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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  June 5, 2019 9:00am-10:00am BST

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royal british legion. and his jump today will ray reed, from port talbot raise money for it. in south wales, served as a radio operator in a special operations he meets his modern—day equivalents, regiment in normandy. paratroopers from the us and the uk, he died five years ago, who willjump alongside him just after his grandsonjim recorded these memories. and who have much in common. you had to push hard enough to miss the back of the hull, so that your parachute didn't push you forward because that banged your did you know at the time that nose on the other side. which they called ringing the bell, by the way. we all go through tough training, and at the end of the day, it's ourjobs to jump out of aeroplanes behind enemy lines. and it's something we look back on, and we will always remember they were the trailblazers. returned from northern france, and despite his age, he was fully aware of what he was being ordered to do on that day. i came to the conclusion, very seriously, to my own satisfaction,
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that i would shirk nothing. i wouldn't surrender. if i had to have my little fight with the germans on my own, i would do it and die. that i would be true to the traditions that had grown up around our kind of unit, and i would pay the price if necessary. d—day was a low—leveljump from a dakota plane. today, harry will exit the same aircraft type, but will freefall attached to one of the red devils display team. he has done one before, last autumn, but was 94 then. now he is 95, but still young at heart. it's going to be cool to see his reactions, jumping out of a plane, out of the same area that he jumped. all these stories that we hear about about guysjumping in
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in world war ii, it's going to be amazing to see his reaction. it's amazing with all that time, as long ago as it was, the amount of detail that he still remembered. and that was — that was quite amazing. airborne troops talk of a brotherhood, a unique bond — the same for these young men today as it was for the tens of thousands of young men three quarters of a century ago. and our very special guest, harry is with us this morning, and a couple of the red devils. they will be jumping with harry and another vetera n, jumping with harry and another veteran, dot cotton, laterthis afternoon, weather permitting. harry, there's the dakota. you have probably —— jock hutton. there is the dakota, harry, what does it feel like to be that close to the old bird again? i know you called it an
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old bird, but to me, it is a piece of magic. we started off with the old 100 page woodley, you know, where it was so primitive, it was unbelievable. then we advanced from that to, what was it? the albemarle? we had to hop out because it was not deep enough for us to stand. and then lo and behold, due to american generosity, we found ourselves jumping like gentlemen out of this. when you reckon, 193a, i think, jumping like gentlemen out of this. when you reckon, 193a, ithink, this model was designed. we in this country were still experimenting with three wing aircraft that were tied together with string. the americans brought this out and, oh, it may jumping so americans brought this out and, oh, it mayjumping so much more pleasant. and you will be jumping
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again this afternoon. i think it will be your 18th jump, isn't it? why are you so keen to get back up there because it's not my aim teen some it's on my 19. i beg your pardon. you must not deny me! my lastjump pardon. you must not deny me! my last jump was on pardon. you must not deny me! my lastjump was on d—day... i beg your pardon, on d—day, that was my 17th jump. then, i had this desire, which i believe was a god—given desire, to doa i believe was a god—given desire, to do a tandem jump. i checked up to see... i was told i was going to be jumping with the red devils and i checked up on the box to see what the red devils did and they did not seem to do low—leveljumps, they did high level stuff which i had never done. it seemed ridiculous to me to face the great british public and beyond, not having had the experience of a high leveljump. so
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you did a warm up. i did, i did a warm up. a skydive. yeah. it was brilliant, absolutely brilliant. and so brilliant, absolutely brilliant. and so that was my 18th. so this one is my 19th. yeah, well, let's kopites enjoyable, which i'm sure it will be and takes place as well. —— hope it's enjoyable. mike, some valuable cargo strapped to your front this afternoon. yes, it's a great pleasure for myself and nathan, it is very humbling. thank you, gentlemen. it was great to spend some time with you the other day, the bond is so obvious and lots of the bond is so obvious and lots of the same kind of trials and tribulations that they faced in the infa ncy of tribulations that they faced in the infancy of airborne warfare, the same kind of thing you do today. yes, a similar role, obviously, there is no one shooting back at us these days, thankfully. but the role is still the same, nothing has changed, the mentality of the paratrooper. they could away is missed, of course. let's up so!
