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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  May 31, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at 9:00 with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines: business lobby group, the cbi, warns conservative leadership candidates over leaving the eu without a deal. what we are trying to communicate here is the depth and breadth of opposition to no deal in the business community. donald trump says he'll hit all goods from mexico with 5% tariffs until they curb illegal immigration. the lawyerfor shamima begum has written to the home secretary, accusing authorities of failing to protect herfrom being "groomed" by so—called islamic state. new figures from the gp's magazine pulse reveal nearly 140 surgeries closed across the uk last year — up from just 18 in 2013.
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scientists say they've developed a genetically enhanced fungus which can rapidly kill 99% of malaria—spreading mosquitoes. and coming up in our sports bulletin: ben stokes pulls off a stunning catch to help england get off to a flying start in their cricket world cup campaign, as they beat south africa in the first match of the tournament yesterday. good morning and welcome to the bbc news at 9:00. the confederation of british industry has issued another warning about leaving the european union — this time in an open letter to the next conservative leader and prime minister. the cbi tells the candidates
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for number ten in the tory leadership race that a no—deal brexit would cause "severe" damage to british businesses and urges the next prime minister to reach an agreement with brussels. it says smaller companies can't afford the necessary preparations for leaving without a plan. this comes as a 12th candidate joins that leadership race, the former chief whip mark harper. he voted remain in the 2016 referendum, and has suggested that a further delay to brexit could be needed. our political correspondent, jonathan blake is at westminster. good morning. let's begin with the open letter from the cbi first of all, warning again, as it has been for some time, the dangers of a no—deal brexit. are the conservative leadership candidates going to listen? because for some time now,
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the relationship between business and the conservatives has been changing and becoming more difficult perhaps? it has been strained recently and it isn't the first time that britain's biggest lobby group has warned about what it sees as the dangers of a no—deal brexit. but it is certainly a timely warning. because that question of whether the uk will leave the european union at the deadline of the 31st of october with or without a deal, has dominated this contest to become the next conservative leader and the next conservative leader and the next prime minister. so far boris johnson, dominic rab, esther mcveigh are prepared to take the uk out of the eu without a deal. others are arguing that no deal shouldn't be a viable option. the cbi is saying, appealing to those candidates to listen to them and listen to businesses and to say that whilst they will manage, whilst they will get through it somehow, it is by far not the ideal scenario and the
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economy and businesses will suffer asa economy and businesses will suffer as a result. here is the cbi's director—general explaining their argument. businesses are resilient, but let's be absolutely clear. there is no such thing as managing no deal. it is impossible to prepare except for the very biggest companies. 85% of small companies cannot prepare, they haven't got the money, they haven't got the time to be able to put contingency plans in place, so of course the world will carry on spinning. but we would have lost jobs, we'd have lost investment and damaged our economy. it isa it is a clear warning and a clear appeal to the candidates in this race. we are now up appeal to the candidates in this race. we are now up to 12, mark harper, the former chief whip is the latest to enter the race. if you don't recognise the name or the face doesn't ring any bells, he has not beenin doesn't ring any bells, he has not been in government for some time and he is trying to turn that to his advantage. as a backbench mp he is trying to distance himself from
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theresa may and those who sat round the cabinet table with her, saying he can offer fresh ideas and a fresh approach. lam very i am very clear, i am the underdog in this race but i am the only candidate who hasn't been a part of theresa may's government. we are going to get brexit delivered, i have a proper plan to get brexit delivered, which i will be setting out shortly. i will bring a fresh approach to the race, which will be successful. and then there were 12, jonathan. let's talk about labour and alistair campbell, expelled from the party over his decision to vote for the lib dems in the elections. he has been speaking about this, what has he had to say? yes, alistair campbell has been giving his thoughts on being expelled from the labour party, which happened as a result of him voting for the liberal democrats in the european election and announcing that on
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television after the polls had closed. it has been a controversial decision because a lot of high profile party figures have said they also voted for other parties. mr campbell says he will appeal the decision and has accused jeremy corbyn of only listening to those immediately around him. i live in keir starmer's constituency. i think he is a very good mp and that is one of the reasons i voted labour in 2017. i would like to do so again in the next election. where i was living, the area i was, virtually every memberl the area i was, virtually every member i met, who have basically supported the labour party, have said to me, i am voting lib dems. i felt that was where the momentum was and the best thing to do with the single vote i had. mention in keir starmer, when i talk about who jeremy corbyn needs to listen to, i have had it clearly spelt out to me
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from keir starmer, john mcdonnell, from keir starmer, john mcdonnell, from tom watson and emily thornbury, they all think this decision is bonkers. there is no indicationjeremy corbyn all the labour party will reverse their decision, we will have to see how the process goes. as you had, alistair campbell will be appealing against it and he clearly feels a lot of other people and high—profile people in the labour party are currently on his side and don't agree with that decision. but it does highlight the big issues the labour party is grappling with, those disastrous results in the european elections. the style of leadership that has evolved under jeremy corbyn and the direction of the party more broadly. jonathan, thank you very much for that. he saw a clip of the director—general of the cbi a few moments ago. we will be getting more on that when we talk to her at 9:15am so stay with us for that. staying with politics.
