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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 4, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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r m: its. quite tell. the well, i couldn't quite tell. the aduu well, i couldn't quite tell. the adult children of donald trump who are all on this trip with him. sarah sanders the press secretary crossing over ahead of that news conference. because this is part of the final pieces of choreography that theresa may will be going through, the greater the nervousness that donald trump doesn't see anything that will impact on that from her perspective and her team's perspective. impact on that from her perspective and her team's perspectivem impact on that from her perspective and her team's perspective. it is ha rd to and her team's perspective. it is hard to know which way it will go. if you are leaving yourjob, well that give you more freedom? will she be more forthright with him? will she be more prepared to engage with him, not so nervous? you do not know which way it will go. we were discussing that yesterday on the subject of climate change, when downing street made it would be
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clear it would be raising that with donald trump. she could be bolder and her statements as a result of leaving office. yes, all of the things that over the years have proven controversial, you do wonder whether she might take the opportunity to be more outspoken. i do not know, it does not feel like your style, to be honest. i would imagine she properly does not want to rock the boat. she did seem more relaxed i thought on the cameras, watching her laughing with donald trump as they arrived. she seemed more at ease and maybe that is just the fact that she knows she is leaving under pressure from the job has been lifted from her shoulders. but it is whether she can engage perhaps in a joke with him or two. she obviously has a sense of humour and maybe they will have a joke or two between them as well as they have the last press conference together. of course, great speculation over whether donald
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trump will win another term. he had said on twitter that he will officially announce he is running again in 2028 next month. —— 2020. world politics is in such a state of flux that you would not put any bets on where everyone will be next year in terms of all of these political leaders that we are looking at now. yes, it is interesting and that is the point if you are a leadership hopeful in that race, about to become the next prime minister of this country, you know, by the end of next month. of course, that is what you will be partly thinking about, and if you get to speak to donald trump today, you know, jeremy hunt has had a lot of face time with him. he has been in these meetings and greeted him at the airport when he arrived. borisjohnson has had a 20 minute phone call with the president. they do know each other a little bit. no word yet on nigel farage on whether he will have any kind of meeting. and here they come.
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presidents trump, theresa may. philip may and the first lady. —— president trump. the two political spouses attending a garden party here at downing street, we are told, although the weather was a little inclement, shall we say. so i am not quite sure if that went according to plan. we haven't heard very much about what the first lady has been doing, actually, on this visit. last time on the working visit she had some specific engagements, but not so some specific engagements, but not so much this time around. really, the two big days, i think, have been the two big days, i think, have been the royals yesterday and meeting the queen and, of course, tomorrow, the d—day 75th anniversary commemorations. portsmouth, that seems to be sandwiched in the
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middle, not as important this time around. yes, because the reason that donald trump is here is not specifically for the politics, he is here because of those d—day commemorations. that is going to be a huge and very moving day tomorrow. and i think that is why there was some criticism of the opposition party leaders who did not attend the banquet because they have said that this is about donald trump representing all of the americans who came and fought and died, and thatis who came and fought and died, and that is what they will be remembering tomorrow. they are just heading over to the foreign office, right next door for that press conference. and then after this news conference, donald trump and melania trump will be given a tour of the churchill war rooms. you might be more familiar with the name of the cabinet war rooms, those underground corridors and rooms beneath
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westminster, with a special connection, of course, to winston churchill. he will even visit the secret to both where churchill would have telephone conversations with president roosevelt as they tried to plot the course through world war two. —— booth. and as you may well be familiar with from last year, the president is a huge fan of winston churchill, so that will be of special interest to him, and then they go back to winfield house, the us ambassador‘s residence. perhaps that meeting with michael gove will happen then, if it has not happened already, but that would seem like an opportune moment for that meeting to happen. and then tonight at winfield house, that return banquet after the state banquet at buckingham palace last night, after which prince charles and duchess of cornwall will represent the queen. but right now,
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as you watch these images, we are waiting on a news conference to begin with the prime minister, theresa may, and the us president, donald trump. mrs may's last major news c0 nfe re nce donald trump. mrs may's last major news conference most probably as a leader of the conservative party. she stands down on a sunday. it is going to be very interesting... 0n friday, i beg your pardon. it will be interesting to watch the dynamic between the two of them as we see melania trump, the first lady and philip may, arrive. so, we arejust moments away from that news conference getting under way. president trump's adult children in the row behind. philip may and
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melania trump also present. this visit has been about him and his family for that to domestic audience in the united states. to see donald trump and his family meet the queen, meeting british royalty. very much about emphasising the brand of donald trump as he looks to another run at the white house. but as i mentioned a second ago, it will be very interesting to watch the body language. and, of course, to listen to what they have to say. so let us do that now. this week, we commemorate the extraordinary courage and sacrifice of those who gave their lives for oui’
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of those who gave their lives for our liberty on d—day, 75 years ago. as leaders prepare to gather here from across the world, it is fitting that we begin with a celebration of the special relationship between the united kingdom and the united states. enduring partners, who stood side by side on that historic day, and every day since. for generations at the heart of the transatlantic alliance, has been our shared democratic values, our common interests and our commitment to justice. it is the opportunity of purpose that will preserve the deep—rooted ties between our people and underpin our nations security and underpin our nations security and prosperity for the next 75 years and prosperity for the next 75 years and beyond. so i am very pleased to welcome the president of the united states of america on this state visit to the united kingdom. for the past two and a half years, the president and i have had the duty and privilege of being the latest
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guardians of this precious and profound friendship between our countries. as with other predecessors, as we have faced threats to the security of our citizens and allies, we have stood together and acted together. when russia used a deadly nerve agent on the streets of our country, alongside the uk's expulsions, the president expelled 60 russian intelligence officers, the largest contribution towards an unprecedented global response. and in syria, when innocent men, women and children were victims of a barbaric chemical weapons attack, britain and america, along with france, carried out targeted strikes against its regime. since we spoke about nato during my first visit to the white house, we have maintained oui’ the white house, we have maintained our support for this crucial alliance. thanks in part to your clear message on burden sharing, donald, we have seen members pledge another $1 billion, increasing their contributions to our shared
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security. and i am pleased to announce that nato will soon be able to call on the uk's queen elizabeth class aircraft carriers and f 35 fighterjets to help tackle threats around the world. today, we have discussed again the new and evolving challenges to our security, our values and our way of life. we share the same view about their origin and oui’ the same view about their origin and our objectives and meeting them. but, like prime ministers and presidents before us and no doubt those that come after, we can also differ sometimes on how to confront the challenges that we face. i have a lwa ys the challenges that we face. i have always talked openly with you, donald, when we have taken a different approach and you have done the same with me. i have always believed that cooperation and compromise are the basis of strong alliances, and nowhere is this more true than in the special relationship. today, we have discussed again the importance of oui’ discussed again the importance of our two nations working together to address iran's destabilising activity in the region and to ensure that tehran cannot acquire a nuclear
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weapon. although we differ on the means of achieving that, as i have said before, the uk continues to stand by the nuclear deal. it is clear that we both want to reach the same goal. it is important that iran meets its obligations and we do everything to avoid escalation, which is in no ones interest. recognising our nations are safer and more prosperous when we work together on the biggest challenges of ourtime, i together on the biggest challenges of our time, i also cited the uk's approach to tackling climate change and our continued support for the paris agreement. and we also spoke about china, recognising its economic significance and that we cannot ignore action that threatens oui’ cannot ignore action that threatens our shared interests or values. as we have deepened our cooperation on security, including joint military operations, and our unparalleled intelligence sharing, so our economies are ever more tightly bound together. every morning, 1 million americans get up and go to work for british companies in america and 1 million britons do the same for american companies here.
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0ur trading relationship is worth over £190 billion each year, and we are the largest investors in each other‘s economies, with mutual investments valued at as much as $1000. mr president, you and i agreed the first time we met that we should aim for an ambitious agreement when the uk leaves the eu. and from ever positive discussions today, i know that we both remain committed to this. i am also sure that our economic relationship will only grow broader and deeper, building on the conversations we had and the ideas we heard from uk and us businesses when we met him earlier today. tomorrow, we will sit down in portsmouth with our fellow leaders, to reaffirm the enduring importance of the western alliance and the shared values that underpin it. and as we look to the future, and the years and in the generations ahead, we will continue to work together to preserve the alliance thatis together to preserve the alliance that is the bedrock of our shared prosperity and security, just as it
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was on the beaches of normandy 75 yea rs was on the beaches of normandy 75 years ago. mr president. well, thank you, prime minister. my wife and i are honoured to return to london as our nations commemorate the 75th anniversary of d—day and world war two. we want to thank her majesty the queen, who i had a lovely dinner with last night, a fantastic person, a fantastic woman. i thank fantastic person, a fantastic woman. ithank her fantastic person, a fantastic woman. i thank her for so graciously inviting us for this state visit. it was very, very special. 0ur inviting us for this state visit. it was very, very special. our thanks as well to prime minister may and her husband for the warm welcome that they have given to me and the first lady, as we remember the heroes that laid down their lives to rescue civilisation itself on the 6th ofjune, rescue civilisation itself on the
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6th of june, 1944, rescue civilisation itself on the 6th ofjune, 1944, tens of thousands of young warriors left these shores by the sea and air to begin the invasion of normandy and the liberation of europe and the brutal nazi—occupation. liberation of europe and the brutal nazi—occu pation. it liberation of europe and the brutal nazi—occupation. it was a liberation like few people have seen before. among them were more than 130,000 american and british brothers in arms. through their father and sacrifice, they secured our homelands and saved freedom the world. tomorrow, prime minister may andl world. tomorrow, prime minister may and i will attend a commemoration ceremony in portsmouth, one of the key embarkation points for the invasion. more than 1.5 million american servicemen were stationed right here in england in advance of the landings that summer. the bonds of friendship forged here and see what employed on those hollowed beaches will endure forever. 0ur
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special relationship is grounded in common history, values, customs, culture, language and laws. 0ur people believe in freedom and independence as a sacred birthright and cherished inheritance worth defending at any cost. as the prime ministerandl defending at any cost. as the prime minister and i discussed defending at any cost. as the prime ministerand i discussed in defending at any cost. as the prime minister and i discussed in our meetings today and yesterday, the united states and united kingdom share many goals and priorities around the world. i want to thank the people of the united kingdom for their service and partnership in our campaign to defeat ices. as we know a few months ago, isis's caliphate in syria and iraq has been completely obliterated, defeated. the united kingdom is also a key partner in nato. the prime minister andl partner in nato. the prime minister and i agree that our nato allies must increase their defence spending and we have both been working very ha rd toward and we have both been working very hard toward that end. and we are
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very current, and some of them are not, we cannot allow that to happen but i appreciate everything you have donein but i appreciate everything you have done in that regard. we expect a growing number of nations to meet the minimum 2% of gdp requirement to address today's challenges. and all members of the alliance must fulfil their obligations. they have no choice, they must fulfil their obligations. among the pressing threats facing our nations is the development and spread of nuclear weapons, perhaps that is our greatest threat. the united states and the uk are determined to ensure that iran never develops nuclear weapons and stop supporting and engaging in terrorism. and i believe that will happen. in protecting our nations, we also know that the border security as national security. today, the prime minister andl security. today, the prime minister and i discussed were thriving economic relationship. both countries are doing very well and
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participated in a roundtable with industry and business leaders. i can say probably the biggest business leaders anywhere in the world. our nations have more than $1 trillion invested in each other's economics. the united kingdom is america's largest foreign investor and our largest foreign investor and our largest european export market. that isa largest european export market. that is a lot of importance. as the uk makes preparations to exit the european union, the united states is committed to a phenomenal trade deal between the us and the uk and there is tremendous potential in that trade deal. i say probably to and even three times of what we are doing right now. tremendous potential. 75 years ago, this thursday, courageous americans and british patriots set out from this silence towards history's most important battle. they stormed forward out of ships and aeroplanes,
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risking everything, to defend our people and to ensure that the united states and britain would forever remain sovereign and forever remain free. following this press conference, prime minister theresa may, her husband, the first lady, my family andl may, her husband, the first lady, my family and i will visit the legendary churchill war rooms beneath the streets of london. i look forward to that. in his famous speech on this day in june 1940, prime minister churchill urged his countrymen to defend our island whatever the cost may be. as we mark this solemn anniversary of d—day, we remember that the defence of our nations does not begin on the battlefield, but within the heart of every patriot. today, let others renew our pledge engraved at the american cemetery in normandy, and inscribed by president dwight
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eisenhower and st paul's cathedral, right here in london, that the cause for which they died shall live. prime minister theresa may, it has beena prime minister theresa may, it has been a true honour. i have greatly enjoyed working with you, you are a tremendous professional and a person that loves your country dearly. thank you very much, it has truly been an honour. thank you for the invitation to memorialise our fallen heroes and for your partnership in protecting and advancing the extraordinary lives between the american and british people. it is the greatest alliance the world has ever known. thank you, prime minister, thank you. thank you very much. applause thank you, we are going to take two questions from the uk media and then
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from the american media. beth rigby, firstly. thank you. thank you, prime ministerand firstly. thank you. thank you, prime minister and president strom. firstly. thank you. thank you, prime ministerand president strom. beth rigby, sky news. residents trump, as you hold talks with the current prime minister, the leader of her majesty's opposition has been addressing a protest rally against your visit in trafalgar square. —— president strom. he said he is disappointed you attack the london mayor and criticised your record on refugees. what do you have to say to him and is this man someone you could do a trade deal with. prime minister, do you think that sadiq khan isa minister, do you think that sadiq khan is a stone cold loser? thank you. you are talking about the mayor of london? yes? i think he has not beena very of london? yes? i think he has not been a very good mare from what i understand. he has done a poorjob, crime is up, a lot of problems and i do not think he should be criticising a representative of the united states that can do so much good for the united kingdom. we
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talked about it before. he should be positive, not negative. he is a negative force, not a positive one. if you look at what he said, he hurts the people of this great country, and i think he should focus on hisjob country, and i think he should focus on his job and country, and i think he should focus on hisjob and be a lot better if he did that. he could straighten out some of the problems that he has and probably some that he has caused. thank you. what about the jeremy corbyn? he wanted to meet with me andl corbyn? he wanted to meet with me and i said no. i do not know him, never met him. never spoke to him. he wanted to meet today or tomorrow, andl he wanted to meet today or tomorrow, and i decided that i would not do that. i think that he is, from where i come from, somewhat of a negative force. i think that people should look to do things correctly as
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opposed to criticise. i really don't like critics as much as i like and respect people that get things done. sol respect people that get things done. so i have decided not to meet. as faras so i have decided not to meet. as far as the protest, so i have decided not to meet. as faras the protest, i so i have decided not to meet. as far as the protest, i have to tell you, because i commented on it yesterday. we left the prime minister, the queen, the royal family, there were thousands of people on the streets cheering. and even coming over today, there were thousands of people cheering. and theni thousands of people cheering. and then i heard that there were protests and i said, where are they? i don't see any. i small —— i saw a very small one. but a lot of this is a fake news. you saw the people wearing —— a fake news. you saw the people wearing — — you a fake news. you saw the people wearing —— you saw the people waving the american flag, your flag. there was great love and it was an alliance. i did not see the protesters. there was a very small group put in for political reasons. so that was fake news. thank you. i would say to both the mayor of london and jeremy corbyn, the