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gentlemen, all the very best for later. harry, it's been a real privilege to meet you and hear your story. thank you so much, and guys, all the best for later this afternoon. there we are, harry reid, what a gentleman, a true legend, i think it is fair enough to use that phrase and from duxford, back to dan in portsmouth. thanks, john, we've had some incredible heroes on the programme today. and thank you for being a pa rt today. and thank you for being a part of it as well. all week we've been asking you to send in your pictures and family stories of d—day and those who took part. john laslett was a gunner in the royal navy and went out on mine—sweeping patrols along french coast in the months leading up to d—day to keep the channel clear of mines for the ships that were coming across. his son keith laslett said they were constantly under fire from german aircraft and shore batteries. roy smart drove a sherman tank ashore on sword beach at the start of the d—day landings. he was in the east riding yeomanry. a few years ago he received
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the legion d'honneur from the french government. jonathan leafe sent in these photos to show how how proud he is of his uncle and all the mates he lost in world war two. i think those memories and photographs have been very much part of what we have been trying to bring you a flavour of today. now we are joined by the historian giles milton, who, iwas joined by the historian giles milton, who, i was talking to earlier about some of the detail around d—day and also mick gentry, warrant officer mick gentry, your official title and most people today have been talking about their grandfathers who took part in d—day but it was your father who was involved in the second wave of men to get to normandy. what did he do? yes, my father landed with the oxford and buck's light infantry, the vast bucks battalion on sword beach on the second wave on d—day, he was dropped on a sand bank and when they lowered the ramp, they went straight into six foot of water. like several men on that day,
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i would think, he spent the early pa rt i would think, he spent the early part of the day soaking wet. what is incredible, speaking to harold and the others we have spoken to today, for many years, nobody talked about it, because of, i suppose, for many years, nobody talked about it, because of, isuppose, shell shock, what they saw, the people they lost, the friends they never saw again after that day and the weeks of campaigns after that as well. how often did your dad... was he able to say what he had seen and what he did? know, like all the others, he said very little about his experiences. just enough for us to understand that it was quite a traumatic experience for him. and many, giles, went through that, and only now, in their late 90s, some of those here today, are enjoying spending time with the others who we re spending time with the others who were also part of d—day, 75 years ago. it was such a collaborative effort, probably the biggest secret anyone has had to keep in this country, and in canada and america as well, such a huge operation. country, and in canada and america as well, such a huge operationm is quite amazing that the germans
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never. . . is quite amazing that the germans never... they knew the invasion was coming but they had no idea when and where. it is interesting talking about the stories because traditionally, for many years, the stories of d—day that we know were written down by the officer class and the generals and we never really heard the voices of the young, the teenage conscripts in the first and second waves to land on the beaches. you know, it was absolutely terrifying for them. they were in a landing craft, the ramp goes down and either they landed water that is too deep and they sink to the bottom because they are carrying incredibly heavy packs, or they have to fight their way ashore under heavy machine—gun fire. their way ashore under heavy machine-gun fire. we talk about the fa ct machine-gun fire. we talk about the fact d—day was a success but only 1596 fact d—day was a success but only 15% of paratroopers landed in the right place and there were mistakes made on both sides. but if you are assessing it from a german perspective, so many generals thought this was not the day, this was not the invasion or they were going to attack calais which was pa rt going to attack calais which was part of the big diversion. this was a brilliant deception, operation fortitude was about trying to
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convince the germans we would land in calais and make them believe that. field marshal rommel, who was in charge of the german army northern france, his idea was to hit the allies hard and fast. they had to be attacked while they were landing, were seasick and terrified. but of course, the panzer divisions could not be released without hitler's orders and he was fast asleep in bavaria and knew nothing about the landing is taking place. amazing to think about what was going on in a high level of german command 75 years ago. but today is not about the commanders, mick, is it? it's about the 300 veterans here today remembering and also those who lost their lives then but have died since, as your dad, who has passed away in recent years. he passed away in 1992. for me, away in recent years. he passed away in1992. for me, i'm away in recent years. he passed away in 1992. for me, i'm very proud of what my father did and of course, i think my father likewise would be very proud of what the country is doing today, to commemorate those events 75 years ago. that is the essential thing is we see the picture of your dad, that we continue to tell the stories of him