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the deputy leader of the liberal democrats, jo swinson, has announced she'll stand for the leadership to replace sir vince cable. he steps down onjuly the 23rd, and nominations to replace him close this friday. her competition so far is the former energy secretary, sir ed davey, who's also said he'll stand. welljo swinsonjoins me now. there is a huge expectation around the lib dems following the party's su ccesses the lib dems following the party's successes in the european elections and the local elections, why are you the politician to take the party forward ? the politician to take the party forward? there is a huge opportunity andi forward? there is a huge opportunity and i am running for the leadership of the lib dems because the country is crying out for a liberal alternative, a liberal movement to ta ke alternative, a liberal movement to take on the forces of nationalism and populism. the liberal democrats should be at the heart of that and i am the best person to lead that.“ there a danger you are being seen at
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there a danger you are being seen at the moment as a one issue party? obviously you have policies on lots of things but the focus on the lib dems at the moment is to get the uk to remain as a member of the european union. the people who have moved here recently, is that a protest vote ? moved here recently, is that a protest vote? how do you get them to stay with you when they have come from labour, the conservatives or elsewhere? we have a clear message, we wa nt elsewhere? we have a clear message, we want to stop brexit and we have the consistency on that and we have the consistency on that and we have the biggest party to have the rallying point on that. why do we wa nt to rallying point on that. why do we want to stop brexit? it is rooted in oui’ want to stop brexit? it is rooted in our liberal values, we want a country that is open, outward —looking and internationalist. we believe that to solve the problems of the climate emergency or terrorism, we need to work with other countries. we are standing up and advocating for those values, which i think people want. and the people like us, who want to stop brexit, share our values and we are saying to them, if you agree with us
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and want the voice for liberalism, joiners, joined the liberal democrats. you think the people who have moved to you, this is a sign of more than vote fury? i think people are looking at our politics at the moment and people despair when they see labour looking to the past and equivocating on an issue like brexit. they see the conservatives being dragged off by nigel farage into a more extreme position. it looks like the frontrunners for the tory leadership contest are on the ha rd tory leadership contest are on the hard brexit wing. there is this opportunity that people want something different and they want the liberal alternative. that is why thousands of people have joined us in the last week alone and i am sure many more will do so. as we look towards the october the 31st deadline and with the leadership candidate saying, if necessary, they will take britain out without any deal. how do you see your strategy
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evolving? do you see any working relationship with change uk, if there was a general election, with there was a general election, with the liberal democrats be prepared to be in the liberal democrats be prepared to beina the liberal democrats be prepared to be in a coalition again as she wants way with the conservatives? many people have criticised you for that. the liberal democrats are clearly the strongest rallying point for this liberal movement to stop brexit and we will continue to work with others in different parties, who share the goal. i have never been a tribal politician, i have always beenin tribal politician, i have always been in favour of working with others. the current state of labour and the conservatives, i cannot see how coalition would work because they are led by brexiteers. the tories will be led by a hard brexiteer and that is at odds with oui’ brexiteer and that is at odds with our values. should we change the political system so that you have different parties, you have a pluralist politics working across party becomes the norm like it is in most countries in the world? yes, we should do that. we have this
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opportunity. this is the reason we should be helpful, there is a better way of doing things, we can't reshape our economy for people on the planet, we can harness this technical revolution we are living through. there is a betterfuture available and the liberal democrats are going to fight for that and i wa nt to are going to fight for that and i want to leave them doing it. jo swinson, thank you very much. president trump is trying another hardline tactic to pressurise mexico to reduce the number of migrants crossing their border into the us. this time he is targeting trade. he says a 5% tariff will be imposed on all goods from mexico — rising to 25% unless, he says, the "illegal immigration problem is remedied". markets have fallen in response. the mexican president has criticised the measure and called for talks on friday. from washington, chris buckler reports. donald trump had said mexico could do more to stop illegal immigrants
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migrating into the united states. large groups are watched by border patrol agents as they try to sneak into america. it is notjust people across this border every day. the president believes this offers an opportunity to put pressure on the mexican government. in a post on twitter, he said onjune the 10th, the us would impose a 5% tariff on all goods coming into the country from mexico and he warned the tariff would gradually increase, up to 25% by the 1st of october. tariffs have become a favourite weapon of president trump. he has use them with his ongoing trade battle with china, to some concern on the stock market. there are firms rattled about this latest dispute, including several of the well‘s largest car manufacturers who have factories in mexico and the huge market in america. they are not alone. some in the white house are worried about
