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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  May 30, 2019 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's 11am. and these are the main stories this morning. lower fees but longer repayments — university tuition fees in england should be cut to £7,500, a review recommends. we looked very hard at the way higher education is funded and we feel that the benefits accrue for the individuals who go there, and also the state and economy at large, and we think it right that the cost of that should be shared. at least seven people are killed and 19 are missing after a boat capsizes in the hungarian capital, budapest. the uk's first 56 network, which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds is being switched on today.
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we catch up with the pensioners trialling driverless cars. it's hoped the new tecnology will help them be more independent cat—astrophe averted — as a tabby stuck on a railway bridge for six days, leading to a major rescue operation, simply walks home. and a dramatic start to england's cricket world cup campaign as opener jonny bairstow falls to the second ball of the tournament good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the prime minister theresa may has welcomed a review that calls for a cut in university tuition fees and the re—introduction of some maintenance grants. the recommendations were put forward
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in a report commissioned by mrs may, but she acknowledged that the fate of the proposals would depend uopn the next prime minister. universities have warned that the proposals could leave them short of funds. the report proposes a cap on tuition fees at £7,500 per year, maintenance grants restored for less well off students and student loan repayments should continue for a0 years rather than the current 30 years. frankie mccamley reports. six students at one college, each with a different plan for theirfuture. some want to go to university. for others, apprenticeships are on the cards. for francesca—lily, money is a big part of her decision. i care for somebody. they can't afford to work because they are disabled. so it makes it harder to then think, "0h, i'll go off to university and have this £40,000-£50,000 debt." if they lowered the fees, would that make a difference? i believe you can't put
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a monetary value on education, so whether it be 7,500, 9,000, i think so long as the quality of the education is significant enough. lauren chose to do an apprenticeship, but would have liked more support, like those at university. i've got a family, a household to run, and i'm on the same basic rate of pay as a 16—year—old doing the same apprenticeship. but i think a grant or a bursary or even a loan would be more attractive to apprenticeships. the outgoing prime minister, theresa may, commissioned a review looking at post—18 education in england. it's recommending a cap of £7500 on university fees, grants for living costs brought back for the poorest students, and tuition fee loans available for everyone doing advanced qualifications. we looked very hard at the way that higher education is funded. we feel that the benefits accrue certainly to the individuals that go there, but also to the state, to the economy at large, and we felt it
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right that the cost of that should be shared between the beneficiaries, the graduates, and the broader population of taxpayers. we felt that was the right balance to reach. but with change at the top of government, some are concerned this latest review could be ignored, which still leaves uncertainty for future students when deciding what path to take. frankie mccamley, bbc news, in 0ldham. speaking this morning, the prime minister welcomed the review. nobody should feel they have to go to university and that applies to children from middle—class backgrounds just as much as anyone. but nor should anybody feel that because of who they are or where they are from that the world of h e is not open to them because it will cost too much. thanks to this government, universities are legally required to improve access and if you are an 18—year—old from a
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disadvantaged background, you are more likely to go to university than ever before. but improvements are slow and the challenge remains large. the number of young people from working—class families who apply to and take up places at universities is still a long way from reflecting the country in which we live. and we hope to talk to sir david bell from universities uk to get his reaction to these proposals. at least seven people have died, after a cruise boat carrying tourists capsized in the hungarian capital, budapest. the south korean government says 33 of its citizens were on—board the boat on the river danube, and 19 are still unaccounted for. gareth barlow reports. the incident happened late on wednesday evening aound ten o'clock local time on a popular part of the river close to the hungarian parliament. a group of south korean tourists were on board the boat, the mermaid, when it collided with a larger vessel, capsized and sank.
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they found the same boat at the danube river so they found the details and the little parts of the boat. all of the river is closed and more than 400 people are working for the rescue. boats, searchlights and radar are scanning the river. police and paramedics lined the banks as divers searched the water. child ren's ambulances ready on stand—by. the south korean foreign ministry said a quick response team would be sent to budapest to assist with the investigation. translation: regarding the accident of the cruise ship, president moonjae—in orders every possible means to be put into the rescue operation together with the hungarian government. the danube, europe's second longest river, is flooding, with strong winds and heavy rain hampering the rescue effort.
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in the centre of budapest the search continues for those lost in the river. but as a new day dawns, the search for answers as to what caused the tragedy will get under way. gareth barlow, bbc news. 0ur correspondent nick thorpe has this update from the scene. well, yes, for a long time as gareth was saying the river was closed and in the early hours of this morning and it has now reopened, and we do see police boats behind me and ambulances out on the river but i think hope is fading fast for the 19 people still missing in this tragedy. the water is very cold here, between eight and 10 degrees last night, some are fished out of the water were already suffering from hypothermia so the hungarian authorities doing what they can to search the river but hope is fading
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fast for those who are not rescued last night. what more do you know today about how this happened in the first place? there are conflicting stories. 0ne first place? there are conflicting stories. one is that the pleasure boat which had a capacity of 60 passengers had 3334 plus the three crew was either stationary and moored in front of the parliament building behind me here or was moving slowly when a larger vehicle, probably one of the large river cruise ships hit it in the stern and the boat capsized and sank very fast. it was darkness hours, pouring with rain, storming conditions and it's calmer now although it is still raining and has been raining here in budapest for about a month, so are much higher than usual and flowing faster than usual.
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israel is to hold fresh elections, after the prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, failed to form a new coalition government. mr netanyahu's attempts to form an administration were hampered by differences between secular and religious parties. he says that he is confident in winning the snap poll taking place in september despite criticism from opposition parties. it is the first time in israel's history that a prime minister—designate has failed to form a government. raoul wootliff is political correspondent at the times of israel. hello to you, the blame game is going on. tell us more about why there was a failure to form this administration. well, the government of benjamin netanyahu has been made up of benjamin netanyahu has been made up of of benjamin netanyahu has been made upofa of benjamin netanyahu has been made up of a number of different factions over the last four years and the main rivalries within his coalition have been between the ultraorthodox
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factions and the secular party. that secular party is leaning more to the right and has made various demands on israel's treatment of gaza and the security situation in gaza but specifically among the coalition negotiations the conscription bill was there to conscript seminary stu d e nts was there to conscript seminary students into the army on the ultraorthodox party opposed any bill doing so and the opposition leader demanded such a bill be passed and that was the root of the stand—off that was the root of the stand—off that brought us to the decision to hold more elections. based on all of that, what hope is there that the new election, this second election in september could deliver a fundamentally different result to form a coalition or could we be in the same scenario again? we could
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very much be in the same scenario but as he said often in the political context we know where election start and we don't know where they end but in the last election the blue—and—white party surged to challenge both parties with 35 seats but much of that surge was due to the momentum they gained through the campaign and they were able to keep up towards the last days of the campaign. it's likely the momentum would not be a new fresh party that offers a new hope of challenging benjamin netanyahu and it's possible that large swathes of support could be lost to avigdor lieberman's party and it may end up being a lot easier for benjamin netanyahu being a lot easier for benjamin neta nyahu to form being a lot easier for benjamin netanyahu to form a coalition but we don't know where things will end and there are lots of pressures facing him in the last few months, particularly the legal troubles facing potential indictment in three criminal cases, and that could
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affect the ultimate outcome. what could the implications be for benjamin netanyahu could the implications be for benjamin neta nyahu personally could the implications be for benjamin netanyahu personally and his ability to continue? benjamin netanyahu his ability to continue? benjamin neta nyahu is nicknamed his ability to continue? benjamin netanyahu is nicknamed the magician in israel for repeatedly pulling a trick out of the hat to get out of some difficult political situations. last night was the first crack in the facade that we have seen of him asa the facade that we have seen of him as a political mastermind, this machiavellian, unbeaten politician. he failed to form a coalition and it was in his hands to form a coalition and he had the easiest potential partners all wanting to join the coalition by their own claims, and he failed to do so, so we may see the beginnings of a public questioning of whether benjamin
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netanyahu questioning of whether benjamin neta nyahu is the questioning of whether benjamin netanyahu is the political mastermind who is always able to get out of a whole and if people question that they might question his general political longevity, particularly with these investigations looming over his head. thank you very much. the proportion of low—paid workers in britain — those on less than £8.52 per hour — has fallen to its lowest level since 1980, according to a new report. the resolution foundation — a think tank focusing on people on the lowest incomes — found that the number of low—paid workers dropped by 200,000 last year and suggested it could be eliminated all together by 2020. the uk has a long—standing low pay problem, but which is being eroded thanks to the higher minimum wage that was introduced in 2016. at the moment there is a political consensus it seems in favour
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of pushing the rate higher, it is good news because it would further reduce the number of people on low pay. but going into uncharted territory we need to be careful about how we make that change. eating highly processed food such as crisps, sugary cereals and ready meals, puts you at higher risk of heart problems and an early death, according to new studies in the british medicaljournal. researchers say people should eat fresh produce to reduce the risk, but as a our health correspondent, james gallagher reports, some scientists warn the findings are too simplistic. this is ultra—processed food. they are the foods that have been through the most industrial processing and often have a long list of ingredients on the packet. it includes popular items like fizzy drinks, chicken nuggets and breakfast cereals. the two studies regularly assess the diets of more than 100,000 people and recorded what happened to their health. they should people who ate the most ultra—processed foods tended to have the worst heart
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health and die earlier. it is not definitive proof of harm and experts have expressed caution. more work is still needed to explain what it is about ultra processing that might have a detrimental effect on our bodies. what we actually need to know is what's behind these associations. is it the ultra—processed foods, and the nutritional content of them, some kind of additive that is in them or something to do with the people's lives of the people who are eating more of them? and i think before we make any changes orjump to any conclusions, we really need to find out a bit more about it. the authors of the two studies say there is now mounting evidence that ultra—processed foods may be harmful and the research comes out hot on the heels of trials showing these types of foods make a seat more and put on weight but while the term ultra—processed might be all new, the health advice is very familiar. a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, dish, nuts and seeds also happens to be one full of unprocessed foods.
