long time. you realise you have done this entire interview submerged in a giant fizzy drinks, i willjust
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point that out. good to see you this morning, thank you forjoining us. it is not as straightforward as it seems, i think. we will be back at 8am. good morning from bbc london news, i'm charlotte franks. a major driver of knife crime in the capital is the belief that it will go unpunished. that is according to the deputy chairman of the london assembly, tony arbour. his comments come as new figures suggest two thirds of robberies at knifepoint go unsolved every year. of the 10,000 or so incidents recorded in england and wales last year, nearly 70% resulted in no suspects being identified. historic england says a london—wide approach is needed in planning new skyscrapers in the capital, to preserve the character and environment of our city. more than 500 buildings of more than 20 storeys are being planned or built across london, which is a record number. many of them will be in the outer boroughs,
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and it is feared local councils have different ideas about how best to build high. as you've been hearing, chelsea have beaten london rivals arsenal in the europa league final, which took place in baku last night. we caught up with some chelsea fans who didn't make it out to azerbaijan, but enjoyed their victoryjust as much. before the game, i didn't predict that it at all. i thought we were the underdogs. arsenal had more to pay for. how we came out on top, couldn't tell you, but i'm ecstatic. everyone just came together, chelsea fans love each other. couldn't be more happy. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, there is a good service all round this morning. 0n the trains, thameslink services via west hampstead are running with delays of up to 20 minutes. 0nto the roads, and traffic on the north circular is slow westbound from the a10 at the great cambridge interchange towards bounds green.
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the m23 is down to two lanes southbound a mile before gatwick airport, following a breakdown. and the a3 is closed northbound at j10, the wisley turnoff, following a three—vehicle collision. now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. compared to yesterday, it is a very mild start to the day. we've got temperatures in the mid—teens already this morning. now, we're into some much warmer air. you'll really notice it over the next couple of days or so, particularly when the sun eventually comes out. it will brighten up a bit later on through the afternoon, but it is quite a cloudy, misty, murky old start to the day. there are a few spots of drizzle over the higher ground for a time this morning. it's a fairly brisk south—westerly wind blowing, and we'll keep that throughout the day, really. temperatures will get up to 22 or 23 degrees celsius, but it will brighten up later on through the afternoon, and there'll probably be a few spells of sunshine as well. now, overnight tonight, again it's going to stay very mild. yes, there will be some clear spells at first, but it will cloud over.
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some rather misty conditions again developing into tomorrow morning, and all that mild air. lows of around 12—1a degrees celsius. now, tomorrow, despite the cloudy start, we'll eventually see the sunshine break through, so it will help to lift the temperatures — 23, 2a degrees celsius. temperatures will peak at 27 or 28 celsius for some places, perhaps, on saturday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning and welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: universities in england are told to cut tuition fees by up to £1700 a year. at least seven people have died after a tourist boat on the river danube in budapest capsizes. 19 others are still missing. so—called ultra—processed foods such as burgers and crisps are linked to poor
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health and early death. chelsea thrash arsenal in the europa league final. they win a—1 in baku, but star man eden hazard hints that he's on his way out of the club. due a refund? energy, broadband and water customers have been overcharged by around £2a billion over the past 15 years. that's according to a charity which wants the companies to pay their customers back. from the andes to africa — a bird's eye tour of the world in a new documentary filmed from the air. good morning. today will be warmer than yesterday which will progressively be the story until saturday with some of seeing high temperatures of 27. for now it is cloudy with some brighter breaks and rain across the north. more in 15 minutes. good morning. it's thursday 30th may. our top story:
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university tuition fees in england should be cut by £1,700 a year, according to a government review published today. it also suggests that students from poorer families should receive grants to cover living costs. here's our education correspondent frankie mccamley. six students at one college, each with a different plan for theirfuture. some want to go to university. for others, apprenticeships are on the cards. for francesca—lily, money is a big part of her decision. i care for somebody. they can't afford to work because they are disabled. so it makes it harder to then think, "0h, i'll go off to university and have this £a0,000-50,000 debt." if they lowered the fees, would that make a difference? i believe you can't put a monetary value on education, so whether it be 7500, 9000, i think so long as the quality of the education is significant enough. lauren chose to do an apprenticeship, but would have liked more support,