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the white house are worried about the potential wider economic impact and what this could mean for the us mca trade deal between canada, america and mexico. as president trump was finalising his plans, the us vice president mike pence, was north of america's other border to discuss that arrangement with the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau. but it still has to be ratified by each of the countries and these tariffs could put that in doubt. mexican officials are warning they will retaliate and that is sure to test cross—border relationships once again. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. let's get more on this, and i'm joined by gary o'donoghue, our washington correspondent. president trump will be in the uk next week but with your talk about that in a moment. these tariffs, is this a sign of president trump's frustration because he hasn't made
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the progress he wanted to with getting a wall built? the problem he has had in particular this week, there was a huge seizure, if you like, arrest of illegal migrants coming across the border. despite his rhetoric which plays well with his rhetoric which plays well with his pace, there is this problem, as he perceives it, as rising numbers of illegals coming across. congress denied him the huge amount of money he wanted to actually build the wall itself. they are down at the moment of renovating bits, tens of kilometres of the stage are being put in place and renewed. this is him returning to his core issue and theissue him returning to his core issue and the issue he thinks serves him best. but also this interesting combination, the use of trade policy and security policy and the issue of immigration, all wrapped into one, which he thinks is very effective. isn't this going to come back to bite him? surely this will harm american companies as well? yes, is
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the answer to that. american trade is huge. mexico exports $1140 billion across the border into the us. but a lot of the stuff made in mexico, pa rt lot of the stuff made in mexico, part of it have already been manufactured in the us. what companies will do, importing and exporting into the us, they will put their prices up and that will hurt their prices up and that will hurt the american consumer as well. a colossal mistake, is one of the ways the organisations representing importers described it. the american farmers, of course, they will not like it because they explore quite a lot to mexico. let's talk about the visit next week. president trump bringing all his adult children with him as well, as has been publicised quite well. what does he hope to get out of this? this is a moment of recognition for him. the state bits of the state visit has always been something important to him and to
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the white house to get done. they have always been concerned about the question of protest, which is why, the last time i was here covering his visit, you will remember he avoided central london, he skirted around central london because of the baby blimp of him over trafalgar square. but he likes the idea i think of meeting the queen and that kind of pump that will surround that. it gives him some sort of acceptance, if you like. but there is business to be done and the difficulty is, theresa may is leaving three days after he comes. it is difficult to see how he will get anything arranged or agreed with the british government, whose head is about to leave. the timing is certainly awkward. on the issue of oui’ certainly awkward. on the issue of our way, it is reported he will put pressure on the uk and save their could be less intelligence sharing with the united states if the uk goes ahead with allowing huawei, the chinese telecoms firm to become
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involved in the uk's five g network. do you think he is going to follow through on that threat? we saw mike pompeo talking tough when he was in europe last time, talking about this. i have no reason to believe the president will not do the same. there is a wider trade war going on with china at the moment and this is pa rt with china at the moment and this is part of that in many ways. but also, it threatens notjust part of that in many ways. but also, it threatens not just the part of that in many ways. but also, it threatens notjust the uk, us relationship in terms of sharing intelligence and working together with their security services, but this whole what they call the five eyes, english speaking world, canada, australia, new zealand and the other countries involved, there will be a lot of discord in there about how much the chinese will be allowed to be involved in these networks. it won't just allowed to be involved in these networks. it won'tjust be britain and america are turning their ion. gary o'donoghue, great to talk to you. the headlines on bbc news: business lobby group, the cbi,
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warns conservative leadership candidates over leaving the eu without a deal. donald trump says he'll hit all goods from mexico with five percent tariffs — until they curb illegal immigration. the lawyerfor shamima begum has written to the home secretary, accusing authorities of failing to protect herfrom being "groomed" by so—called islamic state. gp surgery closures across the uk have reached an all—time high — affecting an estimated 500,000 patients last year — according to new research. an investigation by the medical website pulse found under—resourcing and recruitment difficulties were forcing surgeries to close with many smaller practices merging to survive. nhs england rejects the figures. our reporter leigh milner has more just say ah for me — that is excellent. every year, millions of people are treated by their local gp. but over the past year,
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the nhs has lost more than 400 fully qualified gps in england and surgery closures across the uk are at an all—time high. according to new figures released by the medical magazine pulse, in 2013, just 18 surgeries shut across the uk. by last year, that number had increased to 138. nhs england, which runs the health service, said it refuted the pulse figures. according to their data, which only covers the past financial year, it had seen fewer closures and patient dispersals. let's just lift this over your hand. the investigation also revealed that gps felt that increasing workloads and recruitment difficulties meant practices were often forced to close as a last resort. how can we help today? speaking earlier this month to the bbc, dr carmel boyhan irvine, who works in plymouth, said something has to change.