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the headlines on bbc news. lower fees but longer repayments — university tuition fees in england should be cut to £7,500, a review recommends. at least seven people are killed and 19 are missing after a boat capsizes in the hungarian capital, budapest. the uk's first 5g network, which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds is being switched on today. and in sport: the cricket world cup is less than an hour old, and england have lost their first wicket — jonny bairstow gone, second ball of the match. england are 68 for1 in the 11th over. eden hazard has dropped the biggest hint yet that he's on his way out of chelsea. he scored twice as they beat arsenal 4—1 to win the europa league last night. and kyle edmund loses
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the first set of his second at the french open to pablo cuevas on a tie break lets go back to our main story and — theresa may has welcomed a review that calls for university tuition fees in england to be cut to seven and a half thousand pounds. the government—commissioned report also says that maintenance grants for poorer students should be reinstated, and graduates should pay back their loans over 40 years rather than 30. joining us now is sir david bell, vice chancellor of sunderland university, and universities uk vice president for england and northern ireland. sir david, you are very welcome. in broad terms, what are your thoughts on the recommendations set out?” think there are some positive recommendations here, the reintroduction of maintenance grants which will go a long way to
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alleviating some concerns students have expressed and i also think the report rightly highlights the importance of further education and higher education to the success of oui’ higher education to the success of our country, so all of that i think is to be welcomed. is interesting seeing responses from joe johnson this morning who says the plans to reduce fees will destabilise university finances and many courses and leave a funding hole. is that something you are concerned about? the report published today says that if tuition fees are dropped, the shortfall in income for universities must be made up by central government and i thinkjoejohnson is absolutely right to warn of the funding shortfall. funding cut might appear to be good news for students, but if the income to universities falls substantially, that is a bad news story clearly for students. not
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only are there no guarantees that the next prime minister, whoever thatis the next prime minister, whoever that is will take on board these recommendations, there is the spending review later in the year that would choose to plug or guarantee any spending gap.|j that would choose to plug or guarantee any spending gap. i heard the chancellor of the exchequer being interviewed and asked a similar question this morning and i thought he was remarkably cautious on the subject, making the point about the spending review but also saying not all priorities can be afforded. i think we have to wait and see what happens during the comprehensive spending review. and see what happens during the comprehensive spending reviewm terms of a model that makes the uk able to deliver young people with the sorts of skills in demand tonight is this going any way towards assisting it? yes, because it rightly highlights the need for
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the country to have people skilled at different levels and that is why further education is highlighted is of great importance in the same way university education is highlighted andi university education is highlighted and i think there are positive features because acquiring skills for the future is notjust for 18 and 19—year—olds, it's for people through their lives and the report talks about the concept of lifelong learning allowances which would allow people at different stages of life to acquire the skills they need. so to some extent the report addresses that significant issue for the country. ijust want addresses that significant issue for the country. i just want to addresses that significant issue for the country. ijust want to ask addresses that significant issue for the country. i just want to ask you a couple of other things in terms of affordability because value for money was one of the premises that the review was asked to focus on and one other area we have not talked about so much today is the cost of university accommodation. should that be reviewed ? university accommodation. should that be reviewed? where do you think that be reviewed? where do you think that sits at the moment? 0bviously that be reviewed? where do you think that sits at the moment? obviously a lot of students are in privately owned or privately run accommodation
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and there are other forms of accommodation run by the universities themselves? does there need to be work in this area? it's interesting that the review touched on the subject briefly but decided it wasn't in a position to make recommendations and i think this is genuinely a difficult issue because universities are autonomous institutions and have to make the decisions that they think are right and with student accommodation the prices have to be pitched at a level that students can afford and the suggestion today to reintroduce maintenance grants will help for some students who genuinely do find the cost of being at university challenge. and i think for many stu d e nts challenge. and i think for many students that's more important than the cost of the headline fee, the £9,250 as it is, as opposed to 7500 recommended today. for some students that's much less important than being supported when they are
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actually at university. coming back to the line that seems to have grabbed the lion's share of the headlines about the tension reduction in fees, if the prime minister was to sign that off, but if the treasury was not able to plug the funding gap for universities, do you accept that that might be a reasonable rebalancing and that universities must do more to try and make efficiency savings in other ways of plugging the gap themselves? i absolutely agree that universities should do the business of making efficiencies so everybody benefits from the best education, but the report published today makes the point that british universities are a world—class asset to the nation. and i think it funding was significantly reduced the universities it would be students that would suffer the consequences and also the many other things that universities do, supporting great research, working with industry and
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adding to the cultural fabric of areas where they are located. all of those could be at risk and i think that could be a real danger, simply to achieve a headline reduction in fees if that is not supported by central government top up to mitigate the effects of a fee reduction. sir david bell, thank you very much. the uk's first 5g network — which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds — is being switched on today. ee is starting the service in six major uk cities, with ten more locations due to come on line by the end of the year. our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones reports. the first new masts have been fitted out, the network has been switched on. now, 5g can make mobile network users reach everyone and everything a lot faster — at least, that is the promise. you will be able to enjoy much faster speeds, which means you can download things like box set in seconds rather than minutes.
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it means you will be able to do multiplayer gaming in augmented reality. but first, ee is just switching on the network in six cities across the uk, and even there, coverage will be patchy. for now, speeds will be roughly five times as fast as 4g, but the network will connect millions of things as well as phones to the network. everything from driverless cars to dustbins. the very few people who have one of these phones on launch day may find the revolution gets off to a bit of a slow start, but at least the uk is at or near the front of the pack with this technology. there is, however, one problem. ee is dependent for some of their equipment on one controversial chinese company. huawei, according to the americans, poses a security threat, and they are urging the uk government to ban it from involvement in 5g. this analyst says an outright ban
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would have a serious impact. i think it will be very negative for the uk. it means we will lose a leadership position in europe for 5g, and it will slow everything down. that is disappointing for the networks, and as a consumer i would be disappointed as well. the 5g revolution is getting under way, but even without bumps in the road it will be three years before it stretches right across the country. let's go over to our reporter sarah walton who is live from covent garden which has one of the strongest signals for 5g. and you are broadcasting using 5g, sarah. that's absolutely right. today the bbc has become the voice broadcasting in the uk to go live using a commercial 5g network and that means that there is no delay on the line and i'm hearing you instantaneously and hopefully it is nice and clear at your end as well,
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all very well if you are a broadcaster but if you don't have to go on television, what does it mean? it means if you have a mobile phone you can do things like download an ultra high definition film instantaneously, meaning if you were at home right now using your home internet connection you're properly getting 40 or 50 megabytes per second but this phone is from ee who launch the service today and right now we are getting 240 megabits per second that this has registered as high as 500 and getting some speeds of 800 megabits per second. kate bevanis of 800 megabits per second. kate bevan is with me. thanks for coming along. what could this ultra fast 5g mean? it means you have loads of bandwidth, so it's notjust the speed of getting things done it, it means more devices can be connected to the internet and each other so are not just to the internet and each other so are notjust talking about to the internet and each other so are not just talking about smart devices talking to the servers in the cloud, they will talk to each other. it's a new connected future
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is one of the buzz phrases. so what will we see coming in? mobile phone technology. when you are in a crowded place like this, covent garden, lots of people trying to get on the network and it can be slow and drop out, that won't happen because the bandwidth means you will because the bandwidth means you will be able to connect and it will problem in the end of home broadband packages because you won't need it with 56 packages because you won't need it with 5g coverage, you canjust put your devices on the cellular network and it will mean a lot for gaming which you can do from the cloud and its huge change. people might struggle to get 4g or even a 3g connection in places, so why do we need 5g? we talk a lot about getting 4g and 3g rolled out into the furthest reaches of the country at the same time as getting this. we don't want people excluded. at the moment there are still people struggling to get a decent connection, just to be doing things like shopping and banking and
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dealing with officialdom, so we are looking that —— at that as well as sg looking that —— at that as well as 5g rolling out. ee is hoping to roll out to more towns and cities and vodafone are bringing on their next —— network in the next week. it is now the time for people to get this? i would sit tight for a bit because at the moment we don't know when all the networks will be rolled out and if you live in one of the cities and you have money to spare, absolutely, loads of fun but it's expensive at the moment and it will evolve as time goes on. all going well it's hope there will be coverage across the country in about three years' time. chatting to people to people here, it seems they will wait a bit and see how it goes. seamless in terms of what you were doing, sarah, making a little bit of history. in our own small way, yes. thank you, sarah. later will be taking your
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questions on what 5g means as chris fox will be here, so do get in touch. you can send your questions and all of the usual ways. —— in all of the usual ways. take a look at this extraordinary footage of russian astronauts out on a spacewalk. they're doing maintenance work on the international space station, which is 250 miles above the surface of the earth. the event marked the 85th birthday of alexey leonov. the first ever person to walk in space. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. thank you, and if you are watching in the last half hour i will show you a lovely picture from cornwall showing lots of sunshine and i thought i would show you what is going on elsewhere and this is a more typical scene for many northern and western areas of the uk. quite a
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bit of clout in north wales and we have some rain moving through northern ireland and into scotland. quite heavy this afternoon and a bit drizzly around north—west england on the coast of wales and best of the sunshine is down by the south and the east where you have the highest temperatures, 22 or 23 degrees and even further north, warm and humid but the far east of scotland a little bit chillier at 10 degrees. through the night it stays pretty mild and we have lots of cloud and rain and drizzle around western areas but temperatures no lower than 11 or 13 celsius and then on friday, further rain expected for scotland and northern ireland and that will be heavy through the day. further south and east for england and wales, bit of cloud but brightening in the afternoon and all of us having a pretty warm day. goodbye.
