Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 4, 2019 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

1:30 pm
speaking to anti—truck protesters, jeremy corbyn. speaking to anti—truck protesters, jeremy corbyn. thank you. -- mike speaking to anti—trump protesters. thank you each and everyone of you for being here today. look around this crowd, look at each other, we are young, we are old, we are black, we are white, we are disabled, we are lgbt, we are the hold down a coal at wonderful diversity. that we represent. we are the living embodiment of what a democratic society is about. where people come together not to exploit their differences, but to share the joy of learning something from each other.
1:31 pm
and from our experiences that others may not go through the hardship that so may not go through the hardship that so many have may not go through the hardship that so many have gone may not go through the hardship that so many have gone through to bring about some of the social changes we have achieved. and so in welcoming visitors from the united states, i hope there can be a conversation. i am not absolutely not refusing to meet anybody. i want to be able to have that dialogue to bring about the better and more peaceful world that we all want to live in. but i am very disappointed, particularly today on their wonderful festival of eid that our mayor has been attacked the way he has. i am proud that our
1:32 pm
city has a muslim man. we can chase down racism within our society. racism divides. exploitation of minorities divides. exploitation of minorities divides. exploitation of minorities brings about hatred, dislike, disdain and a horrible place for individuals to live in. when you have created that sense of hate, when you have destroyed people's are self by those forms of racism, do you know what? you haven't built a house, you haven't built a school, you haven't trained a nurse, you haven't defended our natural world. you have done is created a greater sense of hate and hatred that goes with it. so we, as a community and people, have to work together to bring about that different world. we are in the midst
1:33 pm
of the debate about the future of oui’ of the debate about the future of our relationship between britain and europe and the rest of the world. the basis of that debate should surely be that we encourage the protection of jobs surely be that we encourage the protection ofjobs and living standards and public services and reach out to people all across the world. but it should not be, it should not be a debate about how we go forward with no deal at the same time as offering up, offering up, oui’ time as offering up, offering up, our precious, wonderful, national health service to private american companies to come in and take it over. we will not stand for that. we will fight with every last breath of oui’ will fight with every last breath of our body to defend the principle of a health care system free at the point need for everybody as a human
1:34 pm
right. in the same way, many colleagues from my party, by shadow cabinet and parliamentary group that are here today, are proud to put forward the same principle for an education system based on the right to learn and the right to know, not the ability to be able to buy it from somebody else. it is about the kind of world we want to live in. there isa of world we want to live in. there is a refugee crisis around the world. there are 65 million people across the globe who have no place to call their own as home. they are living as internal exile is in refugee camps oi’ living as internal exile is in refugee camps or they are undertaking perilous journeys to try to reach a place of safety. 65
1:35 pm
million is more than in any time in recorded history there have been displaced people on this globe. can we stop treating people who travel for a place of safety, escape from oppression, from climate change induced degradation or economic poverty to try to make their contribution to the world, don't treat them as enemies, treat them as fellow human beings and citizens of this planet who deserve our support, oui’ this planet who deserve our support, our sympathy, and our understanding. but recognise, as many of us did when we marched in 2003 in hyde park, that going to war has consequences, consequences for the soldiers who die who we remember
1:36 pm
this week from the commemoration of what happened on d—day, the consequences live on in the disability, the mental health stress, the dislocation, and the flows of desperate refugees. that was in afghanistan and iraq and syria are feeding this desperate refugee flow. i want to work with every government across the planet to bring about a peaceful world where we don't solve our problems by going to war, we solve our problems by an understanding of history and how those conflicts came about. that is the intelligent message of peace that i believe we are giving here today in this marvellous demonstration here in whitehall. there is one other thing i want to say and it is this, three weeks ago
1:37 pm
in parliament it was my privilege and pride to introduce sadly a very necessary resolution, a resolution that the british parliament should declare there is a climate and environmental emergency across the whole planet. i am proud to say that it was not opposed, therefore it was carried and that is the decision of the british parliament. but passing a motion like that is only part of it. if we are to protect the natural world and environment on which we all depend, then actions have to be taken. a world dedicated to personal profit and greed, to mass exploitation and the most intensive forms of farming, destroys the national world —— make the natural world bit by bit. 60% of wildlife
1:38 pm
has been lost in this country in the past a0 years and it is getting faster and getting worse. the problems are galloping all around the world. the paris climate change accord was the product notjust of the brilliance of some of the people that whether they're negotiating it, but in reality it was the product of decades and decades of environmental campaigners pointing out there have to be limits to how much you destroy the planet. never forget, to be limits to how much you destroy the planet. neverforget, protest and activism eventually leads to change. and so i want to live in a world that survives, i want to live ina world that survives, i want to live in a world that thrives. you do that by respecting the natural world, you do that by respecting each other, you do that by recognising that we
