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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  May 30, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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the government is told to cut university tuition fees in england as part of a package of reforms to the funding of higher education. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm ben brown. my today at 2pm. the government is told to cut my view is very clear. removing university tuition fees in england, maintenance grants for the least as part of a package of reforms well—off students has not worked and i believe it is time to bring them to the funding of higher education. back. at least seven people have died and 21 are missing after a tour boat collision my my view is very clear. removing on the river danube in hungary. a boy has been airlifted maintenance grants for the least to hospital after an incident well—off students hasn't worked, and at a theme park in north yorkshire. i believe it's time to bring them back. to bring them back. at least seven people have died and 21 are missing, after a tour boat collision sport now on afternoon on the river danube, in hungary. a boy has been airlifted to hospital after an incident at a theme park in north yorkshire. live with hugh ferris. the uk's first next—generation sg mobile network is switched on, the cricket world cup, and a pretty but is only available, terrible start for england. yes, in certain areas. coming up on afternoon they will probably be happy. they
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live all the sport. played south africa at the oval and including the cricket, not a bad they scored 311—8. given the start for england. it could have been better. england are battling to expectations and recent form, bearing in mind if they are the try and post a competitive total in host, that pretournament favourites and the world number one ranked the first match of the men's cricket world cup. they are side, that might be considered a little disappointing. but you have facing south africa. they have four to bear in mind that south africa's more in the last half an hour or so strength is their bowling attack. and our 280 547. and we have an although it did strike through an unusual source. jonny bairstow update on the weather with darren. getting a golden duck, caught behind good afternoon. two different air off this man. a leg—spinner bowling masses affecting the uk at the the first over of the tournament. moment, which is why we are seeing such a wide range of temperatures. i the recovery immediately began. 50s have a look at air masses and what from jason roy and joe root as well, but they were both out having just they affect the uk. and we will look at the weather for the weekend. thank you. passed 50. then another rebuilding effort took place. eoin morgan making 50 but then wickets fell regularly thereafter, leaving ben stokes to do most of the work. he also, why driverless cars could soon top scored with 89 for england. 4/2 be helping people to maintain their
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centuries overall for the england independence. batting line—up. they would have wa nted batting line—up. they would have wanted closer to around 350. 325 may this is afternoon alive. a major review into higher education be, but south africa are chasing 312 funding has recommended that university tuition fees in england, to win. it will be interesting to should be reduced to £7,500 a year. see how england's bowlers do. it also says that maintenance grants to support poorer students, which were scrapped three years ago, should be reinstated. i know you will keep us posted on that through the afternoon. let's the report, commissioned by the government, calls for loans talk about last night's football. to be written off after 40 years, rather than 30 at present chelsea victorious but mixed —so that graduates would be feelings for chelsea fans with eden repaying their debt for longer. hazard looking like he will leave the club. here's our education correspondent, yes, two of the key architects of frankie mccamley. six students at one college, each with a different their future, they future's looking plan for theirfuture. some want to go to university. for others, apprenticeships are on the cards. in doubt. eden hazard and maurizio for francesca—lily, money is a big part of her decision. sarri, who has delivered third place i care for somebody. and a european trophy. most would they can't afford to work say that is a good season byjob because they are disabled. so it makes it harder to then think, security has never been a feature of
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life at chelsea. the question if he "0h, i'll go off to university and have this £40,000—50,000 debt." might want to return to italy. the juventusjob is if they lowered the fees, might want to return to italy. the juventus job is available. might want to return to italy. the juventusjob is available. as might want to return to italy. the juventus job is available. as far as would that make a difference? i believe you can't put a monetary value on education, temp to —— eden hazard is concerned, so whether that be 7500, he seemed to suggest last night that 9000, i think so long the final in baku was his last game as the quality of the education for chelsea. is significant enough. there is a big debate on social lauren chose to do an apprenticeship media at the moment as to where eden but would have liked more support, like those at university. hazard stands in the list of great chelsea players and the consensus i've got a family, a household seems to be that he is right up to run, and i'm on the same basic rate of pay as a 16—year—old doing there. seven years, two league the same apprenticeship. titles, and fa cup, a league cup, and it looks like he has signed off but i think a grant or a bursary or even a loan would be more with a starring performance in the attractive to apprenticeships. europa league final against arsenal. the outgoing prime minister, theresa may, commissioned two goals for him, and assist as a review looking at post—18 education in england. well. and the language he used it's recommending a cap afterwards has suggested this would be his final game for the blues. it on university fees of £7500, seems that he is off to real madrid, grants for living costs brought back a move he has been hankering after for the poorest students, for at least 12 months. and tuition—fee loans kyle edmund is out of available for everyone the french open after being forced doing advanced qualifications. to retire when two sets down
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in his second round the current fee, which is high match at roland garros. jim lumsden reports. by international standards, can act as a deterrent to disadvantaged groups. edmund had dropped to 30th in the world rankings, down from 14th at a small but significant minority of students are getting poor value the start of the year, after five from the university experience. successive defeats on the clay, which he once described as his at age 29, graduates in some preferred surface. had the right subjects from some institutions in less than their peers who did not stop? his uruguayan opponent made a study for a degree. students would be expected to pay fantastic start. the briton rallied back loans up to 40 years, ten years longer than the current system. to force a tie—break but his opponent came through that 7—3. he the impact is regressive, picked up where he had left off as a it's actually graduates who earn 110w picked up where he had left off as a now heavy legged edmund moped around less who are going to be contributing more for longer. the court. the british number one the review came about because there was a feeling amongst ministers 110w the court. the british number one that university costs now cut a forlorn figure. 2—1 down were just too expensive. in the third set, he called the there also political pressure from other parties, trainer on and after a short looking at reducing tuition fees conversation, decided enough was or scrapping them altogether. enough. he has now lost six of his but with change at the top last seven matches. of government, some are concerned this latest review could be ignored. british athlete eilish mccolgan has had her medals stolen
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by thieves who targeted her it will be up to the government home while she's away to decide at the upcoming in sweden competing at the stockholm diamond league. spending review whether to follow their recommendation. mccolgan said british but my view is very clear — championship medals had been removing maintenance grants from the least one of students has taken alongside a necklace featuring the symbol of the olympic games. not worked, and i believe it is time to bring them back. she's appeared at the last two and she described her home which still leaves uncertainty in manchester as being trashed, for future students when deciding what path to take. leaving her upset and angry. that's all the sport for now. frankie mccamley, bbc news, in 0ldham. we have beenjoined from leeds by serene esuruoso , victims of rape are being advised an education officer not to seek counselling until after criminal at leeds university union. trials are complete. that's the claim being made thank you for being with us. so, it after an investigation by the news website, vice. current government rcommendatons are that pre—trial discussions, is only a proposal to cut tuition including therapy, may lead to allegations of coaching and, fees to £7,500, do you welcome that? ultimately, the failure of the criminal case. labour is now calling for an leeds university union has always been very clear that we believe eve ryo ne been very clear that we believe everyone should have access to emergency review of that guidance. education and it should be accessible to everyone. a cut in tuition fees won't achieve that, there is some sort of ancient
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necessarily. but the reintroduction guidance that is clumsy and of maintenance grants well. so you contradictory that it appears on welcome the reintroduction of official websites, that appears to maintenance grants if that were to be, as faras happen, why do you think that's a official websites, that appears to be, as far as i understand it, the good thing? official guidance, and whatever that i think the thing about maintenance says, and it speaks with forked gra nts tongue, we are being told by i think the thing about maintenance grants is it means that students don't have to worry about how they journalist and women's groups that women are being actively discouraged will afford to live at university. they can go through the day student from seeking counsel, therapy, vital life knowing they have money to put mental health treatment. food on the table and pay rent, chantel, which is not her real which at the moment, not everyone name, is 23 and alleges she has been raped. feels. there is argument, some people are she says she was told she could not have counselling until any saying that these cuts, if they go criminal trial is over. through, they would effectively cha ntel told joanna gosling change the quality of higher the reasons she was given for not education. it wouldn't be as good. receiving the help she wants. universities wouldn't have as much money. i 10096 universities wouldn't have as much money. “0096 agree universities wouldn't have as much money. i 100% agree with universities wouldn't have as much money. i 10096 agree with that, the k that students will be taking away i reported it straight after it happened, literally hours after, and from what they have to pay will have when you report to the police, you to be found somewhere else —— mac then get sent to lots of rape crisis 1.5 k. the quality of education will centres and there are lots of go down as well as the services that different ones. they told me i would stu d e nts go down as well as the services that students have access to. are you not be allowed counselling, only
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saying that this cut, you think it pre—trial therapy. how did that make you feel? it was kind of confusing could actually damage the education that you have gone through this event and you have done exactly what that students get? you are meant to do, you are told to potential, yes, because the money is report it straightaway, and it is kind of disappointing. and so did not... yes, yes, potentially, yes. what do you think of tuition fees in you not have counselling?” general, this issue has been debated kind of disappointing. and so did you not have counselling? i am having pre—trial therapy, which long and hard for many years. basically, i am having pre—trial therapy, which basically, lam not having pre—trial therapy, which basically, i am not allowed to talk the principle of tuition fees, it about the event that happened to me. sends a message which isn't one that ican about the event that happened to me. i can see it is really distressing we should welcome. education should for you to talk about. thank you. we be seen as a public good, it should appreciate you joining s, chantelle, be seen as a public good, it should be seen as something everybody feels which is obviously not your real they can access and not seen as name. all alleged victims of any sex transactional. the way their higher offence have a complete right to education sector is moving is anonymity. let's bring in grace. is contrary to that narrative. the argument has been that the this happening in court, that country can't afford to provide free alleged victims are being accused of higher education for everybody, having been coached by defence especially if we want to expand student numbers. that's true, but i don't know what counsel? not necessarily being coached. i think when we talk about to say, it's true, yes, i don't know the use of counselling notes, in
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what to say. sorry. what do you say about this idea of making it longerfor trials for sexual offences, that is stu d e nts to idea of making it longerfor students to pay back their debts. so where it might come in. and so, for that rather than 30 years, it will example, if it is a reasonable line be 40 years, effectively, you would be 40 years, effectively, you would of enquiry, for the prosecuting be paying it back, i don't know, until the age of 60 or so? authorities, to look at a it's a shame, because the people who complainant's authorities, to look at a will suffer the most are those from complaina nt‘s counselling notes, low and medium household incomes. authorities, to look at a complainant's counselling notes, and there is some fundamental those students who come from higher inconsistency, then the danger is household incomes who aren't worried that the defence may apply to seek about the cost of tuition fees are the ones who will benefit. low and medium household income students to use the inconsistency in cross will be paying for longer and being examination or to deploy it as part squeeze the most over the years. of their defence. so in the cases that's interesting. thank you for being with us. that was the where i have been prosecuting, there education officer at leeds hasn't generally been any university. thank you for your time. suggestions of coaching by the thank you for your time. rescue teams in the hungarian capital, budapest, say there's little hope of finding any more councillors, but more what appears survivors, after a tour boat sank in the notes, that is inconsistent on the river danube. it's thought 21 people with the allegations that they make are still missing, after the vessel for the sexual offences. rebecca,
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carrying south korean tourists capsized in a collision with a another boat. what do you think the impact is of seven people are confirmed dead. nick thorpe reports from budapest. this? the impact is significant. chantelle has just described this? the impact is significant. chantelle hasjust described it as confusing and i think it really is, the rescue effort to continue this morning with little hope of survival but more than that it is cruel the for the 21 people still missing. fa ct but more than that it is cruel the according to eyewitnesses, fact that a woman who has been raped the mermaid, a 26—metre pleasure is then told that she can't access boat, capsized and sank within seconds after she was struck counselling, she can't access that by a large river cruiser. specialist support that is described as life changing and life—saving, video has emerged allegedly because of issues with the criminal showing the incident. justice system. it is shocking, it as the small tourist boat needs to change. we know there are serious issues across the criminal justice system when it comes to the passed under the bridge, prosecution of rape and childhood sexual abuse and this isjust one of many other injustices survivors are the mermaid is going north, the having to experience and face. can mermaids turns in front of the you see a way this can be changed viking, for some reason, and there because we heard that labour would was a collision. the smaller boat reveal this. it was a collision. the smaller boat was turned on its side, and within because we heard that labour would about seven seconds it sank. revealthis. it does because we heard that labour would reveal this. it does need reviewing. there is an ongoing end—to—end police and rescue vehicles rushed to the scene. review of the criminaljustice there were 33 south korean tourists syste m review of the criminaljustice system happening at this time as a on the pleasure boat at the time result of the drop in prosecution
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and two hungarian crew. this is a busy stretch rates and other issues, so we need of water often crowded with small and large craft. to see that, come up with some weeks of heavy rain and snow melt radical changes and radical upriver in the alps mean the river improvements so that all the is swollen and flowing faster survivors that are reporting to the than usual, and rescue efforts wese police, and we know more and more hampered by a continuous downpour. are doing that, are able to experience a form ofjustice. translation: national directorate a "national scandal." for disaster management is assisting that's how 0fsted has described support for children with special educational needs in england and wales. so far we have hospitalised seven today, thousands of parents have delivered a petition demanding people after their condition had that the government takes action, with campaigners saying underfunding has left been stabilised. since their body vulnerable children in limbo. jayne mccubbin has been speaking temperature had dropped dangerously. the ambulance service can confirm to one of the families involved. the death of seven people. attempts to revive them have been, this is when she was hours old. u nfortu nately, to revive them have been, unfortunately, six unsuccessful. born at 24 weeks, dakota was so small she fit in mary's hand, so small she weighed less as the investigation starts in earnest, there are many than a bag of sugar. questions to answer — first and foremost about they really fought the experience and level to keep her alive. of training of the crews. yeah, and she fought to stay alive, the wreck of the tourist ship must now be raised and now i'm fighting for her. from the bed of the river. it is expected to contain the bodies mary is one of thousands
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of many of the missing. nick thorpe, bbc news, budapest. who will march in protest today. a child has been taken dakota is now ten and needs help with every aspect of her life to hospital, after an incident from washing to dressing and eating. at the lightwater valley theme park in north yorkshire. this is john, our cameraman. police say the 6—year—old boy, who was conscious when officers hello. arrived at the scene, has been taken but her mum tells me the fight to hospital by air ambulance. for even basic special—needs support his condition isn't believed to be life threatening. has been a constant struggle. the health and safety executive has day in, day out. been notified and poice a fight. remain at the scene. every day. we've had to fight for the right support plan, 0ur correspondent is with me. what fight for the right education, physio, 0t, speech and language, else do we know, lisa? police were and fight for the right home—to—school transport. called around 11:30am to this theme what do you think of this system? park near ripon in north yorkshire, it's unacceptable. a witness said he saw the boy in a month, she and two other parents will take their fight even falling from a ride called the further, to the highest court twister. i'm social media we've had in the land. photographs of the air and emergency the government says it's investing record sums to support children services at the theme park. we've like dakota with special needs — with 350 in extra funding, heard from the air ambulance that but councils in england warn the boy was taken to leeds general they face a £50 billion black hole infirmary, and in the last hour in the next six years we've heard from the police that the
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and the most vulnerable buy is not in a life—threatening are already paying the price. inspections show send provision condition. and he is in hospital, as in half of over 80 local you say, he was conscious when they authorities is failing. got there. the health and safety even 0fsted describes send support as a national scandal. executive has been notified. this is why dakota's mum, and others, will march. lightwater executive has been notified. lig htwater valley executive has been notified. lightwater valley bills itself as a i'm marching because my school place for the ultimate family adventure, and it is half term at doesn't have enough money. the moment. iam sure i am marching because currently the moment. i am sure they are very busy. what the education system is broken. about this right, the twister? i'm marching for all it is one of about 35 rides they children with special educational needs to ensure are, according to the theme park has that we meet our responsibilities. michael website it says the ride, the protests around the country are unprecedented — as is next month's legal action. gives an awesome fun packed "fight" is a word many parents experience. the track is full of with special—needs children say seriously tight turns giving riders they are all too familiar with. that fight spills onto the streets the impression they might not make today and into the high court it around the next corner, with the at the end ofjune. threat of plummeting into the tree tops being a source of tension for jayne mccubbin, bbc news. pa rents tops being a source of tension for parents and amusement for kids. i should say we haven't yet talked to the theme park. thank you very much indeed.