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there is a crisis in general practice, it is very real, it is the worst crisis since 19118. its future is injeopardy, there's no doubt about that. as a result of the surgery closures, the research revealed that more than 500,000 people were affected. leigh milner, bbc news. let's go back to that further warning from the confederation of british industry about brexit — we're joined now by the director general of the cbi, carolyn fairbairn, she's at westminster. thank you for your time this morning. what is your fundamental message to the now 12 people contending for the conservative leadership and the winner of course, being the next prime minister? we have written to all 12. we are saying two simple things. first of all, there could be such opportunity for this country if business and government work together. back in business, we can rhys gill the nation, tackle climate change and
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tackle inequality. the second important message is, it is only possible if we have a deal that protects the economy as we leave the european union. the cost of no deal is so great and severe, to companies of all sizes, that this is something that should be absolutely a last resort not a plan a or b. you must be alarmed by some of the leadership candidates who are either openly embracing the idea of leaving on october the 31st with no deal or they would be content to go down that route? i feel hugely concerned by that. i spent so much time with businesses across the country. £20 billion of additional customs fees, ta riffs billion of additional customs fees, tariffs that would rise overnight. the fact we have 150,000 businesses that do not have the systems to be able to trade on wto terms. these are practical issues. we are seeing the cost now, 44% reduction in car
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production last year. headquarters leaving the country. you don't need to look into the future to see the impact of no deal. we do want every conservative candidate to hear directly from the coal face of british business. the relationship between business and the conservative party has changed hasn't it, over this process of brexit so far. where once the conservatives called themselves the party of business, now that relationship has become more strained hasn't it? we do see this as an opportunity. i do think there is some truth in that, i do think brexit has created strains. but there is a chance to rebuild that. this is a time when the uk could have a golden age. we are so well placed to compete in the next industrial revolution, but we need the skills, we need the infrastructure and we need to be carbon free. it is a partnership between business and government that can do that. we are saying, back business and it is an offer at first base to get brexit right. those
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candidates that are saying we will go for a new deal if necessary, are they potential leaders of the conservative party that would make that party no longer the party of business that it has claim to be? we have been frank in every letter to the candidates, any future prime minister, that took action and brexit that damage our economy, damagejobs brexit that damage our economy, damage jobs and investment, brexit that damage our economy, damagejobs and investment, they cannot claim to be the party of business. this is an incredibly important moment for our country in terms of that decision. so any leader who would take the party in that direction, you are saying the conservatives can no longer claim to be the party of business, based on the warning you are saying today? we don't have a vote, we can only talk about the evidence from the coalface of british business, jobs and investment. we are saying absolutely loud and clear, no deal is the wrong way forward. we should be leaving with a deal and we want every
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potential conservative leader to come and talk to us, come and talk to businesses to hear the evidence, because this is so vital for our future. thank you very much. police in hungary have arrested the captain of a ship, which crashed into a smaller tourist boat on the river danube in budapest. the 64—year—old ukrainian national was held on charges of reckless misconduct. at least seven people died, seven others were rescued and 21 are still missing. gareth barlow reports. in a split second, the disaster unfolded. in just seven seconds, the mermaid sank. the a0 tonne boat, forced into the water. no match for the thousand tonne viking. the front of the viking hit the back of the little boat and itjust, it turned broadside in front of the boat and itjust rolled over and then the hull popped up on the opposite side of the ship just a few seconds later and then
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it was down, it sunk. more than 2a hours on, the search continues for those still missing, but hopes are fading of finding anyone alive. the danube is flowing in full force. its waters, just 10 celsius, offering little chance of survival. the focus now for the authorities, to find out what went so terribly wrong. the vikings ukrainian captain has been arrested, suspected of reckless misconduct leading to mass casualties. translation: what we can see on the cctv footage is the small boat, the mermaid, is sailing north. as is the bigger vessel, the viking. when they reach the pillars of the margaret bridge, the mermaid turns in front of the viking, for some reason and there was a collision. the mermaid got turned on its side and within about seven seconds, it sank. in south korea, relatives of the victims joined military search teams on a flight to budapest.
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in hungary, as rescue workers prepare to raise the sunken vessel, candles mark the place where a happy holiday became a tragedy. gareth barlow, bbc news. a lawyer for shamima begum, who left the uk as a teenager to join the islamic state group, has written to the home secretary accusing the british authorities of failing to protect her from being trafficked by islamic state fighters. according to the letter, seen by the bbc, ms begum was "groomed" and "trafficked to isis controlled territory". it says there were multiple failings by the authorities to safeguard the then 15—year—old schoolgirl. in a moment the weather but first let's here what's coming up on the victoria derbyshire programme this morning with chloe tilley. a letting agency has been illegally
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evicting tenants and taking their belongings. my clothes, shoes, towels. they took my shaving machines, they even took my bed sheets. that exclusive reportjust after 10am on bbc two, the bbc news channel and online. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon temperatures will rise further over the next few days, peaking at 27 or 28 celsius. another warm day for all of us but we have some rain in the forecast and that will be heavy across northern ireland and through scotland. quite a bit of cloud this morning, some sunshine across eastern areas and then sunshine developing across south—west england, wales and the midlands. it is in the north—west, the western highlands where we could see a0 to 50 millimetres of rain by the end of the day. temperatures, 17 or 18 celsius in the north—west. further south and east, temperatures up into
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the low 20s, maybe 23 degrees in south—east england. the rain this evening will move further south, fizzling out but as we go through the weekend, there will be cloudy skies on the irish coast with rain. temperatures up to 27 degrees in the south—east. becoming cooler with showers on sunday. goodbye.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... business lobby group the cbi warns conservative leadership candidates over leaving the eu without a deal. the director—general of the confederation of british industry said smaller companies cannot afford the necessary preparations for leaving without a plan. donald trump plans to hit all goods from mexico with 5% tariffs until they curb illegal immigration.
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mr trump said this would rise by 5% each month until october, when the rate would reach 25%. the lawyerfor shamima begum has written to the home secretary, accusing authorities of failing to protect herfrom being "groomed" by so—called islamic state. he's calling for her british citizenship to be restored. the gp magazine pulse has revealed that nearly 1a0 surgeries closed across the uk last year — up from just 18 in 2013. nhs england disputes these figures. scientists have developed a genetically enhanced fungus which can rapidly kill 99% of malaria—spreading mosquitoes. researchers in burkina faso and the united states altered the dna of a fungus to make it produce a toxin normally found in spider venom. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing.
