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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 2, 2019 6:00am-7:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and rogerjohnson. our headlines today: liverpool are the champions of europe. jurgen klopp‘s team beat spurs 2—0 in madrid to lift the champions league trophy for the sixth time. we were all pretty much crying on the pitch because it was so emotional, it was so big. it means so emotional, it was so big. it means so much to us. it was tottenham's first champions‘ league final, but they say it won't be their last. at least we didn't get thrashed, it could have been a lot worse.
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fears grow for four uk climbers among eight missing in the himalayas. heavy and rain and snow are hampering search efforts one of the biggest shocks in the history of the of heavyweight boxing — anthony joshua loses his three titles to the mexican andy ruinr after a seventh round stoppage at new york's madison square garden. yesterday we got to 27.6 degrees — caller 28 if you like — just to the west of london at heathrow, officially the hottest day of 2019 so officially the hottest day of 2019 so far. fresh air is on the way for the week ahead. it's sunday the 2nd ofjune. our top story: liverpool have become european champions for the sixth time after beating tottenham in last night's champions league final. the reds won the game in madrid 2—0 to givejurgen klopp his first trophy as liverpool boss. 0ur sports reporter
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david 0rnstein was at the game. backin back in possession of the trophy they have come to love the most, a clu b they have come to love the most, a club defined by european success doing what they do best. the one thing missing from liverpool's resurgence underjurgen klopp was silverware. now they have a piece — arguably the greatest of the lot. fans converged on the spanish capital intensive thousands, or only the second all english final, but no sooner the second all english final, but no sooner had the teams take into their stage than the drama began, liverpool given a penalty of inside 30 seconds. moussa sissoko punished for use of the arm, mohamed salah merciless from the spot. spurs
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simply had to raise the level, and finally they did. through a combination of acrobatics and some poor finishing, combination of acrobatics and some poorfinishing, it cost combination of acrobatics and some poor finishing, it cost them dear. it was moments like those in which these ties often turn, and so it was when divock 0rigi settled the outcome. an unlikely hero on the journey here, perhaps it was fitting that the belgian should have the last say, creating a sea of celebration, more history for liverpool. tonight is really emotional, that is my main feeling. all the meaning, all that stuff, it feels really good, but i am much calmer than i thought i would be when it finally happened, so it was not important to me really to touch the cup, or whatever. not important to me really to touch the cup, orwhatever. i not important to me really to touch the cup, or whatever. i love the
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pictures when the boys had it, i loved it when i saw some faces in the stands, that is what gave me everything i need. while it wasn't a spectacle many hoped—for or an amazing advert for premier league football, butjurgen klopp and his players won't care less. for totte n ha m players won't care less. for tottenham players there will be questions, especially over the future of boss mauricio pochettino, but as for liverpool, they are no longer the nearly man, but champions of europe. let's get some reaction from madrid with our reporter hugh woozencroft. i bet you are the only one who is still awake! not a great game, but good to have two english sides there. it was great to have an all premier league european cup final, just the second time that has happened after chelsea and man united went toto in moscow back in 2008. the game wasn't a classic, it won't live long in the memories in terms of what we saw out on the
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pitch, but it will for liverpool fans. the players, jurgen klopp the manager as well. they last won the european cup in 2005, and have been beaten in two finals since, last year against real madrid and in 2007. they haven't won any kind of trophy since the league cup back in 2020, under club legend kenny dalglish. jurgen klopp has made himself a legend, because liverpool reminded everyone last night that they are one of europe's giants. they have one twice as many as any other english club, meaning there are only two clubs ahead of liverpool in terms of that great success. real madrid, then ac milan, now liverpool moving ahead of barcelona and bay and munich ——
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bayern munich. this just underlines that they are back on the top level of european football, having been missing for some time. we'll have plenty more reaction to liverpool's win throughout the programme. the search for eight climbers missing in the himalayas is expected to resume in the next few hours. the group, which includes four britons, began the climb up nanda devi almost three weeks ago, but failed to return to base camp. rebecca hartmann reports. it is known as one of the toughest climbs in the himalayas. at an imposing 7000 metres, nanda devi is the second highest mountain in india, and now eight climbers are missing three weeks after they started to climb. the aim of the expedition was the east peak of nanda devi, which lies close to the border with china. they were to take
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a route along the north—east ridge, which has never been successfully climbed before. it is very technical, meaning you are notjust walking on a path, you are using ice axis, when it is icy it might turn into rock when you have to climb differently, so you are using multiple skills at one time to scale the mountain. it is a very challenging mountain even by its more common route. this is a mountain that has only seen 13 or 1a successful expeditions since it was first climbed in 1936. the rescue effort had to be paused due to harsh weather conditions. local officials feel they may have been hit by an avalanche. this comes at the end of what has been a particularly deadly climbing season in the himalayas. at least 11 people have died on the nepalese side of mount everest so far this year. many have claimed overcrowding, after this photo showing heavy crowds taken at the summit went viral.