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hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: lower fees but longer repayments — university tuition fees in england should be cut to seven and a half thousand pounds, a review recommends. nobody should feel they have to go to university, and that applies to children from middle—class backgrounds just as much as anyone. but nor should anybody feel that because of who they are or where they are from, the world of higher
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education is one that is not open to them because it would cost too much. at least seven people are killed and 19 are missing after a boat capsizes in the hungarian capital, budapest. the uk's first 5g network — which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds — is being switched on today. sport now, here's hugh ferris. the cricket world cup is under way. england are playing south africa in the opening game at the oval, and patrick gearey‘s been watching the early action for us. and patrick some early drama too. and not of the type we expected. when south africa chose to bowl, we thought they would send their quick men in but what they chucked the
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ball to a 40—year—old leg—spinner, the first time a spinner has ever bowled the first wicket of a men's world cup. jonny bairstow begins his tournament with a golden duck. england have rebuilt steadily. jason roy and joe root, not the explosive start we have sometimes seen, but they are conscious that they need to give england a solid platform and not start a batting collapse. the hosts and favourites, england. all ten teams will play each other once before we get to the semifinals. i've very long tournament. 86—1 for england in the early stages. chelsea are on their way home from azerbaijan after thrashing arsenal to win the europa league in baku last night. 0lly foster is there for us, and the dust has barely settled on that win, but already questions about their star man and their manager.
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good morning to you. a beautiful afternoon here. the chelsea team hotel just a couple afternoon here. the chelsea team hoteljust a couple of hundred yards away, we wave them goodbye in the last couple of hours. the bus pulled up last couple of hours. the bus pulled up and off they went. the europa league trophy in a box. eden hazard starred last night against arsenal and scored twice in their 4—1 victory. he trudged off, left the hotel by himself. i wonder whether he had said goodbye to all his team—mates. strongly linked with real madrid, as he has been for the last season. the language he used last season. the language he used last night was that it was his last game for chelsea, and said it would be the perfect ending. they finished third, and finish with the first major trophy in their manager's career. does he really stand the aggro of knowing whether he is still in thejob from aggro of knowing whether he is still in the job from one season to the next? plum jobs at juventus
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in the job from one season to the next? plum jobs atjuventus and inter milan have been offered. he had inter milan have been offered. he ha d su ccess inter milan have been offered. he had success with napoli, in a very one—sided final last night. the atmosphere was terrible. we told the stories of fans struggling to get here and tickets being sent back. there were hundreds and hundreds of empty seats across the stadium. the official attendance last night, 51,000, over 10,000 down on what u efa 51,000, over 10,000 down on what uefa and the azerbaijan federation said it would be. plenty of embarrassment there, and thank goodness a game broke out in the second half. the first half was pretty drab. the flood opened, and chelsea deserve this. a lovely headerfrom 0livier g roo against his former club.
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arsenal scored a lovely girl, but eden hazard made sure the trophy was chelsea's. that is now packed up and heading back to stamford bridge. you just feel that is the perfect way for eden hazard to sign off for chelsea. we can now look forward to the second all english final in a couple of days in madrid, and you know there will be far more liverpool and spurs supporters than there were chelsea and arsenal here. 0llie, thank you very much indeed. you can follow the cricket on bbc radio five live sports extra, and kyle edmund is in second round action at the french open, and you can action at the french open, and you ca n follow action at the french open, and you can follow that on the bbc sport website and app. he has lost the first set to the uruguayan at roland garros. that's all the sport.
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now ever since theresa may announced her resignation as leader of the conservative party, lots of mps have been keen to throw their hat into the ring by announcing their plans to replace her as prime minister. 11 people are in the running so far, but who will be the successful candidate and what are their chance of improving the brexit deadlock? 0ur assistant polical editor norman smith is at westminster, along with the former conservative leader iain duncan smith. i think it is certain more will throw their hats into the ring. priti patel and penny mordaunt have written articles signalling they might. is it a bit of written articles signalling they might. is ita bit ofa written articles signalling they might. is it a bit of a mess, the more the merrier, or time to rewrite the leadership rules? what do you think, iain duncan smith? we are getting to the point where i hope the 22 will have to think carefully
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that this election is beyond anything we have seen before. we don't have plenty of time, and it needs to be done sharply. there are two elements that the 22 will have to look at. the 1922 committee. one is, how many people does it take to nominate somebody? it is low at the moment, but i think it needs to be ten or12 moment, but i think it needs to be ten or 12 people. each round, instead of having one drop off, they may need to look at whether three drop off in the early rounds to accelerate the process. it may not be popular, but i given —— but given the nature of the fact of what we face, we don't want it to be chaos. given the contest is pretty much under way, isn't it too late for the 1922 to do anything about it? no, they haven't set the rules. they haven't said when the hustings or
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the votes in parliament will be. i would ask them to think about simplifying this contest. numbers of nominations, and how many drop out on each round. with this many people you need to change those. does it matter if you have a number of candidates? not in the sense that they will all, most of them, eventually drop out until you are lost with —— left with five who will battle to be in the top two. we need to get their reasonably quickly. we can't be meandering for weeks with one person dropping out, then another than another. it needs to get to the point quickly where it is obvious some people won't go through and others will get towards the last two. we should be able to make that decision reasonably quickly. debates will be on for the next week or two weeks. we need now to settle how we do it rather rather swiftly. how
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widely is that you shared that you need to change the rules? colleagues are coming round to the idea that the 22 needs to revisit them for this contest, because i have never seen so many this contest, because i have never seen so many people lining up. there may be even more. frankly, two thresholds would do well. why do you think there are so many people entering? a number of people may have the view that they might come through. a lot will have the view that if they show reasonably well, they might obtain themselves a job and get on stop and others are definitely keen, wanting to believe they have a chance to be leader. it isa mix they have a chance to be leader. it is a mix of these things. sometimes, people from behind come through. you don't know. it is not a normal leadership election but one in order to be prime minister, which means that we need to be focused because the person taking it will be the prime minister the day after result and will have to pick up the pieces
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of brexit, which will require someone who really knows where they are going. should be confined to someone who has been or is in the cabinet? i don't think they can find it. it needs a degree of experience. you have to know how this works and how you are going to work things. have you decided who to back?|j haven't. have you decided who to back?” haven't. i said i would listen to everyone. it is becoming a long list, but i will listen to everyone and figure out what they think needs to be done. we want to see a rounded individual that knows where they are going on a range of issues, notjust brexit. iain duncan smith, thanks very much for your time. some concern that the contest is becoming just a bit and will —— unwieldy. the number could go up to 17, on some
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suggestions. wow, that would involve many rounds of voting, i suspect, norman. let's see. the number of race hate crimes against children has risen by a fifth over the past three years, according to research by the nspcc. their study found that babies under the age of one were among the victims who had racist abuse shouted at them. i'm joined now by childline counsellor, atiyah wazir. thank you for coming to talk to us about these incredible statistics, horrific statistics. amongst the other findings from the nspcc and childline is building to youngsters telling councillors they have tried to change the colour of their skin using make up after being subjected to racist insults. this is horrific. what are the other findings? to racist insults. this is horrific. what are the other finding57m to racist insults. this is horrific. what are the other findings? it is shocking, and people will be wondering how this could happen in 2019. they are seeing young people
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experiencing horrendous racial abuse and bullying. young people of all ages contact childline saying things like they have been told to go back to where they came from. they are being mocked because of the colour of their skin, because of their accent, their appearance. leaving them feeling completely helpless. some people struggle with anxiety, feel as if they don't belong, and no young person should ever experience this. tell us more about the impacts on children who are subjected to this kind of horrific abuse when they call childline. childline can be the first time they have ever disclosed such horrific abuse. they might have been scared to tell their pa rents might have been scared to tell their parents or might have been scared to tell their pa rents or carers might have been scared to tell their parents or carers because they don't wa nt parents or carers because they don't want them to feel worried, don't wa nt want them to feel worried, don't want them to feel worried, don't want them to feel stressed. sometimes racial bullying includes mocking their whole family, so they feel as though, if i tell mum and dad, it will make them feel even worse about who they are, so it is
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struggling with a sense of identity, struggling with a sense of identity, struggling to cope day—to—day with normal pressures that young people have to deal with, and on top of that, having to go to school and experience racial abuse and bullying in their communities. before this interview, you told me that people like raheem sterling talking openly about racial abuse is helping to empower young people to feel that they can also have a voice and can report this. that is something that is coming through in calls as well. what he has done is amazing and we need more people like him to speak out, because they are people who young people look up to. when you talk about something like this and say there is no place for racism in our society, young people also feel empowered, feel as though this is something that is not ok and we don't have to tolerate it. we can have the confidence to speak out, contact childline, speak to a
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trusted adult and get support. we deserve support. i would like to see, as a society, people embracing diversity, and for schools with anti—bullying policies in place to make sure that they support young people when they do disclose this. expand on that thought a little more, because childline and the nspcc are very much about supporting children, but in terms of wider society, some people are shouting racist abuse to babies less than one—year—old. what is the broader message that has got to get out into wider society to try to address this and stop this kind of bullying and racist behaviour in the first instance? this racist behaviour is a crime. there are laws that say this is not right, so if someone is witnessing this behaviour, you have the right to report this. you can go to the police, contact the nspcc or any concerned adults. the nspcc
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website has help and information to support you, even if you are unsure. contact and get that support that you need. there is more to that. i would say the police are doing what they can, and they are getting better at recording these hate crime offences, so work with the police and be sure that you do report these incidents. thank you very much. we often hear about how younger people are embracing the latest technology, but could the older generation be the ones to benefit most from driverless cars? scientists think the cars of the future will help pensioners be more independent and less isolated. jon kay has been to bristol where the new vehicles are being put to the test.