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the department for education says researchers say people who eat ultra—processed foods, such as chicken nuggets, ice cream and breakfast cereals, tend to be less it's increased ‘high needs' healthy and die earlier. the studies in france and spain suggest levels of consumption of such foods have soared, funding to £63 billion this year, but the findings aren't conclusive. compared to £5 billion in 2013, and it's consulting here's our health and science on how to make the funding system, more effective. ben bland is here in a moment correspondent james gallagher. he will have the latest this is ultra—processed food. business news. first, a look at the headlines they are the foods that have been on afternoon live the government is told to cut through the most industrial university tuition fees in england, processing and often have a long as part of a package of reforms list of ingredients on the packet. to the funding of higher education. it includes popular items like fizzy at least seven people have drinks, chicken nuggets died and 21 are missing and breakfast cereals. after a tour boat collision on the river danube, in hungary. the two studies regularly assess a boy has been airlifted the diets of more than 100,000 to hospital after an incident people and recorded what happened at a theme park in north yorkshire. to their health. crisps, chocolate, sweets? mcdonalds here's your business and processed meats like bacon and headlines on afternoon live. transport giant firstgroup has said sausages. pasteur? white bread? that it will sell off its us greyhound coach business and spin is processed multiple times. staff off its uk bus arm amid pressure from an activist investor in packets. processed terms, that to break up the firm. sort of thing. chicken bites, that
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uk car production collapsed last month. it's the biggest fall still. heavily processed food is since the global financial crisis a decade ago. the society of motor manufacturers and traders recorded a production everywhere in our diets. the impact slump of 44.5% in april compared on health was assessed in two with the same time last year studies, asking more than 100,000 as uk carfactories braced people for up to a decade. for every for a possible no—deal exit from the european union on march 29th. telecoms firm ee switches on the uk's first super fast ten deaths of people eating the most 5g network today. under processed food there was a 60% it will be available in six major cities with plans to reach 1,500 sites increase. the second study looked at by the end of the year. hart house, that found that people rival vodafone has confirmed it eat in the least ultra processed will launch its own service in seven cities onjuly 3rd, food were 242 cases of with another 12 cardiovascular disease, in every by the end of the year. year. people eating the most out of processed food, they were 277. the authors of the study say there is i believe you are looking at disney mounting evidence that alta process and what looks like a political will food are harmful. the research intervention in the united states. is hot on the heels of trials showing these types of foods make us yes, the head of disney, bob iger, eat more and put on weight. however, says it is unlikely they will make
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any new movies in the us state of much more work is still needed to georgia. this is after the state explain why industrially processed food might have a detrimental effect government passed a controversial new anti—abortion law. the ruling, on our bodies. until then, experts which would ban abortions as early expressed caution and say these studies are not definitive proof of as six weeks into pregnancy, comes into effect, we think, at the start harm. what we need to know is what of next year. why does this affect the movie—making industry? here is bob iger explaining more. is the issue, is it the nutritional content, the additives, or something to do with people's lives. and i i think if it becomes law it would think before we make any changes and be very difficult to produce there jump andl be very difficult to produce there and i doubt we will. many people who think before we make any changes and jump to conclusions we need to find out more about it. while the chain work for us will not want to work ultra processed might feel no, the there. and we will have to heed health advice is very familiar. a their wishes in that regard. right diet rich in fruits, vegetables, now, we are watching it very carefully. i guess there is so much fish, nuts and seeds happens to be one full of unprocessed foods. speculation it could be enacted sometime, it could also be uk car production fell challenged in the courts and that by almost half last month — could delay it, and we are being the biggest drop since the global financial crisis a decade ago. cautious and careful about it, but according to the society of motor manufacturers if it becomes law, i don't see how and traders (smmt) — production slumped 44.5% in april — it is practical for us to continue
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compared with the same time last to shoot there. year — as uk carfactories braced let's talk to samira hussain, for a possible ‘no—deal‘ exit from north america business the european union on march 29th. correspondent. the proportion of low—paid workers in britain — when i think of movie locations, i those on less than £8.52 per hour — tend to go for the cliche, los angeles, hollywood. why is georgia has fallen to its lowest level such an important location? georgia since 1980, according has for the last decade really been to a new report. resolution foundation — a think tank focusing on people on the lowest incomes — found that the number of low—paid workers dropped by 200,000 last year and suggested it could be eliminated all together by 2020. encouraging studios to come and use their state so they have pretty impressive tax incentives, for companies to come and make films the uk has a long—standing low pay that they are. so it has been problem, but which is being eroded thanks to the higher minimum wage happening for a while. in fact, last that was introduced in 2016. at the moment there is a political year, they were responsible for consensus it seems in favour 92,000 jobs in the state, bringing of pushing the rate higher, it is good news because it would further reduce the number in $2.7 billion. what we are talking of people on low pay. about is a significant amount of but going into uncharted territory we need to be careful about how money that comes into the state of we make that change. georgia. to hear a big company like disney suggest that perhaps it is not going to be able to do business
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in that state any more if this law you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. goes into effect, that is really the government is told to cut very significant. and i suppose the university tuition fees in england, as part of a package of reforms other concern for georgia is that to the funding of higher education. where disney has given this morning, at least seven people have died and twenty one are missing , others may follow suit. is there any after a tour boat collision indication of this may be thinking the same? certainly there has been. on the river danube, in hungary. a buy has been airlifted to hospital netflix has echoed similar following an incident at a theme sentiments, suggesting it is not park in north yorkshire. going to be able to do business in the area. because of this law. and the area. because of this law. and ben stokes dragged england the stance some of the employees have taken. 0ther the stance some of the employees have taken. other companies have said what they are trying to do is work with organisations on the ground to try and mount challenges another trophy won, but the key architects may not be around to to this. in fact, one hollywood celebrate, chelsea star ed in hazzard and actress has already said, she has celebrate, chelsea star ed in hazza rd and the celebrate, chelsea star ed in hazzard and the manager are in the air. and carl edmund is out of the already pulled her movie from being french open, the british number one is forced to retire after losing the filled —— filmed in the state of first two sets. i will have more on georgia because of this. briefly, for the threat to be credible,
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all of those just after 2:30pm. surely they need to say where they would filmed instead. have they done so? they haven't, but i would suggest that corporate america, especially a company as big as disney, doesn't have to say it is going to come somewhere else because much faster download speeds, launches today. there are plenty of places in the ee has switched on the network united states and canada that would in london, cardiff, belfast, edinburgh, birmingham happily welcome a big movie and manchester, but customers will need new handsets. production company like disney to here's our technology correspondent, make films there. i would suggest rory cellan jones. the first new masts have been thatis fitted out, the network make films there. i would suggest that is probably not something they has been switched on. would have to do. thank you very now 5g can make the mobile internet reach everyone and everything a lot faster — at least, that's the promise. much. you'll be able to enjoy let's see what the markets are much faster speeds. that means you can download things doing. like box sets in seconds the ftse100 being held by some rather than minutes. gains among the oil company shares. they were up, they have been up it means you'll be able to do multiplayer gaming in augmented reality. throughout the day, there was a rise at first, ee is just switching in the oil price, that has since on the network in six cities across the uk, given up some of its gains. concerns and even there coverage around the trade war between the us will be patchy. and china ratcheting up, so more for now, speeds will be roughly five harsh words exchanged between them, times as fast as 4g, and other concern is that will
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but eventually the new network should connect millions of things affect global economic growth and as well as phones to the network, everything from driverless cause a slowdown so you need less cars to dustbins. fuel to transport goods around, hence the price dipping. the very few people who have one of these phones on launch day may find the 5g revolution gets off i mentioned first group responding to a bit of a slow start, to some shareholder desires to but at least the uk restructure and that is having a is at or near the front of the pack positive effect on the share price. with this technology. there is, however, one problem. ee and other operators are dependent for some of their equipment on one among smaller stocks, controversial chinese company. de la rue plc lost a quarter of its value and plummeted to a more than 14—year low. huawei, according to the americans, the maker of banknotes and passports poses a security threat, warned of "somewhat lower" profit and they're urging the uk government in 2020 and said its chief executive to ban it from involvement in 5g. this analyst says an outright ban would step down. would have a serious impact. that's all the business news. i think it's going to be very negative for the uk. tony blair's former spokesman, it means we will lose alastair campbell, has welcomed a near leadership position in 5g reports that the labour party may review the decision in europe, and it will slow everything down, and that's to expel him from the party disappointing for the networks, but as a consumer i would because he voted liberal democrat be disappointed too. the 5g revolution is getting under way, but even without bumps in the european elections. in the road, it'll be three years before it stretches right
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across the country. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. it comes after the shadow attorney general, shami chakrabati, told today programme this morning 0ur correspondent sarah walton is at covent garden in central london, where people can now access 5g. that the move would be reviewed. it is one of the areas where you mr campbell tweeted to say he was "pleased", if it's true, can. first of all, how has the that his ‘expulsion‘ from labour is being ‘reviewed”', signal beam today? although he said he had not heard anything officially yet from the governance unit. it's received wisdom that it's well, as you heard in the report, mainly younger people who are embracing the latest technology, but could older generations benefit the most the signal is a bit patchy. that's from driverless cars? scientists believe the vehicles what we've been finding today. we of the future will help pensioners stay independent we re what we've been finding today. we were hoping to be broadcasting to and feel less isolated. jon kay has more. you right now p willey on the 5g electronic voice: where would network, and earlier today the bbc you like to go today? we'd like to go to the became the first broadcaster to go picnic area, please. that would be nice, wouldn't it? live on a commercial 5g network. yes. we've had to boost it with 4g, maya and jeff are off for a drive... let's go! because as things have got busier journey starting. here, more people are using their ..but without a driver. phones and the signal has begun to in the grounds of their retirement village, they are testing drop. this phone is connected to the a computer—operated vehicle. ee network here in central london,
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this is amazing. we have a speed of about 48 megabits it really is. because they don't know how much per second, that's what you would longer they'll be able to drive, get from your home internet. but ee could this help them get out and socialise? this is the future. says that in their testing, they've well, it is the future. gone as high as 800 megabits per oh, gosh. second. earlier today we were look we're coming up to. sensors on the pods detect hazards. getting 500 megabits. that means if whoops! we all start getting the speed of that was a sharp stop! internet on our mobile phones, the automatic braking then sort of things we spend all day prevents accidents. was it scary? doing on iphones, on the internet, no, it wasn't, it wasn't. downloading music and films and it was exhilarating, putting things up on social media, rather than scary. did you trust it? we could do that pretty much yes, i did, completely. instantaneously. at the moment only and i was secure, i had plenty available in a number of places, you of room, i was comfortable. very impressive. have to buy a new handset and get a yes. new contract, but it will become it could be years before these available in more towns and cities, vehicles could be on the roads, but the british team of scientists, they will also be more mobile phones psychologists and robotics experts say the pods getting their 5g networks up and could work now in enclosed, running. what you will see in the private spaces, giving residents in homes like near future is st monica's more independence. running. what you will see in the nearfuture is going running. what you will see in the near future is going to running. what you will see in the nearfuture is going to become increasingly available. and the mobile phone providers say things
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it's cutting—edge technology, like patchy networks will be worked and we're making the future right now, and very privileged to have on, as the technology develops and been a part of that. grows. and also i'm thinking in the future so when it all comes in, eventually, maybe i will actually benefit and it's all rolled out, will it be from one of these myself. when you're older? yeah, kind of an insurance policy. revolutionary change, rather than incremental change? that's really journey starting. i went for a ride with 88—year—old monica. what people are hoping. you have to remember the last time we had a big turning right. you've made a new friend there. change it was 4g. the uk was quite thank you! slow at taking up 4g internet. but she is one of 100 older people what 4g did was change the way we who have been consulted in the design of these pods. use our mobile phones. it led to things like the start of taxi hiring unable to drive, she thinks they have real potential. apps and food ordering. it allowed it can help us to be independent companies to start operating around for as long as possible. the use of a mobile phone app. this turning left. time the uk is ahead of the game and they were a bit late saying that. one of the first countries to be of course, not all care homes will have the space or the money rolling out commercial 5g networks. to have this kind of technology. it is hoped that will allow more and but the developers say older people more devices to connect to the should be at the forefront internet. things like driverless of developing driverless cars. ca i’s
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internet. things like driverless cars which are going to need a fast, jon kay, bbc news, bristol. instantaneous connection, having 5g available wherever you are could make things like driverless cars time for a look at the weather. reality. good to talk to you, have fun! sarah is in covent garden where we have got a real mixture of weather around this afternoon. some of us having cloudy skies. there is they have a 5g signal. she was saying it's not completely perfect. rain across the north west. a few and later on this afternoon — fog patches and also some glorious right here on the bbc news channel — we'll be taking your questions sunshine. the satellite picture on what 5g coud mean for you. shows where we have the best of the our technology reporter chris foxx will have all the answers at 3:30, sunshine. that echoes cloud across the north west. and then we have got so if you have a question, please do get in touch. a few fog patches approaching the coast of south—west england and running through the english channel. for some coastal areas, we could see the occasional fog patch this afternoon, making things rather murky, but otherwise we could keep a lot of sunshine. quite cloudy for a row that's lasted more than 5 years between the philippines and canada over the dumping wales, xiao is pushing across of tonnes of rubbish, northern england. and then more has been resolved. persistent rain across parts of back in 2014, the authorities northern ireland and scotland. in manila discovered canada had sent more than a hundred shipping containers of household waste