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like those at university. i've got a family, a household to run and i'm on the same basic rate of pay as a 16—year—old doing the same apprenticeship. but i think a grant or a bursary or even a loan would be more attractive to apprenticeships. the outgoing prime minister, theresa may, commissioned a review looking at post—18 education in england. it's recommending a cap of £7500 on university fees, grants for living costs brought back for the poorest students, and tuition fee loans available for everyone doing advanced qualifications. but with change at the top of government, some are concerned this latest review could be ignored, which still leaves uncertainty for future students when deciding what path to take. frankie mccamley, bbc news, in 0ldham. at least seven people have died after a cruise boat carrying tourists capsized in the hungarian capital, budapest. the south korean government says 33 of its citizens
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were on board the boat on the river danube, and 19 are still unaccounted for. gareth barlow reports. the incident happened late on wednesday evening aound ten o'clock local time on a popular part of the river close to the hungarian parliament. a group of south korean tourists were on board the boat, the mermaid, when it collided with a larger vessel, capsized and sank. they found the same boat at the danube river so they found the details and the little parts of the boat. all of the river is closed and more than a00 people are working for the rescue. boats, searchlights and radar are scanning the river. police and paramedics lined the banks as divers searched the water. child ren's ambulances ready on stand—by.
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the south korean foreign ministry said a quick response team would be sent to budapest to assist with the investigation. translation: regarding the accident of the cruise ship, president moonjae—in orders every possible means to be put into the rescue operation together with the hungarian government. the danube, europe's second longest river, is flooding, with strong winds and heavy rain hampering the rescue effort. in the centre of budapest the search continues for those lost in the river. but as a new day dawns, the search for answers as to what caused the tragedy will get under way. gareth barlow, bbc news. eating ultra—processed food such as crisps, sugary cereals and even fishfingers puts you at higher risk of heart problems and an early death, according to new studies in the british medicaljournal. the research, by scientists in france and spain, says people should eat fresh produce to reduce the risk, but some have warned the findings are too simplistic.
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what we can take from these studies is they are large studies, but they are observational studies. they can only show an association. they can't show cause and effect. what we actually need to know is what is behind these associations. is it the ultra—processed food? is it the nutrition content of them? is it the additives in them? or is it actually something to do with the people's lives of the people that are eating more of them? i think before we make any changes orjump to any conclusions we really need to find out a bit more about it. the proportion of workers in britain on less than £8.52 per hour has fallen to its lowest level since 1980, according to a new report. the resolution foundation think tank has found that the number of low—paid workers dropped by 200,000 last year and suggested there could be none at all by the mid—20205. the chancellor philip hammond has warned conservative leadership contenders against making reckless spending promises in the hope of becoming prime minister. 11 mps including sajid javid,
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esther mcvey and dominic raab are among those who have declared themselves in the running to succeed theresa may. mr hammond revealed he is not yet ruling himself out of the race. well, i'm not about to make a declaration of my participation in this contest today, and i wouldn't hold your breath, if i were you. but i'm talking to all the candidates who have declared themselves so far. i'm seeing some more of them today, trying to understand how they are going to propose to resolve the brexit impasse. the principal issue for me here is that changing the leader of our party does not change the arithmetic in parliament. and therefore i need to understand from the various candidates what is their strategy for resolving this impasse? israel is to hold fresh elections after the prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, failed to form a new coalition government. the september vote will be the second this year, an unprecendent event
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in israeli politics. mr netanyahu's attempts to put together an administration were hampered by differences between secular and religious parties. chelsea have won the europa league after thrashing arsenal a—1 in the all—english final in baku. only about 5,000 fans of both sides travelled, leaving the stadium appearing to be half—full, and a rather eerie atmosphere. here's our sports correspondent, david 0rnstein. a season of highs and lows finishing with a flourish. even in turbulent times, chelsea know how to win and certainly how to celebrate. two teams separated by a a0—minute drive across london meeting 3000 miles away in azerbaijan. the result, an unusual atmosphere. but still there was plenty at stake. arsenal were playing for the added bonus of champions league qualification. indeed they made the better start but couldn't find a breakthrough. chelsea's superior continental
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pedigree began to tell. as the local time ticked past midnight, the sparse crowd needed awakening, and 0livier giroud duly obliged. the former arsenal striker returning to haunt his old club. pedro doubled the lead. when eden hazard extended it further, chelsea were in cruise control. arsenal perhaps scored the goal of the game to briefly threaten a comeback, though any such hopes were soon crushed by hazard in what could be his final chelsea appearance. if it is, what a way to go out. arsenal humiliated, their dream ending in tears. the blues adding more silverware to the collection. if the build—up was dominated by issues off the pitch, the match itself will be remembered for what happened on it. chelsea annihilating arsenal to lift their fifth european trophy and a first in the career of manager maurizio sarri. a night of contrasting fortunes, emotions and repercussions.