1:39 pm
learn from each other‘s history. so i say to our visitors that have arrived this week, think on, please, about a world that is one of peace and disarmament, is one of recognising the values of all people, is a world that defeats racism, defeats misogyny, defeats to religious hatreds that are being fuelled by the far right in politics, in britain, in europe and the united states. they have no a nswe rs. the united states. they have no answers. no answers. no answers to young people growing up worried about their future, no answers to communities that have lost their industries, no answers to the people who are desperate in all parts of the world to get somewhere to live, no answers to those people who are desperate to get medical help and support that they need, no answers to those going through a mental
1:40 pm
health crisis of any sort all over the world. do you know what? together we can make a big difference, together we can change this world, together we can bring about that peace and justice, and by our demonstration here today, we have shown just how determined we all of us are. to achieve that better place and that better world. thank you for being here today, for peace, for justice thank you for being here today, for peace, forjustice and disarmament. well, jeremy corbyn there as energised as many will have seen him in that speech. certainly people have commented that in as many years asa have commented that in as many years as a backbench politician, he was a politician of protests and opposition and that he seems very
1:41 pm
co mforta ble opposition and that he seems very comfortable when he is coming from that perspective. but there is a challenge, a potential concern here forjeremy corbyn as he protests against donald trump's presence on the state visit. what if in the state of flux british politics is in there is an election in which labour comes to power and he is their pm and has to deal with president trump. we know that the president and the first lady are still inside downing street behind me. they have had a working lunch, president trump and theresa may. before that, they had an expanded bilateral, in other words it was notjust a one to one between the two leaders, but a meeting between the teams. representative of the fact that by the end of the week she will be no longer leader of the conservative party and by next month she will be
1:42 pm
replaced as prime minister with donald trump with an eye to who might be replacing her at number ten. we are going to wait on them to leave downing street and walk the short distance to where they will hold a news conference. we will keep a close eye on that for you. i would chief political correspondent is with me. jeremy corbyn in an interesting position because if the wheel turns and labour was to come to power, how would he be working with a president too he has criticised? it divides opinion. his decision to not go to the state banquet last night, something that is the right thing to do, that donald trump has demeaned the office of president of the united states of america and it is the right thing to do. others say if you want to be a serious politician and you are saying that you want to be the pm,
1:43 pm
you have to engage with people, surely it is better to turn up and make our case. some would say prince charles does not agree with donald trump on on climate change, he had tea with him and raise the issue. when it was the chinese president that came, he did go to their banquet but their record on human rights is not something jeremy corbyn would agree with. some saying it is making a stand. they believe he isa it is making a stand. they believe he is a misogynist, racist and do not agree with what he has done. it isa not agree with what he has done. it is a dilemma that is difficult for mps but you could seejeremy corbyn looking very comfortable making his speech in front of big crowds and getting a huge reception as we heard. various groups of people emerging from downing street now so
1:44 pm
we think the walk across may be imminent. we know because downing street told us that theresa may was raising the issue of climate change in these talks. they are expected to also have been talking about why wayne with the white house administration —— why of course, that decision has been kicked down the road for whoever the new prime minister will be. we will find out next month. much of the focus has been donald trump holding at the premise of a very significant trade deal in the future. there is a big leap between those words and any
1:45 pm
future trade deals. both from a uk and us point of view. welcome to viewers on bbc two as well as all of you watching on the bbc news channel as we look closely at the door of number ten waiting for the prime minister who is a mac and the president of the united states donald trump to emerge from that door. —— theresa may and the president of the united states donald trump to emerge from that door. earlier they were shown a copy of some documents, the declaration of some documents, the declaration of independence amongst them. before that expanded bilateral meeting took
1:46 pm
place. what we mean by that is that it wasn't just happening place. what we mean by that is that it wasn'tjust happening between the president and the prime minister, but between a much larger group of people on both the us side and theresa may's side as well. we saw jeremy hunt, for example, going in a little earlier. we are expecting that the two leaders will emerge and walk across, a very short work, to the foreign office for a news conference. you may remember the news co nfe re nce conference. you may remember the news conference last summer during donald trump's working visit which came off the back of a newspaper interview he had done, details of which emerged the night before at a dinner that was hosted for him in which he said that he thought boris johnson would make a very good prime minister. he has repeated that again and we have learnt today that he has