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electronic voice: where would you like to go today? we'd like to go to the picnic area, please. that would be nice, wouldn't it? yes. maya and jeff are off for a drive... let's go! journey starting. ..but without a driver. 0n the grounds of a retirement village, they are testing a computer—operated vehicle. this is amazing. it really is. because they don't know how much longer they'll be able to drive, could this help them get out and socialise? this is the future. well, it is the future. oh, gosh. look we're coming up to. sensors on the pods detect hazards. that was a sharp stop! automatic braking then prevents accidents. was it scary? no, it wasn't, it wasn't. it was exhilarating, rather than scaring. did you trust it? yes, i did, completely.
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and i was secure, i had plenty of room, i was comfortable. very impressive. yes. it could be years before these vehicles could be on the roads, but the british team of scientists, psychologists and robotics experts say the pods could work now in enclosed, private spaces, giving residents in homes like st monica's more independence. it's cutting—edge technology, and we're making the future right now, and very privileged to have been a part of that. and also, i'm thinking of the future, maybe i will actually benefit from one of these myself. when you're older? yes, kind of an insurance policy. journey starting. i went for a ride with 88—year—old monica. turning right. you've made a new friend there. thank you! she is one of 100 older people who have been consulted in the design of these pods. unable to drive, she thinks they have real potential. it can help us to be independent for as long as possible.
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turning left. they were a bit late saying that. of course, not all care homes will have the space or the money to have this kind of technology. but the developers say older people should be at the forefront of developing driverless cars. jon kay, bbc news, bristol. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news: lower fees but longer repayments — university tuition fees in england should be cut to seven and a half thousand pounds — a review recommends. at least seven people are killed — and nineteen are missing — after a boat capsizes in the hungarian capital, budapest. the uk's first 5g network — which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds — is being switched on today i'm ben bland —
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in the business news: transport giant firstgroup has said it will sell off its us greyhound coach business and spin off its uk bus arm amid pressure from an activist investor to break up the firm. uk car production collapsed last month, in the biggest fall since the global financial crisis a decade ago. the society of motor manufacturers and traders recorded a production slump of 44.5% in april — compared with the same time last year — as uk carfactories braced for a possible no—deal exit from the european union on march 29th. telecoms firm ee switches on the uk's first super fast 5g network today. it will be available in six major cities — with plans to reach 1500 sites by the end of the year. rival vodafone has confirmed it will launch its own service in seven cities on july third, with another 12 by the end of the year.
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car production fell a massive 44.5% in april — as car production stalled while the industry prepared for a no deal brexit. that's according to the society of motor manufacturers and traders. nearly 57,000 fewer cars were produced as factory shutdowns rescheduled ahead of the march 29 brexit deadline took effect accross the uk marking an 11th straight month of decline. emma butcher is from smmt explained what's going on earlier. brexit is just brexit isjust one brexit is just one challenge that the industry faces at the moment. there are slowing growth in key international markets, across europe, in asia, china specifically, and the us as well in april for uk car production. we are also facing
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the challenge of the technology race, so manufacturers are keen to be investing huge amounts of money into electrification, into new autonomous technologies, so it should be exciting times, but instead we are facing this huge distraction that is brexit. the proportion of workers on low pay is at its lowest since 1980. the resolution foundation think tank says that the introduction of the national living wage has resulted in people on higher wages getting more as well. it argues poverty pay could even be eliminated completely by the middle of the 2020s, if the government agrees to keep increasing the national living wage. let's talk to kathleen henehan, analyst, resolution foundation. white like all very well to say, put up white like all very well to say, put up the national living wage, but how do you pay for it? it is a good question. in the last 20 years, the national minimum wage has grown
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substantially, and one of the things people were worried about was that employers wouldn't keep up with the rising cost of labour, but so far we haven't really seen employment effects. 0urs are up and employment is ata effects. 0urs are up and employment is at a record high. there seem to be signals that we are right to keep moving, but that doesn't mean to move without being cautious. moving, but that doesn't mean to move without being cautiousm might be that it is reaching a sweet spot where small businesses in particular can absorb it, but if you keep pushing it too high too quickly, small businesses may decide to do the opposite and have to cut jobs in order to fund the rises for some of the other stuff, no? that is an excellent point. it is one of the things we delved into an hour report today. in theory there is an optimal point for the minimum wage but we won't know we've reached it until employers have to start cutting employment and hours. the idea is to move the minimum wage at a pace that allows you to row back to the
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optimum level in short order if we see employment effects on the ground. of course, when you look at where the uk sits in international rankings, it is already doing pretty well, isn't it? in europe, france is the only country that pays higher, on average. the uk minimum wage performs very well when compared internationally. 0ur minimum wage as a proportion of median earnings is higher than the 0ecd average. we are ninth in the 0ecd club of rich countries. we are doing well, and if we push even further, we will be sort of up there with new zealand and really at the forefront of minimum wage policy. kathleen, really good to talk to you. and some other stories in the news today. bob iger, the ceo of disney says georgia's controversial new anti—abortion law would make it "difficult" for the company to keep filming there because many of its staff would not want to work there.
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blockbusters like black panther and avengers: endgame were recently shot in the state, due to its generous tax breaks forfilm productions. the big five european leagues generated a record £13.8bn in revenue from 2017 to 18, which is a 6% annual increase, according to new figures from deloitte. it says the european football market is now worth more than £25 billion. the english premier league was the market leader as five teams competed in the champions league for the first time. consumers have been overcharged around £24 billion over the past 15 years by utility companies. that's according to the charity citizens advice. it says the method of calculation used by regulators in the water, energy, and broadband and telephone sectors over—estimates how much companies will need to invest in their network infrastructure. it's calling on companies to give a rebate to all customers and it wants regulators to stop
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it happening again. gains in heavyweight oil company shareshelped london's main index inch higher on thursday even as someaversion to risky assets prevailed after beijing dialled up the rhetoric against washington in their protracted trade war. 0il majors shell and bp boosted the mainshare index as oil prices rose on thursday after an industry report showed a bigger—than—expected decline in us crudeinventories, though global trade uncertainty still looms. among smaller stocks, de la rue plc lost a quarterof its value and plummeted to a more than 14—year low, after the banknote and passports maker warned of "somewhat lower" profitin fiscal 2020 and said its chief executive would step down.
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it goes to show that even if you print money, it doesn't guarantee you will rake it in. that's all the business news. a pet cat that was stuck on a railway bridge for six days, sparking a major rescue operation, has walked home. five—year—old hatty got trapped on the 30 foot section of the royal albert bridge, which connects plymouth and saltash, on friday. firefighters spent hours trying to rescue her while network rail planned to close the line to help save her. hetty‘s owner, kirsty howden, described the moment her pet finally returned home. it was such a shock to hear her meow and answer the door. i was overjoyed. i know when the firemen left her, they blocked off the gap she was in so she could no longer walk out onto the parapet, the ledge of the bridge. i am hoping that kind
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of the bridge. i am hoping that kind of may be forced her up, tojump up through a hole, and she has run back across the tracks. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. varying conditions at the moment across the uk. across southern and eastern areas, you are enjoying sunshine, further north and west it is cloudy. he was a weather watcher photo from north wales. 0utbreaks is cloudy. he was a weather watcher photo from north wales. outbreaks of rain across the coast of wales, north—west of england. heavy rain spreading its way out of northern ireland and into parts of central and southern scotland. further south, sunshine and it will feel warm this afternoon, temperatures up to 23 celsius. further north, still warm and humid for many, except the far north—east of scotland, where it is about 10 celsius. tonight, a lot of cloud and rain, particularly across the northern half of the uk. drizzle on the coast of wales, south—west england. lots of clout. a
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mild night, temperatures not dropping below 11 celsius. 0n friday, heavy rain for northern ireland and scotland, drier and brighterfor ireland and scotland, drier and brighter for england and wales. a warm day for many, with temperatures in the high teens to low 20s. goodbye.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live — these are today's main stories: lower fees but longer repayments — university tuition fees in england should be cut to £7,500 a review recommends. nobody should feel they have to go to university, and that applies to children from middle—class backgrounds just as anyone. but nor should anybody feel that because of who they are or where they are from the world of higher education is one not open to them because it will cost too much. at least seven people are killed and 19 are missing after a boat capsizes in the hungarian capital, budapest. the uk's first 5g network — which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds — has been switched on. today the bbc has become the first
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broadcast in the uk to go live using a commercial 5g network, and what that means as there is no delay on the line and i'm hearing you instantaneously and hopefully it is nice and clear at your end as well. cat—astrophe averted — as a tabby stuck on a railway bridge for six days, leading to a major rescue operation, simply walks home. england make a steady recovery to their cricket world cup campaign after a dramatic start sees jonny bairstow fall to the second ball of the tournament good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm annita mcveigh. the prime minister theresa may has welcomed a review that calls for a cut in university tuition fees and the re—introduction of some maintenance grants. the recommendations were put
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forward in a report commissioned by mrs may, but she acknowledged that the fate of the proposals would depend uopn the next prime minister. universities have warned that the proposals could leave them short of funds. the report proposes a cap on tuition fees at £7,500 per year, maintenance grants would be restored for less well off students and student loan repayments should continue for 40 years rather than the current 30 years. frankie mccamley reports. six students at one college, each with a different plan for theirfuture. some want to go to university. for others, apprenticeships are on the cards. for francesca—lily, money is a big part of her decision. i care for somebody. they can't afford to work because they are disabled. so it makes it harder to then think, "0h, i'll go off to university and have this £40,000-£50,000 debt."