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ahead of his state visit to the uk, donald trump has, once again, intervened in british politics. speaking to the sunday times, president trump said that if britain did not get what it wanted in talks with brussels, it should "walk away". joining us from our london newsroom is political correspondent susana mendonca. weighing in again on the brexit debate, but also talking about the trade potential between the uk and the us was yellow donald trump is someone the us was yellow donald trump is someone who doesn't like to stick to convention, weighing in on what is meant to be a diplomatic trip. 0n this question of whether britain should leave with no deal, we know donald trump is not someone who is keen on the european union, so is pushing for britain to go down that route, not particularly surprising. barack 0bama is one of his great
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rivals, and the donald trump is saying that the uk could have a very good trade deal with the us. we can work in it very quickly. there is tremendous potential for a trade deal. they have never had a president like me, i would go all out. it would be a great advantage for the uk. of course, donald trump has been a difficult trading partner for some countries around the world, currently in trade wars with mexico and also with china. here is an example of him again delving into that relationship between the eu and britain. he has done that before when he came on his visit last year, he told theresa may that she should sue the european union. he has also suggested who he thinks might make a good tory leader, so we know he has been quite positive about boris johnson. of course, borisjohnson is someone johnson. of course, borisjohnson is someone who has advocated the idea
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of leaving the eu without a deal, if he were the leader. but what we don't know is whether or not donald trump knows that borisjohnson once described him as demonstrating stupefying ignorance, and not being fit for office. that is after donald trump said that london had no—go areas, and borisjohnson was at the time mayor of london. perhaps they will chat about that when he comes to britain. he will be here for three days, meeting the queen and theresa may, and of course at the end of the week theresa may is due to announce her formal resignation, and that will trigger the leadership race, which is pretty much already in play here in britain. another quiet week in politics ahead of us! the home secretary, sajid javid, has said the number of migrants attempting to cross the channel to reach the uk is "deeply concerning". yesterday, 7a people on eight boats tried to make the crossing when they were intercepted by the uk border force off the south coast. a criminal investigation is now under way. police in northern ireland have condemned dissident republicans, after an improvised bomb was discovered under a car owned by a serving police officer. a golf club in east belfast,
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where the car was parked, was evacuated. army experts were called to the scene, and an attempted murder investigation is now under way. funeral plan providers could be regulated by the independent financial watchdog for the first time under new government plans. it follows complaints some people are being pushed into buying products they don't fully understand. those found guilty of bullying people into buying expensive pre—paid plans could face fines and criminal charges. there is some evidence of, for example, up selling, where consumers have been pressurised into purchasing a more expensive funeral plan than they might either want or need. there have been issues around, for example, hidden management charges, so it isjust for example, hidden management charges, so it is just not clear to consumers exactly how much money is going to the funeral plan provider
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for administering the plan. an explosion at a factory in the russian city of dzerzhinsk has injured 79 people and damaged 180 homes nearby. city officials say the factory produces and stores high—explosive bombs for the military. at least five people were inside the factory at the time of the explosion. they were all safely evacuated. british airways is set to become the first western airline to resume flights to pakistan, after the route was cancelled because of security risks. the airline stopped flying to the country in 2008 after the marriott hotel in the capital, islamabad, was bombed, killing more than 50 people. a flight from heathrow to islamabad is due to take off later this evening and arrive in the early hours of tomorrow morning. but first let's look at the front pages. in an interview with the sunday times, donald trump has advised the uk to seek a no—deal solution on brexit and to send nigel farage to lead negotiations in brussels.