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rather than recyclable plastics for disposal, 0vernight tonight, the first batch breaking international law. of rain tends to pull away from scotla nd of rain tends to pull away from scotland but there will be further now canada says, it's willing pulses of rain coming and going across the north—west of the uk. the to take the rubbish back. howard johnson has more. driest weather across much of england and wales. mild night for most of us but called air still loitering across the north west of customs officials, busy at work scotland. we have got another weather front targeting the west. fumigate in canada's are controversial containers. the another wet night for northern dispute dates back to 2013 in 2014, ireland and scotland. we could see when more than 100 containers were sent to the philippines in a private 40 or 50 millimetres of rain. enough to bring some big puddles out on the business deal. the paperwork was falsified, and the contents were roads and localised surface water. plastic waste. when the containers away from the north—west, there will we re plastic waste. when the containers bea away from the north—west, there will be a lot of dry weather for england were opened, inside was a mix of and wales. the cloud will thin and recycla bles a nd were opened, inside was a mix of recyclables and household waste, and break to allow sunny spells to come through and in the sunshine feeling used adult nappies. that meant the and humid. generally, the high teens waste festered for a decade, last for the temperatures. for saturday, april, months ahead of elections firebrand filipino president roderigo tightly took up the issue. whether friends are weakening as the
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pressure begins to build so a little bit of patchy rain is possible but they loaded the containers to a there will be some dry weather as well. a little bit warmer across ship, and advised canada that the northern areas. those temperatures garbage is in the philippines. really building across eastern england. temperatures on saturday could reach 27 celsius. that is canada agreed to pay for the waste's likely to be the warmest weather we return, but when they missed the deadline the president said he see. 0n likely to be the warmest weather we see. on sunday, low pressure is wa nted moving in. this rain will bring deadline the president said he wanted his government to shoulder the cost. the row has played well fresh air. but before it arrives with the filipino electorate. i'm happy about it. here in the across eastern england, again we could see temperatures into the mid philippines there is a lot of 20s. feeling fresherfurther could see temperatures into the mid rubbish already. 20s. feeling fresher further west. i think the way he handled it is good. he imposed our rights as a sovereign country. the saga comes to an end today after more than five years as the philippines export to the rubbish back to canada. what started as a threat by the president appears to be encouraging other countries here in southeast asia. this week
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malaysia said it would send 3000 tonnes of waste back to developed countries, including the uk for improperly labelling rubbish as recycla ble improperly labelling rubbish as recyclable goods. they hope this will avoid favour abuse of the system. this waste was discovered from falsified documents. it is smuggled m, falsified documents. it is smuggled in, literally. ithink falsified documents. it is smuggled in, literally. i think we should call it waste trafficking. although far away in the philippines, today's shipment has prompted developed countries to look at better ways of dealing with their waste closer to home. time for a look at the weather. here's darren. we also have a look ata here's darren. we also have a look at a mass and why are important. we often talk about different sorts of weather, a air mass is a mass of air
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that has certain characteristics. it can be modified as it heads towards the uk depending on what service it goes over, land or sea. there are six different air masses that can affect the uk. this is one of them. this is the cold one, this is arctic this maritime. this is northerly, wet, hello, you're watching cold air with snow showers in afternoon live. today at 3. winter. that is the mass that brings the government is told to cut university tuition fees in england, most of us know. we also have many as part of a package of reforms more cold air masses, that will affect the uk. this is polar to the funding of higher education. maritime, this area originates from my view is very clear. removing maintenance greenland or the arctic sea. it's grants for the least well—off students hasn't worked, not as cold but can bring wintry and i believe it's time to bring them back. showers in winter. then we have at least seven people have died and 21 are missing, after a tour boat collision something called returning polar maritime. this originates from the same place but heads further down, on the river danube, in hungary. into the atlantic. it's got more of a boy has been airlifted an atlantic sea track and is a to hospital after an incident little bit warmer. and this one here at a theme park in north yorkshire. the uk's first next—generation 5g mobile network is switched on, is polar continental air mass. it's but is only available,
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an easterly air mass. is that the in certain areas. one that brought in the beast from )coming up on afternoon the east? yes, very good. you told live all the sport. me that before we went our need to make me look clever! it didn't work, it includes the cricket. how is it did it? it's very hard to make me going for england? they have said look clever. this is polar south africa 312 to win the opening match of the world cup. south africa continental, drier and not over the has just started the chase, 14 sea so continental, drier and not over the sea so much. it has been known as without a last in the fourth over. the beast from the east. when you more later. how is the weather have this sort of a mass in the winter it's very cold with some snow. that sort of a mass in looking over the weekend? summertime, as we saw last year is warm and humid across many parts of the country, the peak of the warmer, actually, warmer and drier temperatures will be on saturday. air. the warmest of the air comes it's all due to this tropical from the south, from the tropics. so maritime air, we'll have a look at a mass and what it means later in the this is tropical continental, it programme. thank you. comes across from africa, picking up also coming up, sand and dust, and it drier, warmer why driverless cars could soon be helping elderly people to retain their independence. asa wind. sand and dust, and it drier, warmer as a wind. the last one is tropical maritime. this is obviously warm
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air, much more humid and coming from air, much more humid and coming from a long sea track containing a lot of clout. we've got that a mass across most parts of the uk which is why it feels so muddy and form. so the two hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. 0range ones give us nice weather, a major review into higher education funding has recommended and the four blue once chilly that university tuition fees weather, is that right? i could do in england, should be reduced to £7,500 a year. thisjob. yes, i didn't realise we it also says that maintenance grants we re thisjob. yes, i didn't realise we were damming it down. we've got a to support poorer students, which were scrapped three years ago, tool in six chance of having nice should be reinstated. the report, commissioned weather. well, we could get that in by the government, calls for loans the sunshine, i guess. that's very to be written off after 40 years, rather than 30 at present —so that graduates would be interesting. it's like a science repaying their debt for longer. here's our education correspondent, lesson at school, actually. where are you not very good at science at frankie mccamley. school? i failed at all. six students at one college, each with a different are you not very good at science at school? ifailed at all. most are you not very good at science at school? i failed at all. most parts of the uk are in this. we'll go to plan for theirfuture. some want to go to university. the forecast now, i think. this is for others, apprenticeships what most parts of the uk are seeing are on the cards. now, particularly across central and for francesca—lily, money is a big part of her decision. eastern parts of england, i care for somebody. temperatures are on the high side.
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they can't afford to work we see 23 or 24 degrees. northern because they are disabled. so it makes it harder to then scotla nd we see 23 or 24 degrees. northern scotland are different air mass, think, "0h, i'll go off this is polar maritime, so much to university and have this colder and drier. temperatures £40,000-50,000 debt." barely in double figures. most of if they lowered the fees, scotla nd would that make a difference? barely in double figures. most of scotland is seeing cloud and rain, i believe you can't put a monetary value on education, this conveyor belt of cloud and so whether that be 7500, rain, broken cloud for england and 9000, i think so long as the quality of the education wales. some warmth and sunshine is significant enough. coming through. what happens as we lauren chose to do an apprenticeship had to do this evening, and but would have liked more support, like those at university. overnight, is that the wetter i've got a family, a household weather continues for a while, much to run, and i'm on the same basic rate of pay as a 16—year—old doing of scotland, northern ireland, and northern england. there is a lot of the same apprenticeship. but i think a grant or a bursary clout coming in on that air mass, or even a loan would be more the tropical maritime air mass, it's attractive to apprenticeships. going to be warm, muggy, certainly the outgoing prime minister, theresa may, commissioned across the far north of scotland. we a review looking at post—18 education in england. it's recommending a cap should see some sunshine perhaps on university fees of £7500, grants for living costs brought tomorrow. after a reasonably dry start the rain comes back in again back for the poorest students, across scotland and northern ireland. probably a bit more clout and tuition—fee loans across the west of england and available for everyone
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wales. some sunshine at times, still doing advanced qualifications. warm with this south—westerly breeze for most areas and the rain is the current fee, which is high by international standards, can act adding up they across the western as a deterrent to hills of scotland. a couple of disadvantaged groups. inches of rain over high ground. 17 a small but significant minority of students are getting degrees, not bad, but not as good as poor value from the university experience. the 22 or 23 towards the south. at age 29, graduates in some subjects from some institutions in less than their peers still a muddy field. some cloud on who did not study for a degree. saturday but drier. cloud as far south as north wales. it will work students would be expected to pay back loans up to its way northwards, allowing more in 40 years, ten years longer the way of sunshine across south than the current system. wales, the midlands and southern the impact is regressive, it's actually graduates england. so much warmer, 27 or 28 who earn less who are going to be contributing more for longer. degrees. not as one further north the review came about because there was a feeling amongst because there is more cloud around. ministers that university lower pressure on sunday so we start costs were just too expensive. there also political pressure to see the weather changing. a band of rain sweeps in from the west with from other parties, looking some sharp showers. the last of the at reducing tuition fees warmth probably towards east anglia, or scrapping them altogether. but with change at 23 or 24 degrees. cooler fresher air the top of government,
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comes in from the west with a some are concerned this latest stronger wind on sunday. that's review could be ignored. going to signal a change as we head it will be up to the into next week, we are not in the government to decide at the upcoming spending review whether same air mass, we are looking at the to follow their recommendation. but my view is very clear — turning polar maritime air which will be cooler and more unsettled. removing maintenance grants from the least well offstudents has not worked, and i believe it is time to bring them back. which still leaves uncertainty for future students when deciding what path to take. frankie mccamley, bbc news, in 0ldham. we are nowjoined by sir peter lampl, founder and chairman of the sutton trust an educational charity which aims to improve social mobility. thank you very much for being with us. what is your reaction to the this is bbc news. 00:32:50,083 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 our latest headlines: proposal is to cut tuition fees? it's a step in the right direction but not enough. 0ur it's a step in the right direction but not enough. our kids come out with over £50,000 worth of debt, the
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highest in the english—speaking world by males, so we are paying far too much, pull the kids are coming out with more debt than well—off kids, because they have to borrow money for maintenance. so a kid from a council estate comes out paying more than someone from a top boarding school. that needs to be rectified. i think we should means tested tuition fees, so in other words, if you come from a well—off family you will pay more, than someone who comes from a less well—off family. that's what they do in the usa. not only do they means tested tuition fees, they means test everything. most of the top universities in the world are in the usa, so the whole thing gets means tested, in fact, we have 400 kids from the uk, low income kids, studying in the usa having
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everything paid for, because of their income levels. if you are well off, you pay everything. we have a very big difference between the well off and in fact, the poorer kids come out with more debt. the original argument when tuition fees were first introduced, the argument for tuition fees was that they would open up higher education for poorer members of society, the less privileged. do you not by that? that's not happened. i don't understand why. tuition fees went from £3000 a year to £9,000 a year, the thing about low—income kids is, would you like to walk out with £55,000 worth of debt? those kids are debt adverse, and the interest rate is going up more than 6% a year. that means in 12 years your debt is going to dabble. the whole thing is really out of control.
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there is a proposal to cut the interest rate down, the inflation rate. 0nly rate. only for the first two years while the kids are at university. the fact they pay anything whilst at university is another issue. in the workplace you pay three times over the retail price index which gives you an interest rate of about 6.3%. so the answer is, it's still a big dealfor so the answer is, it's still a big deal for those sort of rates. and the... before this review, you would have 30 years and you wouldn't have to pay any more. now it's 40 years. if i'm coming out of university, aged 22, 23 if i'm coming out of university, aged 22,23 abbey if i'm coming out of university, aged 22, 23 abbey paying until if i'm coming out of university, aged 22,23 abbey paying until i'm 62 was 63, how would that make you feel? i wouldn't feel good about that. there are a lot of negatives. a reduction in tuition fees is welcomed, its only 20%, so not a
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big deal. they pay a little bit back on the maintenance grant but you still have to borrow most of the money. the kids i'm working with, low and moderate income kids, this isn't a great deal. the argument has always been that if you go to university it gives you access to a betterjob, in the long run, and higher pay, therefore, if you are earning the right to that higher pay you need to give something back to society. you can't expect the state to pay for your higher education. state and students should be sharing the cast, right now it's too much on students. five years old, over one third of student graduates are not in graduate employment. they are working in hamburger joints. in graduate employment. they are working in hamburgerjoints. but if they are working on a hamburger joint they are probably not paying back their student loan, it's only after £25,000 you pay it back. i wouldn't want to spend that amount of time and be earning less than
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25,000. the idea that being a graduate as a panacea is wrong. we are pushing what we call a degree level apprenticeships, which means you are based on a company, working with university, you come out with no debt, you come out with qualifications the marketplace once. it's a much better way to go. we've got far too many kids going to university, over 50%, it got far too many kids going to university, over50%, it should be much fewer, and more should be doing what we call apprenticeships. thank you very much for being with us. thank you for your views. you are watching bbc news. now for the other news. rescue teams in the hungarian capital, budapest, say there's little hope of finding any more survivors, after a tour boat sank on the river danube. it's thought 21 people are still missing, after the vessel carrying south korean tourists capsized in a collision with a another boat. seven people are confirmed dead.