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in the many others because these vetera ns a re in the many others because these veterans are 95, 94, 96, and we may not get the opportunity to have another huge commemoration like this because there won't be many of these amazing men left. no, we need to commemorate it, and capture their stories while we can. looking back on 75 years on that tomorrow we will be live in normandy reflecting on the actual landings, it is interesting as well to think about the fact that not many of these men knew what they were doing, they knew they were sat in boats out on the solent and on the other side of the isle of wight, thousands of ships and planes going across but it was ten weeks of some of the most intense fighting we have ever seen on the planet to achieve a freedom which we all celebrate today. on the planet to achieve a freedom which we all celebrate todaym on the planet to achieve a freedom which we all celebrate today. it is incredible, we talked about security earlier, the security was such that even the men did not know where they we re even the men did not know where they were landing until they were crossing the channel, they were told they would be landing on a beach and look out for certain houses on the foreshore. it was extraordinary, they were almost going in blind and many of them had never been in combat before or even fired a gun in
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angus. of course you had the elite commandos and men like that but —— a gun in anger. but many of them were not really ready and poorly trained. really appreciate both of your reflections this morning and it's going to be a poignant and emotional day for many in portsmouth as well, i think. when you think about the history, by the end of d—day, by the end of tomorrow, back in 1944, there we re end of tomorrow, back in 1944, there were 55 miles of french coastline that the allied forces had got to, some of them had got several miles inland, over 140,000 men some of them had got several miles inland, over140,000 men had made some of them had got several miles inland, over 140,000 men had made it there and within a year, hitler was dead and the war was over, and that is what remembering d—day is all about. thank you for taking part in oui’ about. thank you for taking part in our programme today and to all of our programme today and to all of our guests and the many messages and memories you have shared with us as well. we will leave you with these words from general dwight d eisenhower, a little reflection on the man who was the commander of the allied expeditionary forces in europe, as he rallied the troops before they set out across the channel in the
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fight forfreedom. soldiers, sailors and airmen of the allied expeditionary force, you are about to embark upon the great crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. the eyes of the world are upon you. your task will not be an easy one. your enemy is well—trained, well—equipped and battle hardened. he will fight savagely. the tide has turned. the free men of the world are marching together to victory. i have full confidence in your courage, devotion to duty and skill in battle. we will accept nothing less than full victory. good luck, and let us all beseech the blessing of almighty god upon this great and noble undertaking.
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you're watching bbc news with me annita mcveigh — the headlines. commemorating the 75th anniversary of the d—day landings — the queen will be joined in portsmouth by theresa may, president trump, and other world leaders, to remember the allied invasion of nazi—occupied france. the heroes of d—day, the veterans who are now over 90 years old have arrived in france ahead of the anniversary. we'll bring you full coverage of the d—day commemorations, live from 11:15am. president trump back—tracks from his suggestion that the nhs should be part of a trade deal between the us and uk after brexit. i don't see it being on the table. somebody asked me a question today, and i say everything's up for negotiation, because everything is, but i don't see that being, that something that i would not
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consider part of trade. that's not trade. conservative leadership candidate boris johnson says the party faces extinction if it fails to deliver brexit by the end of october. police raid the headquarters of the australian broadcasting corporation over concerns about an investigation into alleged misconduct by australian special forces in afghanistan. sir philip green's retail group, arcadia, faces a crucial meeting as it tries to avoid administration. good morning — and welcome to the bbc news at nine. president trump appears to have retreated from his suggestion yesterday that the national health service would be "on the table" for trade
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negotiations in a post—brexit deal between the us and uk. the remark prompted a backlash from conservative leadership candidates, labour and the trade unions. in an interview with piers morgan for good morning britain on itv — the president was also asked if he could see himself working with labour leader jeremy corbyn in the future, despite turning down a request for a meeting yesterday. it's always possible. anything's possible. i don't know him. he wanted to meet, it was very tough to meet, and probably inappropriate to meet, to be honest with you. a lot of things are happening right now with respect to our country, and your country, my country, and let's call them almost the same, because i feel that way. it's really a tremendous relationship. so, i didn't think it was appropriate to meet him, but i would, i certainly would. i'd have no problem with that. i think it's a long shot when you say that, you know, i don't think it's going to happen. no leader, it seems to me, would allow britain to effectively sell the nhs as part of a trade deal. would you as the american president