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security minister ben wallace has told the mail on sunday that britain's spy network is being stretched by a "barrage of new deadly threats" and is asking for more treasury funding to cope with a rising number of threats. 0n the front page of the sunday telegraph, michael gove has said he would consider delaying brexit until late 2020 in order to avoid the uk crashing out of the eu without a deal. the football is on the front pages of most papers, and unfortunately the boxing upset happened too late for it to make today's papers. and finally, liverpool is dubbed as ‘the incredibles' by the daily star after after they beat tottenham hotspur in the european champions league
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final in madrid last night. professor cary cooper is with us today, and he will review the papers with us. here's susan with a look at this morning's weather. the son is a bright and early. a very good morning to you, yesterday we got to 27.6 degrees, just to the west of london at heathrow. we could see a west of london at heathrow. we could seea similar west of london at heathrow. we could see a similar high today across eastern england, but things are generally changing as we moved to the start of our new week. fresh air coming in from the east along with some wet weather and some gusty wind. here is the culprit, this weather front moving through with showers. some sunshine for the first half of the day in eastern areas, but expect cloud to thicken, and
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cloud becoming increasingly hazy. in the afternoon, the rain will thin across scotland so some brighter skies. you can see the red is confined to eastern england by the time we get into sunday afternoon. towards the west, behind the band of rain, temperatures around average. i tend to 20 degrees in birmingham, but 27 or 28 possible across eastern england. scotland should get a little bit brighter and there should be some sharp showers to follow. similarto be some sharp showers to follow. similar to northern ireland, but the worst of the persistent rain in the morning. gusty winds later on, particularly across northern ireland, and they will remain so overnight as the low pressure centre roles to the north of the uk. you can see it is quite a lively night for the start ofjune, we are not anticipating any damage, but
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certainly noticeable wind. fresher than last night, so may be more co mforta ble than last night, so may be more comfortable for sleeping. here is monday, the low centre to the north, but behind the cold front we are all into the fresh air for monday. quite a bit of sunshine first thing across england and, showers piling in across scotland, more to come through the day and some showers moving in to northern ireland, wales and the south—west of england. sunny on the east, but cooler, highs of 19 or20. on the east, but cooler, highs of 19 or 20. tuesday, once they start piling and they keep coming, another area of low pressure roles in, more persistent rain, particularly pushing its way further north through the course of tuesday across a central swathe of the uk, but still to the south and east, we are struggling to get any really significant rain. hopefully we will see some rain around their as the week pans out. it will feel fresher
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and most of us will see some rain. you were talking yesterday and describing the weather as muggy. have you heard of the synonym pothery? enlighten me. i am worried now. it is a expression from the midlands that means muggy. you can use that one. enjoy the pother.|j have been informed that it is common in stoke—on—trent that i never heard it. time now for this week's film review, with martine croxall and jason solomon.
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hello, and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is jason solomons. in his spring linens. so, jason, what do we have this week? i have a schlocky shocker from the blumhouse horror locker. 0livia spencer and some gullible teenagers star in ma. a nuclear threat unleashes the titans again in godzilla. should i say i'm armageddon out of here? laughter. europe on the brink of collapse. this is in 1913, in budapest and the return of the oscar—winning director laszlo nemes in sunset. let's start with ma. as in mum or mother. one of the teenagers calls 0ctavia spencer's figure ma. a slight racial overtone in this, and the film—makers have brought us get out and us. they have been gradually turning
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the horror genre on its head with the racial elements in there, and that is to the fore here. 0ctavia spencer, who won the oscar for her supporting actress role in the help, that director that she re—teams here for a film that has very good credentials. juliette lewis stars in it. alisonjanney also stars in it. small roles, it's about 0ctavia spencer, really, who plays a woman who agrees to buy some teenagers some alcohol because in the us they can't do it, so adults have to do it for them, provided they come back to hers and party in her basement. they do that, but then she gets a bit needy and they think we shouldn't do that and find another venue, leaving 0ctavia spencer's ma feeling put out ofjoint and turning a little bit stalkery, as we can see in this clip. phone repeatedly chimes. hey, this is ma.
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i got a new number. just picking up a few things. don't make me drink alone. and i don't want to hear any of this "i have homework" crap. don't make me drink alone. # don't make me drink alone... are you guys mad at me for something? i mean, i risked myjob so that you could have fun, and we definitely did. the least you could do is say thank you. don't keep your phone by your bed. that's the first thing. it's not good energy. you will not get good sleep. it is terrible for you. it spirals and gets a lot worse. things get really strange between the teenagers and ma. it's a good idea, 0ctavia spencer is great at this. people have talked about kathy bates in misery. it's that kind of role.
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0r carrie, where something happened in her past and why she's wreaking some alcoholic revenge on these particular teenagers. so it's quite a clever little film, but it doesn't really reach get out or us levels, much bigger films than little horror films. this one has a old—fashioned 80's slasher movie vibe to it. that isn't quite scary enough to carry it through. is it aimed at teenagers? i would think so. don't drink, teenagers. certainly don't drink with ma. heaven forbid. what have we got next? i think it's godzilla. is it anything like the films that i saw? or the tv series. they were invented in tokyo in 1954 as a response to the nuclear threats. releasing these titans, these dinosaurs. do you remember the chewits adverts? with the big monster? they said it is a long shot but it mayjust work and give to him. 0ccupied him. the dialogue isn't much better
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in this then it was in those adverts of the ‘705. but the titans have been unleashed again because of a nuclear threat. charles dance plays an ecoterrorist. he wants to pit the titans against each other. with these, you want to wait till the monsters clash. you don't really care about the humans, even if they are played by vera farmiga or sally hawkins. if you remember from the shape of water, she is good with monsters and can even tap dance with them. she doesn't bother with that here. you really want the monsters to fight each other. what will godzilla do? will he beat mothra? will he get slammed down by rodan? what i am waiting for is godzilla versus king kong. that is coming. it has to. that is the clash we are all waiting for. that's the big purse. is there enough of the monsters in this? sometimes, in the new godzilla movies, the monsters are so big.