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nick thorpe reports from budapest. the rescue effort continued this morning with little hope of survival for the 21 people still missing. according to eyewitnesses, the mermaid, a 26—metre pleasure boat, capsized and sank within seconds after she was struck by a large river cruiser. video has emerged allegedly showing the incident. translation: what we can see on the cctv footage is the small boat sailing north, as is the bigger vessel. when they reach the pillars of the margaret bridge, the mermaid turns in front of the viking for some reason, and there was a collision. the mermaid was turned on its side, and within about seven seconds it sank. police and rescue vehicles rushed to the scene. there were 33 south korean tourists on the pleasure boat at the time and two hungarian crew. this is a busy stretch of water often crowded
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with both large and small craft. and rescue efforts wese hampered by a continuous downpour. translation: we have 17 units stationed on the shore at different locations. so far, we have hospitalised seven people after the condition had been stabilised, since their body temperature had dropped dangerously. the ambulance service can confirm the death of seven people. attempts to revive them have been unfortunately u nsuccessful. as the investigation starts in earnest, there are many questions to answer — first and foremost about the experience and level of training of the crews. the wreck of the tourist ship must now be raised from the bed of the river. it is expected to contain the bodies of many of the missing. nick thorpe, bbc news, budapest.
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a child has been taken to hospital, after an incident at the lightwater valley theme park in north yorkshire. police say the 6—year—old boy, who was conscious when officers arrived at the scene, has been taken to hospital by airambulance. his condition isn't believed to be life threatening. the health and safety executive has been notified and poice remain at the scene. the uk's first 5g mobile phone network, offering much faster download speeds, launches today. ee has switched on the network in london, cardiff, belfast, edinburgh, birmingham and manchester, but customers will need new handsets. here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan jones. the first new masts have been fitted out, the network has been switched on. now 5g can make the mobile internet reach everyone and everything a lot faster — at least, that's the promise. you'll be able to enjoy much faster speeds. that means you can download things
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like box sets in seconds rather than minutes. it means you'll be able to do multiplayer gaming in augmented reality. at first, ee is just switching on the network in six cities across the uk, and even there coverage will be patchy. for now, speeds will be roughly five times as fast as 4g, but eventually the new network should connect millions of things as well as phones to the network, everything from driverless cars to dustbins. the very few people who have one of these phones on launch day may find the 5g revolution gets off to a bit of a slow start, but at least the uk is at or near the front of the pack with this technology. there is, however, one problem. ee and other operators are dependent for some of their equipment on one controversial chinese company. huawei, according to the americans, poses a security threat, and they're urging the uk government to ban it from involvement in 5g.
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this analyst says an outright ban would have a serious impact. i think it's going to be very negative for the uk. it means we will lose a near leadership position in 5g in europe, and it will slow everything down, and that's disappointing for the networks, but as a consumer i would be disappointed too. the 5g revolution is getting under way, but even without bumps in the road, it'll be three years before it stretches right across the country. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. earlier i spoke to our reporter sarah walton from covent garden, to see if the 5g there was good enough to broadcast on. well, as you heard in that report the signal is patchy. that's what we've found today. we helped to broadcast right now purely on the 5g network. earlier today the bbc
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became the first british broadcaster to go live on a commercial 5g network. we've had to boost with 4g, because as things got busy here more people came to use their phones and the signal dropped. this is a 5g enabled phone connected to the network and we have a speed of about 48 megabits per second. that's what you would get at home. ee says that in testing they've got as high as 800 megabits per second. we were getting 500 earlier today. that means that if we all start getting this speed up internet, this sort of things we spend all day doing on the internet, downloading music, films and putting pictures on social media, we could do that pretty much instantaneously. it is only available in a limited number of
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places, and you need a new handset and contract but it will become available in more towns and cities, they will also be more mobile phone providers getting five g networks up and running. in the weeks and months ahead this is going to become increasingly available, and mobile phone providers say things like apache networks will be worked on, as the technology develops and grows. when it all comes in, eventually, is it going to be revolutionary? rather than incremental change? that's really what people are hoping. you have to remember the last big change in mobile internet was 4g, and the uk was quite slow taking up 4g internet. but what it did was change the way we use our mobile phones. it led to things like taxi hiring apps and food ordering. it allowed companies to operate
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purely around the use of a mobile phone. this time the uk is ahead of the game, one of the first countries in the world to be rolling out commercial 5g. it is hoped that that will allow more and more devices to connect to the internet. things like d riverless connect to the internet. things like driverless cars, which will be very fast. having 5g available, wherever you are in the country could make d riverless you are in the country could make driverless car is a reality on streets in the uk. that was sarah walton reporting from covent garden on how effective, or ineffective, 5g is there. we will be taking your questions on what 5g might mean for you. we will be asking our technology correspondent. he will be here just after 330. if you've got a question you can send it in. the details are on screen.
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the government is told to cut university tuition fees in england, as part of a package of reforms to the funding of higher education. at least seven people have died and twenty one are missing , after a tour boat collision on the river danube, in hungary. a boy has been airlifted to hospital after an incident at a theme park in north yorkshire. ben stokes drags england to a competitive total in the first match of the men's cricket world cup. his 89 helps the hosts post 311 for 8 against south africa at the oval. another trophy won... but the key architects may well not be around long to celebrate. the futures of chelsea star eden hazard and manager maurizio sarri are up in the air. and kyle edmund is out of the french open. the british number one is forced to retire after losing the first two sets of his second round match agaistn pablo cuevas. i'll be back with more
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on those stories later. president trump has called the inquiry by robert mueller into russian interference in the 2016 election the greatest presidential harassment in history. his comments come after mr mueller made his first public statement about his report in which he refused to exonerate mr trump of obstructing justice. mr mueller also said justice department policy prevented him from charging a president with a crime. the president also had something to say about the british politicians he supports. nigel farage is a friend of mine and boris is my friend. they are good quys boris is my friend. they are good guys and impressive people. nigel had a big victory, 32% of the vote, starting from nothing. i think they are big powers over there and are doing a good job. that was president
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trump. the us special counsel said the justice department trump. the us special counsel said thejustice department prevented him from charging any president with a crime. donald trump said his treatment by mr muller and the media has been a witch hunts. to me, it was the same as the report. there is no obstruction, that's what we're saying. no obstruction, no collusion, no nothing. nothing but a witch hunt. a witch hunt by the media and the democrats, their partners. they keep going, i thought it was finished when the report was released. but it goes on, and the media is the same, he said it was the same as the report. i think he is totally conflicted, as you know, he wanted to meet the fbi director and i said no. after he left the fbi he wasn't
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happy with what i did. i had to do it because it was the right thing to do. i had a dispute. you look at the relationship, so whether it's club, or life, he was conflicted. he should never have been chosen. he wa nted should never have been chosen. he wanted the fbi job, and he didn't get it, and the next day he was meeting the special counsel. that was just meeting the special counsel. that wasjust an meeting the special counsel. that was just an exit of his latest comments. we speak now to our corresponding whojoins comments. we speak now to our corresponding who joins us from washington. he clearly feels he's being completely exonerated, doesn't he the investigation? he feels as though the report and statement yesterday shows that trump did not commitany yesterday shows that trump did not commit any crimes, there was no obstruction of justice, commit any crimes, there was no obstruction ofjustice, no collusion, and as he often does he
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made it personal by attacking robert muller, his background, and saying that he was conflicted, and that was why he did this investigation. so once again, jump on the world stage. so will congress pick this up, or is it all over after the statement yesterday? democratic lawmakers are very disturbed by the president's state m e nts very disturbed by the president's statements and energised by the remarks yesterday, an increasing number of democratic lawmakers, and candidates for the next presidency have called for impeachment proceedings. in the past it was part of the left wing of the democratic party but more and more democrats are saying they should go ahead with impeachment against the president. is that a possibility, really? the idea of impeachment, or has that ship sailed, really? they could go through the impeachment proceedings, the republicans haven't endorsed the
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idea, so the democrats would have a ha rd idea, so the democrats would have a hard time, but if supporters would like to go ahead, they could. the conclusion is not at all clear at this point in time. thank you very much. that was tara in washington for us. the proportion of low—paid workers in britain — those on less than £8.52 per hour — has fallen to its lowest level since 1980, according to a new report. (tx 00v)the resolution foundation — a think tank focusing on people on the lowest incomes — found that the number of low—paid workers dropped by 200,000 last year and suggested it could be eliminated all together by 2020. the uk has a long—standing low pay problem which is being eroded, thanks to higher minimum wages introduced in 2016. at the moment there is a political consensus about pushing the rate higher, it's good news because that would reduce the number of people on low pay. we are
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going into uncharted territory and need to be careful about how we make that increase. we've got a look at the wear that for you now, darren is back with us. this afternoon you are looking at a masses, they cause the weather we enjoy or hate! 0r endure! yes, india. the masses that affect the uk and bring our weather. you've heard the phrase full seasons in one day. yes? that's because of different air masses that affect the uk. a mass is a mass of eight that has particular characteristics depending on where it has come from. it can be modified by the surface that it goes over, land or sea. we've got six different air masses affecting the uk. we start off with arctic maritime, this is essentially northerly. it brings
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cold air, and snow showers. this is where we get most of the snow. we have a number of other cold air masses, this is polar maritime. this isn't from the arctic, it comes from across greenland. still cold, not as cold as arctic maritime but it brings winter showers. then we have something called returning polar maritime, this is an indecisive ams, it starts off on the same place, greenland, but wanders southwards. as it moves further south it's got a longer sea track, and is cold. your favourite air mass, of course, is polar continental. and the beast from the east. i covered that. yes. i enjoyed that. you did. i was up in northumberland for that. and you probably had a fair bit of snow.
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it's quite a dry air mass. it's very cold and gets modified by the north sea. down here there's not much of north sea, so it doesn't bring a huge amount of snow. here you are more likely to get snow because it warms up and gets wetter. polar continental air mass, in summertime, is very different, because their land is much warmer. it's been heated up by the sun. it's a warmer easterly wind, still dry. the warmer winds come more from the south, from the tropical belt. this is tropical continental, a wind, and a mass, probably from africa, over the mediterranean, over the continental europe. it's warm and hearty. the air mass be got at the moment across many parts of the country is tropical maritime, it comes from a long way southwards over the sea. it's warm, very warm, but much more humid which is why it feels sticky.
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and it tends to be more clout. it brings some high temperatures to some parts of the uk. so these masses are travelling huge distances to reach us? yes, when you talk about a weather front, this marks the boundary between two different air masses. so if you've got a large temperature contrast either side of that weather front, it's temperature contrast either side of that weatherfront, it's more temperature contrast either side of that weather front, it's more likely that weather front, it's more likely that the front is more active. we see this sort of thing in north america, at the moment, with all the tornadoes over the past few weeks, brought about by two different air masses colliding. that produces severe storms. see, we don'tjust bring you the weather forecast, it's much deeper than that. what do you mean, we? you, sorry, you. so, speaking of the weather forecast? we've got this tropical maritime air, it'sa we've got this tropical maritime air, it's a typical picture from a weather watcher in hertfordshire where we see some of the highest
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temperatures. a real contest across the uk. not a tea bag all areas are in this maritime air. you've got sunshine across the east of england. northernmost parts of scotland, actually, are in the polar maritime air. so it's cold, temperatures struggling to make double figures. most of scotland sits under all this cloud, outbreaks of rain over the past few hours. some of thatjust touching the far north of england. as we head towards the evening, whilst it will be a lovely end to the day most of england and wales have a lot of cloud and rain. 0vernight, lighter and patchy, have a lot of cloud and rain. 0vernight, lighterand patchy, but still drawing in a lot of clout, going in all that humid air, my stay, temperatures not falling a great dealfor stay, temperatures not falling a great deal for england and wales. now, we've got this rain coming back in again tomorrow, into northern ireland, turning wetter across scotland, and the far north of england. some sunshine at times, it
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may not be quite as sunny as today. still quite warm with this south—westerly breeze. it leaves a lot of moisture in the west midlands of scotland, two inches of rain by the end of the day. temperatures in the end of the day. temperatures in the central belt is not bad, but maggie again across a good part of england and wales. warmer still on saturday, because there's less cloud around, it might produce if few showers, as it heads back northwards again across north wales and england up again across north wales and england up to scotland and northern ireland. but sunnier skies across south wales, the midlands and england, temperatures rise on saturday, 27, may be 28 degrees. that would be the peak of heat, pressure is falling. we've got a weather front coming in from the west, two different air masses cooler air coming in from ireland bringing rain. ahead of it we've got the warmer air. that anger could be up to 23 degrees, but quite a windy day for many on sunday.