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see that as a deal breaker, if none of the nhs was on the table? i don't see it being on the table. somebody asked me a question today, and i say everything's up for negotiation, because everything is, but i don't see that being, that's something that i would not consider part of trade. that's not trade. the president also defended the comments he made about the duchess of sussex in a newspaper interview ahead of his arrival in the uk. and they said some of the things that she said and it is actually on tape. isaid, that she said and it is actually on tape. i said, i that she said and it is actually on tape. isaid, i didn't that she said and it is actually on tape. i said, i didn't know she was nasty. i was referring to she was nasty. i was referring to she was nasty about me. i didn't know she was nasty about me. but you know what, she is doing a good job and i hope she enjoys her life. sion what you think of her. i don't know her. i have to be honest. but it shows you how terrible the news can be because if you read it, that was not
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about nasty... it was a little bit ambiguous. i don't mind clearing up because you hear it, they released the type and cnn and some of the other phonies went out and took the type and they even tried to take it from that. they talked about nasty but we were talking about nasty, she was nasty to me and that it's ok for her to be nasty to me, it's not good for me to be nasty to her and i wasn't. i think she is doing well. this morning president trump took to twitter to comment on protests against his visit — calling them "organised flops." he said... i kept hearing that there would be "massive" rallies against me in the uk, but it was quite the opposite." he goes on to say that he found big crowds gathered in support of himself and the usa. he said these were "big & enthusiastic" as opposed to — what he calls — the "organized flops!" borisjohnson, the conservative mp and frontrunner to replace theresa may as prime minister, has said the party faces extinction if it fails to deliver brexit by the end of october.
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he made the comment at a hustings debate with other leadership contenders in westminster last night. housing minister kit malthouse and brexit ministerjames cleverly have pulled out of the contest, leaving 11 still in the running. let's hear more from our assistant political editor norman smith. good morning to you. how much do you think borisjohnson saying the party faces extinction will worry the conservative membership who will decide between the final two candidates? he clearly hopes it will focus minds over the scale of the challenge the party now faces in the wa ke challenge the party now faces in the wake of the european elections, in the wake of its failure to deliver brexit, and to look to him almost as the saviour, the man who can rescue the saviour, the man who can rescue the party from what he thinks is an existential threat to its survival. his pitch at a hustings last night
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organised by the one nation group of tory mps, these are sort of middle ground centrist tory mps including many remainers, was that faced with this looming disaster only he can secure some sort of brexit steel which first off would enable the tories too in his words put nigel farage back in his box and then to get brexit dealt with. enabling the party he believes to return to its one nation values, to re—engage with its supporters, build some sort of momentum and enthusiasm about conservative values, leading to a victory overjeremy corbyn in the general election, so that is his pitch and trajectory, the difficulty of course is it all is predicated on resolving brexit. and there mr johnson has so far avoided detailed scrutiny because he hasn't actually launched his campaign yet, he has
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kept his head down and avoided media interviews and not allowed himself to be interviewed so at the moment it isa to be interviewed so at the moment it is a sort of campaign by stealth, almost a softly softly campaign. he is avoiding those direct questions which might begin to tease out exactly how he would secure a brexit deal. and we saw several of the leadership candidates yesterday saying the nhs would absolutely not be on the table in any future trade discussions between the uk and united states. do you think president trump was made aware of that before he backtracked on those comments in that interview? he must have been. it was interesting at the news co nfe re nce have been. it was interesting at the news conference at first i don't think he quite understood the question he was being asked or didn't quite grasp what the nhs meant. mrs may actually lent over and said to him at national health service and his reply was yes, to save the nhs would be part of the negotiations but i think it was more framing it in terms of everything will be on the table whether
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specifically i want the us access to private sector companies to services the nhs provides. after which i suspect he was made aware of the symbolic and political importance of the nhs within the british domestic debate, and it will come as some relief i am sure to the tory leadership contenders that the president now appears to have backtracked and ta ken president now appears to have backtracked and taken it off the table because politically it would make a deal with the united states almost a nonstarter, almost inconceivable prime minister could go into trade negotiations and is pa rt go into trade negotiations and is part of those trade negotiations put the nhs on the table. i suspect first time round the president wasn't perhaps quite aware of the symbolic importance stop now he has taken the nhs off the table i would think there will be considerable relief amongst many of the tory contenders. norman, thank you. australian police have raided the headquarters of the public broadcaster abc, targeting three journalists over allegations they had published classified material.