1:47 pm
had a 20 minute conversation with borisjohnson. and had a 20 minute conversation with boris johnson. and also had a 20 minute conversation with borisjohnson. and also that he is going to add some point today had a meeting with michael gove, another one of the leadership contenders, another one of the people seeking to replace theresa may next month. our chief political correspondent is with us. i was just saying a moment ago how much of the focus and discussion in the run—up to this meeting has been about a possible trade deal, a future trade deal between the united states and the uk with donald trump talking about a very, very significant, in his words, trade deal being possible. it isa words, trade deal being possible. it is a difficult equation to go from those words to actually some future trade deal went number one, the uk and the us trade on a number of levels very freely already, and it
1:48 pm
will be very difficult from both points of view to change that relationship. yes. people think it could take several years, even though donald trump is saying it could happen quickly, it is controversial. we have heard lots of people saying that they do not like the idea of the nhs procurement being up for grabs. we have heard a lot about chlorinated chicken, the different levels of regulations on the two sides of things. one of that isa the two sides of things. one of that is a big problem. as far as today goes, is a big problem. as far as today o is a big problem. as far as today goes, we are in this bizarre situation where theresa may is about to step down. she has got a few more weeks left as prime minister, days left as a member of the conservative party. it is not surprising that they had a team on either side in they had a team on either side in the bilateral meeting. it is hard to see how they might get along, they are different people, but of course if you are the americans, you are
1:49 pm
looking ahead at who is coming next and that is inevitable in that situation. politics can be brutal. she is moving on, they are looking to the next person. it was interesting to seejeremy corbyn at the protest talking about the nhs. labour sees itself as the party of the nhs, saying that labour would defend the principle of a health ca re system defend the principle of a health care system free for all at the point of use. the us ambassador at the weekend, he talked about or speculated contracts with relation to the nhs might be rolled into some sort of trade discussions as well, but it would be a brave next prime minister, whoever that is, who would consider doing that. in fact, a number of the candidates have already ruled that out, haven't they? yes. this is the problem. when it comes to a trade deal, all sorts of things out on the table. as lots of things out on the table. as lots of the candidates have said, each has their red lines and it is pretty
1:50 pm
certain that most of the candidates, most of the people who might be the next prime minister, a red line might well be the nhs. but when it comes to these things, visas, immigration issues, all of those things that are controversial, have to be on the table. that is the way trade deals work. it is going to be something that all of the candidates are asked about. at the moment, we are asked about. at the moment, we are talking very at brexit, but when it comes to a trade deal, these are the questions that people are going to have to answer when they look ahead to the post brexit world. to many people, it doesn't feel like we're getting there that quickly, i think that is still the main issue for the tory leadership contenders, is leaving without a deal. that is where we are seeing the big divide between the conservative candidates. of course, a trade deal with america isa of course, a trade deal with america is a prize that many are looking at. people like liam fox, one of the few
1:51 pm
not in the race, have talked about it are saying there is no reason why it are saying there is no reason why it could not be done quickly. others say you cannot suddenly replace all of that free trade we do with the eu, put that to one side and replace it with a trade deal with america, it with a trade deal with america, it does not work like that. it is much harder, europe is still the biggest market on our doorstep. reminder that we are waiting for theresa may to emerge with president trump from number ten and looking ahead to this news conference that is getting under way shortly, how much trepidation do you think theresa may and her may be feeling? she has been stung by what donald trump has said, hasn't she? last year, his criticism of her handling of brexit. and i am sure donald trump us people would like to think he will be extremely diplomatic but then he hasn't got a track record in diplomacy, has he? no. they are so different, aren't they? when you look at them as characters in front of the cameras, you could not have
1:52 pm
two people who act more differently. she is reticent on camera and some people say in private as well. she is not nervous of the press whereas he is completely the opposite. we saw him tweeting about sadiq khan. he is not afraid to say what he thinks. that makes press conferences very entertaining for journalists but if you are the prime minister of any country standing next to him, you have got to be thinking where is this going, what will he say next? we so yesterday with the royal family ina we so yesterday with the royal family in a very different setting, he was on best behaviour, he was making sure the protocol was correct. he may not feel the same here. i'm sure he will say one word about theresa may. he has said likes her, they get on and that she was the first to visit him in the white house where they held hands as they
1:53 pm
came down the steps. that was the moment where she offered and promised him at this state visit. at the time, people said it was very quick to do that although there have been previous american presidents who have done it. i don't think he had even been inaugurated at this point. it was a quick thing to offer, something she may have regretted as things transpired with the controversy there has been. i think standing in those press conferences, and the questions donald trump may get from the british press he is not used to at home, all of these things make it something well worth watching. the camera shutters are clicking every time the door open. the us ambassador is coming out. mike pompeo as well. leading the way to the foreign & commonwealth office. i think we must be moments away from