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if they lowered the fees, would that make a difference? i believe you can't put a monetary value on education, so whether it be 7,500, 9,000, i think so long as the quality of the education is significant enough. lauren chose to do an apprenticeship, but would have liked more support, like those at university. i've got a family, a household to run, and i'm on the same basic rate of pay as a 16—year—old doing the same apprenticeship. but i think a grant or a bursary or even a loan would be more attractive to apprenticeships. the outgoing prime minister, theresa may, commissioned a review looking at post—18 education in england. it's recommending a cap of £7,500 on university fees, grants for living costs brought back for the poorest students, and tuition fee loans available for everyone doing advanced qualifications.
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but with change at the top of government, some are concerned this latest review could be ignored, which still leaves uncertainty for future students when deciding what path to take. frankie mccamley, bbc news, in 0ldham. speaking this morning, the prime minister welcomed the review. nobody should feel they have to go to university and that applies to children from middle—class backgrounds just as much as anyone. but nor should anybody feel that because of who they are or where they are from that the world of he is not open to them because it will cost too much. thanks to this government, universities are legally required to improve access and if you are an 18—year—old from a disadvantaged background, you are more likely to go to university
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than ever before. but improvements are slow and the challenge remains large. the number of young people from working—class families who apply to and take up places at universities is still a long way from reflecting the country in which we live. joining us now is the conservative mp and former universities minister , jo johnson. good afternoon. you were previewing the review and calling it bad politics and bad policy. as anything you've heard this morning changed your mind about that?” you've heard this morning changed your mind about that? i welcome the reintroduction of targeted maintenance grants for students from the most disadvantaged background and that was something i wanted to do when i was universities minister but my concern is about the headline offer of the review which is to lower fees to £7,500 from 9250, but the reality is this will benefit
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only those who go on to have the highest earning careers, and i guess they are the only ones who repay their loans in full. the ones hit ha rd est by their loans in full. the ones hit hardest by the proposal are those on lower and middle income salaries who will be repaying, not for 30 years, but 40 years or more, and in that sense the proposals are regressive but my concern is that by bringing universities into the public realm where they are dependent on the treasury to make up lost income, they will gradually restrict the number of places they offer, particularly to students from disadvantaged backgrounds who may not have the highest a—levels when they are entering the university application process, so to that extent my real concern is that i think this will slow down the progress we have been making towards widening access to higher education for people from disadvantaged backgrounds. lets pick up on a
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couple of those points. first of all, don't you think that by lowering the fees there is a psychologically, if not in any other way, a boost to people who might be put off by those fees, that that barrier to going to university means not everyone going to university will earn necessarily huge amounts of money, but the whole point is to get people into university in the first place and opening up those opportunities to them. the student funding system we have at the moment a lexus widen access at an unprecedented rate but what deters some students from disadvantaged background is the maintenance cost of supporting themselves when they are at university which is why a welcome part of the proposals which is about targeting students from the most disadvantaged background and i think that is welcome and i'm glad the review proposes that and it's something that a future government would want to consider. in terms of
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anyfunding would want to consider. in terms of any funding shortfall, isn't that up to universities now? if the next prime minister agrees to these recommendations, isn't it up to the universities to review where they can make efficiency savings or gain income from other sources to plug any gaps? we want universities to be officially run and to deliver value for money. that is the most important task facing universities at the moment. students are paying a significant cost towards their own higher education and they want value for money and universities have to embrace that accountability and demonstrate they are providing real value teaching, proper teaching intensity and so on giving feedback to stu d e nts intensity and so on giving feedback to students when they are struggling, supporting them in that crucial transition in their first year through to the second year, the key moment that most students drop out and feel that students are getting a return on their investment and that benefits taxpayers too. you clearly have serious concerns as well as feeling there are positives.
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let's look finally at the area of skills provision which was one of the key areas looked at. do you think the recommendations in this, particularly the focus on further education, notjust university education, notjust university education is going to equip future generations with the kinds of things and skills that this country needs? that's right, the technical and further education system has been the cinderella of our education offer stop and it is right that it is getting serious attention but there isn't an answer that says you ta ke there isn't an answer that says you take money from universities and you give it to colleges. we need to fund all skills provision in this country at the level the economy needs. there no point in robbing peter to pay paul. 0f there no point in robbing peter to pay paul. of course we should level up pay paul. of course we should level up the funding but we should not do slashing byrne for universities at the same time in order to pay for it. thank you for your time today.
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at least seven people have died, after a cruise boat carrying tourists capsized in the hungarian capital, budapest. the south korean government says 33 of its citizens were on—board the boat on the river danube, and 19 are still unaccounted for. the rescue effort continued with little hope of survivors. according to eyewitnesses, the mermaid, 26 metre pleasure boat capsized and sank within seconds after she was struck by a large river cruiser. video has emerged allegedly showing the incident. as the small tourist boat passed under the bridge, a large swiss registered cruise ship begins to overtake it. the tourist boat then swerves directly into its path. police and rescue vehicles rushed to the scene. there were 33 south korean tourists on the pleasure boat at the time and to
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hungarian crew. this is a busy stretch of water often crowded with small and large craft. weeks of heavy rain and snow melt in the alps mean the river is swollen and flowing faster than usual and rescue effo rts flowing faster than usual and rescue efforts worse hampered by a continuous downpour. national directorate for disaster management is assisting the search and rescue operation. with 96 teams and also volunteer diver organisations with several of their members here to give a hand as well as the military. ican give a hand as well as the military. i can confirm there is a criminal investigation in progress with the involvement of many experts to discover what exactly happened last night. as the investigation starts in earnest there are many questions to answer. first and foremost about the experience and level of training of the cruise. the wreck of the tourist ship must now be raised from the bed of the river. it is expected to contain the bodies of many of the
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missing. nick thorpe, bbc news, budapest. the uk's first 5g network — which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds — is being switched on today. ee is starting the service in six major uk cities, with ten more locations due to come on line by the end of the year. our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones reports. the first new masts have been fitted out, the network has been switched on. now, 5g can make mobile network users reach everyone and everything a lot faster — at least, that is the promise. you will be able to enjoy much faster speeds, which means you can download things like box set in seconds rather than minutes. augmented reality. but first, ee is just switching on the network in six cities across the uk, and even there, coverage will be patchy. for now, speeds will be roughly five
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times as fast as 4g, but the new network will connect millions of things as well as phones to the network. everything from driverless cars to dustbins. the very few people who have one of these phones on launch day may find the revolution gets off to a bit of a slow start, but at least the uk is at or near the front of the pack with this technology. there is, however, one problem. ee is dependent for some of their equipment on one controversial chinese company. huawei, according to the americans, poses a security threat, and they are urging the uk government to ban it from involvement in 5g. this analyst says an outright ban would have a serious impact. i think it will be very negative for the uk. it means we will lose a leadership position in europe for 5g, and it will slow everything down. that is disappointing for the networks, and as a consumer i would be disappointed as well.