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discussions that we have had today are about the future of this most important relationship between the us and the uk. as the president described it, the greatest alliance that the world has seen. it is this deep and special relationship and partnership between the us and uk that ensures our safety and security, and the safety and security, and the safety and security of others around the world, too. and it is this relationship that helps to ensure there are jobs that helps to ensure there are jobs that employ people come here, in the uk and in the united states, that underpins our prosperity and our future. that is a relationship we should cherish, it is a relationship we should build on, it is a relationship we should be proud of. this really is a big and important alliance. and i think people should act positively towards it, because it means so much for both countries. and it has been so good. steve, go ahead. thank you, mr president. what
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is your current view on brexit, sir? should britain leave the european union if there is no agreement by 0ctober union if there is no agreement by october the 31st? and for the prime minister, what would be the ramekin —— ramifications if there is no deal? well, i do not like to take questions on things that i am not really... i understand the issue very well, but and i predicted what was going to happen. some of you will remember that strong prediction made at a certain location on a development we were opening the day before it happened. and i thought it was going to happen become of —— because of emigration more than anything else, but it probably happens for a lot of reasons. but i would tell you it will happen and it probably should happen. this is a great, great country and it wants its own identity. it wants to have its own identity. it wants to have its own identity. it wants to have its own borders. it wants to run its own affairs. this is a very, very special place, and i think it deserves a special place. and i feel like maybe for that reason and for others, but for that reason, it was
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going to happen. i think it will happen, yes. and i believe the prime minister has brought it to a very good point where something will take place in the not—too—distant future. i think she has done a very good job. i believe it would be good for the country, yes. and from my point of view, i believe it is important for us to deliver brexit. we gave that choice to the british people. parliament overwhelmingly gave the choice to the british people. we should now deliver on that choice. i continue to believe that it is in the best interests of the uk to leave the european union in an orderly way with a deal. i think we have a good deal, sadly, the labour party and other mps have so far stopped us from delivering brexit in that deal, but obviously, this is an issue that will continue here in the uk. the important thing is that we deliver brexit, and once we are out of the eu we can do what we talked about today and develop notjust that free trade agreement but a broader economic partnership into the future. mr president, are you
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prepared to impose limits on intelligence sharing with britain if they do not put in place some restrictions on huawei? no, because we will have an agreement on huawei and everything else. we have an incredible intelligence relationship and we will be able to work out any differences. we did discuss it. i see absolutely no limitations. we have never had limitations. this is a truly great ally and partner, and we will have no problem with that. francis? mr president, francis from the times. do you agree with your ambassador that the entire economy needs to be on the table any future trade deal talks, including the nhs? and prime minister, are you tempted to take the president up on his suggestion and stick around for a while? i think we will have a great trade deal, yes. it will be
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comprehensive and great. but what about the nhs wish to mark should that be on the table? —— but what about the nhs? should that be on the table? well, everything is on the table, nhs and a lot more than that. but everything will be on the table, absolutely. the point about making trade deals is that both sides negotiate and succumb to an agreement about what should or should not be in that trade deal for the future. as regards your second question, nice try, but, no. iam a woman of my word. john, please. thank you, mr president. domestically, in recent days, mexico has stepped up apprehensions in deportations of central american
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migrants. that's good. this could possibly be in response to your threat of terrorists. it can possibly be. has mexico done enough to avoid tarus, which would be imposed in the from now? —— threat of tariffs. this will take effect from next week. what do you say to republicans who will try to go against your actions? that would be foolish, there is nothing more important than borders. i have a 94% approval rating as of this morning in the republican party. that is an all—time record. can you believe that? is it that something? i love records. we have a 94% approval rating in the republican party. i wa nt rating in the republican party. i want to see security at the border andl want to see security at the border and i will see great trade, i can see a lot of things happening. and thatis see a lot of things happening. and that is happening. mexico called,
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they want to meet, we will meet on wednesday. mike pompeo will be at the meeting along with a few others who are very good at this and we will see if we can do something. but i think it is likely that the tarus will go on and we will probably be talking during the time that the targets are on and they will be paid. and if they do not step up and give us security for our nation, look, millions of people are flowing through mexico, that is unacceptable. millions and millions of people are coming right through mexico. it is a 2000 mile journey, and they are coming up to our border. 0ur border patrol, which is incredible, they are apprehending them, but our laws are bad because them, but our laws are bad because the democrats do not want to pass laws that could be passed in 15 minutes. they could be passed quickly. in one day it could change. but even beyond the laws, mexico should not allow millions of people to try and enter our country. and they could stop it very quickly. and i think they will. and if they won't, we will put tariffs on them. and every month those tarus go from
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596 and every month those tarus go from 5% to 10%, to 15%, to 20% and then 2596. 5% to 10%, to 15%, to 20% and then 25%. and what will happen is that all of those companies that have left our country and going to mexico, they are going to come back to us, and that is ok. but i think that mexico will step up and do what they should have done. and i do not wa nt they should have done. and i do not want to hear that mexico is run by the cartels and the drug lords and the cartels and the drug lords and the coyotes. i do not want to hear about that. a lot of people have said that. mexico has something to prove. but i do not want to hear that they are run by the cartels. you understand ? you that they are run by the cartels. you understand? you reported it all the time, a lot of people do. that would be a terrible thing. mexico should step up and stop this onslaught, this invasion into our country. prime minister theresa may, you tried three times to get a deal on brexit, at this point do you believe that a deal on brexit is this a gordian knot? president tom
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pa said you did not take his advice on the negotiation. should you have, would that have made a difference goes to mac and president trump, you had a conversation with boris johnson. could we ask what you spoke about and will you meet with michael gove today? firstly, on the first issues, as i said in answer to any other question, i personally believe that it other question, i personally believe thatitis other question, i personally believe that it is in the best interests of the uk to leave the european union with the deal. i believe there is a good deal on the table. obviously, it would be for whoever succeeds me as prime minister to take this issue forward. what is paramount, i believe, is delivering on brexit for the british people. and i seem to remember the president suggested that i sue the european union, which we did not do, we negotiated and came up with a good deal. we did not do, we negotiated and came up with a good deallj we did not do, we negotiated and came up with a good deal. i would have sued and settled, you never know. she is properly a better
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negotiator than i am. but you know what? she has got it in a sense, that deal is teed up. i think they have to do something and perhaps you will not be given the credit that you deserve if they do something, but i do think you deserve a lot of credit. yes, john? sol but i do think you deserve a lot of credit. yes, john? so i know boris, i like credit. yes, john? so i know boris, ilike him credit. yes, john? so i know boris, i like him and i have liked him for a long time. i think he will do a very good job. i knowjeremy, a long time. i think he will do a very goodjob. i knowjeremy, i think either diegojob. i do not know michael, but when tda good job? —— would he do a good job? thank you very much, everybody.
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the news conference ending with some laughs there, ending a news conference with laughs as donald trump said he, he knew boris, he knewjeremy, talking about boris johnson and jeremy hunt. but he did not know michael, talking about michael gove, who we understand he will meet later and get to know him a little bit. being slightly more circumspect i think that time around and not wholeheartedly in door saying boris johnson and not wholeheartedly in door saying borisjohnson as he has done before. listening and watching natwest me is our chief political correspondence. a lot to go through
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there. theresa may began by talking about herself and donald trump being the latest guardians of a profound friendship. right from the beginning i think there was a nod to the idea of legacy from theresa may, wasn't there? yes, i think she was also making the point that because of the controversy that there is around him,| controversy that there is around him, ithink controversy that there is around him, i think she is making the point it does not matter who is prime minister of the united kingdom and two as president of the united states, you have to get along. you have to try and make sure that relationship continues despite your differences. she said they have a lwa ys differences. she said they have always been very open and honest with each other, for example on their differences on climate change. it led very directly into talking aboutjeremy it led very directly into talking about jeremy corbyn, of it led very directly into talking aboutjeremy corbyn, of course the labour leader, who has not met donald trump. as he revealed there, he said they asked to meet me. jeremy corbyn asked to meet me today
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or tomorrow and i said no. we have spoken to labour about that and they have confirms that they asked to meet. we do not know the timings, if that was some time ago, but, you know, a pretty startling moment when he said it was a negative. it was a startling moment given thatjust moments before the news conference began we could hear echoing down in downing street to the voice of jeremy corbyn speaking to protesters at the rally today. let us just talk quickly about trade, donald trump began in his visit by talking about a significant deal that could be done. that it was a very big deal and any news conference at was a phenomenal deal. he talked about the us and uk doing trade perhaps two or three times more than what they do may moment. that cannot be the case, can it? he says it has tremendous
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potential. of course, he knows where it would end up and how long it would take to do, but he says two or three times more than what we do now. there have been assessments by the treasury here talking about how much would other trade deals that are not there now, how much would they be worth. i think they said two or 3% of they be worth. i think they said two or3% of gdp they be worth. i think they said two or 3% of gdp could be gained. another startling moment when he said should ideal be on the table, because there has been a lot of controversy about the nhs and whether that should be part of all of this. he said yes, everything should be on the table including the nhs. that is a big problem for whoever takes over from theresa may, because it is highly controversial, something opposition parties are very much against and some of the leadership contenders in the conservative race are against as well. they will now be asked about that and watch their views are on
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that, as well. overall which is said with a fairly reigned a news conference for donald trump? yes, maybe, but even then he is being very critical of the labour oppositionjeremy corbyn. saying he isa oppositionjeremy corbyn. saying he is a negative force, given that reason mac is moving on, given the uncertainty that there are in british politics to many people are speculating about a general election and jeremy corbyn women. a conference and if you months' time with the two of them could be very difficult. it did end in laughs where he turns tojeremy hunt sitting on the front there about michael gove and asks him jeremy, which michael gove do a good job? quite prep like thing, because donald trump has met michael gove. he was interviewed by him on behalf of the times. thank you very much. let us head away from downing street
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over to buckingham palace and simon, certainly one thing you can savour a donald trump news conference edge gives you plenty of material to talk about. it is never dull. unless we are talking about the weather, it is pouring here. let us pick up on what happened this afternoon. with us is doctorjames boyce happened this afternoon. with us is doctor james boyce and happened this afternoon. with us is doctorjames boyce and bronwen maddox. what was your first impression of that news conference in the whole? i thought it was fascinating, especially the chemistry between the two leaders. theresa may started are very formal, a bit forced into her language, i was waiting to see if donald trump would reciprocate and of course it was not. very formal on his account ofi was not. very formal on his account of i thought. do you agree? i think they were a bit more friendly than that. i thought donald trump is
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trying very hard to be very controlled and measured, but he did burst out of that when he said i did not see any demonstrations, i saw love out there. just as the crowds are gathering behind us to demonstrate against us. he also said the same about democrats in america, they love me. he really cares about that, but then there was more positioning stuff on trade deals on stuff that i think we should take seriously. let us pick up on the trade. you could almost gasps as president trump said everything is on the table, including the nhs. theresa may try to ameliorate that, but that is going to touch a nerve. absolutely, this is been a problem for the americans ever since the american ambassador spoke on the bbc at the weekend suggesting that the nhs would be up for grabs effectively. donald trump double down on that and you could see the
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prime minister trying to go back on that. as energy start opening up the doors for negotiation, anything is going to be up for grabs and americans will be looking at that pharmaceutical companies and conservatism have to be careful if they are still in power at that point of the allegations of trying to privatise the nhs. bronwyn, they are both technically right. of course everything is on the table and of course the nhs will be part of the negotiation. yes and no. the fa ct of the negotiation. yes and no. the fact is quite a lot of nhs services are provided by private companies and some others have american ties, so and some others have american ties, so the picture is magic. but the symbolism of it is not muddy at all. he must know that theresa may and any prime minister would know that the nhs is totemic care. that is going to be very difficult. another question muddy chlorinated chickens, the uk will have to decide will it
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be closer to the eu or the us? there is room for ambiguity, like all trade deals i think this may turn on ambiguity. rfid standards may be the same, but this is about the conditions about which chickens are raised. he was smiling broader than most when he said well i do not like to comment on what is going on in other places and then he answered lots of questions about the succession of the conservative leadership. interestingly said that he had never met michael gove, because he has. but he was treading a fine line because he has. but he was treading afine line 19 because he has. but he was treading a fine line 19 unit. i think so. there is one thing between tweeting which of course he does an awful lot and speaking with the prime minister. i thought if ever going to be any areas of controversy it was going to be there. i think actually that past as well as the prime minister could have hoped for
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regarding him walking a fine line and coming down and making reference to one or two people. he made a reference to the foreign secretary therefore examples is trying to think spread the love around as donald trump would say. apart from jeremy corbyn, he said he asked to see me and i did not. yes, he made a distinct point without extending the theatre if like that already has with sadiq khan. when he when he said he chooses not to deal with someone, said he chooses not to deal with someone, his text by that. nothing there at the moment. we are talking to countries with huge interest, mutual interest in terms of trade. you're absolutely right. over the last 48 hours there has great discussion above the united states and that they could elaborate whatever trader they want. as was said there indie press conference, we are so vital in terms of
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investment, the amount of people who go to work for british companies in the united states, the prime minister was very clear about that. certainly there are the some furious negotiations over the coming weeks, months and maybe even years in regards to trying to strike a deal. we should not underestimate our position here. donald trump is very vocal saying we should enter our negotiations at the eu from a position of strength. if we take that same approach to negotiations with the united states may not be a bad approach. where do you think the state visit has left the negotiations as of now? exactly where they where i think. we knew what was at stake and the incentive sample sides. we had the spectacle repeated this week and ongoing of how the us deals with trade partners, harvey trump administration deals with trade partners. mexico are a new front on top of china, i'm not sure it is changed very much. thank you very much. joining us in the second day
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of the state visit, concentrating very much today on the politics. tomorrow is about commemorations. this is the moment we say goodbye to viewers watching on bbc two. now, let us get more reaction. we can speak now to betsy who is a former adviser. what did you make of that in the round? first of all, there was a tone of mutual friendship that is part of the whole visit because of course there's visit is primarily a commemoration of our partnership 75 years ago in defending liberty. you can feel some personal warmth between your prime minister and the president. i think it is an exaggeration to say there wasn't, in fa ct, exaggeration to say there wasn't, in fact, there was. he ultimate
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deal—maker is using that, promoting thatis deal—maker is using that, promoting that is a way to establish a very strong bilateral trade arrangement but the uk when they leave the eu. they were effusive in their praise of each other's countries and indeed of each other's countries and indeed of each other's countries and indeed of each other. but back there, back home, how do you think they will react to what is happened here in the last 24—hour is also?” react to what is happened here in the last 24-hour is also? i think that the president is very eager to establish a strong trading relationship at the uk, as well as a friendship and many other ways in terms of mutual defence for example. we have always counted the uk is a most important ally. in terms of the next presidential election, that race which, let's face it, seems to already be under way for many. all the time. how do you think, well the