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it's full of actors going like this... and you never get to see the full scale. in this one, you get to see the cgi monsters taking on each other at boston's fenway park. i have enjoyed a baseball game there. the dinosaurs were not appearing that night. sunset is next. a hungarian film. from oscar—winning director laszlo nemes. gave us one of the greatest holocaust films, son of saul. he is back with a film called sunset, easily the film of the week. terrific. but it is very confusing. it stars a woman played by a newcomer, a woman called irisz. we see things through her eyes and watch her face almost continuously. she arrives in budapest in 1913, a flowering, great society full of inventions and industry, she wants to work in a hat shop that used to belong to her parents. it doesn't any more and she thinks
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herfamily has been wiped out, but somebody says your brother is living here. but he's gone to seed, he's gone bad, he's an anarchist, and she wants to investigate and find out more. very tense. is it in the style that this director usually does? very tense. is it in the style that this director usually does? it's like he did in son of saul. he does that here. long snaking travelling shots. literally, like i wanted to be gawking at godzilla. i was gawking at the audacity of this movie. i can't believe he is still doing the same shot.
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a horse will pull out of the blue and peasants will come with flaming torches and coachmen will come all snaggly toothed. aristocrats will be randomly assassinated while in the same shot and you are like, "what is going on?" the point is you don't know what is going on. it is about the collapse of the austro—hungarian empire and about europe now and how that could come to the fore. at the height of intellectual sophistication, how does it turn bad and how do we turn on ourselves? why do we destroy our own societies? that's what this is asking. it does it brilliantly. great performance from the lead. she's in every shot. we are seeing it through her eyes. extraordinary. for best 0ut, you have chosen rocketman. taron egerton and in his platforms. bursting through every door in a big outfit playing eltonjohn. in a biopic that really isn't a biopic. it is sort of about eltonjohn and his friendship with bernie taupin. it is fabulous. it is a neorealist musical. it uses the songs we know so well.
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and they reappropriate those lyrics, breathing new life into songs you thought you knew so well. elton grows up with his mum and his dad. it also goes very dark and very deep into elton's past drug use and drug addiction and homosexuality. a very bold film in the way bohemian rhapsody wasn't bold, it was bright and good and fun, but this one is stronger and bolder. not a family musical but it is brilliant. eltonjohn said he didn't want a sanitized version of his life. i don't think he has lived a sanitized life. he is proud of the fact that he is still standing, as the song goes. i can't get it out of my head. he is still standing and he lives to tell the tale, a brilliant tale. if you remember the songs the first time around orjust heard them and wondered what they were about, this really adds another layer to the rocketman and to eltonjohn himself and his legacy as a musician and the lyrics by bernie taupin are terrific poetry.
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best to stream. the blue angel. marlene dietrich. der blaue angel — the name of the club. where marlene dietrich made her breakthrough. in her tights and stockings. it brings down a respectable school professor, played by the brilliant emiljennings. ruins his life because he is from head to toe in love. like the german song. speaks german. i can do it in german. very good. falling in love again. university of modern languages. idid. i have looked you up. a lot of people will not have seen this film ever, will they? but they will have seen cabaret. it is very much that atmosphere. it's about backstage. a weimar republic film. it is about that decadence
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that led to nazism. it is also just sexy and very funny and brilliantly performed. she sang the song all the way into the ‘90s through decades doing her cabaret show. all over the world. iconic piece of cinema and you can see it at home. you can see in a few cinemas. you can see it on bfi player. my streaming choice for the weekend. an erotic masterpiece. i have to say thank you. danke schon. nice to see you. that's it for this week, though. thanks for watching. goodbye.
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hello, this is breakfast with nina warhurst and roger johnson. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: liverpool have become european champions for the sixth time in their history after beating tottenham in last night's champions league final. an early penalty from mo salah and a late finish from divock 0rigi gave them a 2—0 win in madrid and a first trophy forjurgen klopp as liverpool boss. a search is under way after a group of eight climbers have gone missing while climbing india's second highest mountain. the group, including four britons began the ascent of nanda devi almost three weeks ago, but failed to return to base camp. donald trump is due to arrive in the uk tomorrow for a three day state visit. ahead of his arrival the us president has told the sunday times he'd leave europe without a deal and without paying the a0 billion pound "divorce bill". it's only the third state visit in us presidential history.
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the home secretary, sajid javid, has said the number of migrants attempting to cross the channel to reach the uk is "deeply concerning". yesterday, 7a people on eight boats tried to make the crossing when they were intercepted by the uk border force off the south coast. a criminal investigation is now under way. police in northern ireland have condemned dissident republicans, after an improvised bomb was discovered under a car owned by a serving police officer. a golf club in east belfast, where the car was parked, was evacuated. army experts were called to the scene, and an attempted murder investigation is now under way. funeral plan providers could be regulated by the independent financial watchdog for the first time under new government plans. it follows complaints some people are being pushed into buying products they don't fully understand. those found guilty of bullying people into buying expensive pre—paid plans could face fines and criminal charges.