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the 5g revolution is getting under way, but even without bumps in the road it will be three years before it stretches right across the country. the headlines on bbc news. lower fees but longer repayments — university tuition fees in england should be cut to £7,500, a review recommends. at least seven people are killed — and nineteen are missing — after a boat capsizes in the hungarian capital, budapest. the uk's first 5g network — which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds — has been switched on. sport now, here's hugh. from losing a wicket in the second ball of the men's cricket world cup
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as the hosts attempt to start the tournament with a win in the opening match. that recovery came in the form of half centuries each forjason roy andjoe root. but they've both fallen in the last few minutes, so another rebuilding job is being attempted by captain eoin morgan and ben stokes. jonny bairstow was out in the first over bowled by leg spinner imran tahir. chelsea are on their way home from azerbaijan after thrashing arsenal to win the europa league in baku last night. the dust has barely settled on that win, but already questions about their star man and their manager, as 0lly foster reports. there is a big debate on social media as to where eden hazard stands in the list of great chelsea players and the consensus seems to be that he is right up there. after seven yea rs, two he is right up there. after seven years, two league titles, an fa cup, now it seems he has signed off with a starring performance in baku in the europa league final. two goals for him and he ran arsenal ragged in
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the 4-1 for him and he ran arsenal ragged in the 4—1 victory for him and he ran arsenal ragged in the 4—1victory and the language he used afterward suggested this would be his final game for the blues. it seems he is off to real madrid, a move he has been hankering afterfor at least 12 months. as for the manager, his first season in charge, he got them to third which is a champions league position for next season and has won his first major trophy, the europa league, but there area trophy, the europa league, but there are a couple of plum positions back in italy. juventus, inter milan, that position is available to him as well and job security at stamford bridge has not been great for a number of years for a number of managers and he might think, why don't i sign off on a high and go back home to italy? kyle edmund is out of the french open after being forced to retire when two sets down in his second round match.
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the british number one was trailing uruguay‘s pablo cuevas at roland garros and at 2—1 down in the third he called the trainer... before eventually deciding he couldn't carry on. we're not sure what the injury is at the moment. it means johanna konta is the only british player left in the competition. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the proportion of low—paid workers in britain — those on less than £8.52 per hour — has fallen to its lowest level since 1980, according to a new report. the resolution foundation — a think tank focusing on people on the lowest incomes — found that the number of low—paid workers dropped by 200,000 last year and suggested it could be eliminated all together by 2020. the uk has a long—standing low pay problem, but which is being eroded thanks to the higher minimum wage that was introduced in 2016. at the moment there is a political consensus it seems in favour
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of pushing the rate higher, it is good news because it would further reduce the number of people on low pay. but going into uncharted territory we need to be careful about how we make that change. uk car production fell by almost half last month, the biggest drop since the global financial crisis a decade ago. according to the society of motor manufacturers and traders, production slumped 44.5% in april — compared with the same time last year — as uk carfactories braced for a possible ‘no—deal‘ exit from the european union on march 29th. eating highly processed food such as crisps, sugary cereals and ready meals, puts you at higher risk of heart problems and an early death, according to new studies in the british medicaljournal. researchers say people should eat fresh produce to reduce the risk, but as a our health correspondent, james gallagher reports, some scientists warn the findings are too simplistic. this is ultra—processed food. they are the foods that have been through the most industrial processing and often have a long list of ingredients on the packet.
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it includes popular items like fizzy drinks, chicken nuggets and breakfast cereals. the two studies regularly assess the diets of more than 100,000 people and recorded what happened to their health. they showed people who ate the most ultra—processed foods tended to have the worst heart health and die earlier. it is not definitive proof of harm and experts have expressed caution. more work is still needed to explain what it is about ultra processing that might have a detrimental effect on our bodies. what we actually need to know is what's behind these associations. is it the ultra—processed foods, and the nutritional content of them, some kind of additive that is in them or something to do with the people's lives of the people who are eating more of them? and i think before we make any changes orjump to any conclusions, we really need to find out a bit more about it. the authors of the two studies say there is
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now mounting evidence that ultra—processed foods may be harmful and the research comes out hot on the heels of trials showing these types of foods make a seat more and put on weight but while the term ultra—processed might be all new, the health advice is very familiar. a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, dish, nuts and seeds also happens to be one full of unprocessed foods. the boss of boeing has apologised to the families of 346 people killed in two separate crashes, involving the 737—max aircraft. the lion air and ethiopian airways flights crashed within five months of each other, leading to the entire fleet to be grounded. speaking to cbs news, dennis muilenburg said he was sorry for the impact on families, and insisted the company is "committed to safety for the long run". samira hussein reports from new york. the 737 max is boeing's most lucrative plane. it was meant to be the latest answer to the competition from europe's airbus.
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but two deadly crashes in just five months forced global aviation regulators to ground the 737 max. it's anti—stall system, or mcas, was identified as a common factor in both accidents. boeing says it is close to fixing the software, and there have been reports that boeing rushed the plane to market to fast and that it knew of problems with the mcas system before the first plane crash. in an interview with cbs, boeing's ceo said the company remains committed to safety. we can't change what happened in these accidents but we can be absolutely resolute in what we are going to do in safety going forward. this we apologise to the families affected, and more broadly to the travelling public. confidence has been affected.
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people who are scared. we have impacted our customers, we regret that as well. so we are stepping up, we are taking responsibility, we know we have improvements we can make and we will make those improvements. we are committed to safety for the long run. the primary focus for boeing is getting the 737 max fleet approved for takeoff. the real test will be if the flying public ever feels safe on those planes again. israel is to hold fresh elections, after the prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, failed to form a new coalition government. mr netanyahu's attempts to form an administration were hampered by differences between secular and religious parties. he says that he is confident of winning the snap poll taking place in september despite criticism from opposition parties. it is the first time in israel's history that a prime minister—designate has failed to form a government. let's go over to our
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middle east correspondent, tom bateman. tell us more about the reasons behind this failure to form a coalition. mr netanyahu was celebrating victory in the election six weeks ago and on paper it should have been pretty easy for him to form another right—wing coalition government and he needed a majority of mps, which would be more than 60 and on paper he had 65 of the traditional right—wing bloc, but the sticking point came in the old issue, a fracture in israeli society and politics between and ultra religious dues and more secular jewish parties in parliament. and this was the degree to which ultra orthodox men should be drafted into the army. they have traditionally had an exemption, unlike their
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secular counterparts. this became a sticking point in one of the parties an old adversary of mr netanyahu, avigdor lieberman, who wanted more drafted into the military and dug his heels in and they could not find agreement, so the coalition could not be formed. mr netanyahu blamed avigdor lieberman for this and this affected his own ambitions for power and that is what has precipitated this second election. so why should another election in september change any of these factors that have failed to lead to a coalition this time round, and if it were to happen again, what does it mean for benjamin netanyahu again, what does it mean for benjamin neta nyahu personally? again, what does it mean for benjamin netanyahu personally? it probably won't change anything. the opinion polling suggests israelis will vote the same way they did six weeks ago. not much has changed in that time. there will be similar dynamics but both sides will hope
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there might be be a change in mps that gets him over the line and it will help him form another coalition but i think there is a deeper issue, that mr neta nyahu but i think there is a deeper issue, that mr netanyahu is facing these corruption charges later this year which leaves him politically weakened and his allies want him to have immunity while he is in office and that really has limited the people he can bring into the coalition if it is attached to him so for the first time in his decade in office he is more politically vulnerable and he has been for a long time and some of those old rivals like avigdor lieberman may be sensing that and calculating that this is the moment for them to jockey for position. thank you very much. tony blair's former spokesman, alastair campbell, has welcomed reports that the labour party may review the decision to expel him from the party because he voted liberal democrat
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in the european elections. it comes after the shadow attorney general, shami chakrabati, told today programme this morning that the move would be reviewed. mr campbell tweeted to say he was "pleased", if it's true, that his ‘expulsion' from labour is being ‘reviewed', although he said he had not heard anything officially yet from the governance unit. the men's cricket world cup is under way at the oval in london. england are taking on south africa right now in the first match. prince harry was there to open the tournament, and delivered a short speech and met young cricketers before watching england take on south africa. a pet cat that was stuck on a railway bridge for six days, sparking a major rescue operation, has walked home. five—year—old hatty got trapped on the 30 foot section of the royal albert bridge, which connects plymouth and saltash, on friday. firefighters spent hours trying to rescue her while network rail planned to close the line, to help save her. hetty‘s owner, kirsty howden, described the moment her pet finally returned home.
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it was such a shock to hear her and an answer the door and in she popped. so yes, overjoyed. i know when the firemen left her they blocked off the gaps she was in so she could no longer walk out onto the parapet ledge of the bridge so i'm hoping that kind of forced her up i'm hoping that kind of forced her up tojump up through a hole and she has run back through the tracks.” don't know if that counts as one of her nine lives, but she is home. chris is here with the latest weather forecast and things are warming up! weather forecast and things are warming up i hear. indeed they are, for a number of us, but not all of us and we have a real mixture of weather with some of us having cloudy weather and some of us wet weather. the wettest conditions across the north and west with the rain persistent for northern ireland with showers moving across northern england but with the cloud breaking nicely it feels warm and humid with
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temperatures up to 23 celsius this afternoon. we have more of the rain to come tonight and it will come in pulses, easing for a time then another wave working in. further south, dry and mild for most of us with temperatures 13 or 14 degrees but colder for northern scotland with the kohler air lurking. it looks like another soggy day for the north west with persistent rain for northern ireland and particularly western scotland where we could see localised impacts of flooding. england and wales star cloudy but it should brighten up with spells of sunshine and it's should brighten up with spells of sunshine and its warm in the sunshine and its warm in the sunshine with highs of 23 and it could reach 27 for some on saturday. that is your weather.
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hello this is bbc newsroom live.