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president returned to the states at the end of the week, will he be happy with how this has gone so far? barry much so, despite the very distasteful and inappropriate editorial in your newspaper this morning. regarding president trump's visit, i think you come home with the glow of success, he has presided over one of the most important anniversaries in europe and american history and he has shown a great deal of friendship and received friendship back not only from the royalfamily friendship back not only from the royal family but from theresa may. isa royal family but from theresa may. is a perhaps a very undiplomatic diplomat? i would not say so. i would say instead that he had a new style. it is warmer, it is not part of that leftist elite, and as a down pump style that most people really
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like. of course his family, looking at pictures of them in talks earlier with the british delegation, how important and with the british delegation, how importantand a with the british delegation, how important and a behind—the—scenes? certainly they are important adviser to the president, he trusts their advice. but beyond that i would not exaggerated. what about milani? -- what about melania ? exaggerated. what about milani? -- what about melania? how she has composed herself, that strong relationship that she has a donald trump as they are walking around london. she is always there at his side, that is an important role, too. yes, she appears even more stunning than usual. much as the president is talking about her outfit yesterday, she made quite a beautiful show without of course
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upstaging everybody in the royal family. i think americans felt very proud that she is our first lady. what will he take away with this? tomorrow there is the change of mid tier as we look at the commemoration, the 70 fete anniversary of the d—day landings. —— change of mood. he was almost mocking himself in that news conference when he said he does not like to get involved in other people because my business, when he seems to be very little but in some cases. he has a good demeanour, we expect that tomorrow he will do his very best to story to the heights that this commemoration deserves. the fa ct this commemoration deserves. the fact is that the ceremony itself, the event itself deserves that kind of commitment from all of us
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tomorrow, whether we are speakers or simply observers. betsy it was very good to talk to, betsy mccaughey joining us from newark. —— from new your. gemini is a chief strategist with republicans overseas. how do you think the last hour has gone? the way i sought was that chun came with a clear message, he highlighted the fact that we are the most direct line of foreign investment in each other's companies in automobiles and we oil. he came over to the strength and that bilateral agreement and i think he is on message there. on message, there is always a fear at the start
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ofa there is always a fear at the start of a news conference involving donald trump that he might go script. the teatro in this do you think? no, once he got over the landing tweet he has kept things pretty cordial. he made little comment about the nhs, but of course thatis comment about the nhs, but of course that is not policy that isjust negotiating tactics and the way he is. i think he conducted himself as he should have. he will always be looking over his shoulder at what is happening back home. the images of yesterday and that news conference today, he will be happy, well he? yesterday and that news conference today, he will be happy, well he ?|j think he will be very happy. as he mentioned he has 94% republican support. we came for a state visit, we did not come to take pictures with parliament, we came to see the queen and we ask in the queen. it will play very well back home, with a very well received. he mentioned he did not see the protesters, when he did not see the protesters, when he came by their were a lot less people than have come there. there
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are thousands of people in the streets are demonstrating, it is there. sure, i was streets are demonstrating, it is there. sure, iwas down streets are demonstrating, it is there. sure, i was down there but at there. sure, i was down there but at the time that he came there weren't as many. what you think, let us look at yesterday and the rule the royal family has taken. is that something thatis family has taken. is that something that is obviously unique to this country, does that help many presidents can then move onto the politics that he has done today without any background ? politics that he has done today without any background? does he feel that that has him something?m without any background? does he feel that that has him something? it is given him a symmetrical advantage in negotiating with the government. he can separate the monarchy and the government, he can do a very proper state visit with the queen and when he deals with people who have been very negative and nasty to him he has never wanted back down from a fight. he has turned down a request to meet the leader of the opposition here. regardless of what he says, isn't there a moment when you say
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you are big enough, you are the president of the united states to speak to you wish to speak to?|j president of the united states to speak to you wish to speak to? i do not thinkjeremy corbyn deserves an audience. if you want to end up eating the animals like they did in venezuela i think jeremy eating the animals like they did in venezuela i thinkjeremy corbyn is the one. you're talking about somebody who could be the next leader of the country. president trump certainly does not want jeremy corbyn to be the next prime minister, he wants to build this trade agreement and strengthen our large foreign investment and jeremy corbyn would not be about that at all. jeremy corbyn are strong about relations with united states enemies, why would he want to meeting? britain is a unique country
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and a sense that it has a water barrier, there is a bed of cultural insensitivity from the eu towards the british people, detect dictating how people behave on their side of the about border. finally, do you think he will regret and i know he was responding to something sadiq khan had said about him? very derogatory, very unpleasant, but do you think he will regret responding in the way that he did yesterday given the response that there has been to? absolutely not. he got a very positive response from his fans back in. sadiq khan, no offence he is the mayor of london, but he is a very small fish in the playing field. it is very disrespected to the queen and very disrespectful to the queen and very disrespectful to the commemoration of d—day, i think the commemoration of d—day, i think the comments of sadiq khan very disrespectful and charm is never one
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to back down from a fight. thank you so much. as mentioned, 75 years ago and american bomber was part of the casualties list of the d—day landings and the timing of the 1944 fight to regain control of europe from nazi germany. one particular plane from sheffield claimed the lives of ten airmen on board when it crashed. it was the bees 70 flying fortress which came down and was watched by a local schoolboy, he was eight years old at the time. for yea rs eight years old at the time. for years he has attended a memorial to the many losses lives on after the bbc his story, a fight pass was arranged to commemorate them. now ahead of d—day that each old boy tony has arranged to accompany...
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the american cemetery in cambridge and a service to remember all those who died in the second world war.‘ yea rs who died in the second world war.‘ years ago they world held its breath. alongside the american ambassador and military personnel there is a guest of honour. the service and they special fly—past,. all of a sudden sb 17 came over and of course i burst into tears like i a lwa ys of course i burst into tears like i always do when i state. tony was just a schoolboy playing in a park when he saw a badly damaged aircraft. the pilot we are trying to clear the area, but tony did not understand and waved back. moments later the pilot brought the plane down in the trees. the first thing i
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down in the trees. the first thing i do of course is, i always kiss it first. tony has been attending a memorial to the crew for decades, he can sense family and blames himself for their deaths. three of the airmen are buried at the cemetery in cambridge. tony is visiting the graves of the first time at the american ambassador. synergy gets there, you can feel itjust is that they without. as soon as you get there. it is unbelievable to see them, i could stay. it would not bother me if i sat down on the grass and stayed here all night. it would be lovely.
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how are you doing? grand, oh, what a plane. a special treat. this is the only be 17 still flying in europe, kept operational by charitable operations. the crew have kindly agreed to take tony for a spin along the runway. it was meant to be this, meant to be. it is hard to put into words. it is so... the feeling to know that my lads were in a plane like this. 0h,
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what a beautiful thing. great story. let us had a look at the weather. the rain has pushed its way northwards over the last few hours. you can see the heaviest of the rain, the most persistent is across western areas. the way the showers are lining up at lex's episode quite wet around london and south—east a guide for the next several hours. the driest weather for a northern scotland, just a few isolated showers. into this lighter cooler air. overnight the rain is slow—moving across scotland and northern ireland. tomorrow it is a
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brighter kind of day with a fuse showers across western areas, more persistent rain over scotland and northern ireland. these are the kind of temperatures, feeling warmer in any sunshine across the england and wales. still quite cool for scotland and northern ireland with some rain. flooding is a possibility. the rest of the weekend is quite unsettled and quite skilfully last part of the week and into the weekend.
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this is bbc news, i'm simon mccoy. the headlines at 3pm... president trump and theresa may speak of the strength of the alliance between the uk and usa — at a joint news conference on the second day of the state visit. as we look to the future, and the years and the new generations ahead, we will continue to work together, to preserve the alliance that is the bedrock of our shared prosperity and security. it is the greatest alliance the world has ever known. earlier, jeremy corbyn addressed protesters in central london. donald trump says he refused a request to meet the opposition leader. he wanted to meet today
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or tomorrow and i decided that i would not do that. i think that he is, from where i come from, somewhat of a negative force. and i'm annita mcveigh here in downing street where we will bring you the political reaction to president trump's state visit. to president trump's state visit. good afternoon. welcome tojust outside welcome to just outside buckingham palace on what is a very miserable afternoon. but not far away at it was a much more cheerful site as theresa may and donald trump gathered for a news conference. theresa may has praised the "unity of purpose" between the uk and us in a news conference with us president donald trump. mr trump said there was "tremendous
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potential" for a trade deal with the us after the uk leaves the eu. the pair have been holding talks at no 10, with contentious issues such as business with the chinese telecoms giant huawei on the agenda. and after the warm welcome from the royal family yesterday, the us leader is getting a different reception on this, the second day of the state visit, as protestors take to the streets. let's hear more of what was said when the us president and prime minister held a news conference in westminster. theresa may began by saying it was fitting to be celebrating the relationship between the uk and us ahead of the 75th anniversary of the d—day landings. this week, we commemorate the extraordinary courage and sacrifice of those who gave their lives for our liberty on d—day, 75 years ago. as leaders prepare to gather here from across the world, it is fitting that we begin with a celebration of the special relationship between the united kingdom and the united states. enduring partners, who stood side
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by side on that historic day, and every day since. for generations at the heart of the transatlantic alliance, has been our shared democratic values, our common interests and our commitment to justice. it is that unity of purpose that will preserve the deep—rooted ties between our people and underpin our nations' security and prosperity for the next 75 years and beyond. so i am very pleased to welcome the president of the united states of america on this state visit to the united kingdom. president trump also spoke about the sacrifice made by troops 75 years ago and the bonds forged. tomorrow, prime ministertheresa tomorrow, prime minister theresa may andl tomorrow, prime minister theresa may and i will attend a commemoration service in portsmouth. one of the key embarkation points for the invasion. more than 1.5 million
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american servicemembers were stationed right here in england in advance of the landings that summer. the bonds of friendship forged here and sealed in blood on those hollowed beaches will endure forever. our special relationship is grounded in common history, values, customs, culture, language and laws. our people believe in freedom and independence as a sacred birthright and cherished inheritance worth defending at any cost. shortly after the opposition leaderjeremy corbyn addressed crowds at an anti—trump protest, the president revealed that the labour leader had wanted a meeting with him. i don't know jeremy corbyn, never met him. never spoke to him. he wanted to meet today or tomorrow, and i decided that i would not do that. i think that he is, from where i come from, somewhat of a negative force.
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i think that people should look to do things correctly, as opposed to criticise. i really don't like critics as much as i like and respect people that get things done. so i have decided not to meet. the president was also asked whether he agreed with his uk ambassador who told the bbc‘s andrew marr programme this week that the nhs should be on the table in any future trade deals. here's what he had to say on that. look, i think everything, when a trade deal is on the table. when you are dealing on trade, everything is on the table. so nhs or anything else, and a lot more than that. but everything will be on the table, absolutely. but the point about making trade deals is that both sides negotiate and come to an agreement about what should or should not be in that trade deal for the future. the president also gave his opinion on whether brexit would go ahead on the 31st of october —— with or without a deal
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with the european union. i understand the issue very well, and i predicted what was going to happen. some of you will remember that strong prediction made at a certain location on a development we were opening the day before it happened. and i thought it was going to happen because of immigration more than anything else, but it probably happens for a lot of reasons. but i would tell you it will happen and it probably should happen. this is a great, great country and it wants its own identity. it wants to have its own borders. it wants to run its own affairs. this is a very, very special place, and i think it deserves a special place. and i thought maybe for that reason and for others, but for that reason, it was going to happen. i think it will happen, yes. and i believe the prime minister has brought it to a very good point, where something will take place in the not—too—distant future. i think she has done a very good job. i believe it would be good for the country, yes.
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on huawei, president trump was asked if he would impose any limits on intelligence—sharing if britain did not restrict the use of huawei technology in developing its new 56 mobile phone network... we have an incredible intelligence relationship and we will be able to work out any differences. we did discuss it. i see absolutely no limitations, we have never had limitations. this is a truly great ally and partner, and we will have no problem with that. my colleague annita mcveigh is at downing street. yes, also in the rain with our chief political correspondent, vicki young, simon. of course, the president gave us some breaking news on that news conference, didn't he vicky, when he said thatjeremy corbyn had requested a meeting with him, and you have confirmed that was the case with the labour party? yes, what is interesting is thatjeremy
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corbyn refused to go to the state banquet last night. you know, some of those in his team, hi shadow cabinet, feel that the donald trump has demeaned the office of the president of the united states, and they feel that they are within their rights and it is the right thing to do to not go and engage with him in that sense. but they have been coming under pressure from people suggesting, if you want to be the next government and the next prime minister, you must speak to people that you do not agree with and surely it is better to meet them and put your point of view to them. it turns out, we do not know the timings, but it turns out that jeremy corbyn did ask for a meeting with donald trump, but he said no to all of that. a labour party spokesperson says that corbyn proposed a meeting with donald trump during the visit, he is ready to engage with the president on a number of issues such as the threats to peace, the refugee crisis and climate change. i am sure that those close to jeremy corbyn would climate change. i am sure that those close tojeremy corbyn would say probably donald trump, having said he does not like critics, may be did not want to meet with someone who was going to have a meeting and
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criticise him for various aspects of his policy. but he was also pretty rude aboutjeremy corbyn, saying that he was a negative force. so, this begs the question, given the flux in british politics, if you put it like that, many people speculating that there could be a general election within the next year or two if donald trump is still there and jeremy corbyn as prime minister, they will have to meet at some point and they would have to repair this relationship. so that was a bit of a turn—up for the books. last time he was here, last july, he said difficult things about theresa may's handling of brexit. this time he was more complimentary and said that she was possibly a better negotiator than he was and that she probably had not been given the credit that she was due. that was interesting in terms of the tone, wasn't it? yes, he spoke of her in glowing terms actually. partly, she is, of course, standing down as the conservative party leader on friday and will no longer be the prime minister. so he probably did not think there was
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much point in publicly criticising her having done so previously. he was far more glowing about her. i think it is interesting has point that she has not got the credit that she may be deserves, because we do not know what is coming down the line. she would argue, i think, and she dead they are very passionately, that she believes the best way to leave the eu is where the deal, and she feels that the deal that she has got is the right one. it could well be that it ends up that a future prime minister might end up bringing any deal that could be quite similar. so it could be that she has laid the groundwork if you like for what is to come, because a lot of theissues what is to come, because a lot of the issues and that withdrawal agreement will have to be sold and solved by who comes next. and president strom also commented on the tory leader candidates. yes, he spoke aboutjeremy hunt whom he spent quite a bit of time within the last few days. he spoke about boris johnson as someone that he knew. and
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intriguingly, someone asked him if he was going to meet the environment secretary michael go. he said he was but he did not know michael, which is surprising because he did meet him afew is surprising because he did meet him a few years ago. michael gove interviewed him on behalf of the times. and at the end he put the question out there, would michael do a good job and put that tojeremy hunt, did he think that michael gove would be a good leader. so weighing and a little bit but not too much. thank you very much for that. at the beginning of that press conference, theresa may said that herself and donald trump were the latest guardians of profound friendship. that will be in evidence in portsmouth at the 75th commemorations of d—day, when it is all about that shared history, much bigger than any particular individuals and office at any one time. for the moment in downing street, back to you, simon. thank you very much.