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an explosion at a factory in the russian city of dzerzhinsk has injured 79 people and damaged 180 homes nearby. city officials say the factory produces and stores high—explosive bombs for the military. at least five people were inside the factory at the time of the explosion. they were all safely evacuated. british airways is set to become the first western airline to resume flights to pakistan, after the route was cancelled because of security risks. the airline stopped flying to the country in 2008 after the marriott hotel in the capital, islamabad, was bombed, killing more than 50 people. a flight from heathrow to islamabad is due to take off later this evening and arrive in the early hours of tomorrow morning. k—pop act bts have made history by becoming the first south korean group to headline london's legendary wembley stadium. the seven—member band are part of the hugely popular k—pop genre. 60,000 fans came from around the world to watch them perform, and it's not the only record they've broken this year — their latest album went straight
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to the top of the uk charts, days after their new single broke the youtube record for the most views in 2a hours. k pop, korean pop, i thought that was it but i had to have a cheeky google. i suppose if you have a cheeky google for things like anthony joshua and boxing, you will see things like that. we are all in shock, i think. andy ruiz andy ruinunior hasn't been around for very long, a lot of people look at the condition of him, the state he came into the fight, you make those assumptions but you can't do that in heavyweight boxing because you get caught once or twice as
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joshua did, and the whole thing can change. you said this morning it was like a greek god chiselled out of granite, and then the mexican guy who looks like he has had one too many tacos. yes, but he has wanted feral —— fair and square. anthonyjoshua hasn't and square. anthony joshua hasn't been and square. anthonyjoshua hasn't been able to go intoa anthonyjoshua hasn't been able to go into a press conference because of concussion protocols. anthonyjoshua started of concussion protocols. anthony joshua started well of concussion protocols. anthonyjoshua started well enough, with ruiz down in the third, but then he went down. it's the first time he's been down since fighting klitschko. the referee waved off the contest, and he is now the holder of a number of titles. i wanted to
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prove eve ryo ne a number of titles. i wanted to prove everyone wrong, all the doubters saying i would lose in the first round, the second round, i was looking at comments as well. i am the first mexican heavyweight champion of the world. i am still pinching myself to see if this is real, man. a big win for callum smith in new york last night, and katie taylor has become the undisputed lightweight world champion as well, and there is a rematch on the cards. let's get some reaction from madrid to liverpool becoming european champions for thr 6th time with our reporter hugh woozencroft. liverpool fans were singing late into the night in madrid here, celebrating that sixth european cup final. the match itself not a
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classic, the first goal coming early, injust the classic, the first goal coming early, in just the second minute, classic, the first goal coming early, injust the second minute, it was a penalty after moussa sissoko was a penalty after moussa sissoko was adjudged to have handled the ball, the penalty awarded afterjust 23 seconds. after that there was no real quality in the game until substitute divock 0rigi added liverpool's second with just a few minutes to play. he has only scored seven times this season, a few of the goals coming across the champions league semi—final, of course in the final as well. fantastic evening for him, but as you say there won't be remembered for much apart from liverpool really reassessing themselves as the third most successful team, after ac milan and real madrid. the champions league final may have let us down but the premiership rugby union finale at twickenham certainly didn't. saracens sealed a premiership and european champions cup double
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for the second time. having been 11 points behind in the second half, the holders pulled off a great comeback against exeter chiefs to win their fourth title in five years. 37—34 was the final score. england's women suffered a surprise defeat in their final warm—up game before the world cup. phil neville's side were beaten 1—0 by new zealand at brighton's amex stadium, sarah gregorious sealing victory for the visitors just after half time. it's the first time new zealand have ever beaten england, and is england's second defeat in four games. they begin their world cup campaign against scotland a week today, looking to improve on the third—placed finish they achieved four years ago. we didn't get the win, to give us the sendoff. the crowd have back just for the last couple of games and they deserve it. we are continuing our development and improvement, and the real thing sta rts improvement, and the real thing starts next week.
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australia started their world cup campaign witha australia started their world cup campaign with a defeat of afghanistan. glenn maxwell hit the winning runs for the defending champions. johanna konta will aim to go further than any british woman since jo durie in 1983 at the french open later. she faces 23rd seed donna vekic for a place in the quarterfinals. there's been a big shock in the women's draw though with world number one and reigning us and australia 0pen champion naomi 0saka beaten in the third round by unseeded czech katerina siniakova. and serena williams was left stunned after she was knocked out in the third round by by unseeded american sofia kenin. she lost lost 6—2, 7—5 to the 20—year—old, who was at times booed by the crowd. it means williams will have to keep fighting to equal margaret court's record of 2a grand slam singles titles. i think she played really well.