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cooler, fresher air arrives from the west. that sets up next week as we head into next week, cooler, more u nsettled, head into next week, cooler, more unsettled, and some showers along as well. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: the government is told to cut university tuition fees in england
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as part of a package of reforms to the funding of higher education. my view is very clear. removing maintenance grants for the least well—off students has not worked and i believe it is time to bring them back. at least seven people have died and 21 are missing after a tour boat collision on the river danube in hungary. a boy has been airlifted to hospital after an incident at a theme park in north yorkshire. sport now on afternoon live. the cricket world cup, england are in action, a shaky start but it ended up not too bad. and in the last five minutes it has got significantly better, when you bearin got significantly better, when you bear in mind that shaky start. you get the feeling it is going to be a close one. the first game between england and south africa. archer, a
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controversial selection prior to the tournament, has immediately made an impact. he provided england with their first impact. he provided england with theirfirst and impact. he provided england with their first and second wickets of their first and second wickets of the tournament at the oval. they scored 311—8. that might be considered a little disappointing from england's point of view. it started a little bit shakily. jonny ba i rstow started a little bit shakily. jonny bairstow with a golden duck with just the second ball of the debt —— day. the recovery included 4/2 centuries, including from ben stokes, but wickets fell regularly towards the end. but now archer has provided those two breakthroughs. in south africa's reply, two early wickets. not the only impact archer has made either. hashim amla, star batsman for south africa, has been
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forced to retire hurt after being hit on the helmet by a bouncer from archer. he is certainly to the fore. those two wickets, 44 runs. they have had ten overs. you can listen to it on five live's sports extra or you can follow it on the bbc sport website. it sounds like a great game. let's also talk about last night's football. chelsea victorious, winning the europa league. but were read their star player is leaving, and possibly the manager. two key architects of that victory in baku, eden hazard, who scored twice last night, and maurizio sarri, who has delivered third place in the premier league and a european trophy. most would say that is a successful season butjob security has never been much of a feature of
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the manager's position at chelsea and despite that strong performance on the field, there has been enough to question, and he might want to return to italy, where thejuventus job is available. time to maxing to suggest that last night's match was his last game for chelsea. there is a big debate on social media at the moment as to where eden hazard stands in the list of great chelsea players and the consensus seems to be that he is right up there. after seven years, two league titles, and fa cup, a league cup, and it looks as though he hasn't signed off with a starring performance against arsenal. two goals for him, and assist as well. he ran arsenal ragged. and the language he used afterwards suggest this would be his final game for the blues. it seems he is off to real madrid. a move he has been hankering after for at least 12 months.
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kyle edmund is out of the french open after being forced to retire when two sets down in his second round match. the british number one was trailing uruguay‘s pablo cuevas at roland garros. and at 2—1 down in the third he called the trainer before eventually deciding he couldn't carry on. we're not sure what the injury is at the moment. it means johanna konta is the only british player left in the competition. and it was a routine win for world number one novak djokovic. a 6—16—4 6—3 victory over henri laaksonen sees him move into the third round in paris. he's aiming for his second grand slam title of 2019 the uk's first 5g mobile phone network, offering much faster download speeds, launches today. ee has switched on the network in london, cardiff, belfast,
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edinburgh, birmingham and manchester, but customers will need new handsets. we have been asking for your questions about how the new technology works and find out what it might mean for you, and see whether it is going to be implemented where you live or when that might be. we arejoined by our technology reporter, who is in covent garden. you have been testing out the new 5g grow network there. how has it been going? we have been doing live broadcast using the 5g antenna all day. we are in one corner of covent garden, which one angry cyclist has told me is the most congested corner, so not eve ryo ne most congested corner, so not everyone is happy we are here. we did have one problem at lunchtime so now we are using a combination of 5g and good old—fashioned 4g as well. give us an idea, i can see you
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disappearing occasionally so it is not perfect, but is it quite a decent signal that you have been getting? yes, so the benefit of 5g, at least for broadcasters, is that it isa at least for broadcasters, is that it is a very low latency. so there isa it is a very low latency. so there is a short time between you asking your question and me answering, at least in theory, but because we are using a little bit of 4g, we have not got the full effect of it, but it is supposed to delay that satellite delay effect. let's move on to the questions. i presume eve ryo ne on to the questions. i presume everyone will need a new device to receive a 5g. is that right? absolutely right. you will need a 5g compatible handset. that is going to come at a cost. the cheapest deal ee has is £54 a month, which only gets you 10 gigabytes of data and you have to pay £170 for the handset.
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there are other deals available. because the 5g antenna uses battery power, all the 5g phone is available at the moment are quite big. another question on twitter, and you do keep dipping in and out so it is not entirely reassuring, but what are the predicted speeds of 5g and what regions will receive 5g first? i ran through some of the cities that are going to be getting it first but what regions? yes, the predicted speeds, we are on about 140 megabits per second, that is ten times faster than what you would expect on 4g, and ee says at the best of times, if no one else is using the signal around you, you might get one gigabit, similar to a fibre—optic connection. rory was here this morning when the square was a lot less busy and he managed to get 600 megabits per second. i have not been
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able to match that now. which regions? there were six major cities, one in scotland, wales, northern ireland, three in england, but it will roll up to more cities later in the year. and a related question, great news, for those in the cities, but what about rural areas where mobile coverage and speed is patchy and fixed line roll—out of fibre is minimal? speed is patchy and fixed line roll-out of fibre is minimal? it is a lwa ys roll-out of fibre is minimal? it is always frustrating when the cities get all this latest technology and if you live in a rural area you can't even get a good 4g signal. this is not going to change that. ee told me the focus is on capacity, so ina big told me the focus is on capacity, so in a big city, you have that effect sometimes, if you go to a concert, eve ryo ne sometimes, if you go to a concert, everyone is trying to upload videos, sg everyone is trying to upload videos, 5g is about solving capacity problems like that. ee told me it's coverage geographically is about 85%
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for 4g. it wants to get that up to about 95%. that could take another ten years. and the government could come up with guidelines to encourage networks to offer more coverage. how much more energy intensive is a 5g network compared to the existing 4g system ? network compared to the existing 4g system? nice question. i asked ee this. they say the antennas are not particularly more energy intensive but where they have added 5g antenna is next to the 4g antennas, they are pumping out twice as much, so there is an increase in power consumption while they are rolling this out, but in time they will switch off some of the older transmitters, once 5g carries voice calls, we might not need to g, so they might switch off older transmitters and hopefully they will not be too much of an uplift in energy consumption. and the health implications of all this,
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what are the health concerns that reputable researchers have found so far? in other words, reputable researchers have found so far? in otherwords, are reputable researchers have found so far? in other words, are the health concerns about the masts in particular? one concern is that 5g requires more transmitters. you might have a transmitter on each bmp might have a transmitter on each lamp post, for example, but radio waves have been studied for years. they are one of the most investigated areas. we have had waves for years. this is not some new type of radio wave. we have been using these frequencies for a long time and a lot of research has gone into that. ee told me it's transmitters are well within the guidelines set internationally by organisations like the world health 0rganisation. organisations like the world health organisation. one more question, this is where we stray into international politics. i have a huawei phone, is the company involved in the network? huawei
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technology is used by the major telecoms companies in the uk. all this concern we've had about huawei is whether it should be at the core of our network. if the main bit of the network is run on huawei technology, if the government of china wanted to launch a cyber attack, they could potentially turn off our mobile networks and that would have been plications for our emergency services if they were using the mobile network. the idea is to make sure that huawei is not at the core of the network, but it is ok to have it at the end of the network, which is things like your handset, because if huawei are able to turn off your phone, it is not a huge problem. and if we were using a huawei transmitter to broadcast this into the bbc, if there was an attack, we would not get on the air but the world would continue turning because it has not affected the core network. and a last question from
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me, can you quantify how big a revolution is 5g? is it really going to change our lives dramatically? there are a few things it will do. there are a few things it will do. there was a faster download speeds mean you can download a movie very quickly, but you can already download a movie fairly quickly if you are using 4g. their capacity is a big benefit because if you are at a big benefit because if you are at a concert, everyone will be able to connect to the 5g transmitter at the same time so you won't get that situation where you can't get on the internet way too many people are using it. even in covent garden, sometimes the internet is a bit patchy. and because they will be so many more access points, in theory you will be able to notjust connect things like our phones to the internet but all our devices. we might have lamp post taking temperature and pollution readings and feeding them back to a data centre so it opens up a lot of possibilities for wider data use as well. great to talk to you. thank you very much. not a bad 5g signal
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in the end. but not perfect. it's often mainly younger people who are embracing the latest technology, but could older generations benefit the most from driverless cars? scientists believe the vehicles of the future, will help pensioners stay independent and feel less isolated. jon kay has more. electronic voice: where would you like to go today? we'd like to go to the picnic area, please. that would be nice, wouldn't it? yes. maya and jeff are off for a drive... let's go! journey starting. ..but without a driver. in the grounds of their retirement village, they are testing a computer—operated vehicle. this is amazing. it really is. because they don't know how much longer they'll be able to drive, could this help them get out and socialise? this is the future. well, it is the future. oh, gosh. look we're coming up to. sensors on the pods detect hazards.
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whoops! that was a sharp stop! automatic braking then prevents accidents. was it scary? no, it wasn't, it wasn't. it was exhilarating, rather than scary. did you trust it? yes, i did, completely. and i was secure, i had plenty of room, i was comfortable. very impressive. yes. it could be years before these vehicles could be on the roads, but the british team of scientists, psychologists and robotics experts say the pods could work now in enclosed, private spaces, giving residents in homes like st monica's more independence. it's cutting—edge technology, and we're making the future right now, and very privileged to have been a part of that. and also i'm thinking in the future maybe i will actually benefit from one of these myself. when you're older? yeah, kind of an insurance policy. journey starting.
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i went for a ride with 88—year—old monica. turning right. you've made a new friend there. thank you! she is one of 100 older people who have been consulted in the design of these pods. unable to drive, she thinks they have real potential. it can help us to be independent for as long as possible. turning left. they were a bit late saying that. of course, not all care homes will have the space or the money to have this kind of technology. but the developers say older people should be at the forefront of developing driverless cars. jon kay, bbc news, bristol. ben bland is here in a moment he will have the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the government is told to cut university tuition fees in england as part of a package of reforms
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to the funding of higher education. at seven people have died and 21 are missing after a tour boat collision on the river danube in hungary. a boy has been airlifted to hospital after an incident at a theme park in north yorkshire. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. transport giant firstgroup has said it will sell off its us greyhound coach business and spin off its uk bus arm amid pressure from an activist investor to break up the firm. uk car production collapsed last month. it's the biggest fall since the global financial crisis a decade ago. the society of motor manufacturers and traders recorded a production slump of 44.5% in april compared with the same time last year as uk carfactories braced for a possible no—deal exit from the european union on march 29th. telecoms firm ee switches
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on the uk's first super fast 5g network today. it will be available in six major cities with plans to reach 1,500 sites by the end of the year. rival vodafone has confirmed it will launch its own service in seven cities onjuly 3rd, with another 12 by the end of the year. you are going to look for us at the world of football in terms of the financing of football and how much money all the big leagues are worth. we know that football is a big money game and these numbers gave us an idea just how much is involved. the big five european leagues generated a record e15.6 billion in revenue in 2017—18, a 6% annual increase, according to new figures from deloitte. it says the european football market is now worth some e28.4bn. the english premier league was the market leader,
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with record revenues of £4.8 billion, as five teams competed in the champions league for the first time. germany's bundesliga overtook spain's la liga to become the second—largest revenue generating league in the world. it has been boosted by the fact english teams have done particularly well this season. five english teams competing in the champions league for the first time. the final, eve ryo ne for the first time. the final, everyone looking forward to that this weekend. germany's bundesliga overtook spain's la liga to become the second—largest revenue generating league in the world. that is the summary. let's talk to austin houlihan, director in deloitte's sports business group. where is the money coming from? is
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it television deals? the big driver of revenue for the big five european leagues over the last 20 years has been broadcasting revenue and it continues to make up a big proportion of revenues and it is a differentiator in particular for the premier league. to put that in context, the premier league, in euro terms, generates about 1.6 billion more than the next highest revenue generating leak from more than the next highest revenue generating leakfrom broadcasting, which is la liga, so that is where the premier league has its big differentiator. the other big driver is, some of the larger clubs are global brands around the world and so they are able to capitalise on that and grow their commercial reve nu es that and grow their commercial revenues and that is driven overall market growth over the last few yea rs. market growth over the last few years. and do these numbers tell us anything about attendance at stadiums? are they still raking in money from ticket sales and people going there in person? attendances are still strong. in the premier
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league, for the season just gone, over 38,000, stadiums pretty much full. in terms of ticket pricing, a lot of clubs have frozen to get pricing over the last few years. where the growth has really come from is broadcasting and commercial revenue. and ijust from is broadcasting and commercial revenue. and i just wonder what the numbers tell us about wages. are they paying footballers more money across all the leagues or does it vary? the principle of the more revenue you generate them or you can spend, the more you can spend on your playing squad, holds true. when of the key trends over the last couple of years is how clubs around europe have been able to keep the relationship between wages and revenue better in check and that has been helped by uefa's financial fair play regulations. in the premier league, for example, wages as a percentage of revenue is about 59%,
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so that is a trend within the european football market, how clubs have been able to manage that relationship better. and when you look at this, briefly, ijust wondered... is it sustainable for the coming years? that is one of the questions we are often asked, is the bubble going to burst, is revenue going to go down, and it never seems to. the power of top quality sport, the premier league, a driving audience, like few other genres, and when you have got that ability, you will always be an attractive proposition to media partners, to broadcast, two people to go and watch, to commercial partners to partner with, so the overall outlook is pretty healthy. what is your final prediction for the weekend?” ama final prediction for the weekend?” am a liverpool fan so i have to go liverpool. but i think it will be quite tight. thank you very much. he isa
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quite tight. thank you very much. he is a good man! a good, solid liverpool fan. there is no bias on this programme. clearly not! there we go. let's have a quick look at the markets. the ftse100 making gains to date helped by some oil price increases. a little claims for you on what is happening. the first figure is there because of changes to the structure i mentioned. it came under pressure from a key investor to make those changes to sell off the greyhound coach business and so that seems to have gone down well with investors. they share price climbing. and that is the picture. de la rue might they make passports and banknotes, they will always be demand for those.