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with me is bronwen maddox, director of the institute for government, a think—tank working to make government more effective. let us talk about the issue of trade, how will that affect what happens in any negotiations, what has just been happens in any negotiations, what hasjust been said happens in any negotiations, what has just been said at the press conference? well, the us position has been consistent under the donald trump administration, it is friendly but they want everything on the table when it comes to doing a trade deal. they might press the point much harder than countries would think. mexico, for example, is being pushed against the wall, more or less. one of the things that the president made clear was on the table was the nhs. now, probably just worth showing you in the last two minutes, that the health secretary matt hancock has been on twitter and tweeted a direct message to donald trump.
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does that complicate things in any way? you can see why matt hancock has done it, we are into our own election period here, aren't we? yes, no prime ministerial candidate can yes, no prime ministerial candidate ca n afford yes, no prime ministerial candidate can afford to tell you that the nhs is on the table. that us companies could bid for parts of that, for example. and you could see that theresa may was very uncomfortable on that. yes, the us position has been clear that they would want it and play in return, for example, for access to their services market, which matters an awful lot to the uk. so they are both correct in effect? yes, and if the politics weren't so incredibly sensitive, which they are, and the nhs wasn't such as it is, you could suggest that there is room for fudge such as it is, you could suggest that there is room forfudge because the nhs does buy in quite a lot of what it does from private companies
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already and is it that much of a change? but the politics are what they are, which is that the nhs has this kind of sacrosanct image in the uk and no prime minister is going to wa nt to uk and no prime minister is going to want to be seen that that is in play. that is the grown-up politics, there has been a lot of playground politics in the last 48 hours. again, this time withjeremy corbyn, donald trump saying, where i come from, he has been nastier than me so ido from, he has been nastier than me so i do not want to meet him. but how helpful is that when we are talking about the leader of the opposition in this country? that is right. but i think both jeremy in this country? that is right. but i think bothjeremy corbyn and donald trump would have to do some serious thinking if the labour party we re serious thinking if the labour party were to win power. the labour party has said many things that are anti—american, not justjeremy corbyn but those around him, and they would have to work out quite carefully what they would want to do with the uk's biggest ally. but it is not helpful for the with the uk's biggest ally. but it is not helpfulfor the us president to start sniping at assorted politicians, including very prominent ones in another country.
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quite interesting that donald trump went out of his way to make the point that he felt that theresa may's roll and legacy had perhaps been underplayed. he said that she had done some very hard work and perhaps had been underestimated. yes, he did say that. i think he was trying hard to be nice. he said some things that are less complimentary about her negotiating skills in the past, and all of this was a sort of surrounded by lots of fluff and blustering about his own skills and deal making and what he would hand would not have done and so on. but i think he was trying to be graceful. standing next to our prime minister in her last days of feeding her own party... speaking about the word graceful, how do you think those across the channel in brussels would have viewed what he had to say about the uk's future with the eu?|j have viewed what he had to say about the uk's future with the eu? i do not think it would have changed their position much. they may have raised an eyebrow or two at his idea
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that a country like the uk can do better independently. that it is a great country and needs its independence, its own borders, to be free of all of these trappings and constraints that the eu presents. they would not have liked that bit and they will question his prescription, which might work for the us weather that would actually work for any european country, including the uk. very quickly. we had a lot of talk, did we actually get anywhere of substance? no, but i do not think we were expecting that. this is a very curious position, with a big state visit right at the waning hours almost of the prime minister's authority, if there is any minister's authority, if there is a ny left. minister's authority, if there is any left. so it was always a question as to what could be extracted and inevitably, a lot of the focus has gone on which four candidates, her successor, who might bestow the grace of his meetings. so ido bestow the grace of his meetings. so i do not think we could have
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expected a lot of substance, but it is certainly revealing about position and tone, and so on. always good to see you, bronwen maddox. thank you. jeremy corbyn has been speaking at a rally. think on, please, about a world that is one of peace and disarmament. as one of recognising the values of all people. as a world that defeats racism. defeats misogyny, defeats the religious
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hatred that are being fuelled by the far right in politics, in britain, and europe and the united states. they have no answers, no answers to young people growing up, worried about their future. no answers to communities that have lost their industries. no answers for the people that are desperate in all parts of the world to get somewhere to live. no answers to those people that are desperate to get the medical help and support that they need. no answers to those going through a mental health crisis of any sort. all over the world. do you know what? together we can make a big difference. together we can change this world. together we can bring about that peace and justice. and by our demonstration here today, we have shown just how determined we, all of us are, to achieve that
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better place and that better world! thank you for being here today! for peace, for justice thank you for being here today! for peace, forjustice and disarmament. jeremy corbyn, speaking a little earlier. president trump was asked for his reaction to the protests attended by several thousands of people that had been taking place here in central london today. this is what he had to say about that. we left the prime minister, the queen, the royal family. there were thousands of people on the streets cheering, and even coming over today, there were thousands of people cheering. and then i heard that there were protests. i set where are they? i did not see any. i saw a very small protest when i came over today. so i hate to see it, but a lot of it is fake news. you saw the people waving the american flag, your flag. it was tremendous spirit and love. there was great love, it was an alliance. i did not see the protesters untiljust a little while ago, and it was a very small group of people put in for political
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reasons. so it was fake news, thank you. let us go to our correspondent dan johnson who is in central london where the protests have been taking place. the president said it was fake news, is that the case? no, there are protests and speeches going on on that stage, where jeremy corbyn was speaking. you can argue about the numbers, we cannot be clear, hard to say. i would say at least a few thousand people who gathered in trafalgar square earlier and then march down whitehall and gathered for this rally in parliament square. the crowds that the presidents have spoken about, i am not sure where they have been. i have not seen many people lining the route as he described at all. we can argue about the numbers but there have been people out today, despite what has beena damp people out today, despite what has been a damp day in london, protesting against the visit of president trump. we can speak to a half —— handful now. nick, why did you want to protest today?” half —— handful now. nick, why did you want to protest today? i am not here to protest the individual, but
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what is behind that individual. this is not about donald trump? what is behind that individual. this is not about donald trump7m what is behind that individual. this is not about donald trump? it is about the fascism, the horrendous policies that he and his government are enacting and this policies that are enacting and this policies that are made. what policies? the travel bans, moving the embassy in palestine. there is absolutely a tonne of policies. everything from that. the trade deal that he wants. everything. you are living in germany but over here. he is a sexist and he is against females. he is against human rights. i am young and healthy, why shouldn't i come here to support people all over the world? do you
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think he has got a right to visit the uk, should they even be in london? he is not welcome, he should not be here. there is no place for him. but he is the president of the us, an important partner at the church country. but he does not take ca re of church country. but he does not take care of the people, the minorities. he does not look after the poor people in the world and even in america. so if he really wants to help people, he should come, but he does not want to do that. goodbye to him. philip is actually from the united states and you are studying in london at the moment. why have you turned out, what do you think?” would not support trump in america or in the uk. plain and simple, he is not a good representation of how americans are, and to the country is asa americans are, and to the country is as a whole. he does not represent all of us. what would you say to people that these kind of protest will annoy the president and that will annoy the president and that
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will damage the relationship between britain and america? we need to use our voices in order to make it clear what we are against. we need to make it clear, we are against donald trump. we are fully aware that the majority of americans did not vote for donald trump. it is a protest against his policies and actions. thank you very much, all of you. good to talk to you. there are protesters out your despite the weather this afternoon, and what is interesting, the range of issues that people are highlighted, there are so that people are highlighted, there are so much that people have voiced their opposition on on all sorts of issues that they want to have their voices heard on. 0k, voices heard on. ok, dan, thanks very much. dan johnson in parliament square. let us speak to kirsty blackman, deputy westminster leader for the scottish national party, whojoins westminster leader for the scottish national party, who joins us westminster leader for the scottish national party, whojoins us now from westminster. so, where you are pleased that he was here in the end or not? no, not at all and not that he got a state visit. the last time that we had a donald trump state
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visit it cost £80 million in policing costs and we should not be rolling out the red carpet and spending that kind of money for somebody whose views you have just heard, around climate change and pulling out of the nuclear deal, around his misogynistic views and a way that he dehumanises anybody that is not from america that is trying to go there. i would not have rolled out the red carpet for him and i do not think we should be spending this much money policing his visit. he is here tojoin much money policing his visit. he is here to join any commemorations on the 75th anniversary of the temp to landings. as the president of the united states, doesn't the office that he holds merit some respect and a state visit is what would normally be required for that?” a state visit is what would normally be required for that? i think there isa be required for that? i think there is a difference on him being here to go along to those commemorations, which is absolutely sensible on the right thing to do, and being offered a state visit, with all of the trappings that that entails. you know, we heard him saying that he saw american flags waving in the
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streets. well, i have not seen any of that. i have seen some people dressed up in chicken suits. well, i have. to be fair, i have been here today and yesterday and there have been american flags and there has been american flags and there has been cheering. and for everyone that was brewing, there were more cheering. i am only speaking personally but i just cheering. i am only speaking personally but ijust want cheering. i am only speaking personally but i just want to cheering. i am only speaking personally but ijust want to put some perspective on that because all iam hearing some perspective on that because all i am hearing is that people are protesting and that is not entirely true. yes but quite a lot of people have been protesting. i saw people with anti—trump masks and dressed up as chickens. it is clear that many people feel strongly about the views of donald trump and values do not connect with ours and therefore he should not be welcome. we heard that from what he said about the trade deal. the fact that he believes the nhs should be on the table. scotland does not believe that that should be the case and we will do everything that we can to protect the nhs and obviously, being part of the uk is causing us major problems in this
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moment in time if that is what americans are asking for, and if the uk will pursue a trade deal so hard. but theresa may and matt hancock who has tweeted in the last few minutes, they agree with you on that. but it is part of a negotiation. it is, and the uk government has not exactly shown themselves at being particularly good at negotiating. they have also shown their hand very clearly that a trade deal with america is absolutely what they are desperate for. to be fair, theresa may is not going to be in number ten at the point that a trade deal will be negotiated. so, i do not have trust in this conservative government to protect our nhs from the interests of the us. kirsty blackman, thank you so much for your time. the deputy leader at westminster for the time. the deputy leader at westminsterfor the snp. time. the deputy leader at westminster for the snp. former head of strategy and speech writer... sorry, i am going to move on because i will speak to christopher ruddy, who is a friend of the donald trump. and you were at the banquet last night. you are also ceo of newsmax
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media. i won't to spot —— i want to speak to you about last night because i have not met many people that were present. the queen was a gracious host. i have known donald trump for 20 years and i have known the first lady since they were married. this is a high point in terms of the president being happy. this was beyond that. i spoke to him last night. we had a good chat. he was a little concerned about some of the media coverage he has been getting, not so much in britain, but in the united states. that has been a theme of his because he does not get very good press back home, i am not sure how it is in britain. the press about donald trump? you have been standing here for the last five minutes, you probably get a feel. well, you have been fair, you have me on. many netbooks do not have pro donald trump supporters, so to
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speak, on their networks, but i find that the british reach out, which is very nice. i would like to hear what he said he last night. how does he feel personally as to how this is gone. it is all very well speaking at news conference but... is that him? probably, or her majesty! i think he is very happy. this is a man who has a familiar relationship in britain. i was here when he opened up his golf course in aberdeen in 2012. his mother came from the islands in scotland. she came over to america not rich, but she came with a great sense of honour and pride about britain. so the president has taken an interest that he does not take in other countries, and he really likes the british and the relationship. we are just looking at pictures of that banquet last night. when you walked in, and probably when he walked in, what is it like? well, it is an
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amazing experience, and i think even some of the white house staff will be speaking to, i was sitting next to sarah sanders, and she was just, i think, taken by the majesty of the event, the formality, but also the friendliness. and i think this is a very big turning point. people have said that the president is very angry with britain, i think he has a beef with the germans, he does not like the fact that they do not pay up like the fact that they do not pay up their nato commitments. he is not against nato. people have said that the queen was attacking the president for not supporting nato or other special institutions... she was pushing the un and nato and other institutions set up after the war. the president believes in them but he does not think that america should pay for them. germany spends less tha n should pay for them. germany spends less than 1%. america is spending 496. less than 1%. america is spending 4%. so the american president, and you must remember, he is the first citizen president of the united states, he has never been a general ora states, he has never been a general or a politician. he speaks his mind and people do not always appreciate
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that he is just being and people do not always appreciate that he isjust being candid. maybe not as reflective as he needs to be, but he is just telling people what tea m but he is just telling people what team really thinks. given that he was a young boy when the queen came to the throne here, what is his view of her? sen all offer, nervous, how would you describe it?” of her? sen all offer, nervous, how would you describe it? i have never known him to be nervous of anyone, soi known him to be nervous of anyone, so i would not describe it like that. i think he has tremendous admiration and respect and he knows that this woman has been... we have four on the cover of my company's magazine ad we called her the most awful women in the world. she has dominated politics for so long, and we are seeing here that she is playing a very special role in bridging the gap and there has been friction in the relationship between the three is a government and the donald trump government and she is moving that over. she did that with obama and george bush and she has a history of that. the american people are very respectful and i think the
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british people are. what about melania? nobody here really hears what she thinks. people were talking about her outfits but there is much more to her than that.” about her outfits but there is much more to her than that. i would say that melania is the most influential person around the president. he called me last week and started the conversation quoting winger on a matter that he wanted to bring to my attention. —— quoting winger. he really respects. her number one goal it would seem to me from what i have seen it would seem to me from what i have seen is that she loves her child, baron, she is focused on being a mother to her son and being a supportive wife to her husband, the president. she does not want to give speeches all of the time although she does it occasionally and her popularity numbers in the us are off the charts. very high. this state visit, it is running behind schedule today, which is a shame. we had a deal because the motorcade should have been passing us right now.”