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particularly in the first set, she was pretty much inches from the line andi was pretty much inches from the line and i haven't played anyone like that in a long time, so, like, it was, yeah, she actually played really well. novak djokovic, though, cruised into the last 16 after beating italian qualifier salvatori caruso in straight sets. the serbian is yet to drop a set at the french open, and breezed to victory in two hours and four minutes. celebrations for another van dyke yesterday notjust virgil. anthony van dyke won the derby at epsom giving trainer aidan 0'brien a record—equalling seventh winner in the race. jockey seamie heffer—nan rode the 13—2 chance to victory on his 12th attempt. madhmoon finished in second, withjapan in third in the mile and a half long race. 0'brien trained seven of the 13 runners. is it quite rare for there to be
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such a cluster on the finish line in that race? yes, in the derby, yes. saint helen ‘s thrash wakefield yesterday in the lead up to the cup, and they won't forgive me if i don't mention that. celebrations went well into the night back in liverpool with thousands of fans having gathered at the city's exhibition centre to watch the game. a few of them gave us their reaction. jurgen klopp deserve something, and he has got what he deserves. just fantastic. a bit nerve racking at the beginning but we have come all the beginning but we have come all the way from london, it was worth at! amazing, incredible, i don't know what to say. there was beer everywhere, it's in my hair, on my shirt, i will smell of it for the
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next week. aredia will go down in history, warranty —— 0rigi. for every winter has to be a loser, and we got these reactions from totte n ha m. and we got these reactions from tottenham. abbott rob, i think we would have approached the game in a different way. i am disappointed in the result. the second goal, to be honest with you, i think 2—0 was unfair. we playjust as well as them, ithink unfair. we playjust as well as them, i think we at least deserved a draw. hopeful for them, i think we at least deserved a draw. hopefulfor next them, i think we at least deserved a draw. hopeful for next season, at least we didn't get trashed. it could have been a lot worse, and i am sad, but hopefulfor could have been a lot worse, and i am sad, but hopeful for next year. could have been a lot worse, and i am sad, but hopeful for next yearlj don't think liverpool deserved to win the game but i am proud of my
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team. that found saying spurs were robbed, it didn't feel that way, did it? quite a few people thought spurs with a better team on the night. liverpool won fair and square, but went something like that happens so early in the game, 21 seconds. went something like that happens so early in the game, 21 secondsm completely skews the rest of the game is popular yes, you can to get back into it, and tottenham had some decent chances. i say it was a shocker, a bit of an exaggeration, but not the spectacle that the premier league has produced, and what the semi—final in the quarter—final with liverpool against barcelona and tottenham against man city, whether that break three weeks from the end of the premier league, it isa from the end of the premier league, it is a long break, whether you lose momentum from that, but the two managers have been terrific. those two sets of players, for tottenham not to spend a single penny on a player and finish in the champions league spots and get to the champions league final is
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phenomenal. for jurgen klopp, champions league final is phenomenal. forjurgen klopp, he said it in his press conference, i rememberthe said it in his press conference, i remember the first press conference he said, judge me after four seasons. is this four seasons? this is four. chelsea winning the europa league, liverpool with the champions league, liverpool with the champions league, we have them all.|j league, liverpool with the champions league, we have them all. i was impressed by how gracious the managers were, paying tribute to the other clubs. and calm. jurgen klopp said he is calmer than he expected to be. it is a big sporting morning. we are talking a lot about the european cup final, but anthony joshua losing to andy ruiz.