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david 0rnstein, bbc news, baku. it is nearly eight to 10am and you are watching breakfast. thank you for joining are watching breakfast. thank you forjoining us. are watching breakfast. thank you for joining us. —— are watching breakfast. thank you forjoining us. —— 8:10am. as the conservative leadership race hots up, we're hearing more about what each of the candidates would do if they were to become prime minister. so far, 11 mps have put their names forward. one of those is the former work and pensions secretary, esther mcvey, whojoins us now. we are pleased to have you on the sofa and we have done this with a few of your colleagues now and we say i should be prime minister because... the first thing we have got to do is deliver brexit. i am a democrat, the biggest ever in our time, that big vote has got to happen, and then we have got to look at the year we are in, 2019, build upon the success of the conservative yea rs, upon the success of the conservative years, 3.5 million more people in work, turning the economy around, but now what do we need to do? i have made this pledge that of course
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we now have to look at the public services. we have got to put more money in police, more money in education, and i believe in social mobility. i believe in personal empowerment and reaching out to, as i call them, blue—collar conservatives across the country. let's get something very clear. you go into this role, with what you have just go into this role, with what you havejust said, in go into this role, with what you have just said, in the sure knowledge that the eu is not renegotiating. they have said it as clearly as they possibly can. that means you are actively pursuing an ideal scenario. —— no—deal scenario. what i have agreed is that we will be out by the 31st of october and we will do all the no—deal planning. the door is open and should the eu like to come back and off as this, thatis like to come back and off as this, that is fine. they have said they won't. that is fine. we will keep the door open for them. but we will
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be planning and preparing and we will be out as everybody in a democratic vote of stated. it sounds to me that you are pledging if you we re to me that you are pledging if you were to become the leader of the conservative party, the prime minister, we are leaving on the 31st of october, no—deal. minister, we are leaving on the 31st of october, no-deal. we are leaving on that date and if it is with no deal then that is what it will be wed. and what we do know is that nobody wants to withdrawal agreement, nobody in the house, the biggest ever historic defeat, and it is not good enough for the uk and our citizens, and we need to keep the union strung, therefore we now need to say we will be leaving on the 1st of october with or without a deal. how many industry leaders have you spoken to who have said they think business will be fine with no deal? i speak with lots of different businesses and lots of the scare stories that we had in a city in
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2016, as we were told even by voting to leave the eu, all other things that could happen. i unemployment it, it's never proved to be. city has now moved on and actually the worst thing that could possibly happen with that awful withdrawal agreement would be that we would be agreement would be that we would be a rule take up rather than a rule maker. things have moved on. businesses have already made preparations and now we as government need to complete them. we have done a lot. civil servants have done a brilliantjob so far. have done a lot. civil servants have done a brilliant job so far. we need to co m plete done a brilliant job so far. we need to complete them. there is a game going on at the moment amongst you and ten other party leaders and would—be prime minister is, about the things you are promising. so we have pledges about tax cuts from some people and your pledge is about money for the police. how do you know we will be able to afford that? £3 billion a year, you say. more money. where is that coming from? first of all, it is not a game. that is really important and it is about
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running the country. what i did pledge at the launch of what i believe in, blue—collar conservatives, i said what we need to do, the foreign aid budget which has risen by a huge amount since 2010, we actually now have got to go back to those historically high levels of 2010, and if we go back to those levels, we have an extra 7 billion a year. so i am not asking for extra money, new money. iam not getting us into debt. i mean we need to spend that money now at home, of which i want £a billion to go to schools, really important, and 3 billion to go to policing. this is not extra money. this is about prioritising spending to what we need at home. pledges about where money is coming from and how it might be spent have drawn the attention of the chancellor, to whom we have been speaking this morning. have a listen. once no deal is of the table, we can then either use it for tax cuts or additional public spending or capital investment in