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was going to wave to the president. he is the type of guy that might just come over if he saw me because he is very down to earth. well, don't go away. i won't. very briefly, when he heads home, what will be the standout moment for him? the banquet? i think that will be the high point, but also the d—day celebration. when i heard that they we re celebration. when i heard that they were doing the 75th anniversary, someone were doing the 75th anniversary, someone asked me if he would go. i saidi someone asked me if he would go. i said i am sure he will, because i know how strong he feels about the sacrifice that the others have made during that war. you know, his father came from that generation. he was born shortly after the war. so i think he has very strong feelings about the importance of our standing together for a about the importance of our standing togetherfor a common about the importance of our standing together for a common cause. about the importance of our standing togetherfor a common cause. so he really does believe that, contrary to the media spin. it is really good to the media spin. it is really good to meet you. i am glad you have had a good time. i will be back, thank you. if you see the motorcade, bring him over. he will weigh. we have some breaking
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news on the domestic political front. chris mason, what is happening? afternoon, simon. as things go on where you are and there has been the news co nfe re nce where you are and there has been the news conference between the president under prime minister and hisjoshing with at president under prime minister and his joshing with at least a few of the contenders to take over theresa may, here, in westminster, behind closed doors, senior conservative mps are meeting, the 1922 committee, to try and shake up the rules for the leadership contest that will start next week. we have this massive field, as high as 13, then it went back to 12. originally, the idea is that you would have rounds every tuesday and thursday knocking a co nte nt every tuesday and thursday knocking a content art. that would go on forever. neuro is proposed which will go to a meeting of the party board which is happening in 30 minutes. here are those proposed rule changes. to even be a candidate when nominations open and close next week, an mp would need a proposer and a second and six other mp5. in the first round, in order to get
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through to the second round, they would need at least 5% of the vote of mps. our arithmetic is correct, thatis of mps. our arithmetic is correct, that is 16 mp5. and in the second round, they would require 10% of the parliamentary party by our calculations which is 32 mp5. the party boa rd calculations which is 32 mp5. the party board are meeting at four o'clock this afternoon to sign off these proposed changes. i am told by one executive member of the 1922 committee we can expect the result as soon as committee we can expect the result as soon as five o'clock, maybe six o'clock. what does this mean? it means that in all likelihood, the time that the contest, here at westminster will take, to whittle down the contenders to adjust to, who then go out to the party membership, will be much, much shorter, because those barriers to entry at each stage are much, much higher. and what is now going to be fascinating to see, is how many and who amongst those runners and riders right now, the side, having taken a quick look in the notebook and
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realise the numbers do not quite add up, to back out as gracefully as possible now rather than beat defeated when mps start casting votes as soon as next week. one senior source speculated and that was all that was to me, in the last 30 minutes in parliament, that within one week you could be down to the last two. that could be a little bit dramatic and it might take longer, but this, what it will do, it will force notjust longer, but this, what it will do, it will force not just the candidate seen as also—rans, it will force not just the candidate seen as also—rans, but even some of those middle running candidates to seriously look at their numbers and think, is it worth going for it at elimination at the second round is pretty much a certainty? they'll be on the funds asking others on the list of the better chance to look past what it'll take for support. with the the rules what will now happen is that people will start to have conversations about secondary boats, where will it go in the second round of voting for
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candidate x and they get eliminated, that will happen quickly now because there is a far greater necessity to ensure you the numbers far sooner. but as well as posing the big question, about if you think to yourself, i am going to help of winning this so therefore is there a point in going to the whole process and some could say yes because they can enhance their status in doing so but others may conclude if numbers would be embarrassingly low, to these new hire process thresholds, that a discrete hitting and the reverse button might be a better back. ok, thank you very much for the breaking news from westminster. we are in west —— westminster here, let's go for the building behind me. well, it's very wet. as one of my guests at a moment to go where is the sunshine gone? that there we go, that's the scene at the moment awaiting the departure from the
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cabinet church hill war rooms as president from cause them, they are leaving there shortly, they are running behind schedule but they are in there, expecting back to buckingham palace where he will avoid marine one, the us helicopter which will take him to regents park, the home of the us ambassador, where it's quite possible, that meeting with michael gove will take place, there's nothing on the schedule for that at this stage, but there is an hour or two, we that at this stage, but there is an hourortwo, we are that at this stage, but there is an hour or two, we are not quite sure who will be in and the president returns so let's pick up on what we have been watching already this afternoon. i'm here with chris wilkins. and amy pope. so, welcome both of you. first of all, your overview of a news conference they backed out as well as teresa may
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would've helped. i think so, just reflecting on those moments, they can bea reflecting on those moments, they can be a bit nerve—racking when you're sort of government staff working for the prime minister similarly we did at press conference and 2017, and there you are wondering what the president was going to say that you're not sure, but today it went as well as and it was positive. but there was a slight moment when he mentioned that nhs. she sort of acted correctly and picked up on that because i could absolutely become a big story, that she rained in a bit so overall, i think they will likely thinking yes, we got what we wanted out of that it was a good result. look, i think it's my stuff again american government staffers here, particularly because long before a visit like this, they're going to engage with counterparts in the british government trying to come to agreements on the major issues, and
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in this case, the president, you never know where he ends up so you think you have an agreement and he walks in and blows it up, so i think all in all, it's a pretty good outcome for the us government as a whole, and for that president himself. of course, yesterday eve ryo ne himself. of course, yesterday everyone was talking about what he had done before the plane got off which was a tweet about a long writing spiked with say kind, and then he signed with the queen, was that a different donald trump we have seen in the last 24 hours or so ijust i think the donna topics on the plane is the real donald trump, undignified, it should something happen because i care for a protocol or diplomacy which we see a lot, but i think is remarkable is him and staying on script. i think ultimately that's good news for the relationship between both countries which has to transcend any particular individual, but you know, you never know what this guy.
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difficult for teresa may hear she is in the last weeks in office, and yet a personal tribute from the president during that, that was i would think she would relish.” thought it was interesting, yes, she did luck on that and i think being her last in office, she has always been, that professional to the and and treats it with the seriousness it deserves and the president and office at the president with respect toa office at the president with respect to a deserving it, it took the opportunity to make her point on key issues i began thinking back to when we went over there in 2017, there we re we went over there in 2017, there were moments then, by famous image with holding hands walking down the white house but there were moments when she had to stand up for the uk and push back on things he was saying and she's prepared to do it and she would do it again to see but ultimately, i think it's a good result —— all around and she would ta ke result —— all around and she would take that tribute from the president and that's a nice moment for her.
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anyone in the conservative party would have relished them on the 20 five jeremy corbyn wanted would have relished them on the 20 fivejeremy corbyn wanted to see me but i said no. what are the most interesting revelations from the press co nfe re nce , interesting revelations from the press conference, i think it'll be interesting how labour plays that now in the next two hours, and i'm sure it's about him wanting to make his point that he ultimately made on the platform. they can, that's the thing he's capable of, unlike other presidents, it's that moment when you never know what he's going to say next and that's probably gas, unexpected thing. you are with barack obama, a different type of presidency and nine, who presumably would have met anybody who wanted to meet him in the circumstance. president obama believed first and foremost he's a guest in someone else's country, so he was very careful about making sure his actions were well coordinated with government nobody wants to be surprised, but also his interview
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was he was open to meeting with people, and you certainly never would have seen derogatory tweet about someone, you wouldn't see tweets, but certainly not criticising someone as he was flying in and certainly not spelling the name wrong, but is very careful about things like that. how do you handle a president who before you get up in the morning is taking the agenda from whatever it was from the night before. there is a bigger issue at stake, by acting on its own without coordination or advisers is really undermining the power of his advisers to advance the cause is, it also takes away from the us and globally if you can't trust what the secretary of state is saying, he might undermine the work of his advisers, then it just might undermine the work of his advisers, then itjust in spanish to credibility of government. that said, is not a role after this trip,
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members of the royal family pictures it does no harm, is already looking at the next level. it's distracting from problems at home, there are questioned by impeachment hearings and the mother of her continuing, the president will use this as an opportunity to distract the american people from this very real serious issue. looking at theresa may, this issue. looking at theresa may, this is the last moment on the world stage for has. yet the commemoration tomorrow for a dba, and i think actually many ways, people have said why dishes at set a timetable that she did because she wanted to do to stay busy, i suspect the diva commemorations read thing that she really wa nted commemorations read thing that she really wanted to see through, i really wanted to see through, i really big at national moments that she took it, but of course, whoever the president is and whatever you think of the individual the us allied close to the president had an
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opportunity to go out with what is a good result but currently, i think government and success a good way to government and success a good way to go out so i'm wondering. if people in the united states watching the protester, senior politicians refusing to share a banquet where he is making his speech, whether they might regard that as rude.” is making his speech, whether they might regard that as rude. i don't think they do, certainly there are some contingent who think it's rude, but there is another contingent in the united states has been energised to protect themselves, the fact that you had so many landmen and nontraditional candidates when seats, is a testament of how he galvanises political action so i think what's happening in the uk is an extension of that. do you agree with that? it'll be interesting on how people do, it's a difficult one
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and is difficult for the prime minister to feel for the government, are you think about some of the things the president dies or essay about political opponents and things like that, even saying i said no to meeting jeremy corbyn, as amy says that there is a particle issue there, which it's difficult to contend with sometimes how to be responded to things like that. but overall, i think everyone stakes out there in a position i imagine i would be interested to know how much it's followed in the us in the first place, but ultimately i think they see as you say, pictures of him with the queen and that's not going to do any harm for him in his reelection chances. the tone changed tomorrow the commemoration, so far so good for teresa may and donald trump?” think so, they've been working on this for quite some time thinking about what they want to get out of that, i am about what they want to get out of that, iam now about what they want to get out of that, i am now the picture ultimately and pretty much at the moment, until this evening comes,
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it's probably why they picked every box. even his opponents grudgingly will have to say, is working for him. i'm sure that his advisers are all crossing their fingers and that he does not put his foot in it in the next way for hours or so, and his opponents. it's a mixed bag for the opponents because of the united states in general we want to maintaina states in general we want to maintain a fantastic relationship with the uk, said there is a little bit of push and pull here, we don't wa nt to bit of push and pull here, we don't want to be embarrassed of the united states. thank you both. that's the latest from here, still awaiting sub movement and that moment, looking quite at the moment will be back with my little bit later on in fact i like to show you, very little happening, but that suggests a departure from the cabinet war rooms, it's not far off as you look to the right, and to the left, the protest there are no protesters there, they're just people waiting
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for the motorcade, there are not many people out here, but probably it has a lot to do with the weather, it's pouring down but the beast and the motorcade is scheduled to be going down in the next few minutes it will return to that when it happens, but in the meantime, handing you back to rachel in the studio right now. simon, thank you very much you're watching bbc news. breaking is coming in to last concerning change uk, there is a lot of discussion about the political future, joining our political correspondent dan wright talking after the news that they just announced. is taking less than four months for a change uk to have gone from being founded to splitting. you'll remember that originally, there are eight labour mps and quickly joined there are eight labour mps and quicklyjoined by tory mps to form a new party, they began as an independent group and then began to change again fight european elections which they did dismally, there has been turmoil within ranks
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for a number of weeks, and now we have just had a press release from what remains of the change uk, saying that anna super he is at their new leader, and confirming that six of their numbers had left the party, we are not sure where they have gone, but people have left and the five remaining mps are still staying on and hope to build on the brand and keep the new party going, but more than half of their numbers have left the party. so turmoil within change uk. and apart from the press co nfe re nce , within change uk. and apart from the press conference, sorry, the press release, i be expecting to hearfrom anyone playing it quiet? at the moment quiet, we believe they all had a meeting at lunch to work out what to do next, there have been obvious for some time there was internal disagreement about where
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the party should be positioning itself what the long—term tactics should be, whether it's cozying up closer to the lib dems or maintaining themselves as independent party, real ructions inside change uk, we'll know more i think later on when we find out what those six are choosing to do this i may have decided to join the live bands or a semi going off as independence, but in a crowded of fellow parties campaigning clearly for man, you have change uk the lib dems and the greens, another mps lighting referendum, change uk were being squeezed, the party did not keep momentum going that it had earlier in the year, when it launched pretty much out of the blue taking westminster by surprise, it is now in real difficulty, but anna super says she's deeply disappointed because it's a critical time and people have decided to leave the party, but she's an emphatic as the
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party, but she's an emphatic as the party new leader, she intends to carry on and build it at that party battle campaign for another referendum and remain.” battle campaign for another referendum and remain. i know you'll keep an eye on this developing story, i think you can be. in a moment, the business but first headlines. president trump and theresa may speak of the strength of the alliance between the uk and usa — at a joint news conference on the second day of the state visit. early in the president how toxic teresa may and senior administrators and downing street discussing difficult issues. as labour leader jeremy corbyn addressed protesters in central london, donald trump says he refused terror meet the opposition leader. i'm vishala sripadma, in the business news... bad news from britain's construction industry today. its had its worst month
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in more than a year in may, as customers postponed investment in the face of brexit uncertaint. the sector lost jobs at the fastest rate since 2012. one of the uk's most high profile stockpickers has suspended trading in his largest fund as rising numbers of investors ask for their money back. investors have withdrawn about £560m from neil woodford's fund over the past four weeks. and the art of the deal: president trump has been meeting business leaders on the second day of his state visit to the uk. hello, good afternoon... waitrose has begun a trial aimed at reducing packaging, by encouraging customers to use their own containers to buy food such as pasta, rice and cereals. the experiment at a store in oxford will see hundreds of products taken out of their plastic wrapping, and shoppers will be able to borrow boxes to take their food home. it's the latest initiative by supermarkets to tackle the impact of waste on the environment, as our business correspondent, emma simpson, reports.
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we've all become used to taking our own bags to do our grocery shopping, but what about taking our own plastic containers as well? in the corner of this supermarket, there's a refill station where you can pack your own food, from lentils and pasta to frozen fruit. no box? then borrow one or use an environmentally friendly bag. if some of the things that we're trialling here were rolled out across all of our shops and all customers switched to using reusable containers, it would have, it will save thousands of tonnes of plastic and other types of packaging, as well, but it also would completely change the way that we actually shop. is this commercially viable? that's what we need to find out through the test. buy their reusable bottles and you can do wine and beer too and lots of loose fruit and veg. plenty of independent shops offer food unwrapped, but no supermarket has tried anything as varied as this.