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alastair campbell has refuted that comments he made before the european elections amounted to support for the liberal democrats. tony blair's former spokesman was expelled from the labour party after voting for the lib dems in the european elections. he told radio a's the today programme that tactical voting was not grounds for expulsion. jeremy corbyn just has to look at his own constituency, islington. he has to look at that poll today, a1% of labour members, according to you yougov, did not vote for the labour party. now, he can pretend that he can get rid of all those people and somehow labour is going to build a position that will win a general election, at the moment that seems to me to be impossible. more importantly so far as i'm concerned, unless the labour party adopts a credible, coherent position, commits to a people's vote and campaigns on it,
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then they will be complicit, in my view, and helping boris johnson become prime minister... so if the policy... if the policy stays in the area that it is at the moment, short of saying, there should be another referendum on any brexit deal, you would not be able to vote labour in a general election? well, i voted labour in 2017, i wanted to vote labour in these elections. people cannot take their members and supporters and voters for granted. and jeremy corbyn needs to decide, is he going to listen to the many, the public, the members, the mps, or listen to the few? seamus milne, karie murphy, len mccluskey and andrew murray, they are the people driving this and they are the people risking oblivion for the labour party. worse than that from my perspective is the fact that they are facilitating
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and allowing a brexit that they know is going to damage working people most. i live in keir starmer‘s constituency, i think keir starmer is a very good mp and that is one of the reasons why i voted labour in 2017, and would like to do so again at the next election. but where i was living, and the area that i was, virtually everybody that i met, labour member and nonlabour member, who've basically supported the labour party, said to me, "i'm voting lib dem." and i felt that was where the momentum was and that was the best thing to do with the single vote that i had. and let me also tell you, mentioning keir, when i talk about who jeremy corbyn needs to listen to, i have had it clearly spelt out to me from keir starmer, from john mcdonnell, i have heard it publicly from shami chakrabarti, from tom watson, emily thornberry, they all think this decision is bonkers. jellyfish, seahorses and mussel beds are just some of the species that it's hoped will benefit from new marine conservation zones. the a1 new protected areas have been designated in the seas around england from the coast of northumberland to the seas south of the scilly isles. emily baxter, senior marine
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cooservation officer for the wildlife trust, spoke to bbc breakfast. it isa it is a real landmark moment because we've been campaigning for marine conservation zones we've been campaigning for marine conservation zones for about ten yea rs, conservation zones for about ten years, and they've been designated, bit by bit, but this is the final round of a1 sites that have been designated, so it's great news. and how significant is it, what does it mean in terms of sea life and work will be better protected going forwards? it means that a whole array of underwater habitats and species, from seahorses to deep muddy planes, cold water coral reefs, will be protected from damaging activities going forward. we've been doing some... what is this, that is a seahorse. these shots are all in british waters? some of things we might think are in a zoo some of things we might think are in a zoo from the pacific but they are right here in our own sea? exactly, i think when people watch blue panicked and they see this amazing marine life and they don't realise
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that it marine life and they don't realise thatitis marine life and they don't realise that it is right on our doorstep as well. -- blue planet. we don't a lwa ys well. -- blue planet. we don't always associate the coastline around the uk with exotic, rich marine life, what are the more interesting or unexpected things that you might find? so, some of the sites that have been confirmed today include the smelter, which is a species of fish related to salmon but it is also called the cucumber fish because it has a distinctive, cucumber like smell and that lives in the estuaries around england and scotla nd in the estuaries around england and scotland but it has declined dramatically over 200 years so we're hoping that these marine conservation zones hoping that these marine conservation zones will help the populations to thrive again. is it a challenge for you a marine biologist to try to sort of promote the creatures that you're passionate about, because they're just not as appealing, not as cute, maybe, to use a basic word, as lions and elephants and tigers that we might see on the telly? that's true. i think perhaps some of the weird and
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wonderful creatures are less appealing, but they're vital parts of the food chain which feed the whales and dolphins and seals that we all know and love and are abundant in our seas. so they're a vital part of the picture. our weather presenter sarah has been at durham cathedral this morning to find out about the repair works that are hoped will last two centuries. 325 steps i climbed this morning to get to the top of the central tower of durham cathedral. the cathedral has stood here for about 1000 years nearly, but it's been closed for the past three years for some major repairs. chris, you're the cathedral architect. talk me through how you noticed that the tower needed all these repairs? in 20121 noticed that the tower needed all these repairs? in 2012i carried out my inspection of the cathedral and discovered what every conservation architect dreads, which is the stonework to the top of this parapet