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yes, but profits get squeezed, and they also said the chief executive is going to be stepping down, so when investors hear that sort of thing, that's when they start to get a little bit concerned. they were talking about profits in 2020, so it is looking ahead, and she's always try to anticipate future fortunes. thank you very much indeed. the weather is coming up in a moment, but before that a pet cat that was stuck on a railway bridge for six days, sparking a major rescue operation, has walked home. five—year—old hatty got trapped on the 30 foot section of the royal albert bridge, which connects plymouth and saltash, on friday. firefighters spent hours trying to rescue her while network rail planned to close the line, to help save her. hetty‘s owner, kirsty howden, described the moment her pet finally returned home.
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it was such a shock to hear her, and a nswer it was such a shock to hear her, and answer the door, and in she trots. so, yes, overjoyed. i know when the firemen left her, they blocked off the gap she was in so she could no longer walk out onto the parapet, the ledge of the bridge, so i am hoping that maybe forced her to jump up hoping that maybe forced her to jump up through a hole and she ran back across the tracks. a lovely happy ending. let's see what the weather forecast is for the next few days. we have a summer like weather over the next few days. quite a different story for the rest of today. this is what we have seen for the last few hours. patchy cloud. further north, the cloud has been thickening and we are going to see more rain for northern ireland, pushing further into scotland and affecting the far north of england at times. further south, in some sunshine, it is going to be really warm. for northern
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scotland, in the colder air, temperatures barely making double figures so quite a contrast. we have still got some rain to come this evening. a lovely end to the day in the sunshine. more cloud arriving overnight tonight. the rain in the north becoming lighter and more patchy but we still have cloudy skies for the most part. and a really warm night for the bulk of the uk. we are still in that cold air in northern scotland. so we have got some sunshine for england and wales tomorrow. probably a bit more cloud than today. wetter weather coming back into northern ireland. further into scotland. and also affecting the far north of england. and we will have this steady south—westerly breeze for the most pa rt south—westerly breeze for the most part and the rain continuing to accumulate over the hills of western scotland. they could be as much as two inches. those temperatures through the central belt around 17 degrees. not quite as warm as today for england and wales but not far off. there is likely to be more
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cloud. by the time we get a saturday, that loud band is more across england and north wales. that is moving northwards. then we have got some sunshine and a few showers but much more sunshine across south wales, the midlands and south and on saturday. a slight change in the wind direction to break the cloud that more and give us more heat. and wetter weather starts to arrive as an area of low pressure pushes close to the uk on sunday. we have got a band of rain pushing steadily eastwards. ahead of it we could get some sharp showers. temperatures may get as high as 23 or 24 across east anglia before those showers. but with stronger winds we are drawing in fresh with stronger winds we are drawing infresh air with stronger winds we are drawing in fresh airfrom with stronger winds we are drawing in fresh air from the west and that sets the scene for next week when things are looking much more u nsettled. things are looking much more unsettled. showers and longer spells of rain and it looks like it will be cooler everywhere.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm ben brown. today at four: the government is told to cut university tuition fees in england as part of a package of reforms to the funding of higher education. my my view is very clear. removing maintenance grant for the least well—off students has not worked, andi well—off students has not worked, and i believe it is time to bring them back. at least seven people have died and 21 are missing after a tour—boat collision on the river danube in hungary. a boy has been airlifted to hospital after an incident at a theme park in north yorkshire. the uk's first next—generation 5g mobile network is switched on but is only available
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in certain areas. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. how are england doing? they are doing pretty well in what might bea they are doing pretty well in what might be a tight match to open the tournament, jofra archer has taken two wickets, forcing another to retire hurt as the home nation aims for a victory. thanks, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. this weekend is the start ofjune, the start of summer — are we going to have some light weather? join the light of all the details. also coming up in news nationwide, preparations are under way in bristol for a street party and iftar feast for 5,000 people as ramadan comes to an end.
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hello, everyone, iam ben brown. a major review into higher education funding has recommended that university tuition fees in england should be reduced to £7,500 a year. it also says that maintenance grants to support poorer students, which were scrapped three years ago, should be reinstated. the report, commissioned by the government, calls for loans to be written off after 40 years, rather than 30 at present, so that graduates would be repaying their debt for longer. here's our education correspondent frankie mccamley. six students at one college, each with a different plan for theirfuture. some want to go to university. for others, apprenticeships are on the cards. for francesca—lily, money is
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a big part of her decision. i care for somebody. they can't afford to work because they are disabled. so it makes it harder to then think, "0h, i'll go off to university and have this £40,000—50,000 debt." if they lowered the fees, would that make a difference? i believe you can't put a monetary value on education, so whether that be 7500, 9000, i think so long as the quality of the education is significant enough. lauren chose to do an apprenticeship but would have liked more support, like those at university. i've got a family, a household to run, and i'm on the same basic rate of pay as a 16—year—old doing the same apprenticeship. but i think a grant or a bursary or even a loan would be more attractive to apprenticeships. the outgoing prime minister, theresa may, commissioned a review looking at post—18 education in england. it's recommending a cap on university fees of £7500, grants for living costs brought back for the poorest students,
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and tuition—fee loans available for everyone doing advanced qualifications. the current fee, which is high by international standards, can act as a deterrent to disadvantaged groups. a small but significant minority of students are getting poor value from the university experience. at age 29, graduates in some subjects from some institutions earn less than their peers who did not study for a degree. students would be expected to pay back loans up to 40 years, ten years longer than the current system. the impact is regressive, it's actually graduates who earn less who are going to be contributing more for longer. the review came about because there was a feeling amongst ministers that university costs were just too expensive. there's also political pressure from other parties, looking at reducing tuition fees or scrapping them altogether. but with change
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at the top of government, some are concerned this latest review could be ignored. it will be up to the government to decide at the upcoming spending review whether to follow their recommendation. but my view is very clear — removing maintenance grants from the least one of students has not worked, and i believe it is time to bring them back. which still leaves uncertainty for future students when deciding what path to take. frankie mccamley, bbc news, in 0ldham. rescue teams in the hungarian capital, budapest, say there's little hope of finding any more survivors, after a tour boat sank on the river danube. it's thought 21 people are still missing after the vessel carrying south korean tourists capsized in a collision with another boat. seven people are confirmed dead. nick thorpe reports from budapest. the rescue effort continued this morning with little hope of survival
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for the 21 people still missing. according to eyewitnesses, the mermaid, a 26—metre pleasure boat, capsized and sank within seconds after she was struck by a large river cruiser. video has emerged allegedly showing the incident. translation: what we can see on the cctv footage is the small boat sailing north, as is the bigger vessel. when they reach the pillars of the margaret bridge, the mermaid turns in front of the viking for some reason, and there was a collision. the mermaid was turned on its side, and within about seven seconds it sank. there were 33 south korean tourists on the pleasure boat at the time and two hungarian crew. this is a busy stretch of water often crowded with both large and small craft. weeks of heavy rain and snowmelt upriver in the alps mean the river is swollen and flowing faster than usual,
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and rescue efforts wese hampered by a continuous downpour. translation: we have 17 units stationed on the shore at different locations. so far, we have hospitalised seven people after their condition had been stabilised, since their body temperature had dropped dangerously. the ambulance service can confirm the death of seven people. attempts to revive them have been u nfortu nately u nsuccessful. as the investigation starts in earnest, there are many questions to answer — first and foremost about the experience and level of training of the crews. the wreck of the tourist ship must now be raised from the bed of the river. it is expected to contain the bodies of many of the missing. nick thorpe, bbc news, budapest. a child has been taken to hospital after an incident at the lightwater valley theme park
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in north yorkshire. police say the six—year—old boy, who was conscious when officers arrived at the scene, has been taken to hospital by airambulance. his condition isn't believed to be life—threatening. police were called at 11:30am this morning, and we are told, this boy, about six years old, he fell from the twister right at this theme park. he fell to the floor, and there are pictures on social media showing that there are paramedics by his side, and the air ambulance arrived, and the air ambulance took him to leeds general infirmary. as he was saying, his condition is not thought to be life—threatening, but he was seen falling from this ride, and the health and safety executive has been notified. i should say that this theme park bills itself as the
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ultimate family adventure. it is clear there were quite a few witnesses, what have they been saying? i got very busy at half term, and we heard from a lot of people telling the story of what happened, one man said that he saw the boy hanging backwards out of this ride, the attempt to right, people in the queue saying that they saw people screaming, they heard people screaming, some people trying to keep the children away from what was happening. they said they saw operators stop the ride and then the boy on the ground, and the parents getting off the ride and leaping over the barriers aren't going to go and see their child. what do we know about this twister right? well, it is said, according to the park's website, that the twister, which this boy was a p pa re ntly twister, which this boy was apparently on, gives an awesome, fun packed experience with the track of seriously tight turns giving riders the impression that they might not make it to the next corner, with the
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threat of plummeting into the tree tops being a constant source of tension for parents and amusement for children. i should say, we have now heard from the theme park itself, and they have confirmed what happened, and i have actually stopped this particular ride, but they have left the rest of the park open. and the boy in hospital now, but condition not life—threatening? absolutely right, he has been treated in hospital. ok, lisa, thank you very much. president trump has called the inquiry by robert mueller into russian interference in the 2016 election the "greatest presidential harassment in history". his comments come after mr mueller made his first public statement about his report in which he refused to exonerate mr trump of obstructing justice. the president also had a few words to say about the british politicians he supports. nigel farage is a friend of mine, and boris is my friend.
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they are two good guys, interesting people. nigel had a big victory, 32% of the vote, starting from nothing. i think they are big powers over there and are doing a good job. that was donald trump speaking earlier. robert mueller has also said justice department policy prevented him from charging a president with a crime. but president trump said his treatment by mr mueller and the media had been a witch—hunt. to me, it was the same as the report. there is no obstruction, that's what we're saying. no obstruction, no collusion, no nothing. nothing but a witch—hunt. a witch—hunt by the media and the democrats, their partners. they keep going, i thought it was finished when the report was released. but it goes on, and the media is the same, he said it was the same
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as the report. i think he is totally conflicted, as you know, he wanted to be the fbi director, and i said no. after he left the fbi, he wasn't happy with what i did. i had to do it because it was the right thing to do. i had a business dispute. and he loves comey. you look at the relationship, he was conflicted. he should never have been chosen. he wanted the fbi job, and he didn't get it, and the next day he was meeting the special counsel. that was donald trump's view. earlier, i spoke to our white house reporter tara mckelvey about president trump's comments. he feels as though the report and also the statement by mr mueller yesterday shows that,
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once again, president trump did not commit any crimes, there is no obstruction ofjustice, there is no collusion between him and his associates and, as mr trump often does, he made it personal by attacking robert mueller and his background, and saying that he was conflicted, and that was part of why he did this investigation. so it was president trump once again, on the world stage. so where is it going to go to now? is congress going to pick this up, or is it effectively all over after robert mueller‘s statement yesterday? democratic lawmakers are very disturbed by president trump's statements and also they are energised by mr mueller‘s remarks from yesterday. an increasing number of democratic lawmakers, and democratic candidates for the next presidency, have called for impeachment proceedings. in the past, it was very much part of the left wing of the democratic party, but more and more democrats are saying they should go ahead with impeachment proceedings against the president. is that a possibility, really, the idea of impeachment, or has that ship sailed, really? it's possible.
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they certainly could go through the impeachment proceedings, the republicans have not exactly endorsed the idea, at least not all the republicans, and so the democrats would have a hard time with it, but certainly if their base of supporters wanted them to go ahead with that, they could. the conclusion is not at all clear at this point in time. the boss of boeing has apologised to the families of 346 people killed in two separate crashes involving the 737 max aircraft. the lion air and ethiopian airways flights crashed within five months of each other, leading to the entire fleet to be grounded. speaking to cbs news, dennis muilenburg said he was sorry for the impact on families, and insisted the company is "committed to safety for the long run". samira hussein reports from new york. the 737 max is boeing's most lucrative plane. it was meant to be the latest answer to the competition from europe's airbus.
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but two deadly crashes in just five months forced global aviation regulators to ground the 737 max. it's anti—stall system, or mcas, was identified as a common factor in both accidents. boeing says it is close to fixing the software, and there have been reports that boeing rushed the plane to market too fast and that it knew of problems with the mcas system before the first plane crash. in an interview with cbs, boeing's ceo said the company remains committed to safety. we can't change what happened in these accidents, but we can be absolutely resolute in what we are going to do in safety going forward. we apologise to the families affected, and more broadly to the travelling public. confidence has been affected. for people who are scared. we have impacted our customers,
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we regret that as well. so we are stepping up, we are taking responsibility, we know we have improvements we can make, and we will make those improvements. we are committed to safety for the long run. the primary focus for boeing is getting the 737 max fleet approved for takeoff. the real test will be if the flying public ever feels safe on those planes again. samira hussain, bbc news, new york. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the government is told to cut university tuition fees in england, as part of a package of reforms to the funding of higher education. at least seven people have died and 21 are missing after a tour boat collision on the river danube in hungary. a boy has been airlifted to hospital after an incident at a theme park in north yorkshire. in sport, jofra archer takes two wickets as england tried to defend
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311 to win the opening match of the men's cricket world cup against south africa, who have since been going along nicely, 125—2 after 22 of their 50 overs. kyle edmund is out of the french open, forced to retire with a knee injury after losing the first two set up a second—round match against pablo cuevas. and another trophy won, but the key architects may not be around long to celebrate, eden hazard and maurizio sarri are very much up in the air. more on those stories just after 4:30. a man has been stabbed to death in a busy street near edinburgh castle in the centre of the city. emergency services were called tojohnston terrace just before two o'clock this afternoon. the man, aged in his 20s, was pronounced dead by scottish ambulance service staff. police have arrested another man in connection with the incident and are appealing for witnesses.