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it's nice being able to weigh the amount you want. it's just more flexible and it looks better. i think it's high time that there was less plastic and it's kind of going back to what you hear about pre—war, really. i'm not sure that it's enough but it's a really good start. our biggest supermarkets produce more than 800,000 tonnes of throwaway packaging every year. well, it's really important that the supermarkets are the ones who are taking the lead in this because that's where we really buy most of our plastic packaging on a daily basis. and it's a really exciting opportunity i think for us to consider starting to use reusable alternatives as opposed to using single—use plastics. waitrose says this is a genuine test to find out if shoppers really have an appetite for change. emma simpson, bbc news, oxford.
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lets have a look at other business stories. the rapper jay—z has been named hip hop's first billionaire. forbes says his music, property, fashion and investment assets amount to over a billion dollars. forbes also rejected claims that fellow rapper and producer dr dre has achieved billionaire status. in australia, its central bank has lowered interest rates to a record low of 1.25% — its first move in three years. the economy, which hasn't seen a recession since the 1990s, has been showing signs of weakness recently. house prices are falling, unemployment is up and consumer spending is sluggish. economists says that the reserve bank of australia is unlikely to cut rates again in the nearfuture. and the welsh government will not build the £1.4 billion m4 relief road. its axed the scheme because of its cost and impact on the environment. the plans would have seen a 14—mile motorway built as a gateway into south wales in to try and tackle the traffic
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faced by motorists around newport. kier shares, which collapsed by 40% on monday, are down another 4% today. on monday the builder warned about profits this year. a0 world, e online retailer, has reported a full—year loss at the bottom end of expectations as a result of tough trading in britain and challenges in germany. also brent crude on a bit of slippery slope at the moment — the oil price down today and some analysts are predicting further falls. that's all the business news. simon and anita will have all the latest on the state visit but before that here is your weather. hello, we see wet weather place north in the
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recent alvarez, rain processing across southwest england, but the weather radar shapes up at the moment a line and heavy rain extending up across northern france, that looks like it's heading towards the light in areas that we could see a spell of rain here, over the coming hours and wet weather driving northwards to practise talent, for northwards to practise talent, for north of scotland, staying right into the evening time. he showers and the weather largely dry. overnight tonight, rain becomes quite slow—moving, persistent by northern ireland and scotland, so wet weather largely dry. overnight tonight, rain becomes quite slow—moving, persistent for northern ireland and scotland, so what what is your england and see looking at the picture the next few days, jet strea m the picture the next few days, jet stream taking a big trough passing through western europe where we have by the front, that will help to develop the weather systems and pinned them over to the united kingdom, but that kind of process is open to a degree of uncertainty, so although there will be for the spells of rain to see, deposition and timing of the rain could change
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and timing of the rain could change a little bit day by day. for wednesday, wet weather has been to scotla nd wednesday, wet weather has been to scotland and northern ireland, looking to be satan and the south is having reasonable weather was sunny spells and shallots across western areas but this area of rain extending through france is that section, it could french into parts of east and black, but otherwise it my sunshine across england and wales and a few showers feel warmer with temperature is 20 degrees and cool for northern ireland. heading into thursday, we see on the web front across western europe to fund this area of blood pressure, this could end up being further east, if that happens the rain may not get into eastern england that across northeast scotland it looks like it on moving here, elsewhere on thursday mixture of sunshine and have showers. and sunshine in between with the wind and not feeling too bad in the sunnier moments, and towards the end of the week another area of low pressure
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develops out driving a band north across the uk, so i'm settled looking weather picture for the next few days no doubt they are, quite clear at times but becoming drier and warmer into the early parts of next week.
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this is bbc news, i'm simon mccoy. the headlines at 4pm: president trump and theresa may speak of the strength of the alliance between the uk and usa at a joint news conference on the second day of the state visit. our special relationship is grounded in common history, values, customs, culture, language and laws. people believe in freedom and independence as a sacred birthright and a cherished inheritance worth defending at any cost. i've always believed that cooperation and compromis are the basis of strong alliances, and nowhere is this more true than in the special relationship. afterjeremy corbyn addressed protesters in central london, donald trump revealed the labour leader had requested to meet him.
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he wanted to meet today or tomorrow, and i decided that i would not do that. i think that he is, from where i come from, somewhat of a negative force. and i'm annita mcveigh here in downing street. we'll be bringing you the political reaction to president trump's comments that the nhs would be up for negotiation in any future trade deal. good afternoon. welcome to bbc news at buckingham palace. president trump has been meeting theresa may at downing street on the second day of his state visit to the uk. afterwards, the president praised
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the "extraordinary" alliance between the us and uk and revealed that the labour leaderjeremy corbyn had requested a meeting with him, and mr trump said he declined. at a joint news conference with the prime minister, mr trump repeated his belief that brexit would be good for the country and said the prime minister deserved a lot of credit. he also criticised sadiq khan once again and said that he hadn't noticed any protests against his visit. mr trump described the special relationsip between the us and the uk as the "greatest alliance." he said that "everything" was on the table as part of any future us—uk trade deal, including the nhs. and as i mentioned, he also revealed that the labour leaderjeremy corbyn asked to meet him and mr trump declined the request. mr trump went on to speak about nato. he said those allies must contribute more. in response, the prime minister said the two countries have "a great relationship to build on". and mr trump had glowing words
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for the queen, who he said was a "fantastic person and a fantastic woman". let's get the latest on the day's events from our political correspondentjessica parker. two political leaders so different in so many ways. but at this afternoon's news conference, finding some common ground. for generations at the heart of the transgenic alliance has been our shared democratic values, our common interests, and our commitment to justice. answer one word for a prime minister who is in the last weeks of her premiership. prime minister may, her premiership. prime minister may, he has been a true honour. i have greatly enjoyed working with you. you are a tremendous professional and a person that loves your country dearly. thank you very much.“ and a person that loves your country dearly. thank you very much. if you we re dearly. thank you very much. if you were expecting the unexpected from donald trump, here it is, revealing that he has turned down a meeting with jeremy corbyn, that he has turned down a meeting withjeremy corbyn, the labour leader who spoke at an anti—donald
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trump rally in the afternoon. i don't know jeremy i don't knowjeremy corbyn, never met him, never spoke to him. he wanted to meet today or tomorrow and isaidi wanted to meet today or tomorrow and i said i would not do that. he is somewhat of a negative force. labour says thatjeremy corbyn is ready to engage with the president on a number of issues. with the premise through said they openly discuss their differences on things like climate change and the chinese television firm a while why. he expressed optimism on a trade deal but some of it is made as to what he said that my intel. i think everything with a trade deal is on the table, everything is on the table. everything will be on the table, the nhs oranything. table. everything will be on the table, the nhs or anything. the point about making trade deals is a course that both sides negotiate and come to an agreement about what shooter should not be in that trade
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deal. also a nod to brexit and a recollection that they have not a lwa ys recollection that they have not always see i to i. the president suggested that i sue the european union, which we did not do. we want to negotiate as a came out with a good deal. i would have city but thatis good deal. i would have city but that is ok. i would have sued and settled may be but you never know. she is probably a better negotiator thani she is probably a better negotiator than i am. sometimes this pairing has seemed awkward, but today, the two lea d e rs has seemed awkward, but today, the two leaders appeared more at ease. but of course, she is on the threshold of leaving the stage as a world leader, so he will soon be dealing with someone else. jessica parker, bbc news. let's get more reaction to this. my colleague annita mcveigh is at downing street. thank you very much. beyond looking at the tone and body language in that news covers there is a lot to pick apart in terms of the politics, one of the most controversial things
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the president said there was his comment about the nhs having to be pa rt comment about the nhs having to be part of any future trade deal. something the us ambassador alluded to at the weekend as well. with me is art cheap local correspondent vicki young. let's talk about —— chief political correspondent. revealing to everyone here that jimmy corbett had asked to meet the president. whether labour knew that would come out or not, they certainly did not say in advance we know certainly did not say in advance we knoinmmy corbin boycotted the state banquet last night had some very critical words. calling donald trumpa very critical words. calling donald trump a massage and it is saying he did not meet the office of the american president. that is what they would not be attending that state banquet. but during the press conference, atul trump revealed that labour had asked to have a meeting betweenjeremy labour had asked to have a meeting between jeremy corbyn and donald trump and trump said that he said no
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and also talked about corbyn being a negative force. so i think as ever, the conduct of jeremy negative force. so i think as ever, the conduct ofjeremy corbyn has said that if you want we promised her, you have to talk to somebody you don't like, much better to engage ina you don't like, much better to engage in a joint a protest march by others saying he standing up for what he believes in. other saying they believe very strongly that he is not a fit person to be an american president. coming back to that subject of the nhs, and donald trump's worth being part of any future trade deal negotiations. something here in the uk, a clinical hot potato as are some of the conservative leadership candidates are acknowledging very quickly. has been ever since it was on the table that there could ever be a trade deal between america and the united -- uk. deal between america and the united —— uk. donald trump talking very glowingly about it being intravenous opportunity, huge potential, saying they will do three times as much trade as we do now. the idea of the
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nhs being part of that is controversial and already we have had some of those people, matt hancock saying before this would not happen on my watch. dominic raab saying the nhs is not for self. but the americans will say it on the table, they will always to that but both sides have their redlines. but it is about a compromise, whether it is immigration or visas for american citizens, all those kind of things tend to be on the table. i think very quickly a british premonition would have to say that the nhs would not be part of that. and speaking of the conservative leadership candidates but away from the state visit come of changes to the rules on the way this will unfold that could went out on the field of candidates faster than we thought. we fitted there might be 16 candidates. we have had lots adjoining and one leaving today but we are at 12 at the moment. the idea is they do rounds of voting which can take quite some time. but the committee in charge of all this have
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had a meeting today and they are pushing forward a new suggestion and thatis pushing forward a new suggestion and that is a set of having a proposed and a second, you have to mps plus six other mps. that is a in total. to get back into even the race in the first place. then the first round of voting there will be an threshold for the first time, candidates need to win 5% of the vote to go through. that is 16 mps as it currently stands. in round two, it will be 10% of the vote, that means 32 mps, so that will be a problem for some. i do not think they will reach eight yet as their supporters. that could be an issue and could mean they get through this and could mean they get through this a lot quicker than it could mean that some of the candidates decide to drop out before even starts. just a final thought if you would on change uk, which is changing. someone just waited at me saying
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they should be called small change uk because they have lost six mps. several others have decided to leave to go back to being independence and speculation but whether they would join the liberal democrats are not. but an at subaru, a former conservative in a palm entry party which only has former labour mps. a bit of a disaster for them from start to finish. theyjust have not made the impact they hoped for in the european elections even though they are very much standing for staying in that you. perhaps people voted tactically for the liberal democrats and that seems to be the big issue. it shows you how difficult it is to set up a new party. they have made mistakes along the way. there was ridicule really about their logo, about their name, these thingsjust were about their logo, about their name, these things just were not about their logo, about their name, these thingsjust were not in place quickly enough for them and they have lost the opportunity that they had. the ones who are left are say they can stay and they can still have a message but it is difficult because they are now i wanted to get a second wave of mps because they are now i wanted to get a second wave of mstoining from either the conservatives or the
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labour party. thank you very much. and during that news conference here at the foreign and commonwealth office earlier, donald trump managed to name check three of the conservative leadership candidates, borisjohnson, jeremy conservative leadership candidates, boris johnson, jeremy hunt and michael gove. but we heard earlier today a 20 minute conversation he had with maurice johnson today a 20 minute conversation he had with mauricejohnson on the phone and meeting jeremy hunt in person. and that meeting in dentistry earlier on that the president would be talking at some point up to michael gove as well. perhaps that is happening now, the president is back at the us ambassador‘s residence ahead of a return banquet that he and the first lady are hosting this evening which will be among the guest list, prince charles and the duchess of cornwall representing the queen. for now, back to you, simon. thank you very much.