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what a shock! absolutely, what a shock. anthonyjoshua what a shock! absolutely, what a shock. anthony joshua has just finished his concussion protocols andi finished his concussion protocols and i have just finished his concussion protocols and i havejust managed to grab three orfour and i havejust managed to grab three or four minutes of his time, and he is uttering the same words as you are uttering. what a shock! i asked him what went wrong, and he said, it's boxing! iasked him asked him what went wrong, and he said, it's boxing! i asked him what was going through his mind, and he said not very much. i think the fight was a bit of a blur. unforgettable fight was a bit of a blur. u nforg etta ble for fight was a bit of a blur. unforgettable for anyone listening or watching. he looked... i know you tried to explain, but loads of us are still in shock. he looked dismayed, confused, there was no protest in that seventh round when the referee stopped him in the corner. it looked so unlike him. it is hard to pinpoint where it went
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wrong. i think at that point in the seventh round he didn't know where he was. he may have been on his feet but he was basically unresponsive. anything he said you wouldn't be able to use as evidence against him because he had no idea where he was. the referee was asking him one thing and we don't really know what he was replying. he told me to a three minutes ago that he told the referee he was ok to fight, but after telling the referee he was ok to fight, he took two steps back, but his elbows on the top rope, and leaned back like he was relaxing watching some tennis in the park. it was a really strange ending to a fight. you have to remember he had been down four times, and the real damage was done in the third round. he had just clocked ruiz, and then he got caught with a shock to his temple, and! he got caught with a shock to his temple, and i have been around this business for an awful long time, my gut feeling is he neverfully recovered from that. he may have been just recovered from that. he may have beenjust going recovered from that. he may have been just going through the motions
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at that point, until he was ruled out. the third round was attritional. where are we now with this rematch? are we looking at a november rematch? are contracted rematch is like smoke in the wind in boxing, in theory they fight in november or december. joshua has just told me he still wants... don't be surprised to somewhere like los angeles or las vegas for it. thank you. interesting times. tyson theory has had some things to say. keep it civil. let's check in for the weather. some lovely pictures yesterday do we have any more today? they are starting to come in and by the time we get to our next bulletin i will
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have some nice ones for you. quite different to what we will see today across the uk because there is more cloud around and wet weather so let's see what comes in over the next 30 minutes. 0ur change for the day is that we are picking up the influence of this area of lobe — are increasingly. yesterday high—pressure dominated the south of the uk so england and wales was mostly dry. today we're talking about rain coming in from the west. i went night already across northern ireland and first thing for scotland as the hours go by the rain in scotla nd as the hours go by the rain in scotland should start to thin out and we will have showers in the afternoon but an improving picture for the second part of the day. further south the grey weather slides eastwards and showers move in. we still have some heat to the far east of the uk for this afternoon. yesterday, 27.6 degrees at heathrow and we could see 28 today across the far south—east of east anglia but you can see by 4pm
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more cloud generally is that heads across the central swathes of the uk and extends out into the north sea. low pressure calls back into northern ireland. a lot of cloud around through the afternoon with showers and that curling low centre will bring strong gusty wind to northern ireland through the afternoon and on into the evening and potentially an odd thundery shower as well. those numbers there other dust strength. notable for this point in the year, not likely to do any damage but something you will notice through the evening and overnight. a fresh night and for many that will be a pleasant thing to do 16, many that will be a pleasant thing to do16, 17 degrees many that will be a pleasant thing to do 16, 17 degrees are the overnight lows in the nightjust gone. this a better night sleep perhaps for heading back to work tomorrow. clear skies is well behind the cold front across england and wales with sunshine first thing. that look out for a few showers coming into the west. much drier for scotla nd coming into the west. much drier for scotland and northern ireland and there will be wide and sunny spells.
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chance of showers as well and temperatures are average. high teens the north of the uk, 20, 21 further south to the week ahead looks changeable with low pressure centres keen to roll away from the atlantic tuesday brings wet weather through a central swathes of the uk this and those lows are set to keep lining up through the remainder of the week ahead but still i cannot guarantee you any proper rainfall across southern and eastern england where we are falling short at the moment. certainly a mixed story for the week ahead and feeling fresh. thank you very much susan. descending into the pother whether. ten minutes to seven almost we will have the headlines at the top of the hour. time now for click. this week the team are at the hay festival.
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the sun is finally out in the uk and festival season is upon us. and to celebrate the good weather we find ourselves at the world —famous hay literary festival. nestled at the border of england and wales, hay—on—wye has been home to the event for over 30 years. i love the hay festival. you can come here and fill your brains with all sorts of new knowledge on all sorts of subjects delivered by all kinds of brilliant speakers. and when you have done that, you can come see us doing our live show too. yes, once more click live hit the hay. we spoke about robots, explained in detail about how our brains develop and we built an artificial intelligence using matchboxes.
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please welcome maisy mcadam and willow. applause. but possibly the most magical moment of all of our click live shows starred maisy and her dog willow. about six years ago at the age of 16, maisy was diagnosed with a brain tumour. over the next few months her vision was reduced to a tiny blurry circle in just her right eye. so if you want to pop those on to maisy now... well, maisy had agreed to try on stage the latest version of these givevision goggles. they use magnifiers and augmented reality to amplify the wearer's remaining vision and highlight outlines. maisy, are they working? yeah! i can see your microphone, and i can see that you are smiling and i can see the buttons on your shirt. take a look at the audience. yeah. they are waving!
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i can see there is a lady in the front with a red jacket and the guy next to her is wearing stripes. oh, my god, it is so amazing! applause. i didn't quite realise how many people were there and then i put them on and i could see everybody in the audience. it was a scary feeling, actually. something maisy felt especially robbed of through this traumatic experience was her ability to read herfavourite books. we have a copy of harry potter and the philosopher's stone here. do you think you would be able to read us the first few sentences if i hold the microphone up? 0k. can you see it? yes. she cries. i'm sorry. 0k. "mr and mrs dursley of number 4 privet drive were proud to say that they were perfectly normal, thank you very much." applause.