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the police action is related to reports about alleged misconduct by australian forces in afghanistan. we can speak now to our sydney correspondent phil mercer. just tell us more about the background to this ride, which is day two of rights against journalists. the australian federal police raided the australian broadcasting corporation sydney headquarters in the middle of the morning today, it is after tea time now. this ride has now been going on for quite a long time. those police officers and it experts have a p pa re ntly officers and it experts have apparently identified thousands of documents they believed relate to this case of the alleged publishing of classified material. this case relates to a serious broadcast on the abc injuly 2017 called the
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afg ha n the abc injuly 2017 called the afghan files. this story was based according to the abc on hundreds of secret military documents leaked to abc reporters. the story the abc published alleges killings and misconduct by australian forces in afghanistan. the australian federal police says it has suspicions that a crime has been committed in the publication of these documents. in response the abc is pretty furious that its headquarters has been raided here. it said bluntly that journalism is not a crime. thank you for that update. phil mercer in sydney, thanks for that update. australia's most senior catholic has appeared in court to appeal against his conviction for sexually abusing two young boys in the 1990s. cardinal george pell, who's the vatican's former treasurer, is the most high—profile, high—ranking catholic official ever to have been convicted of child abuse. he's currently serving
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a six—year prison sentence. a jury found him guilty earlier this year. he maintains his innocence and argues the verdict was unreasonable. sir philip green's retail group arcadia is facing a crucial meeting of its creditors as it tries to avoid administration. sir philip has drawn up a restructuring plan which would involve rent cuts and store closures. our business presenter dominic o'connell is here. good morning to you. philip green has made a deal to secure the support of arcadia's largest creditor which is the pension protection fund i understand, so how significant will that be when all the creditors meet today? the chances of this passing have increased dramatically over the last 12 hours because last night the pensions protection fund which is a lifeboat vehicle that would have had to pick up the pension if the company had gone insolvent said yes, because sir philip offered 25 million more pounds into it and the
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basic deal is sir philip and arcadia is offering its security, assets and cash up front in return for lower annual payments into the pension. the pension protection fund and pensions regulator were holding out and saying the other wasn't generous enough and they had the power to make or break this deal. they said yes they will vote in favour of it. that then leaves the company landlords who rent it in the shops. they may not like what is being offered but the alternative might well be an empty shop and no rent at all. they are being asked to take rent cuts. the chances of it going to have improved although we won't know until the vote takes place at midday. and if this rescue deal is agreed, what is next because that is not the end of the story by any means. that is the big question because arcadia is a bit player and high street. 560 shops and 18,000 staff. after the cba a couple of dozen of those shops will close. they will give the company enough money to invest online and stories
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and make it more viable proposition but that mid—market clothing space as we know from the last four years is tough. does the cba mean it is out ofjail is tough. does the cba mean it is out of jail free? is tough. does the cba mean it is out ofjail free? not necessarily. still a hard road. maybe a sale in the offing. it is not a slam dunk that arcadia will be fine in the future at all. because the bricks and mortar stores are still facing the strong robust challenge from online retailers. also fashion, we are into fast fashion, buying online, ranges that change every couple of weeks, the real winners are companies like asus, misguided, they change very quickly, cheap fashion online and really talking to a younger demographic and buying like this. top shop which used to be extremely fashionable has been left behind in this race. the question is can it catch up and cannot catch up ina way can it catch up and cannot catch up in a way in this new slimmed down slightly more financially viable fashion? what might thank you.