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let's talk now to the leader of the liberal democrats, vince cable. did you ask for a meeting with donald trump? no, i declined the invitation to go to the palace and i certainly have not asked for a meeting and he has not after one with me. it is not meant to say that i don't believe in talking to important people. i was roundtable in brussels with eight prime ministers last week talking about our country's future. you can have meaningful conversations with people who are friendly to britain, i am all for it but i'm afraid mr trump does not fall into that category.” am wondering if washing pictures of the banquet last night, was there a little pain, a feeling of regret that you were not there and my meeting some people who are important within the us a administration. no, if we are talking about businesslike conversations with the united states or indeed any other involved country, i am up for that but my
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objection was to ruling out —— rolling out the red carpet, providing royal pagea ntry rolling out the red carpet, providing royal pageantry to salute somebody who is not a friend of the uk and who is undermining our interests in a whole manner of ways. the issues which have not been publicised today but the role that donald trump is playing in undermining and destroying the wto, where our long—term future rests and certainly with breaks is crucial to it. the work he is doing undermining climate change agreements, the arms control agreement and the dissemination of nuclear weapons and many other things. no doubt the discussions are going on behind closed doors but all that is happening today is far as i can see is minimising embarrassment and limiting damage. and yet very warm words in the news conference that we saw a short time ago from the president from the prime minister and talking about shared objectives and talking about shared objectives and that unique relationship they
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describe. there has historically been a very close military and political relationship and i salute that. i am political relationship and i salute that. iam pro—american political relationship and i salute that. i am pro—american and political relationship and i salute that. iam pro—american and i political relationship and i salute that. i am pro—american and i think which have good relationship with the us. but mr trump has been weakening nato, trying to create divisions between the key partners especially germany. he is even now trying to... all he has asked for is they pay their way. it is about time members like germany pay their way. but the crucial effort is sharing intelligence that is one of the more important assets we have had. he is threatening to take that away because of his dispute with china in which britain has quite different and distinct issues. that is the kind of thing that is going on in the background. what has been going on in the foreground is a discussion about trade, it is very clear that this so—called trade deal with the us is not as beneficial to the uk is our existing relationship with them,
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it is narrower and much more limited and has all kinds of poison in it like the commitment to open up the nhs to procurement, the weakening of standards, bypassing british courts in cases of dispute, these are the one thing that is coming out of this talk and it is not something we should welcome. can change tack and talk to you about what is happening to change uk. are you surprised they have lost six of their 11 mps today. iam not have lost six of their 11 mps today. i am not surprised that they were public disagreements, they had a bad election, they had gone prematurely. no, it is not at all surprising and all i can say is that most of the group are people who share the same values as we do, have the same approach to brexit, my door is open to talk with them, especially the independent group about their future. we are already working with them ina future. we are already working with them in a variety of ways and look forward to working with them in future. i don't want to glow over
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their failure. future. i don't want to glow over theirfailure. it was future. i don't want to glow over their failure. it was a failure but we have got to move on and i want to be positive about it. have you spoken to any of them in the last couple of hours was meant i have spokenin couple of hours was meant i have spoken in the court orders and we have had it because mr not serious conversations and i'm sure we will be doing in my case and will be very positive and welcoming. you would wa nt positive and welcoming. you would want them to join the liberal democrats? ideally. but if they want to work with us in other ways, i am up to work with us in other ways, i am upfor to work with us in other ways, i am up for different kinds of collaboration. but certainly people wa nt to collaboration. but certainly people want to work with us and actually join us, then that would be ideal. have any of them expressed an interest injoining the party? not in any formal way. i have picked up various rumours but i don't want to comment on that before there is any official announcement. i am simply acknowledging the fact that they have tried this project and i want to analysis fact that they were bright people, they broke away from
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their parties, they deserve credit for that but setting up a new centre party in the british system just does not work and they have to have a strong and viable force ourselves and mrdid that a strong and viable force ourselves and mr did that in the election. my door is open and i want to work with them and i want to leave this on a positive note. but when applicable leader says before any official announcement, that says something is going on. all kind of things could be going on and notjust with change uk. people approaching us from the conservative party in particular, labour people, to and particularly on the conservative side, people distressed about what is happening, about what might happen if somebody with extreme heartbreak steers mythic over and they may well able ship with us and conversations with them. i think british politics is moving into a new sphere altogether. the old dividing lines are not there. the liberal democrats have an central role in all of that and i
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wa nt to central role in all of that and i want to play that and a positive way. if anyone of them said i want tojoin the liberal way. if anyone of them said i want to join the liberal democrats, way. if anyone of them said i want tojoin the liberal democrats, would you suggested then that that would mean they should go through a violation? not not necessarily. that. but if it really happened. not necessary. they have won election to parliament, they have taken a break stamp in breaking away from the labour party or the tory party and they will think their own plans through interns the next election but certainly there is no need to pursue a violation. not a bad legacy, if you leave the election having whipped a few extra mps in those closing moments. lots of good things have happened in the last month and i think there are more good things to come. this is not the end of it by any means.” good things to come. this is not the end of it by any means. i know you wa nt to end of it by any means. i know you want to tell me but you are not going to. no, there are things
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coming down the track. i think we are beginning to see the break—up of the old established order of british politics. i think that we have established in both the local elections and the european elections that we are a major forest and very much at the centre of all this. now which particular individual we co nve rg e which particular individual we converge with, that is all for the next few weeks in the month so there is no point speaking letting that in public. in which case, i will stop. thank you very much forjoining us this afternoon. with me now is lewis lukens, the former deputy head of london's us embassy. are you a happy man with how this has gone? i think both sides had to be happy at this point. i think yesterday went flawlessly after the president landed, leaving us of the tweeting, the ceremonial aspects we nt well tweeting, the ceremonial aspects went well and the president and his family have seemed happy. the royal family have seemed happy. the royal family seemed happy. today come of the meetings and to be productive and the president was generous in
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his remarks about promised or may at the end, and nothing to gain by criticising her. she made a few subtle not rebukes but differences with him on policy issues, which was not unexpected. so i think they offer a pretty happy at this point. one of those rebukes was when he said everything is on the table in future trade talks and she left him and said the nhs will be part of any negotiation. we are no further in terms of a us— uk relationship than we we re terms of a us— uk relationship than we were three days ago for trade. then we were two years ago. we are no further. until brexiteers ordered out of the us knows what kind of relationship that uk will have with the eu, it is too early to really know what kind of details of a british and american free trade agreement. he said he did not seat protesters today, there have been thousands not far away in parliament square. will that bother him?” think he isjust in denial. he says it is fake news, but you can hear
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him on ten dentistry feet he must've heard them. but his preference is to ignore them. in terms of a trade deal, what pressures will be on the negotiators because obviously a lot of small business in particular will just want to get any trade deal sorted? what just want to get any trade deal sorted ? what is just want to get any trade deal sorted? what is going to be stopping those negotiations, let's clear the decks and try and make this happen quickly. it will be very hard to do quickly. it will be very hard to do quickly for that what they want to do is build on what is already an incredibly robust trading relationship. but it will be difficult and the us, there are us interest in my pharmaceutical, agricultural and health care issues they want a big piece of the market here and will cause issues i think with the local companies who don't wa nt with the local companies who don't want to give up a piece of the market. this could be a very tough negotiation. the us are excellent trade to go see it is, we have a doing it for a long time, the brits have not been doing it for a very
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long time so it will be a bit lopsided, i fear. i have long time so it will be a bit lopsided, ifear. i havejust heard that nigel farage has adjustments by going into winfield house. quite interesting that donald trump is saying with a smile and his news conference he does not want to get involved in other people's stories and yet here he is playing a major pa rt and yet here he is playing a major part in the brexit debate. it is. unprecedented 48 us at her to do that. two things that he have done are unusual, one is tweeting about us to master politics while he is overseas on a state visit and the other is involving or inserting himself into the local politics here in the uk, whether it is promoting nigel farage or promoting the idea of borisjohnson as nigel farage or promoting the idea of boris johnson as the next prime minister, very unusual and unprecedented. if you were in your position today, would you find that frustrating? i would find it for sitting in a novemberthere's nothing i can do about it. ——
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frustrating and annoying. some -- there should be nothing anyone can do about donald trump anyway.” think you step of given up on telling him that he cannot do this or he shooter should not do, he will do whatever he feels is best. and yet everybody is saying in the last 40 hours a have seen donald trump playing by the rules and flame of the book with equally at his side, that he got it right. the fact that everyone breathes a sigh of relief when he does basic functions right shows you a lot about his presidency. and where do you think us-uk presidency. and where do you think us — uk relations are given that we have seen protests and given that we have seen protests and given that we have seen protests and given that we have seen some have seen protests and given that we have seen some very have seen protests and given that we have seen some very senior politicians refusing to share a banqueting table with him? how damaging is that? in the long-term, i don't think it's that damaging. if jeremy corbyn becomes promised or, he may regret having not met with the president but i think the underlying foundation of the us— uk
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relationship is incredible strong and resilient. it is much stronger than one person or one later on either side. great to see you. thank you very much. that is a news coming from winfield house. nigel farage has just been spotted walking into the house. that would bejust moments after the president himself would have gotten back, having toured the ballrooms with the first lady. that was following the news conference. everything running a bit behind schedule but there was this hour or two where many people were talking about if there were meetings between donald trump and let us just go actually to someone who is there and tell us what is happening right there right now. the president arriving back here if human is ago. surely afterwards, nigel farage was seen surely afterwards, nigel farage was seen entering as well. of course, nigel farage was on television
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saying no meeting had been scheduled, but if mr trump's team was to phone him, he would be ready. and so it appears there is the short window in the president's schedule before this return dinner at winfield house this evening. so we know he is meeting now with nigel farage for some there have been tossed between the trump team and michael gove as well. they are meeting —— no meeting scheduled as far as we know. we will watch closely to see if gove appears here today as well. i am right in thinking that nigel farage must've arrived surely after the president got back because he was coming past here not long ago. yeah, it feels like the gap was just a few short minutes. these events, the state visits are always tightly scheduled, tightly choreographed but this was the window of opportunity for president trump if any unplanned
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meetings were to take place. they would likely to take place in this small window between that press conference with president trump and theresa may and that banquet here at winfield house this evening. we do not know what they will be talking about but of course nigel farage and donald trump have met before and they are said to be friends. donald trump said that he is a friend of mine. that relationship goes back some weight. but i am sure we will all be following closely social media later to find out what president trump have to say about that meeting and indeed what nigel farage have to say about that meeting, too. i see you have got one eye on the road there. if anybody arrives, you will let us know and we will come straight back to you. frank, thank you very much. with me is nick wright from newable, which has just launched this america made easy initiative
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for small businesses. have straight with the america just got easier or have we just seen how difficult this is going to be?” think the overarching trend should make the environment more benign. trade deals can take a long time. you may not get all you wish for in that trade deal and get focused on one aspect of the economy, like goods as opposed to services. obesity right now is the uk have got a marvellous opportunity to trade successfully in the us. you say that and yet in that news conference, as soon as and yet in that news conference, as soon as he mentioned the nhs, you can hear the room breitling. this is the problem as theresa may pointed out, that is part of a future negotiation but there will be some areas where we will not be able to offer wealthy will offer. that is true. nothing the chance for small business right now is doing business
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with other business people rather than thinking of a bilateral trade agreement in the states. if you look at the trading environment in the us at the trading environment in the us at the trading environment in the us at the moment, their economy is growing at twice the rate of the uk, the exchange rate is very good for exporters and we have consumers and businesses that are very predisposed to uk goods and services. what are the difficulties of the moment then? the difficulties are not at the national level but there are 50 states. you find when you start doing business there, you come up with state—wide and federal rules and regulations and laws. and navigating that becomes very difficult for uk businesses. and what are the main questions that you get asked when people pick up the phone and say i have got this issue? what are the immediate problems? with of the us through the figure had perhaps of the country as a single entity. they are often two
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different markets. florida very different markets. florida very different than california and is different than california and is different to somewhere else. they're looking for advice. that guides them to choose the best method for their product and service. after brea kfast, product and service. after breakfast, how quickly would you hope that there is some sort of deal with the us? people are saying this could be years anyway.” with the us? people are saying this could be years anyway. i think you are right but as i mentioned earlier, i think that the opportunity to do business now —— is now and i if the trade deal is successful and makes the environment warm—up —— successful and makes the environment warm—up “ more successful and makes the environment warm—up —— more benign, that makes it so much the better. the great thing is there are resources out there for small businesses to answer difficult questions, be it international trade advisers which come from the department for international trade or services like america made easy which we have just launched. we wish you well, thank you forjoining us. that was much of the focus of that news conference
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today, the issue of trade with president trump. and with theresa may. bring you a picture of nigel farage being whisked into winfield house. there it is. definitely him sitting in the back of the car there. and that is the shot we have got. that meeting currently under way with nigel farage inside winfield house, the us ambassador‘s residents. that happening moments after the president himself would have gotte n after the president himself would have gotten back. he was scheduled to fly back by marine one which lands and takes off from buckingham palace but because of the heavy rain here, the side of the motorcade would with combat justice here, the side of the motorcade would with combatjustice quickly. let's find out what is happening in its central london is far as the protests. our correspondent dan johnson is in central london where protests are taking place. what is happening? just picking up here, the main trope —— speeches have just ended and people have starting to melt away. —— just breaking up. 2000 marched down
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whitehall department square earlier, the numbers have thinned out party because of the rain. you have got different causes that have brought people together. there is a shopping truly full of donald trump pull a paper which is being sold here and here we have him dressed as a gorilla in a cage apparently, he only eats clay chicken, trying to draw attention to food standards and potential for a true relationship with the us. perhaps after brea kfast. with the us. perhaps after breakfast. brexit features are quite heavily, this group here is a pro brexit campaign group which have now met some of the antitrust release of all sorts of different causes here. perhaps the attitude toward women or the attitude toward the middle east or different countries and we have had all sorts of things that have been raised. a couple of protesters here, tell us why you wanted to come be part of the protest today.” here, tell us why you wanted to come be part of the protest today. i work at the nhs and passionate about that and also an passionate remain supporter and he says are everything i don't. i think it is important to
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have a tolerant society and import we have socialised health care and things he does not want. i think misogyny, homophobia, racism, hatred isa misogyny, homophobia, racism, hatred is a bad thing for arkham unity in a bad thing for society and something we in the uk should maintain an not the people who stand against those kind of values. a strong message you have got there. yes, because i think we use a british sense of humour, we are very good at taking the mickey ata are very good at taking the mickey at a people and laughing at them. i think narcissus like him should i be taken think narcissus like him should i be ta ken seriously. not think narcissus like him should i be taken seriously. not give them a platform to speak. bad the president of the us let alone the honour of a state visit is very disappointing. what is your opposition to this visit? i believe it is not fitting for such a multicultural and tolerant and holistic society to invite an islamic phobia who supports the far right and who seeks
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to sow the seeds of discord in british society. and amongst other reasons, he is also a racist and misogynistic. there are people who say all that may be true but he is of the us, an important country in an important partner of the uk. what do we do, does not talk to them?” think the answer that question is this is only the third president will that we have had in the uk, there have been a lot of presence that we have not offered this honour to him when he not need to make this a state visit. we need to talk to him unfortunately but does not need to honour and respect him... not the grand reception. i think it is listen if it can and not appropriate for studies or values to british and not be embracing. we do not want to be turning to the right and be intolerant but we want to be together and tolerant and open. what do you think about the numbers out today? nothing like the protest last year when he visited.”
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today? nothing like the protest last year when he visited. i was not in the protest last year but the numbers were huge and that is a good indication that british society does not accept hate or fear mongers like donald trump. we will leave it there. thank you guys. there certainly have been a few thousand on the streets were difficult to estimate because there have been different rallies in different places of people moving around and coming and going all the time. certainly not the skill we saw when donald trump was in london last time and not the numbers people were expecting. but there have been some strong messages here and a lot of different causes that have brought people together in opposition to donald trump in this visit. good to see you. thank you. sport now, here's olly foster. good news from british tennis. brilliant is coming out of. johanna konta has reached her third grand slam semifinal.