1:54 pm
seeing the prime minister and the president emerge from number ten for that news conference. in an alternate universe, if this hadn't happened, the state visit, would it have changed the course of the relationship in the grand scheme of things? i don't know. most people say that it does run much deeper than that and part of one of the controversy about this is whether you look at it as it is the office of the american president that is important, not who is holding the office at the time. we can hear the demonstrations outside, we have seen jeremy corbyn, other opposition leaders and the speaker of the house not been willing to be the same room as him. donald trump not being given the opportunity to address both houses of parliament, seen as too controversial. all of that is difficult for the president, of course. when you saw the pictures yesterday, you can see how well that
1:55 pm
will go down in america, how he will be delighted by all of that. i don't think it affects the special relationship in that sense. it will make donald trump and his feel very welcome. there were those in the white house team who felt they had had a great reception and that it had a great reception and that it had gone according to plan. the politics has felt secondary to all of this and that is partly because theresa may is about to leave office. any conversations they have, the controversy around huawei for example, no decisions have been made about that, whether they get involved in the five g network, the only held today between donald trump and theresa may, how much is that worth? it is not her decision, it will be her successor. do you think there will be a degree of nervousness and concern, for example, over the pronouncement of
1:56 pm
donald trump around reduced intelligence sharing if the uk goes ahead with huawei ? ivanka trump coming out here. by her father's side throughout the trip and at the banquet last night. very much his right—hand woman. seen by many as brought through the ranks. goodness knows, there have been plenty of political dynasty is in politics so far already. on that point, what do you think the feelings of the leadership candidates will be in terms of a
1:57 pm
wariness about working with president trump? the ones who has spoken publicly on this trip, there haven't been many of them, have said that it haven't been many of them, have said thatitis haven't been many of them, have said that it is about recognising you have differences but you make your case to them publicly or privately. that is how it works, that is how diplomacy works. they are one of our closest allies and you cannotjust shun them. the health secretary, one of those leadership candidates, talking about the sadiq khan spat and saying, actually, he was proud that london has a muslim man and that london has a muslim man and thatis that london has a muslim man and that is something to be proud of, even though he does not agree with him. -- even though he does not agree with him. —— london has a muslim mayor. it really has tested the relationship and it does test those leadership candidates about how they react to it. we know that michael gove, the environment secretary has
1:58 pm
been asked to go and see donald trump. he has been offered an audience with donald trump. has that happened yet? i don't think it has happened yet? i don't think it has happened yet. they go back because michael gove did an interview with him on behalf of the times. that is the downing street communication tea m the downing street communication team there. they are being booed by the crowd. i am not sure they know who they are. this is a time of huge change. not all will keep theirjob once theresa may moves on. this is their last big moment, for a lot of them. a lot of them will be moving on. they did want to be around for this. i think theresa may wanted to be around for there is a given that she extended that invitation the first place. i wonder if there will bea first place. i wonder if there will be a nod to that in the questions she is asked as this will be her last big news conference. she stands
1:59 pm
on friday and that leadership gets under way. it is under way already. it has been under way for a while. we went up to 13 and now we have backed down to 12. the voting will start next week. we think we shall get the details of how that will work. there will be a lot of questions are theresa may not about the future, of course, but probably about her legacy. does she have a legacy? three years of trying to deliver on brexit, it hasn't worked. many people looking back and saying it has been a wasted three years. she has not been able to pursue any of her other agenda that she wanted to pursue because brexit has dominated everything that her government has done, so that has proved very difficult. we are seeing a ivanka trump sitting between her brothers. and possibly her sister as
2:00 pm
well, i couldn't quite tell. the aduu well, i couldn't quite tell. the adult children of donald trump who are all on this trip with him. sarah sanders the press secretary crossing over ahead of that news conference. because this is part of the final pieces of choreography that theresa may will be going through, the greater the nervousness that donald trump doesn't see anything that will impact on that from her perspective and her team's perspective. impact on that from her perspective and her team's perspectivem impact on that from her perspective and her team's perspective. it is ha rd to and her team's perspective. it is hard to know which way it will go. if you are leaving yourjob, well that give you more freedom? will she be more forthright with him? will she be more prepared to engage with him, not so nervous? you do not know which way it will go. we were discussing that yesterday on the subject of climate change, when downing street made it would

11 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on