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was becoming loose, it was being jacked up, lifted up, and was starting to fracture and essentially become unstable. so, we're 218 feet up become unstable. so, we're 218 feet up in the air so how do you go about repairing all of this stonework?m isa repairing all of this stonework?m is a huge undertaking, first of all getting scaffolding up here is a huge challenge. everyone of the stones up here at durham cathedral central tower has to be —— had to be dismantled, into the workshop, inspected, repaired, new stones had to be carved where old ones had com pletely to be carved where old ones had completely failed, and then it all had to be brought back up here to be reassembled. this tower has stood here since the 15th century, so how long do you expect these repairs to last now? we have built it incredibly robustly, using mediaeval techniques and molten poured lead so we are confident that it is going to last over 200 years. let's take a
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look at what you have been looking out on the news app. it is about the investment bankjpmorgan, which is going to pay out $5 million, almost £a million, to settle a discrimination case involving pa rental leave for discrimination case involving parental leave for fathers, and the case involves derek rotondo, who said the bank which was due to anyone who was a primary caregiver toa anyone who was a primary caregiver to a newborn. he filed a lawsuit in a class american civil liberties union, the first such settlement of its kind, says the american civil liberties union. he said he simply wa nted liberties union. he said he simply wanted to spend more time with his children. down at number seven, that story we were telling you about, a genetically modified fungus which kills 99% of mosquitoes carrying
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malaria. this is a study which was done, a trial which was done, in burkina faso. and in that study, the mosquito populations carrying malaria collapsed by 99% within a5 days. so, genetic modification produces a spider toxin, the effect of which kills the mosquitoes naturally. more on that soon. let's have a look at the most watched. i'm going to go down to number nine, this is quite fun to watch, spelling bees. quite a big deal in america. and there are some over here as well. it is very good fun to watch these parents attempting to spell these parents attempting to spell these words as well as their children. some of these words i have not even heard of.
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so maybe we can test ourselves. that's it for today's morning briefing. time for the sport. ben stokes says his incredible catch in england's opening cricket world cup win was a fluke. here it is. the catch was the cherry on the top of a man of the match performance from stokes, who helped england to a 10a—run win over south africa at the oval. over south africa at the oval. it's pakistan up next on monday. well, it's ben stokes who's all over the back pages this morning. let's take a look. we'll start with the mail. "ben's blinder", they've gone for. they say stokes enjoyed a "full day out". the sun have gone for "you're a bensation". "stokes stunner."
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"fielder of dreams." photo's caught him mid—air. and the guardian called his catch "out of this world". with that photo again — midair. joffra archer on the bottom left after his three wickets. plenty of appreciation for stokes and england on social media too. "incredible". immediate rection from his former england team—mate james taylor who said the catch was as good as you'll see. former captain michael vaughan was full of praise for bowler joffra archer, who took three wickets and vaughan now says must be part of the ashes squad. to the champions league final, and both tottenham and liverpool are in madrid ahead of tomorrow's final. jurgen klopp has been full of praise for his liverpool side as they go for their sixth european cup title. he says he has "world class players at a sensational club". he's also been talking about what drives him. big an, fortune, blessing of my life, was that i loved to do what my father wanted me to do. i knew my father wanted me to do. i knew my father is very demanding, on his part, he loved slightly talented boy
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doing all that stuff. i remember when i scored four goals in a game andi when i scored four goals in a game and i had a phone call and he said, "i saw your haircut, that's awful." so that was exactly... never mind the game! no! and so, unfortunately, he died before i became a manager, but i know he is now in a better place. as for spurs, it's their first champions league final and they go into the game as underdogs. the momentum could be with them though, after some brilliant late wins in the quarterfinals and the semifinals. and theirforward christian eriksen says winning would mean everything to the club. it would be a dream come true for me, everyone who plays football knows how much, how many people will be watching, i know how many finals i have seen in my life already, i know how much is at stake. so, to be able to win a champions league, not many players has done it in their career, something really special. as for the fans — thousands of them have travelled to madrid, with and without tickets.