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tony blair's former spokesman alastair campbell has welcomed reports that the labour party may review the decision to expel him from the party because he voted liberal democrat in the european elections. it comes after the shadow attorney general, shami chakrabati, told today programme this morning that the move would be reviewed. mr campbell tweeted to say he was pleased if it's true that his expulsion from labour is being reviewed, although he said he had not heard anything officially yet from the governance unit. researchers say people who eat ultra—processed foods, such as chicken nuggets, ice cream and some sugary breakfast cereals, tend to be less healthy and die earlier. the studies in france and spain suggest levels of consumption of such foods have soared, but the findings aren't conclusive. here's our health and science correspondent james gallagher. this is ultra—processed food. they're the foods that have been through the most industrial processing and often have a long
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list of ingredients on the packet. it includes items like fizzy drinks, crisps and read meals. ultra processing is a new term, so do we know what it means? crisps and sweets. chicken nuggets from mcdonald's. processed meats, bacon, sausages. pasta, white bread that has been processed multiple times. a lot of stuff in packets. processed hams, that sort of thing, little chicken bites, that sort of stuff. heavily processed foods, like burgers, are everywhere in our diets. the impact on health was assessed in two studies which followed more than 100,000 people for up to a decade. so what did the two studies show? the first look at ultra—processed food and death, and it showed that for every ten deaths in people eating the least ultra—processed food, there were 16 in those eating
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the most, a 60% increase. the second study looked at heart health, and that found four people eating the least ultra—processed food, there were 242 cases of cardiovascular disease in every 100,000 people every year. now, in people eating the most ultra processed food, there were 277. the authors of the study say there is now mounting evidence that ultra—processed foods may be harmful and the research comes out hot on the heels of trials showing these types of foods make us eat more and put on weight. however, much more work is still needed to explain why industrially processing food might have a detrimental effect on our bodies. until then, experts have expressed caution and say these studies are not definitive proof of harm. what we actually need to know is what's behind these associations. is it the ultra—processed foods, and the nutritional content of them, some kind of additive that is in them, or something to do with the people's lives of the people who are eating more of them? and i think before we make any changes orjump to any conclusions,
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we really need to find out a bit more about it. but while the term ultra—processed might feel new, the health advice is very familiar — a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, nuts and seeds also happens to be one full of unprocessed foods. james gallagher, bbc news. israel is to hold fresh elections, after the prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, failed to form a new coalition government. mr netanyahu's attempts to form an administration were hampered by differences between secular and religious parties. he says that he is confident of winning the snap poll taking place in september despite criticism from opposition parties. it is the first time in israel's history that a prime minister—designate has failed to form a government. narendra modi has been sworn in as india's prime minister for a second term after winning a landslide majority in the general election. mr modi took oath at a ceremony held in new delhi, attended by thousands
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of people, including leaders across the political spectrum. a new cabinet from his bj party has also been sworn in. mr modi made promises in his victory speech about development and inclusiveness, but critics say he faces several economic and foreign policy challenges ahead. here, the proportion of low—paid workers in britain — those on less than £8.52 per hour — has fallen to its lowest level since 1980, according to a new report. the resolution foundation, a think—tank focusing on people on the lowest incomes, found that the number of low—paid workers dropped by 200,000 last year and suggested it could be eliminated altogether by 2020. the uk has a long—standing low pay problem, but which is being eroded thanks to the higher minimum wage that was introduced in 2016. at the moment, there is
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a political consensus, it seems, in favour of pushing the rate higher, which is good news because it would further reduce the number of people on low pay. but going into uncharted territory, we need to be careful about how we make that change. the uk's first 5g mobile phone network, offering much faster download speeds, launches today. ee has switched on the network in london, cardiff, belfast, edinburgh, birmingham and manchester, but customers will need new handsets. here's our technology correspondent rory cellan—jones. the first new masts have been fitted out, the network has been switched on. now 5g can make the mobile internet reach everyone and everything a lot faster — at least, that's the promise. you'll be able to enjoy much faster speeds. that means you can download things like box sets in seconds rather than minutes. it means you'll be able to do multiplayer gaming in augmented reality. at first, ee is just switching on the network in six cities across the uk,
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and even there coverage will be patchy. for now, speeds will be roughly five times as fast as 4g, but eventually the new network should connect millions of things as well as phones to the network, everything from driverless cars to dustbins. the very few people who have one of these phones on launch day may find the 5g revolution gets off to a bit of a slow start, but at least the uk is at or near the front of the pack with this technology. there is, however, one problem. ee and other operators are dependent for some of their equipment on one controversial chinese company. huawei, according to the americans, poses a security threat, and they're urging the uk government to ban it from involvement in 5g. this analyst says an outright ban would have a serious impact. i think it's going to be very negative for the uk. it means we will lose a near leadership position in 5g in europe,
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and it will slow everything down, and that's disappointing for the networks, but as a consumer i would be disappointed too. the 5g revolution is getting under way, but even without bumps in the road, it'll be three years before it stretches right across the country. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. we arejust we are just hearing that the 5g network and a controversial role of technology giant huawei in britain's plans for a 5g network, they will be discussed, not surprisingly perhaps, by donald trump when he comes here in the next few days, and prime minister theresa may, that is according to a british government official being quoted on the reuters news agency. let's talk more about that 56 news agency. let's talk more about that 5g network, as we were saying, it has launched in several cities, including in london, and at covent garden sarah walton is there, well, is it wonderful? what has it been
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like? well, look, ithink well, look, i think it is fair to say we have seen a few teething problems with what is a very new technology today. we were hoping to be broadcast you live on the 5g network, and certainly that is what we we re network, and certainly that is what we were doing earlier today come about through the day we have seen that signal slow down, and i have been told that is because the number of people out here now, just to show you an example, we are now getting on this 5g enabled phone, the speed test here, we have an internet speed of about 170 megabits per second, so to put that in context, if you are at home right now, your home internet is probably giving you something like 40—50 megabits per second, so it is pretty good, but not what we were saying earlier today, we were getting speeds of about 500 megabits per second, certainly ee in some of the tests they have seen 800 megabits per second. if we all started getting that another mobile phones, things
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that another mobile phones, things that we spend all day doing on our phones, on the internet, you know, downloading high quality films and television, streaming music, putting pictures on social media, we would be able to do it pretty much instantaneously. as you say, only really available in a limited number of places, you have to buy a special phone and have the right mobile phone and have the right mobile phone contracts to be able to access it, but there are plans to bring it out soon to more towns and cities across the country, also more mobile phone provider is planning to launch their 5g networks in the next few months, so what we will see in the near future is this months, so what we will see in the nearfuture is this becoming months, so what we will see in the near future is this becoming far more available across the country, may be some issues to iron out, but ee say they are doing that, as will the other providers.” ee say they are doing that, as will the other providers. i guess there are bound to be teething problems, but when it does get fully under way, how revolutionary do you think it is going to be for people? you know, will people be able to do far more than they can now claim
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absolutely, they hope is that this is going to lead to development, new technology, that we have not imagined yet. the uk was quite slow to bring in 4g, but off the back of that we got brand—new things being created, like apps where you can order a cab, where you can order your takeaway meal, whole businesses whose business model is based around an app that exists online that you use when you are out and about. now, sg use when you are out and about. now, 5g gives you a much faster intranet connection, so they thought is that more and more devices will be able to connect to the internet, so things like driverless cars that are going to really need a very fast, very reliable intranet connection to work, 5g and 5g across the country, which is about three years away, looking at the current rate of growth, that could make driverless car isa growth, that could make driverless car is a reality on the streets of the uk. sarah, thank you very much
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indeed, sarah walton with the latest from indeed, sarah walton with the latest fro m cove nt indeed, sarah walton with the latest from covent garden, one of the areas where the new network has been launched. a baby thought to be the tiniest on record to survive premature birth has been discharged from hospital in the united states. saybie was born atjust 23 weeks, weighing only 8.6 ounces, that's 245g, and the same size as a large apple. doctors told her parents that she had just hours to live and transferred her to intensive care at a hospital in san diego. but she's beaten all expectations and, five months later, has been discharged, weighing a healthy 5.6 pounds or 2.5kg. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello again. a real mixture of weather coming up this afternoon, for some of us quite cloudy, others seeing outbreaks of rain, particularly across the north
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and the west of the uk. meanwhile, for much of england, cloud tending to break to allow some warm spells of sunshine. that said, we do have some showers pushing across northern england now. where the sunshine comes out, feeling warm and humid with highs of 23, and even further north not much sunshine. it's not exactly cold, 18 for example in belfast. similar temperatures there in glasgow overnight. there will be some further pulses of rain coming and going across the north of the uk, across much of england and wales is dry, and it's mild for most of us, although the cool air still loitering across the far north of scotland. that takes us to friday's forecast, and it's a wet day coming up for northern ireland and scotland with heavy persistent outbreaks of rain, particularly for western scotland, where we could see some localised surface—water flooding issues, big puddles building up on the roads further south, cloud breaking, and again feeling warm in the sunshine with temperatures up to about 23 degrees once again.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines... the government is told to cut university tuition fees in england, as part of a package of reforms
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to the funding of higher education. my my view is very clear. removing maintenance grants for the least well—off students has not worked and i believe it is time to bring them back. at least seven people have died and 21 are missing, after a tour boat collision on the river danube, in hungary. a boy has been airlifted to hospital after an incident at a theme park in north yorkshire. sport now on afternoon live with hugh ferris. we are talking about the cricket world cup, england and south africa. south africa are at the crease. they are. south africa chasing 312 to win the first game of the men's cricket world cup. if england's innings is anything to go by, regular wickets are going to be the key if they are to win — and the hosts have just made some key breakthroughs. the day started very badly for england, withjonny bairstow out
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for a golden duck in just the second ball of the innings. 40—year—old leg spinner imran tahir bowling the first over. but the recovery involved four half centurions, including ben stokes who top scored with 89, helping england to 311—8 in their 50 overs. jofra archer made the hosts' first breakthrough of south africa's innings. an immediate impact for the team's new fast bowler. that was one of two wickets he'd ta ken. then the crucial wicket of quintin dick clark, taken by liam plunkett, for 68 —— de kock. and in the last few minutes, jp dominique following him back from the crease. —— jp duminy. they have had 26 overs out of 50 but it will be important for england take those wickets regularly, because their score was a
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little below par. you can follow it on5 little below par. you can follow it on 5 live sports extra, in play highlights and much more available on the bbc sport website and app. pretty finely balanced. let's talk about the tennis, a bit of a disappointment for kyle edmund today. yes, the circumstances that forced him out of the french open will be disappointing for him. kyle edmund is out of the french open after being forced to retire with a knee injury when two sets down in his second round match. the british number one was trailing uruguay‘s pablo cuevas in paris. and at 2—1 down in the third, he called on the trainer before eventually deciding he couldn't carry on. it means johanna konta is the only british player left in the singles in paris. serena williams struggled in her first match at roland garros, but not in round two, beating the japanese challenger nara in straight
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sets. two of the key architects of chelsea's europa league victory are flying home with their futures at the club uncertain. manager maurizio sarri has delivered third place in the premier league and a european trophy. and he says he's done enough to keep hisjob, but if the club decide to move on, he could be tempted to return to italy, where thejuventus job is availalbe. meanwhile, star player eden hazard seemed to suggest last night's final in baku was his last game for chelsea. there is a big debate on social media at the moment as to where eden hazard stands in the list of great chelsea players and the consensus seems to be that he is right up there, after seven years, two league titles, and fa cup, league cup and now it seems like he has signed up with a starring performance here in baku in the europa league final against arsenal. two goals and an assist, he ran arsenal ragged in their 4—1 win and the language he
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used suggested this would be his final game for the blues, it seems he is off to real madrid, a move he has been hankering afterfor at 12 months. promoter eddie hearn says deontay wilder's decision not to face anthonyjoshua next is "embarrassing". joshua's hopes for an undisputed world heavyweight title fight were dashed when wilder revealed he will next defend his wbc belt against luis 0rtiz, who he first beat last year. joshua puts his own wba, ibf and wbo belts on the line against andy ruiz in new york this saturday. don't get me wrong, i believe wilder does want to fightjoshua and i know joshua wants to fight wilder, but wilder hasjust been joshua wants to fight wilder, but wilder has just been told and advised to take another route. it will be bigger next year... and he's right, but someone might lose. a year ago we tried to make this fight and it was said, this fight will be bigger next year. they were right, it is twice as big now as it was last year. it is twice as big now as it was last yea r. let's it is twice as big now as it was last year. let's not get greedy, we got a chance for the world to stand still for a fight in a sport we
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love. we should be trying to deliver that. you can listen to live commentary of anthonyjoshua's fight with andy ruiz on radio 5 live. they will be in the ring, we think, around 4am on sunday morning. just to let you know, there has been another wicket at the oval, south africa 144—5, a run out courtesy of ben stokes, the top scorer with the bat, making an impact in the field as well. pretorius run out for one, it is going to be a thrilling conclusion. that is all the sport for now. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to seb choudhury, who's in easton in bristol where preparations are underway for an iftar feast for 5,000 people.