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our future. that is a choice that the next government will be able to make. there isn't enough money that you be able to do all the things that all my colleagues are talking about, including tax cuts, though there will still have to be choices. you have heard it there. he says there is not enough money knocking around. sale would agree with me because i'm not asking him for extra money and i am not asking for anything else. he knows that what i am asking for is for the foreign aid budget, which has nearly doubled from 7 billion to 1a billion from 2010, and other departments have been cut, that has actually grown by a huge amount and i am saying it needs to come from there. so philip andi needs to come from there. so philip and i actually agree. let's be clear on one thing. hammond told us very explicitly this morning this, which is entirely different to you, which is entirely different to you, which is that he would not back someone who pursues a no deal scenario. there is no suggestion that he is on your side. he is the polar opposite
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in this argument. he is putting you ina in this argument. he is putting you in a place where you are actively, deliberately, taking us towards no deal, which is precisely what he is warning against. two things. you are talking about finances and on that one, fill it and i are in the same place. i am one, fill it and i are in the same place. iam not one, fill it and i are in the same place. i am not asking for more spending and i am not asking for any change there, so we are in the same place. let me be clear. philip hammond also said on the finances that if we go to a no deal scenario, all bets are off because of the impact on the economy. so you can't haveit impact on the economy. so you can't have it both ways. you can't say it isa have it both ways. you can't say it is a loving playing field and go to no deal. charlie, hang on a second. the second thing that philip hammond andi the second thing that philip hammond and i have never been on the same place on is brexit. he has always been an arch remain and he has done everything he can to make sure that we remain. in that argument, we are ina we remain. in that argument, we are in a different place. when he talked about what would happen in a no deal situation, remember that we would keep our £39 billion to look at what
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we wa nt keep our £39 billion to look at what we want to do that. some money, yes, we want to do that. some money, yes, we will hand over that fundamentally we will hand over that fundamentally we will hand over that fundamentally we will use that to shore up the economy going forward to make sure there is stability going there. but what we need to do, as politicians, when the country comes to us after we gave them a say on the referendum and we said we want to leave the eu, then we take our time and use it constructively to make sure we deliver on that. in 1000 days we don't come back with 1000 excuses why we can't do it. we have 1000 reasons for how we are prepared to go forward. one thing that happens when 11 people are going for the leadership of any party is personalities. people want to know who you are. and there is a lot of scrutiny on all of you. a couple of things. honesty. now, you have had to apologise to parliament for misleading it on the roll—out of universal credit. more recently you promoted a false article about all eu member states having to adopt the
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euro. how do you come across as trustworthy now? i tell you for why. what i did is i went forward to the house to say the words i used were not exactly right in the report. but the substance was correct. the actual substance was correct but the words are used were not. so actually i come unlike any other mp in the house, put my hand up and requested to go to the house and say, look, i am going to apologise for using their own words. i have never heard another mp do that. i was on the front foot saying let me apologise and come to the has to do that. in that regard, i would say that is more trustworthy and honest than anybody else. if i made one mistake it was coming to the house because people like you are always going on about it. i don't know that going on about it. i don't know that going on about it. i don't know that going on about it but if you are the prime minister you have got to be
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absolutely diligent. on the substance, i was correct, which is why i kept myjob. but on the wording, the roll—out needs to be slower, was going too slowly, and i said it needed to be speeded up. yes, i used the wrong words, hence i personally said can i apologise for that? that was me being very honest and trustworthy and going to my collea g u es and trustworthy and going to my colleagues and the public to say, you know what? i have used the wrong words there. most mps don't do that. iamaone offin words there. most mps don't do that. i am a one off in actually seeking to apologise for using the wrong words, so i would say i am trustworthy. i am looking at a piece in the telegraph this morning which is rory stewart talking about smoking opium in around and jeremy hunt once drunk a cannabis lassie.” am not actually sure what that is but go on! it is an indian milky drink. the cannabis bit! we are talking about scrutiny and it feels like that has entered some kind of