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hugh woozencroft is there. good morning, the fans have started to arrive, some of them have been there for a few days already, clearly enjoying themselves? absolutely, you join me in the main fan park in the centre of madrid, activities just getting underway, some rugby players are about to entertain the crowd, wrong sport but nonetheless! we are expecting something like 150 fans of both teens to come, many without tickets, to the centre of madrid, some tickets going for as much as £a500. we will speak to a couple of fans we have managed to track down. quite clearly, you a re have managed to track down. quite clearly, you are a liverpool fan, and terry as well. especially from a totte n ha m and terry as well. especially from a tottenham perspective, why did you have to make the journey? it has got to be done, never made champions league final that before, so you have got to be out here to support your team. what sort of cost has it been? it was over a grand just to
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get here, and a combination with spending money as well, it's not cheap. and still in the market for a ticket? i've not got money for that, there is no two ways about it, them tickets are going for ridiculous money. just got to do what you've got to do. what do you make of livable's chances for this one? the final last year, beaten, one better this time maybe? i think we are a better team this season, i'm confident but slightly nervous. £a500 for a ticket, would you pay it? no chance, i've resigned myself to the fact that i am not going to get a ticket but i am here supporting the team. the atmosphere is building, plenty of festivities, there will be some legends playing a game later on, and later we will see the two sides training at the stadium later on so plenty to look forward to hearing madrid. a quick look now at some of the other stories around today. kyle edmund is out of the french open. he retired hurt during his second—round match against uruguayan pablo cuevas
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because of a knee injury, but says he should be fine for wimbledon. dina asher—smith set a world—leading time in the 200 metres at the diamond league meeting in stockholm. she beat an elite field that included the olympic champion elaine thompson. and anthonyjoshua says a fight with fellow british heavyweight tyson fury will be his focus if he beats andy ruinunior. they fight at madison square garden in new york in the early hours of sunday morning. that's all the sport for now. more from the bbc sport centre at 11.15. the headlines on bbc news... business lobby group the cbi warns conservative leadership candidates over leaving the eu without a deal. donald trump says he'll hit all goods from mexico with 5% tariffs until they curb illegal immigration. the lawyerfor shamima begum has
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written to the home secretary, accusing authorities of failing to protect herfrom being "groomed" by so—called islamic state. an update on the market numbers for you — here's how london's and frankfurt stand at the moment. and in the the united states this is how the dow and the nasdaq ended the day. let's return to our top story now — and the uk's leading business group says the next prime minister must avoid leaving the european union without a brexit deal which would do "severe" damage to businesses. i'm joined now by gerard lyons, chief economist at netwealth investments and co—founder of economists for brexit. thank you very much for coming along this morning. obviously you have a different point of view from the cbi when it comes to the main issue, of their letter this morning, which is talking about the possibility of a no—deal brexit. at the other part of
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that letter talks first of all about the domestic agenda, and there are more points of agreement there, i think? absolutely, the cbi letter is welcome but there are two parts to it, the first part focuses on the economic agenda, and the reality is that since the referendum we have not really focused on that here in the uk. the uk is a very imbalanced economy, weather we remain in the eu or leave, those imbalances and challenges need to be addressed. there is lots of opportunities in my view to address them outside the european union. and hence one can understand why all of the leadership candidates have made the focus on the domestic agenda the key part of their manifesto. therefore, the prime minister hopefully will start to address that domestic agenda. you're saying they've been too busy to focus on that? yeah. welcome to make a success of brexit, whether you voted to leave or remain, the uk has to have a good relationship with the eu, needs to position itself globally and it needs to really address its domestic economic agenda. and we haven't focused
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enough on that domestic agenda. hence the first part of the cbi letter is welcome, although i think it was too general. they need to go into a bit more specifics about how to achieve that. many people would say the politicians need to go into a lot more specifics as well. absolutely. one of the points which carolyn fairburn made to me this morning is that small business particular simply doesn't have the detail it needs to prepare for a no—deal brexit. is that something you would agree with the cbi on, that the politicians and government have failed to give small businesses sufficient information? well, in terms of small businesses, when one looks at it, only 6% of firms sell directly into the european union single market. they account for about 12% of the economy. so we need to ta ke about 12% of the economy. so we need to take them seriously. but they are largely the big firms. for most small and medium—sized firms, the focus is the domestic economic agenda. many of the small firms will
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not be directly impacted by no deal. but when we talk about no deal... they still need the information? absolutely. the challenge has been that war politics has taken precedent. no deal is a plan b, it's a steppingstone to a future free trade agreement. it has a whole host of different deals in the near term, no deal is not an end state in itself, but you're right we should have been doing a lot more preparation for no deal. in the sector i am in, in the financial sector, there has been full preparation for a no deal. other sectors of the economy, maybe not. three sectors are really impacted badly by a no deal, the auto sector, the pharmaceutical sector and the farming sector. but for large parts of the economy, fears about a no deal are misplaced. but what would be really good on the back of the cbi letter is if we work more constructively to what the plan a that works, will be. you say fears
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about a no deal are misplaced but do you accept that those fears absolutely exist. carolyn fairburn said this morning that the evidence from the coal face is that businesses are really worried about the prospect of a no—deal brexit. you're saying they don't need to be... that's not what i'm saying. so what are you saying? uncertainty is not good for anyone. so what we really need to have is a plan a that works. raw politics has decided plan a doesn't work. plan a is a deal? yeah, but you can't always say what you're against. no deal has to be on the table, as your plan b. you can't just say, "we don't like plan a and not have an alternative." remember, the country did vote to leave and therefore we need to have a plan a which allows the country to leave the eu and satisfies the future economic and financial needs of the uk and it has to be said, the eu. in terms of no deal, one should not
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underplay those risks, those challenges. but i think it is important to stress that no deal again is not the planned scenario. and no deal is not an end to state, it isa and no deal is not an end to state, it is a steppingstone. clearly, whichever sector you are in, you need to try and prepare for all scenarios. but the uncertainty and the lack of clarity, lack of vision, is what is adding to the challenge. so, that fear is very real for businesses, you accept? for some businesses, you accept? for some businesses, yes, you can't ignore it but what we also need to acknowledge is that project fear from three yea rs is that project fear from three years ago was misplaced. remember we we re years ago was misplaced. remember we were told that that by this stage we would have 800,000 lessjobs. were told that that by this stage we would have 800,000 less jobs. since the referendum... all sorts of things were said by both sides which we re things were said by both sides which were not exactly borne out.|j things were said by both sides which were not exactly borne out. i am not here to argue the politics but i am saying that the uk economy is incredibly resilient. most economists acknowledge that the uk economy is the most fixable economy in the western world, it adapts and changes. what really is the problem for business is the continued
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uncertainty. so i think what we need isa uncertainty. so i think what we need is a constructive debate to move to the next stage. and would you urge those are currently 12 people who are vying for the leadership of the conservative party, and to become next prime minister, would you urge them perhaps to stop talking up the idea of no deal at this stage and to focus on getting a deal? what i would say is the first half of the cbi's letter on focusing on the domestic economic agenda is really good, and to have a lot more teeth to that from their perspective. in terms of no deal, i would say that no deal has to remain on the table as plan b, and we need to now focus ona plan as plan b, and we need to now focus on a plan a that would work. thank you very much. more on the malaria fighting fungus now — scientists in burkina faso and the us have used genetic engineering to develop a new way to stop the spread of malaria. they've enhanced a fungus using a toxin found in a species of spider, so that the fungus kills the mosquitos that carry the disease.