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the british number one had never won a match at the french open before this year but she swept aside last yea r‘s runner up sloane stephens in straight sets to reach the last four. she's the first british woman in 36 years to make it that far in paris . rhia choan reports. it's a revival that he predicted with her performance here so far it's remarkable she's never won a major match until this year. having come so far, she relished it, the confidence and patience. sloan stevens delivered some technical finesse but the british number one have plenty of fat and then some. the opening set was immaculate and all that followed less pace. research has been magnificent in the tournament, too hard for the former us champion to get here. and she just continued to impress with full force. stevens it could only look on
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as she smiled her way to straight sets. signing off as a french open semifinalist. she'll play either marketa vondrousova or petra martic who play their quarterfinal shortly. in the men's draw roger federer is two sets to one up against stan wawrinka and rafa nadal is two sets up against kei nishikori. today's cricket world cup match between afghanistan and sri lanka has been reduced to 41 overs for each side following a lengthy rain delay in cardiff. they are the two lowest ranked teens in the tournament afghanistan won the toss and put sri lanka in to bat. they were 92 without loss at one stage, but the game changed when spinner mohammad nabi took
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three wickets in an over. sri lanka lost their last nine batsmen for just 57 runs and were bowled out for 201. that score's now been adjusted because of the reduced overs and afghanistan need 187 to win. south africa fast bowler dale steyn is out of the tournament, he missed the opening defeat to england with a shoulder problem and he won't be able to play any part in world cup. he's been replaced by beuran hendricks. two england players have picked up fines after yesterdays defeat to pakistanjason roy for an audible obscenity. fast bowler jofra archer was also docked 15% of his match fee for showing dissent towards an umpires decision athletics' world governing body — the iaaf — says it's new regulation requiring female athletes to take medication to reduce high levels of testosterone remains in place — despite it being over—ruled
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by a court in switzerland. the double olympic champion caster semenya appealed against the ruling to the swiss federal supreme court and it was upheld. but the iaaf says it is yet to hear from the court — so the regulations stay in place. that's all for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. back to you, simon. thank you, of course here looking at the state visit, second day of the state visit and it's been dominated by the news conference held in the foreign office. teresa may and donald trump facing questions of issues that eve ryo ne facing questions of issues that everyone expected to be asked about, but it was a family atmosphere partly because trees and they knew it was the last time she would be appearing at such a global stage they're heading to pressman tomorrow to ta ke
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they're heading to pressman tomorrow to take place in the d—day commemoration, so this is alaska politics so let's hear some of what was said. this week we commemorate the extraordinary courage and sacrifice of those who gave their lives for our liberty on the 75 years ago. as leaders prepare to gather scare from across the world, it is fitting that we begin with a celebration of the special relationship between the united kingdom and the united states. enduring partners who stood side by side on that historic day and every day since. for generations at the height of the transatlantic alliance, there has been our shared democratic values, our common interest, and our commitment to justice. it's that unity of purpose that will preserve the deep rooted ties between our people. and to underpin our nation's security and prosperity. for the next 75 years and beyond. so i am very pleased
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to welcome the president of the united states of america on this state visit to the united kingdom. president trump also spoke about the sacrifice made by troops 75 years ago and the bonds forged between the us and the uk. tomorrow, prime minister may and i will attend the commemoration ceremony in portsmouth, one at that key embarkation points for the invasion. more than one and a half million americans servicemembers were stationed at right here in england in advance of the landings that summer. the bonds of friendship forged here and sealed in bloody on those hollowed beaches will endure forever. our special relationship is grounded in common history, values, constants, culture, language and laws. our people believe in freedom and independence as a sacred birthright and cherished and here it is worth defending at any cost.
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shortly after the opposition leaderjeremy corbyn addressed crowds at an anti—trump protest, the president revealed that the labour leader had wanted a meeting with him. i don't know jeremy corbyn, never met him. never spoke to him. he wanted to meet today or tomorrow, and i decided that i would not do that. i think that he is, from where i come from, somewhat of a negative force. i think that people should look to do things correctly, as opposed to criticise. i really don't like critics as much as i like and respect people that get things done. so i have decided not to meet. the president was also asked whether he agreed with his uk ambassador who told the bbc‘s andrew marr programme this week that the nhs should be on the table in any future trade deals. here's what he had to say on that.
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i understand the issue very well, and i predicted what was going to happen. some of you will remember that strong prediction made at a certain location on a development we were opening the day before it happened. and i thought it was going to happen because of immigration more than anything else, but it probably happens for a lot of reasons. but i would tell you it will happen and it probably should happen. this is a great, great country and it wants its own identity. it wants to have its own borders. it wants to run its own affairs. this is a very, very special place, and i think it deserves a special place. and i thought maybe for that reason and for others, but for that reason, it was going to happen. i think it will happen, yes. and i believe the prime minister has brought it to a very good point, where something will take place in the not—too—distant future. i think she has done a very good job. i believe it would be good for the country, yes. on chinese telecoms giant huawei — president trump was asked if he would impose any limits on intelligence—sharing if britain did not restrict the use of huawei technology in developing its new 5g mobile phone network.
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we have an incredible intelligence relationship and we will be able to work out any differences. we did discuss it. i see absolutely no limitations, we have never had limitations. this is a truly great ally and partner, and we will have no problem with that. the president was also asked whether he agreed with his uk ambassador who told the bbc‘s andrew marr programme this week that the nhs should be on the table in any future trade deals. here's what he had to say on that. look, i think everything, when a trade deal is on the table. when you are dealing on trade, everything is on the table. so nhs or anything else, and a lot more than that. but everything will be on the table, absolutely. but the point about making trade deals is that both sides negotiate and come to an agreement about what should or should not be in that trade deal for the future.
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on the issue of mhs, the president met with fierce resistance, the health secretary tweeted he would never allow mhs to be on any trade to the table whilst how the secretary and he has been speaking in the last ten minutes. there is absolutely no way that the nhs will be on the table. free-trade parts of the united states or with anywhere else for that matter. full stop. and if i'm prime minister, nhs will never be for sale on my watch. but if we want to trade with the united states we need one post brexit that we are not holding any cards. no way, it's not on the table and it will not be on the table and the nhs is not for sale. does not matter if it's trade talks with the united states or any other country. i love the nhs. the british people love the nhs. and the nhs will never be for
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sale on my watch. not hancock there and of course he's in the middle at and of course he's in the middle at an election process within the conservative party, to be the next leader of course the next prime minister. now, the current prime minister. now, the current prime minister teresa may have been the news co nfe re nce minister teresa may have been the news conference earlier this afternoon with the president of the united states, the state visit he can set your clock by them because every minute is catered for except for this afternoon. once yesterday was about the royals and around family and banquet last night, everything timed it to the second, there is a leeway this afternoon and we saw with the news conference, it drifted about 20 minutes later than it was supposed to be, and then the president went to the cabinet worms with the first lady, and then they we re with the first lady, and then they were supposed to go bike helicopter to the us ambassador residents but because of whether they decided to go because of whether they decided to 9° by because of whether they decided to go by car. they went by motorcade and within minutes of them arriving back at winfield house but is a banquet later tonight, another car arrived late show you the picture
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because inside the picture —— inside the car was nigel farage, who still as far as we know, inside hiding talks with president trump. we know that you have met many times before, and regard one another as friends. so, with a wry smile, he said he does not want to get involved in other countries businesses, but he certainly doing that and of the only valid —— i said he contacted boris johnson and we know he's having a meeting with michael go this afternoon, that's another reason meeting jeremy hunt tomorrow in portsmouth as part of the d—day commemoration, but there's a lot going on, will he will keep on top of that is he who comes in and out of that is he who comes in and out of the house throughout the afternoon, christian fraser bringing you the news at five before that, let's return to the studio for business.
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president trump and theresa may speak of the strength the business news... bad news from britain's construction industry today. its had its worst month in more than a year in may, as customers postponed investment in the face of brexit uncertaint. the sector lost jobs at the fastest rate since 2012. one of the uk's most high profile stockpickers has suspended trading in his largest fund as rising numbers of investors ask for their money back. investors have withdrawn about £560m from neil woodford's fund over the past four weeks. and the art of the deal: president trump has been meeting business leaders on the second day of his state visit to the uk. afternoon — we're going to have a look at how the financial market have been fairing today. its been a good day for ftse 100 — its stayed in positive territory most of the day. let's have a look a some of the movers on the index today. a0 the online retailer, has reported a full—year loss — the company specialises in household appliances such as washing machines
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and fridges and cookers. michael hewson is at chief market analyst at cmc markets. michael, thank you forjoining us, what's going wrong?” michael, thank you forjoining us, what's going wrong? i don't think it's a case of what's going wrong, because if you look at the revenue, it's at 13% about 902.5 million, but u nfortu nately, it's at 13% about 902.5 million, but unfortunately, like the high street, it's suffering from higher cost and narrower margins. it's hard to stop a whole host of goods pre—brexit and that's cost it extra storage cost and also had to start re—stockpiling on the 31st of october at the deadline as well. so that's adding about £15 million to the overall bottom line, more importantly than that, in europe, they are suffering from slightly higher cost and losses as well, so when you actually look at the spread at the risk, its higher cost and
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bigger losses in europe. if you look in the uk, and that businesses are profitable but unfortunately as being overshadowed —— cited by the fa ct being overshadowed —— cited by the fact that europe is an profitable and they are having to absorb higher cost. is it a case of changing consumer patterns as well perhaps we look at kind of washing machines and fridges online, but we like to go in—store and touch and feel than. yeah but if you do it i do it's ego and the store and look at what they're like and go away and buy them online, so i think you touched ona them online, so i think you touched on a point there that washing machines and electric beds tend to be slightly higher ticket prices, so i think consumers are a lot more cautious, you saw that in the retail sales numbers we saw earlier this morning a decline at 3% year on year, so it suggests that consumers are slightly more cautious and they do have slightly more money average earnings and still stripping inflation but with all that the brexit and seconded their spending more money on smaller items rather
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than bigger items. another company not having a great day is the builder group care, the worst day was yesterday with a dropping to 40% and then continuing today so what's going on there? i think it's a confidence issue more than anything else, they had been under the spotlight for some time, there is widespread concern that could be another caribbean or intracerebral, there is a distinct difference, the problem is there's no clarity about how healthy it is, at the new ceo is coming in and doing a strategic review, this strategic review will not be over and the 31st ofjuly, but yesterday profit warning has shined a light on the fact that they have higher debt and slightly lower profit. so markets are bespoke by that and i think what they're shooting —— doing a shooting first asking questions later. last, before they came best as it looks like it's
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in positive territory for crude oil but it's been on slippery slope so far, predicting because they so what is your take on that? i don't think it's a bad thing ultimately what it means a cheaper price is at the pump. let's not forget oil prices are up on the air, we saw some rally today, i don't think it's a coincidence we saw that i had back more slightly positive session, but i think is a concern and i think it's point out not only in oil price but in recent decline in stock market valuations, is that we are on the cusp of the significant economic slowdown because of the concerns for trade, and the us administration is what i would say scatter approach to tariff and that's what i think is boyata thus the clients, not only stockmarkets but in oil prices as well. michael, we are looking and anticipating a slow down so thank you very much. lets have a look at other business stories. the rapper jay—z has been named hip hop's first billionaire. forbes says his music, property, fashion and investment assets amount
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to over a billion dollars. forbes also rejected claims that fellow rapper and producer dr dre has achieved billionaire status. in australia, its central bank has lowered interest rates to a record low of 1.25% — its first move in three years. the economy, which hasn't seen a recession since the 1990s, has been showing signs of weakness recently. house prices are falling, unemployment is up and consumer spending is sluggish. economists says that the reserve bank of australia is unlikely to cut rates again in the nearfuture. and the welsh government will not build the £1.4bn m4 relief road. it's axed the scheme because of its cost and impact on the environment. the plans would have seen a 14—mile motorway built as a gateway into south wales in to try and tackle the traffic faced by motorists around newport.
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let's have a quick look at the markets before we go. us stocks got off to a flyer on tuesday with a triple—digit and then gain for the dowjones industrial average. 5100 a good day too. and you get back to simon. thank you very much indeed. for the last two days, the crowds not as strong as people expected, this morning i said i had not seen one protest against the president bush, so in the last few minutes, well, there you go, dad turned out. —— they have turned up. isaidi turned out. —— they have turned up. i said i would do thatjust to... just to... —— the president —— president bush could —— >> kris: i meant trump, sorry it's an age thing. and you have given them the moment, you're watching bbc news and
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before i handed over to christian who takes us through the next two hours, let's remind you that there isa hours, let's remind you that there is a change in mood because tomorrow is a change in mood because tomorrow is about commemoration, it's about the d—day invasion 71940 four, 75 yea rs the d—day invasion 71940 four, 75 years ago, when american bomber crashed in sheffield claiming the lives of ten airmen on board, the fortress came down and watched by a local school by tony, who is eight yea rs old local school by tony, who is eight years old at the time. for years, he turned it into a memorialfor those who lost their lives and after that a highlighted story, if i pass was arranged to commemorate them and now i had of those commemorations tomorrow, tony has accompanied the us ambassador to visit three of the first time and greg went with him.
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the american cemetery in cambridge and a service to remember all those who died in the second world war. 75 years ago, the world held its breath. alongside the american ambassador and military personnel, guest of honour tony foulds. the service ends with a special fly—past, a mustang, a thunderbolt, and a b—17 bomber. all of a sudden, this b—17 came over and, of course, i burst into tears, like i do when i see it. tony was just a schoolboy playing in a park in sheffield 75 years ago when he saw a badly damaged b—17, the mi amigo, overhead. the pilot waved, trying to clear the area, but tony didn't understand and waved back. moments later, the pilot brought the plane down in the trees. the first thing i do, of course, is i always kiss them first. tony has been tending a memorial to the crew of the mi amigo for decades.
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he counts them as family, blames himself for their deaths. three of the airmen are buried at the cemetery in cambridge. tony is visiting the graves for the first time with the american ambassador. as soon as you get there, it hit me straightaway, just as if they were there. i could do this all day. it's unbelievable. unbelievable to see it. i could stay. it wouldn't bother me if i sat down on grass beside them and stayed here all night. it'd be brilliant.
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hello. how are you doing? 0h, grand. what a plane! duxford airfield and a special treat. the sally b is the only b—17 still flying in europe, kept operational by a charitable donations. the crew have kindly agreed to take tony for a spin along the runway. # wish me luck as you wave me goodbye. # cheerio, here i go on my way. it were meant to be, this. meant to be. # wish you luck as you wave me goodbye with cheer, not a tear. it's hard to put into words. it's so... the feeling to know that my lads were in a plane like this. # wish me luck as you wave me goodbye. oh, what a beautiful thing.
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so those commemorations in portsmouth tomorrow, i willjoin you from there, the tone very different from there, the tone very different from that day and yesterday especially when the weather was better as the president went to buckingham palace, different from what's happening now where it's wet and miserable and anybody and tourists here in london, for a spring summer break while they came prepared. they have them buy less. let's find out what's happening across the country with the weather. hello, away from northern scotland the pressure brought cloudy wednesday, heavy rain through western areas but overnight living north where it's meaning rain becomes confined to northern parts of the uk for scotland, and northern ireland lots of rainfall by the end of the night, and parts of northern england elsewhere a dry story for
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much of england and wales. clear skies with a few patches developing, nowhere is going to be particularly close. wednesday starts at the bright now watching with the wales and sunshine, translated through the day, scotland and northern ireland holding on to topics of rain and showers developing and southwest of england with had the afternoons, at the best of the dry weather could see 20 degrees cooler in the north. there friday, you can see an area pressure bringing heavy rains settling into eastern areas into the weekend, it stays unsettled for their showers and time and since i'm trying to.
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after the pomp — the politics. president trump hails the relationship with britain as the greatest alliance the world has ever known. a hand of friendship between the two leaders but president trump reveals he refused an invitation to meetjeremy corbyn. never met him. never spoke to him. he wanted to meet today or tomorrow, and i decided that i would not do that. meanwhile the labour leader led anti—trump demonstrations in london as thousands of people took to the streets. i want to be able to have that dialogue to bring about the better and more peaceful world. the health secretary hits back at the president

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