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the headlines: lower fees but longer repayments — university tuition fees in england should be cut to seven and a half thousand pounds, a review recommends. nobody should feel they have to go to university, and that applies to children from middle—class backgrounds just as much as anyone. but nor should anybody feel that because of who they are or where they are from, the world of higher education is one that is not open to them because it would cost too much. at least seven people are killed — and nineteen are missing — after a boat capsizes in the hungarian capital, budapest. the uk's first 5g network — which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds — has been switched on. more reaction to our top story, the review of education funding which calls for a cut in tuition fees and
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the reintroduction of maintenance grants. i asked sir david bell, vice chancellor of sunderland university — and universities uk vice president, his response to the review. there are some positive recommendations, for example, the reintroduction of maintenance grants, which i think will go a long way to alleviating some concerns stu d e nts way to alleviating some concerns students have expressed. i also think the report rightly highlights the importance of both further education and higher education to the success of our country, so all of that i think will be welcomed. the success of our country, so all of that i think will be welcomedm is interesting seeing reaction from joejohnson, the is interesting seeing reaction from joe johnson, the former universities minister, this morning, who says that these plans will destabilise university finances, imperil many courses and leave a funding hole. are you concerned about that? the report does say that if tuition fees are to be dropped, the shortfall in income for universities must be made up income for universities must be made up by income for universities must be made up by central government, and i
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thinkjoejohnson up by central government, and i thinkjoe johnson is absolutely right to warn of the dangers of a funding shortfall if that doesn't happen, so a headline cut in the fees might appear to be good news for students, but if the income to the universities falls substantially, that is a bad news story, quite clearly, for students. not only are there are no guarantees that the next prime minister will ta ke that the next prime minister will take on board these recommendations, there are no guarantees that come there are no guarantees that come the spending review later in the year, central government would choose to plug or guarantee that it would plug any spending gap. i heard the chancellor being interviewed and asked a similar question this morning, and i thought he was remarkably cautious on the subject. not all priorities can be afforded, he said. i think we have to wait and see now what happens during the comprehensive spending review. earlier i spoke to amatey doku, nus vice president for higher education. i started by asking him
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whether the nus is welcoming the proposed reduction in tuition fees. at the nus, we have a policy for fully funded education, so we are not sort of celebrating that much this morning, but we think there have been some steps in the right direction. i think there clearly have been concerns about the overall figure and the amount of debt that stu d e nts figure and the amount of debt that students end up in. i think the support and maintenance has been a welcome and important announcement this morning. lower tuition fees potentially, maintenance grants reinstated for some — will that make a significant change to the barriers to access to higher education you have been concerned about for some time? more needs to be done. from the beginning, we have been saying that maintenance grants need to be reinstated, and i am pleased that they have been, but a lot more needs donein they have been, but a lot more needs done in terms of supporting students, not just done in terms of supporting students, notjust in terms of getting them in but also getting them on. one of our concerns is that
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if the cut in fees isn't topped up sufficiently with government funding, that will then be a cut on the student experience, so the government not only needs to top this up, we have been seeing a proposalfor a this up, we have been seeing a proposal for a freeze in expenditure from the government, and we think the government needs to go above and beyond the recommendations today, otherwise it will be a cut in the student experience. when martin lewis... martin lewis said this could be seen as regressive. do you agree? the devil is in the detail. there is a plan for a cap to limit the amount you end up paying back, andi the amount you end up paying back, and i think we need more analysis and i think we need more analysis and look at what impact that does have. the number of race hate crimes against children has risen by a fifth over the past three years, according to research by the nspcc. their study found that babies under the age of one were among the victims who had racist abuse
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shouted at them. earlier, i spoke to a childline counsellor. young people of all ages contact childline saying things like they have been told to go back to where they came from. they are being mocked because of the colour of their skin, because of their accent, their appearance. leaving them feeling completely helpless. some people struggle with anxiety, feel as if they don't belong, and no young person should ever experience this. tell us more about the impacts on children who are subjected to this kind of horrific abuse when they call childline. childline can be the first time they have ever disclosed such horrific abuse. they might have been scared to tell their parents or carers because they don't want them to feel worried, don't want them to feel stressed. sometimes racial bullying includes mocking their whole family, so they
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feel as though, if i tell mum and dad, it will make them feel even worse about who they are, so it is struggling with a sense of identity, struggling to cope day—to—day with normal pressures that young people have to deal with, and on top of that, having to go to school and experience racial abuse and bullying in their communities. before this interview, you told me that people like raheem sterling talking openly about racial abuse is helping to empower young people to feel that they can also have a voice and can report this. that is something that is coming through in calls as well. what he has done is amazing and we need more people like him to speak out, because they are people who young people look up to. when you talk about something like this and say there is no place for racism in our society, young people also feel empowered, feel as though this is something that is not ok and we don't have to tolerate it.
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we can have the confidence to speak out, contact childline, speak to a trusted adult and get support. we deserve support. i would like to see, as a society, people embracing diversity, and for schools with anti—bullying policies in place to make sure that they support young people when they do disclose this. expand on that thought a little more, because childline and the nspcc are very much about supporting children, but in terms of wider society, some people are shouting racist abuse to babies less than one—year—old. what is the broader message that has got to get out into wider society to try to address this and stop this kind of bullying and racist behaviour in the first instance? this racist behaviour is a crime. there are laws that say this is not right, so if someone is witnessing this behaviour, you have the right to report this.
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you can go to the police, contact the nspcc or any concerned adults. the nspcc website has help and information to support you, even if you are unsure. contact and get that support that you need. there is more to that. i would say the police are doing what they can, and they are getting better at recording these hate crime offences, so work with the police and be sure that you do report these incidents. if you've got any concerns about what we've just been talking about, help and support is available on the bbc action line website — go to bbc.co.uk/actionline. more now on the uk's first 5g network — which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds — has being switched on today. ee is starting the service in six major uk cities, with ten more locations due to come on line by the end of the year.
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today the bbc had the uk's first live broadcast over a 5g connection — chris fox is in covent garden for us, over 5g. fingers crossed, if this works well, you will notice a short delay between you asking questions and be answering. there is a higher data rate so we can pump more data. it means you should see me in full hd if you are watching in hd, crystal clear pictures and no break—up. broadcasters used devices like this to strap together eight 4g connections to do this kind of thing, and now we can do it with 15 g sim card. we did a speed testjust now, and we are getting 270 megabits per second. that is faster than
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enough for —— than on a 4g connection. tell us a bit more about what it might mean for phone use. for phone users, i have the movie streaming service open here. if i try to download some episodes of the bbc‘s bodyguard, i will start to download, and the download speed is one of the main benefits. in short latency. the short delay between you asking a question be answering is also useful for asking a question be answering is also usefulfor gaming. asking a question be answering is also useful for gaming. by the way, that whole hour—long episode is now downloaded, injust a that whole hour—long episode is now downloaded, in just a few seconds. you can also fit many more connections onto a 5g set up, so if you have ever been to a stadium or a concert unnoticed, i can't get on the internet because there are too many people, in theory, 5g will
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solve that, so big benefits for the future. that was impressively fast, chris. let's ask finally about the health concerns that some people might have around 5g. explain to us what those concerns are and what the response from ee is. 5g works differently and you need many more masts. people are concerned when those go up, especially near homes or schools, but in theory, 5g could have a mast on every lamp post. it is not the similar technology to existing 4g. in that respect, it shouldn't be more damaging to our health. ee says it uses guidance from the who to make sure it is well within acceptable levels of radiation, and it is non—ionising radiation, and it is non—ionising radiation, so it does not break down your dna. in theory, it should be safe, low energy radiation at the opposite end of the spectrum from
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something like x—rays. opposite end of the spectrum from something like x-rays. chris, good to see you broadcasting smoothly from to see you broadcasting smoothly fro m cove nt to see you broadcasting smoothly from covent garden for us today, using 5g. and later on this afternoon — right here on the bbc news channel — we'll be taking your questions on what 5g coud mean for you. our technology reporter chris foxx will be here at three thirty, so if you have a question, please do get in touch. you can send it in via text on 61124, tweet using the hashtag bbc ask this, or email ask this at bbc.co.uk. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has said there is a real danger of a no—deal brexit. he was speaking just a few minutes ago. the most significant line is that he
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said that labour does not back a rerun of the 2016 referendum. he does say that if an agreement of some sort get through parliament, thenit some sort get through parliament, then it should go to a public vote, soi then it should go to a public vote, so i think we can listen to a short clip ofjeremy corbyn speaking in dublin. i think there is a real danger of that with the prime minister's announcement of her departure from office and the announcement of most office and the announcement of most of the candidates for the tory leadership. we will do absolutely everything we can in parliament to prevent a no deal exit from the eu, because it is a very dangerous prospect, because it will lead to a loss of jobs, prospect, because it will lead to a loss ofjobs, a loss of investment and a loss of trade, and lead us into some kind of different form of economy that would resemble some kind of low tax tax haven, some kind of even greater inequality than the tory government and their austerity
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has bequeathed us at the moment. britain is already the most unequal country in europe at the moment and this would make it worse.“ country in europe at the moment and this would make it worse. if we had the general election you are soaking for, what would prime minister corbyn do to try to get the agreement through parliament?” would go back to the eu and explain the situation that is there in britain, explain that we had fought an election campaign to make sure there was a good relationship with europe in the future, that we weren't afraid of public opinion on this but we would put it to them, and ask them to seriously consider what we are suggesting, which is a customs union and a trade relationship with europe, and a dynamic relationship on rights so that britain would not be undermining europe on workers' rights, consumer rights and environmental protection, and we good —— we would work with the important ages. we are not heading this country off in the direction of
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donald trump's america. would your approach involve tinkering with their withdrawal agreement?m approach involve tinkering with their withdrawal agreement? it would mean there would have to be a different relationship with europe, and whether that would mean changing their withdrawal agreement, whatever we can negotiate out of it. the eu would recognise that with a labour government in office, determined to tackle the inequalities and injustices in our society, and make sure we had that good relationship with europe in the future, not having the noises off the whole time from the tory right, saying, actually they just want to get off the ship altogether, i think it would be a very different relationship. another couple of lines from that: crashing out would put the good friday agreement into question, and he said there had to bea question, and he said there had to be a process to prevent a no deal exit, but labour‘s first priority was an election. the headlines
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on bbc news: lower fees but longer repayments — university tuition fees in england should be cut to seven and a half thousand pounds, a review recommends. at least seven people are killed — and nineteen are missing — after a boat capsizes in the hungarian capital, budapest. the uk's first 5g network — which should allow mobile users to download entire films in seconds — has been switched on. with more than 90 million monthly users worldwide — the online game platform roblox is one of the most popular on the market for children. butjust how safe is it? one parent has told us her child has been groomed despite parental settings on the game being switched on. rachel stonehouse has this report. fun, outgoing, just loved life. sarah says her son was a happy child, until, after a difficult period at school a couple of years ago he then started to play the online game roblox.