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i think we can now hear a clip of a scientist who has been working on that. this fungus will recognise that it is on amos quito, the one we are working with only kills mosquitoes and it will burrow through the mosquito until it reaches the blood of the mosquito. once it's surrounded by blood, then we have engineered it to express a specific toxin from a spider from australia. so essentially we are using this natural fungal pathway as a fan of a spider. normally the spiders use their fangs to deliver the toxin, here, we are using the fungus to deliver the toxins for us. our aim is to control the mosquitoes that bite humans and not to prevent transmission of diseases like malaria. this one was the result of
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an effort by scientists in burkina faso, and they spearheaded all of these experiments in this malaria endemic village in burkina faso. italy's mount etna lit up the night sky overnight, with bursts of sweltering hot lava as the sicilian volcano lurched into activity. the eruptions led to rivers of smoking red lava streaming down the southeastern slope of europe's highest and most active volcano. seismic activity started to rise yesterday evening, peaking at around midnight. the 3,330—metre—high volcano can burst into spectacular action several times a year, spewing lava and ash high over the mediterranean island. the last major eruption was in 1992. now you'll need a bit of a head for heights if you fancy this job. it involves abseiling down the battlements of this castle
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on top of the tidal island of st michael's mount in cornwall, as the new head gardener. the job's advertisers say the successful applicant will need the agility of a "mountain goat" in order to care for its exotic garden. before we go, we'd like to leave you with these pictures of two baby ring—tailed lemurs who have become the latest attraction at rome zoo. they were born in april but they're only out in public now. their mothers carry them around when they're young. ring—tailed lemurs are native to madagascar and listed as an endangered species. the population there has shrunk by a quarter in the last 25 years. have a back. good morning, everyone, we've got another one day across the uk, temperatures probably peaking tomorrow at around 27—28dc. uk, temperatures probably peaking tomorrow at around 27-28dc. quite cloudy, though, this morning, that is the scene at the moment in southend—on—sea. you can see we have
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had cloud streaming in from the south—west, it's mainly been advancing toward scotland and northern ireland and beneath that, we've got some outbreaks of rain. further south, a little bit brighter, some sunshine this morning towards lincolnshire, norfolk and suffolk. later on we'll see some sunshine developing for wales and the south—west of england and the midlands, a bit of brightness elsewhere, not so much for scotland and northern ireland, particularly western scotland, heavy rain continuing here, as much as 50 millimetres by the end of the day. wet weather continuing in northern ireland. despite that it is still quite warm. through tonight, that rain across scotland will gradually move south, but there will still be quite a bit of cloud into saturday morning. and it's going to be another mild night, temperatures no lower than about 9—12d. into the start of the weekend, we've still got this south—westerly air stream,
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bringing in all that warm air from the mid—atla ntic, bringing in all that warm air from the mid—atlantic, so temperatures will be higher during saturday than today. and we will start off with some sunshine across many areas, some sunshine across many areas, some sunshine across many areas, some sunshine around the coast of wales, some patchy rain around the coast as well, i think. highest temperatures down to the south—east. even further north, those temperatures getting into the high teens to the mid—20s. some changes on sunday, because this area of low pressure is going to move its way in from the west, and that is going to introduce more cloud. as you can see, quite a bit of rain across these western parts, some heavy showers embedded with that. further east it should be drier and brighter a few showers ahead of that and still very warm across eastern areas. temperatures getting up into the mid—20s. elsewhere, temperatures will come down by a couple of degrees. still fairly warm, and eventually there will be some
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sunshine breaking through here later in the day. into next week, it's going to be cooler, temperatures about average for the time of year. more unsettled, with some showers and longer spells of rain.
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it's friday. it's ten o'clock. i'm chloe tilley. a letting agency has been illegally evicting tenants and taking their belongings, this programme has been told. tenants say they got home to find the locks changed and their rooms emptied. my clothes, my shoes, towels. they took my shaving machines. they literally took everything. they even took my bed sheets. as far as i can see, there's more consumer protection for someone who buys a bathroom plug than someone who rents a property from a letting agent. the father of a british foreign fighter who plans to go to the high court to try to bring his missing grandson back from syria. my grandson's innocent and he's not a criminal and it's my duty

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