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conversation at the moment. where are you on that stuff, about what you have got to say about your past? well, charlie, you and i have known each other for about 20 years and we have worked together. by way of being open with people, we used to present a programme together, so you know what i am saying. you know about my past but you are quite right, now we live in an age of transparency. whether somebody wants to record what you say, take a photograph, video, we do live in that age of scrutiny. no doubt people will come forward and say i remember esther did this, and if i did it, hands up. anything you are worried about coming out? not that i can think of, really i can't. but as you saw before, i will put my hand up you saw before, i will put my hand up and say that is right or i will say that is not. i am known for being a very straight talking politician and most people know me for that and i will continue to be so. we thank you for your time this morning. thank you, both. it is
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8:20am. it will be hot at the weekend and carol is bringing as that. absolutely right. temperatures up that. absolutely right. temperatures up to 27 degrees in the south east. but wherever you are in uk, temperatures will be high on saturday than today. today is warmer than yesterday and fairly cloudy with some rain in the forecast, courtesy of these weather fronts. rain this morning will pet up across scotla nd rain this morning will pet up across scotland and northern ireland later on. you can see from the isobars that it on. you can see from the isobars thatitis on. you can see from the isobars that it is also breezy with gusty winds later across western areas. a cloudy start with sunnier breaks first thing but don't rely on them because cloud is coming and going as well. rain across northern ireland and scotland, ranging across the far north of england in the afternoon, and coming further south, some of the cloud hugging the coastlines of south—west england and wales, thick enough to produce some drizzle and the same for the hills. moving into the same for the hills. moving into the midlands, east anglia and the south—east and northern england, there will be cloud but also
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brighter breaks as we run into the rain. for the far north—east of scotland, especially the northern isles, this is where we will see some sunshine for the longest period of time. but no heatwave. 0nly nine and ten in stornoway, but further south and east, high temperatures of up south and east, high temperatures of up to 23. through the evening and overnight we have the rain in the northern half of the country moving the north sea. it will weaken as it does so. by the end of the night, another system comes in from the west introducing yet more rain. further south, quite a bit of cloud and picking up over the coast the hills for some drizzle and bits and pieces. patchy mist and fog forming as well. hardly surprising with all of this going on, temperatures will not fall away too much. five in the north to about 1a in the south. it is getting warmer through friday and into saturday. look at the amber conditions indicating warmer air, and we can see them coming into the
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north of the country as well. for friday itself, we start off on a relatively cloudy note with a weather front coming in from the west introducing rain. some of it will be heavy, especially in the hills and the west. northern ireland and scotland and the very far north of northern england. for the rest of england and wales, we start off cloudy with some brighter breaks, but more of them developing from the south—west and wales as we go through the course of the afternoon. some will end up with early evening sunshine with high temperatures up to 22 or 23 degrees. friday into saturday we still have this weather front with us but fairly weak. it will still produce some rain across northern england at times and a bit more cloud. showers across scotland. either side of that we are looking ata either side of that we are looking at a drier either side of that we are looking ata drierand either side of that we are looking at a drier and brighter conditions with some sunshine. this is when we think we will see the peak of the heat. 26 or 27 in the south—eastern corner and even temperatures across