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sarah's not her real name and we've disguised her and her son's identity for legal reasons because of what happened to him. it seemed like an innocent game. we went on and made sure that all the privacy settings were on there, the parental blocks, to make sure that there were no messaging. but sarah and her husband began to notice a difference in their son's behaviour. we decided that we would just do a usual check and then we came across pictures that were inappropriate and, at first, we were shocked and didn't realise it was our son, until we noticed in the background that it was our house. it was horrifying and i was physically sick. can you give an idea of how graphic some of the messages were? they were talking about rape. they were talking about sexual activities. it was pornographic. roblox told us they are committed to protecting the online safety
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of children and the in—game chat has very stringent filters and any photo exchange will have been done on a third—party app. sarah's story is an extreme case, but it's made me wonder about other children who play roblox. it's estimated there are 24 million monthly players in europe alone. how many of you like roblox? ex police officersjohn staines and john woodley go into schools across the country warning children about the worst—case scenarios. john says people can get around the parental settings. unfortunately people they don't know are looking for children whose parents have turned off the chat because they can get them onto a third—party app and get them to send pictures and hold verbal conversations with them. was that the one we went on before? a quick google search brings up a whole host of sinister sort
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of paedophile—type stuff. there is no sugar—coating it. that's what it is. it's life destroying and i will never ever be able to take those pictures or words out of my mind. apologies for the loss of some of the sound in that report. and roblox point out that the third party app that sarah's son was contacted on via the game isn't ‘affiliated or integrated with roblox.‘ they say "it's extremely important to be aware of these chat apps, particularly those with an "overlay" feature making it appear to be part of whatever game is being played."
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some news coming in from the courts that a man whose three—year—old son alfie was crushed to death by a car seat has been jailed for two years and nine months after being convicted of child cruelty. the old bailey sentencing alfie land's mother to two years and nine months in jail after mother to two years and nine months injail after her son mother to two years and nine months in jail after her son alfie was crushed to death by a car seat. more breaking news just coming crushed to death by a car seat. more breaking newsjust coming into crushed to death by a car seat. more breaking news just coming into us crushed to death by a car seat. more breaking newsjust coming into us — we are hearing that the yorkshire airambulance has we are hearing that the yorkshire air ambulance has confirmed that they have attended an incident at they have attended an incident at the lightwater valley theme park this morning. they have flown a child to leeds general hospital, and a crew were told —— we are told
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remain on scene at the theme park. this is the lightwater valley theme park in the north—east of england. the yorkshire air ambulance crew confirming that they attended an incident at the theme park this morning. no details on the nature of that incident, but a child has been flown to leeds general hospital and a crew remained on scene at the theme park. if we get more information, we will of course bring it to you. a " national scandal" — that's how 0fsted has described support for children with special educational needs. today, thousands of parents across england and wales will march to demand that the government take action. campaigners say the latest budget has left vulnerable children in limbo, and in an unprecedented move are taking the education secretary and the chancellor to the high court. jayne mccubbin has been speaking to one of the families involved. this is when she was hours old. born at 24 weeks, dakota was so small she fit in mary's hand,
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so small she weighed less than a bag of sugar. they really fought to keep her alive. yes, and she fought to stay alive, and now i'm fighting for her. mary is one of thousands who will march in protest today. dakota is now ten, and needs help with every aspect of her life, from washing to dressing and eating. this is john, our cameraman. hello. but her mum tells me, the fight for even basic special needs support has been a constant struggle. day in, day out. a fight. every day. we've had to fight for the right support, fight for the right education, physio, 0t, speech and language, and fight for the right home—to—school transport. what do you think of this system? it's unacceptable. in a month, she and two other parents will take their fight even further, to the highest court in the land. you're taking the chancellor of the exchequer and the secretary
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of state for education to the high court. yep. three years ago, i wouldn't have said boo to a goose. but in the challenges that we've faced, i'm dakota's advocate. if i don't speak speak for her, no—one else is going to. and things have to change. the government says it is spending record sums to support children like dakota, with special needs, with £350 million in extra funding, but councils in england warn they face a £50 billion black hole in the next few years, and the most vulnerable are already paying the price. send provision is failing. even 0fsted describes send support as a national scandal. this is why dakota's mum and others will march. i'm marching because my school doesn't have enough money. i'm marching because currently
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the education system is broken. i'm marching for all children with special educational needs, to ensure that we meet our responsibilities. the protests around the country are unprecedented, as is next month's legal action. it's very rare to bring a case against central government in relation to funding decisions. but our clients thought that, because of the severity of the crisis, as they see it, they have no option but to bring this case, given the impact that they're seeing on their children and children across the country with send. so you don't blame the schools, and you don't blame the local authority. no, not at all. they can't do anything if there's no money to fix it. "fight" is a word many parents with special needs children say they're all too familiar with. that fight spills onto the street today, and into the high court at the end ofjune.
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in response to that... the department for education says it has increased ‘high needs' funding to £6.3billion this year, compared to £5billion in 2013, and is consulting on how to make the funding system more effective. inafew in a few moments, it will be time for the one o'clock news. first... take a look at this extraordinary footage of russian astronauts out on a spacewalk. they're doing maintenance work on the international space station, which is 250 miles above the surface of the earth. the event marked the 85th birthday of alexey leonov — the first person ever to spacewalk. extraordinary images. just a reminder of the breaking news in the last few moments that the yorkshire airambulance has last few moments that the yorkshire air ambulance has confirmed it is at the scene of an incident at the
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lightwater the scene of an incident at the lig htwater valley the scene of an incident at the lightwater valley theme park in north yorkshire. yorkshire air ambulance says a child has been transported to leeds general infirmary following that incident, and that a crew from the air ambulance remains at the theme park. there are no more details on the nature of the incident at the moment, but yorkshire air ambulance confirming that a child has been taken to leeds general infirmary following that incident at the lightwater following that incident at the lig htwater valley following that incident at the lightwater valley theme park in north yorkshire. just ahead of the one o'clock news, let's take a look at the weather forecast. a mixture of weather this afternoon. cloudy skies and rain across the north west, some fog patches, and also glorious sunshine. that was the case earlier in derbyshire. we can see where we have the best of the sunshine. the thickest cloud across the north west is rain bearing, and
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we have fog patches in the south—west of england and running through the english channel. in coastal areas, you could see fog at times this afternoon, but otherwise, a lot of sunshine across much of england. cloudy for wales, showers in northern england, and more persistent rain across parts of northern ireland and much of scotland, where it will stay quite cool scotland, where it will stay quite cool. in the best of the sunshine, warm and humid, highs of 23 celsius. 0vernight, the first rain pulls away from scotland, but there will be further pulses of rain coming and going. the driest weather will be across much of england and wales. partly cloudy and a mild night for most of us, but that cold air loitering across the far north of scotland. on friday, another weather front targeting the north west, so another wet day for northern ireland and particularly for western scotland, with rain really mounting up scotland, with rain really mounting up year. we could see 40—50
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millimetres of rain, enough to put big puddles on the road, so some localised flooding. cloud will tend to thin and break to allow sunny spells to come through in england and wales. temperatures will probably reach 23 celsius. even without the sunshine, the high teens across the north. 0n without the sunshine, the high teens across the north. on saturday, where fronts affecting western areas but they are weakening as pressure builds. patchy rain is possible, but there will be drier weather as well, brighter too. warmer across northern areas. temperatures building across eastern england. temperatures across the south could reach 27 celsius. 0n sunday, low pressure moves in, this cloud and rain pushing east is a cold front, bringing fresher air will stop we could see temperatures into the mid 20s before that arrives, fresher further west. that your latest weather.
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it follows a major review which includes restoring grants for poorer students, that the government admits it shouldn't have cut. my view is very clear — removing maintenance grants from the least well—off students and i believe it is time to bring them back. but the suggestion loans should only be written off after 40 years could leave students with debts into their 60s. also this lunchtime: at least seven people have died and 21 are missing after a tour boat collision on the river danube in hungary. how ultra—processed foods, such as chicken nuggets, ice cream and breakfast cereals,

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