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it made me really happy that i could have that back, that thing that was taken away from me, to have it back was lovely. i really do miss the sensation of purchasing a book, bringing it home and reading a book and to think in the future that this kind of technology may be quite mainstream and that ability will be back for me, it is a wonderfulfeeling. it has been a very overwhelming experience, but a really great one as well, i am really grateful. this really was an emotional moment for all of us. but what about other types of vision impairment? jen copestake has been looking at a piece of technology aimed at people who are colourblind. but does it work? it looks so different! i'm notjoking. it looks so different. that's the real world. that's how we see colour.
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this was the moment nine—year—old sebastian tried his enchroma glasses for the first time. designed to help improve the sight of people with certain colour deficiencies, his video was similar to many others posted online. there are so many different greens! oh, my god, sweetie. some of these videos have millions of views on youtube. your bag! and a quick internet search sets up dozens of fundraising pages set up by families trying to raise money to purchase a pair. this could be because the glasses are not cheap. they start at us$349 for adults and $269 for children, with similar prices in the uk. sebastian's father chris first heard about the glasses through watching a video and was keen for his son to try them out. i think you probably feel, as with all disabilities for children, powerless and very keen to try and do anything you can to improve or correct even partially,
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that disability. sebastian was born with a genetic colour deficiency called protanomalous dichromacy. this gives people a decreased sensitivity to red light in particular. people with this deficiency are often called red—green colourblind. about 8% of men and 0.5% of women worldwide have a degree of colour deficiency in their sight. i met sebastien and his father at the institute of ophthalmology at university college in london. i have this book here. what colour do you see this as? i think it is red but i know it is pink. i find that fascinating. put your glasses on and tell me what it looks like. now i see it as definitely pink. if you take the glasses off again, we've got quite a few balloons here. what colour is this balloon? i see it as green but i know it is orange. wow. and with the glasses on? now ijust see it as orange.
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the glasses are said to work using spectral notch filters that actually remove part of the colour spectrum. professor andrew stockman is going to run through some traditional colour deficiency tests with sebastian. these are called ishihara tests, and they're tests for colour deficiency. this example you can definitely see, most people can see, all the colours. what number do you see? a 12. the ishihara test works by showing a number that is slightly different colour to the dots in the background. the glasses don't seem to be helping sebastian with this test. do you see any numbers here? no. and how about here? any numbers? no? don't worry. i think it's... a10? 0k. and does that change when you wear the glasses? i slightly think it's a 20? that is closer.
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it slightly improves your discrimination but you would still not pass a colour test. i'm sorry. there are better results with this test which looks at different colours of wool. this one changes so much. it changes from a green to a very standard pink. and this one where sebastian said he saw a shape he could not see without the glasses. i see a pink circle and a pink triangle on a grey background. what do you see? i sawjust a blue circle but when i put the glasses on i saw a triangle here. so before did you not see a triangle? no. what is going on? we are removing part of the colour spectrum. it changes the apparent colour of light. and it's more than a placebo effect? oh, yes. it definitely changes the appearance of coloured lights. i spoke to the company's president via skype from california who said that the glasses are only sold
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as an optical assistive device. it is important to understand that the glasses are not a cure for colourblindness. they should help the person to see colour in many situations but they don't necessarily provide normal colour vision. recent peer—reviewed research from the university of grenada conducted on 48 people with colour vision deficiency concluded that the enchroma glasses introduce a variation of perceived colour but do not improve results in diagnostic tests for colour deficiency or give the wearers normal colour vision. enchroma provided us a statement regarding the study saying only its indoor use glasses were used on two tests with the subjects wearing glasses for a few minutes at a time. they said this would tend to minimise any results. for chris, the science behind the glasses is less important than the experience his son gets while wearing them. yes, of course, if i thought that him wearing the glasses was harmful then i would be far more concerned. if it is a parlour trick, to be brutally honest,
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i don't really care. but others may expect more definitive results, especially considering the marketing hype and luxury pricetag. these beautiful tulips were generated by a computer programme. the realism is uncanny, and that is because the algorithm that generated them was trained on 10,000 pictures of real tulips. anna ridler, the artist behind this work, then hand—annotated each picture. for each photograph i wrote what colour it was, how stripy it was, what type of tulip it was, what state it was in, so if it was a bud or if it was dead, and i used that information to then use machine learning to train an algorithm to produce will these moving image pieces. i had read about tulip mania which was this in dutch history
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in the 1630s when the price of a tulip went at one point for the same price as an amsterdam townhouse, and it was the first known speculative bubble. and i was interested in kind of comparing this moment in history with speculation that is going on now around cryptocurrencies. so in this piece the tulips are kind ofjittering and flickering, that is because the way the tulips have been created by the algorithm is controlled by the price of bitcoin. so as the tulips change, that is because the price of bitcoin is changing. as beautiful as these tulips are, every so often the realism falls away, and you start to see the artifice. part of the reason that i display my dataset as a separate work is to really kind of emphasise the humanity and humanness that sits behind all of these processes. and that is it for the shortcut
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of click from hay, the full—length

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