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the uk are not as high as that. they will still be higher for some than they have been of late. you had to say that i was right. me? yes, in the middle, the temperatures are rising. it grieves me to say that but you are right! i am onlyjoking and you are of course right. temperatures are climbing. i've recorded that! thank you, carol. the uk's first 5g network which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds is being switched on today. ee is starting the service in six major uk cities, with ten more locations due to come on line by the end of the year. our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones is in london's covent garden for us now. i see you have your phone poised and ready to go. this is an historic moment because we are coming to you over a five g network. i don't know
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what the picture is like and whether iam what the picture is like and whether i am blurry when i move around. i expected pinpoint sharp with no delay because we are coming to you from a little box of tricks, a van a few yards away, which turned this into a 5g signal going over the new network. i am also trying out the service with this phone. 260 megabits. quite impressive. walk a bit that way and it might be higher and a bit that way it might be lower. that this is the funny and ironic thing. we were supposed to be doing this live broadcast about 15 minutes ago and the whole system went down. it turned out we had run out of data on the sim card in our box of tricks, and that goes to show how much data that you might be chewing up with one of these 5g phones when and if they get to you. don't forget it is fairly patchy at the moment and just in six cities. vodafone will be coming with their service injuly. vodafone will be coming with their service in july. the vodafone will be coming with their service injuly. the whole of the country, getting into those parts which can't even get ag and let
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alone 5g, that will probably take three years. your question at the beginning was how it looks. i don't know what people can see at home but in the studio the picture is absolutely clear. you wouldn't know any different and it looks perfectly fine. at the bbc, we and other broadcasters have been using ag networks, we bundled together the ag sim cards and get a good signal, but the problem with 5g is it will do that more efficiently and with less delay. you will ask me a question andi delay. you will ask me a question and i will hear it immediately and a nswer and i will hear it immediately and answer immediately, so an upgrade. but the broader promises all kinds of services being made possible by this. all kinds of objects as well as people being connected to the internet. the internet of things. that is the promise but it is still quite a long way away. thank you. yes, no delay and it all worked fine and we were wondering! it is one of those things, you set it up and will
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it work or not? it works! we will be talking to gordon buchanan later. he has done this lovely filming from the air about wildlife and it will be brilliant. there is, find out what is happening where you are this morning. just the far north of scotland on the other side of this weather front is still a bit chillier. this morning we will continue with a lot of cloud. 0utbreaks morning we will continue with a lot of cloud. outbreaks of rain in
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northern ireland and the north west of england, particularly this afternoon in central and southern scotland. heavy rain moving its way in here. in the far north of scotla nd in here. in the far north of scotland it is ten or 11, but elsewhere it is quite warm, 22 or 23 in the south—east. tonight we will continue with this feed of showery rain into northern areas. further south it will be largely dry. lots of cloud overnight with drizzle in places. another mild night and pretty humid. friday, we will see more rain, mainly across scotland and northern ireland and quite heavy in the west of scotland throughout the day. england and wales are drier and brighter. again, warm and humid, 22-23 and brighter. again, warm and humid, 22—23 and and brighter. again, warm and humid, 22-23 and 16 and brighter. again, warm and humid, 22—23 and 16 or 17 further north. into the weekend this weather system brings friday's rain and it will
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stick around and wiggle around a bit across northern parts of england and in the irish sea. that will bring outbreaks of rain here in that zone. further north a few showers in scotla nd further north a few showers in scotland and further east dry with sunshine and much warmer. 27 in the south—east is possible on saturday. further north, still quite warm and humid.
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this is business live from bbc news with samantha simmonds and tim willcox. the boss of boeing apologizes to victims' families, to airlines and to the travelling public in his first interview since the two fatal crashes that have grounded the 737 max around the world. live from london, that's our top story on thursday 30th may. the boss of boeing says the plane maker is committed to safety but admitted that the 737 max accidents have "damaged public trust in flying". we'll see part of that interview in a moment. and ramping up the rhetoric on trade — a senior chinese

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