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and carol malia is in newcastle — where a group of parents have joined thousands around the country to petition the government against cuts to the special needs budget. so, first to seb and we are going to talk about iftar. what exactly is happening where you are? well, it couldn't have been a much lovelier day than this for bristol to prepare for the grand iftar street party, you can see all the preparations going ahead. the road will be closed ina bit going ahead. the road will be closed in a bit and 5,000 people from around the community are going to descend on the street to break their fast with the muslim community here. so this started in 2017 as a response to the london terror attacks. then they had 1,500 people come here and take part in the grand ifta r. come here and take part in the grand iftar. a year later, that doubled to 3,000 people and, this year, it is
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expected to be over 5,000 people taking part. so part of the reason, the muslim community want to embrace the muslim community want to embrace the community around them and let them know about themselves, their faith and what they do and i have been looking at one of the families who have been telling me about what fasting means to them in this holy month of ramadan. to begin with, on the first or second day, it is hard about your body gets used to it and you just get part of the routine can you just get part of the routine can you don't feel it. you become quite patient and resilient and you feel a lot for other people, the people who are deprived, who don't have enough food while living in poverty, so your heart becomes really soft. so, obviously, there fasting is the key pa rt obviously, there fasting is the key part of ramadan and the fast tonight brea ks part of ramadan and the fast tonight breaks at around 918 pm, when 5,000 people will break the fast with the muslim community on this street here. so, how do you cook for 5,000
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people? the woman who has been doing pa rt people? the woman who has been doing part of that is tehseen majothi, thank you forjoining us. it is quite a task to cook that much. well, it is a veryjoint effort and we have sort of divided the task amongst various communities, you know, just to get a very inclusive feel as well. i am responsible for preparing around 2,000 meals, along with my team and we have got sponsors as well. it is pretty immense, the feast you are putting on, but when you look at it, it is more of a community feel rather than a religious feel, isn't it? it is, absolutely. i mean, the whole point is notjust to absolutely. i mean, the whole point is not just to eat together. i absolutely. i mean, the whole point is notjust to eat together. i mean, obviously food is such a universal thing and it brings people together can use eat together, but it is also communicating with each other. i
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rememberthe very communicating with each other. i remember the very first ramadan, sitting across an english family and the fast was opening quite late on that day but they broke their fast, they had not eaten, so they waited for us to, you know, break the fast with a date and then we shared the food and we talked about various things as well. and it is that communication that really makes everything. tehseen, you have a lot of work to do and i will let you get on with it. thank you very much. so thatisit on with it. thank you very much. so that is it here, we are going to be live at 6:30pm from the grand iftar and so anyone who is going to be watching will find out what this street really feels like as a street party. seb, how long does it all go on for? well, the breaking of the fast is at roughly 18 minutes past nine, and people sit down to eat so it could go go on until well after ten, it is quite a street party. and great weather. seb, thank you very
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much, more from you on bbc points west. let's go to carol in newcastle. parentsjoining west. let's go to carol in newcastle. parents joining thousands of people from around the country petitioning the government against cuts on special needs, just explain what it is they are angry about and what it is they are angry about and what it is they are angry about and what it is they want. i think we are looking at a bunch of parents who have been driven to distraction, not knowing what to do with their children who are different, whojust what to do with their children who are different, who just require that little bit of extra support in the classroom and, as you say, cutbacks have been made to the education budgets in their individual schools, there has been perhaps a rise in exclusions they have had to deal with for their children, who may be seen to be disruptive and in one case, we suspect, one woman said 14,000 support staff have been lost across the country in the last year alone, these are people who would normally be very much hands—on with the children, who need that extra bit of help to just focus on their work. we have been following a mother called emma and her son james, who is now 13 and he was
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diagnosed with adhd and autism, and he needs extra help in the class. but emma, herself a teacher, by the way, has added it all up and james has missed 29 months of schooling in the last five years and she speaks very well on this issue. she is a big part of this group that has headed to london today to hand in a petition to ask for more investment from the government and this is what she has to say. we've had 14,000 support staff lost in the last 12 months. that has catastrophic damage and impact upon children with special educational needs, because those key individuals support our children within our classrooms. we are now at the point where children have to be broken before they get support. if we had the funding to support. if we had the funding to support our children through early intervention, we would have more of our children intervention, we would have more of ourchildren in intervention, we would have more of our children in mainstream and we wouldn't be looking for specialist provisions. so the parents have some specific demands, things they want to change. i think emma speaks very well on that, she says it all, what they want is a bit of extra support,
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extra understanding, more investment and that could really, if it comes at an earlier stage in the child's schooling, it could make all the difference and save lots of heartache later on. that is what the parents want today and i suspect this protest will go on far beyond what we have seen today in london, as it gathers strength. carol, good to talk to you, thank you so much, in newcastle. thanks to two seb in bristol. and if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer. and a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. a row that's lasted more than five years between the philippines and canada over the dumping of tonnes of rubbish, has been resolved. back in 2014, the authorities
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in manila discovered canada had sent more than 100 shipping containers of household waste rather than recyclable plastics for disposal, breaking international law. now canada says it's willing to take the rubbish back. howard johnson has more. customs officials are busy at work this week, fumigating canada's controversial containers. the dispute dates back to 2013 and 2014, when more than 100 containers were sent to the philippines in a private business deal. but the paperwork was falsified and said their contents were plastic waste. when the containers were opened, inside, a mix of recyclables, but also household waste and used adult nappies. a deadlock meant the waste festered in a manila port for half a decade, then last april, just months ahead of crucial mid—term elections, firebrand philippine president roderigo duterte took up the issue. we'll declare war against them.
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load the containers to a ship and advise canada, i will advise canada that your garbage is on the way. canada agreed to pay for the waste's return but when they missed the recent deadline, duterte said he wanted his government to shoulder the cost. the row has played well with the philippine electorate. i am happy about it. in the philippines, there is a lot of trash here already. i think the way the president handled it is, it's good because he imposed our right as a sovereign country. this saga comes to an end today after more than five years. the philippines are about to export their rubbish back to canada. what started as a threat by president roderigo duterte also appears to be influencing other countries here in southeast asia. this week, malaysia said it would send 3000 tonnes of waste back
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to developed countries, including the uk, for improperly labelling rubbish as recyclable goods. environment groups say today's shipment detracts from further abuses of the system. this waste was discovered in spot checks. so they're from falsified documents, smuggled in, literally. so i think really we should call it waste trafficking. although far away in the philippines, today's shipment has prompted developed countries to look a better ways of dealing with their waste closer to home. howard johnson, bbc news, subic bay. ben bland is here — first a look at the headlines on afternoon live the government is told to cut university tuition fees in england, as part of a package of reforms
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to the funding of higher education. at least seven people have died and 21 are missing, after a tour boat collision on the river danube, in hungary. a boy has been airlifted to hospital after an incident at a theme park in north yorkshire. the health and safety executive says its team is now on site and is assisting the emergency services. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. transport giant firstgroup has said it will sell off its us greyhound coach business and spin off its uk bus arm amid pressure from an activist investor to break up the firm. uk car production collapsed last month. it's the biggest fall since the global financial crisis a decade ago. the society of motor manufacturers and traders recorded a production slump of 44.5% in april — compared with the same time last year — as uk carfactories braced for a possible no—deal exit from the european union
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on march 29th. telecoms firm ee switches on the uk's first super—fast 5g network today. it will be available in six major cities — with plans to reach 1,500 sites by the end of the year. rival vodafone has confirmed it will launch its own service in seven cities onjuly 3rd, with another 12 by the end of the year. so firstgroup, as you are saying in the headlines, why would an investor wa nt to the headlines, why would an investor want to company to break itself up? in short, it is because there are losses within the group. its annual losses within the group. its annual loss was almost £98 billion... sorry, £98 million, £98 million, though that is significantly less than the 327 million that it lost the year before and this is an important british transport company. it currently operates in something like one fifth of all bus routes outside of london. it also operates
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a number of rail franchises, including great western railway, south—western and tra ns—pennine express , south—western and tra ns—pennine express, serving more than 400 stations. so what are they planning to do with them? they have outlined a number of things they are considering. 0ne they have outlined a number of things they are considering. one is a review of the rail business to decide whether it is still profitable to continue with that. it's uk—based first bus division, which operates services in glasgow, manchester and leicester among others, could also be sold or merged with other partners and it is also looking for a buyer to take over greyhound buses, which it owns and ru ns greyhound buses, which it owns and runs in the united states. and that is interesting, because it says it wa nts to is interesting, because it says it wants to focus more on north america and what they are talking about is mainly the contract they had to run those iconic yellow school buses, so thatis those iconic yellow school buses, so that is where they think future profitability lies. let's talk to russ mould, investment director, aj bell. it is really interesting, this response to the plans they have
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outlined. shares are up and investors seem annoyed by it. outlined. shares are up and investors seem annoyed by itm outlined. shares are up and investors seem annoyed by it. it is certainly a step in the right direction. —— investors seemed buoyed. the investors are saying it is nothing to do with them, it was in the pipeline anyway but the share prices responded, but don't forget, the share price down at around about £1.10 is down from an all—time high of over £8 a decade ago and the problems that led to that decline predate the current chief executive matthew gregory but he is looking to do something about the problems that have taken the share price to where it is. their share prices are but one that is down is della roo, the makers of bank and passports and earlier, ben and i were talking about the fact that surely there is a lwa ys about the fact that surely there is always a market to make those
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things. yellow speaker there is one banknote in venezuela for which it looks like they haven't been paid, and that has lost their money and they have lost the contract for printing british passports to a french company, there was a bit of an uproarabout french company, there was a bit of an uproar about that and they have also said there is pricing pressure for the privilege of printing country boss mike and profits are under severe pressure for the coming year the chief executive martin sutherland said he would leave his post. the markets took them down by about a third by the close. something we talk about often as the trade war between the us and china, the world's biggest economies, it has a bearing around the world, a knock—on effect and it seems like it is ratcheting up rather than easy. we have the chinese foreign minister saying it is naked terrorism from america for its calls on tariffs on all chinese goods and its calls to
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bana all chinese goods and its calls to ban a huawei from its technology networks, so the chinese yesterday talked about perhaps restricting shipments for things that are used in smartphones and batteries in america and the financial markets took terrible fright yesterday, most down between one and two thirds percent. they have rallied a little bit but they are at two—month lows, so someone thinks there are bargains to be had, but the temperatures in the talks between china and the us continues to rise. just briefly, hours and minutes matter when it comes to business and stocks and especially when it is a watch company listing. yes, watches of switzerland has listed in the uk today, you have probably seen it on the high street. the shares have been very well received, up around 10%, the company has received some money to pay down some debt and expand its reach particularly in america and expand its online offering, currently 5% are only online, but not all customers like
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selling on the internet, rolex for one of them, so there might only be so much room for expansion. russ mould, thank you very much for that. 0urtime is mould, thank you very much for that. our time is nearly up as well but a quick look at the markets. that is the picture across europe, allup by that is the picture across europe, all up by roughly the same amount, 0.5% today. ftse-100 all up by roughly the same amount, 0.5% today. ftse—100 benefiting from a rise in oil share prices and that was based on the oil price rising this morning and although that has dipped as the day has won because of concerns about the us china trade war, oil companies seem to held on to most of the gains that they made. and i think that is where we will leave the markets for today. thank you very much indeed. it's often mainly younger people who are embracing the latest technology, but could older generations benefit the most from driverless cars? scientists believe the vehicles of the future will help pensioners stay independent and feel less isolated. jon kay has more. electronic voice: where would
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you like to go today? we'd like to go to the picnic area, please. that would be nice, wouldn't it? yes. maya and jeff are off for a drive... let's go! journey starting. ..but without a driver. in the grounds of their retirement village, they are testing a computer—operated vehicle. this is amazing. it really is. because they don't know how much longer they'll be able to drive, could this help them get out and socialise? this is the future. well, it is the future. oh, gosh. look we're coming up to. sensors on the pods detect hazards. whoops! that was a sharp stop! automatic braking then prevents accidents. was it scary? no, it wasn't, it wasn't. it was exhilarating, rather than scary. did you trust it? yes, i did, completely. and i was secure, i had plenty of room, i was comfortable.
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very impressive. yes. it could be years before these vehicles could be on the roads, but the british team of scientists, psychologists and robotics experts say the pods could work now in enclosed, private spaces, giving residents in homes like st monica's more independence. it's cutting—edge technology, and we're making the future right now, and very privileged to have been a part of that. and also i'm thinking in the future maybe i will actually benefit from one of these myself. when you're older? yeah, kind of an insurance policy. journey starting. i went for a ride with 88—year—old monica. turning right. you've made a new friend there. thank you! she is one of 100 older people who have been consulted in the design of these pods. unable to drive, she thinks they have real potential. it can help us to be independent
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for as long as possible. turning left. they were a bit late saying that. of course, not all care homes will have the space or the money to have this kind of technology. but the developers say older people should be at the forefront of developing driverless cars. jon kay, bbc news, bristol. (tx) the weather is coming up in a moment, but, before that, a pet cat that was stuck on a railway bridge for six days, sparking a major rescue operation, has walked home. five—year—old hatty got trapped on the 30—foot section of the royal albert bridge, which connects plymouth and saltash, on friday. firefighters spent hours trying to rescue her while network rail planned to close the line, to help save her.
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hetty‘s owner, kirsty howden, described the moment her pet finally returned home. it was such a shock to hear her meow and answer the door. i was overjoyed. i know when the firemen left her, they blocked off the gap she was in so she could no longer walk out onto the parapet, the ledge of the bridge. i am hoping that kind of maybe forced her up, tojump up through a hole, and she has run back across the tracks. that's it from your afternoon live team for today. next, the bbc news at five with clive myrie. time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes. hello, again. we've got a real mixture of weather around this afternoon, some of us having cloudy skies, there is some rain across the north
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and for much of england, the cloud breaking, but we do have showers across northern england. where the sun does come out, feeling warm and humid with highs of 23 but further north, not exactly cold, 18 in belfast, similar temperatures in glasgow. 0vernight, some further pulses of rain coming and going across the north of the uk, across much of england and wales, it is dry and mild for most of us, although the coolest loitering across the far north of scotland. that takes us into friday's forecast and it is a wet day coming up in northern ireland and scotland, with heavy persistent outbreaks of rain, particularly for western scotland where we could see some localised surface water flooding issues and big puddles. the cloud breaking further south and feeling warm in the sunshine, up to about 23 once again. that your weather. —— that is.
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today at five: a major review into university funding says tuition fees should be cut to £7,500 a year. the report, commissioned by the government, recommends restoring grants for poorer students, that theresa may admits, shouldn't have been cut. my view is very clear — removing maintenance grants from the least well—off students has not worked, and i believe it is time to bring them back. we'll be getting the view of students, and a university vice—chancellor, on the report's recommendations. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: a six—year—old boy is airlifted to hospital, afterfalling from a rollercoaster at a theme park, in north yorkshire.
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somehow he got out of the restraint and was hanging out backwards from the carriage, his head kind of backwards over
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