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campaigners will head to the high court this morning for a judicial review into how the government raised the state pension age for women from 60 to 66. they say that around four million women, who were born in the 1950s, were not given enough time to prepare for the change. here's our personal finance correspondent, simon gompertz. it makes me feel angry, depressed, put upon. this woman, an ambulance driver in margate, had little more than a year's notice that she wouldn't get the pension she banked on at 60, but instead she has to wait till 66. we would all love the money we are owed. i am probably owed something like 49,000 by the time i get to 66. i can't see that happening. i would like some sort of compensation if we don't get that. it is sex discrimination, they will tell the court. they don't mind equal pension ages, but they do mind the way they are being brought in. the "back to 60" group that has
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brought this judicial review is demanding repayment of all the pension that women born in the 1950s are missing out on, arguing that the speed of the change and what they call the lack of warnings has left millions disadvantaged. the government says it decided more than 20 years ago that it was going to make the state pension age the same for men and women as a long overdue move towards gender equality, and this has been clearly communicated. but she feels too many realised too late that they would have years without a pension. three in five mps say their constituents are suffering because of cuts to the care system that supports older, or disabled people in england. a poll carried out for a coalition of health organisations says the local authority—run care system needs to be fixed. our social affairs correspondent alison holt reports.
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your transport‘s here to take you to lavender with owen. june chapman is 88, and her husband, owen, is 96. we first met them as their care home was closing because it was outdated, and council fees didn't cover costs. i won't forget you. for the family, it is a worrying time. we thought we'd found the care home from heaven, the support here, the carers here. and we understand the situation — that they have to shut the care home. i just hope and pray that this is going to be the last change for them. like many, the couple are caught in a confusing system. they have to move care home. their flat is also being sold to pay for their care. they spent seven years bouncing between being state—funded and funding themselves. this is your new home. it's a caring roller—coaster. it's a financial roller—coaster, and it takes it out of you.
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families need to know what to expect when they care for their relatives in the future. how to access care, how to access funds. it is a worry that won't go away. when we next saw the couple, they had settled well, but owen has since died. the government says it has put extra money into the care system, and published plans for reforming social care at the earliest opportunity. you can see more on this in the second of a 2—part programme, care in crisis, who pays? bbc one, 9pm tonight. in a moment, we will be joining simon mccoy in portsmouth on the 75th anniversary of d—day. first the 75th anniversary of d—day. first the weather. it is quite an u nsettled the weather. it is quite an unsettled picture over the next few
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days. we have a north — south split, outbreaks of rain which could be heavy and persistent for scotland, northern ireland, drier and brighter further south. wet weather courtesy of the low pressure pushing north as we move through the day, scotland, northern ireland, further rain, but becoming increasingly patchy as it works north and west, something drier and brighter in southern scotland, chance of a few showers. england and wales, sunny spells, showers for western areas particularly. this evening and overnight, we hold onto a lot of cloud in scotland, northern ireland, when confined to western areas, next area of low pressure bringing cloud and rain to eastern areas, and away from that, england and wales, clear spells, showers, bye—bye.
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this is bbc news, i'm simon mccoy live in portsmouth as we commemorate the 75th anniversary of the d—day landings. the queen will be joined
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here in portsmouth by theresa may, president trump, and other world leaders, to remember the allied invasion of nazi—occupied france. 7,000 vessels landed over 130,000 british, canadian and us troops on five d—day beaches. the heroes of d—day, veterans who are now over 90 years old, have arrived in france ahead of the anniversary.
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good morning from southsea common in portsmouth, where later this morning commemorations will take place to mark the 75th anniversary of d—day. the queen will be in attendance, accompanied by the prince of wales, alongside over 300 d—day veterans, heads of state and the president and first lady of the united states on the final day of their state visit to the united kingdom. senior figures from every country that fought alongside the uk forces are attending. to mark the occasion, they've agreed a commitment to uphold democracy, tolerance and the rule of law. graham satchell has been looking ahead to today's events. in the shadow of the vast portsmouth naval memorial, southsea common is being searched
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and made secure. uri, a three—year—old spaniel, trained to find explosives. behind the steel fence later, the queen, the prime minister, president trump and other heads of state will be here to commemorate d—day, 75 years on. 99—year—old ron cross, and bobjones, who is 94, among the veterans being honoured. we really didn't think about the danger. we knew we had a job to do and, if anything happened to us, that was hard luck. i did what they said. i crept up the beach. i thought, what's all these people around me? they're in the water — what are they doing in the water? i thought, you'd think they'd get out of the water and come out and join me where i am. no. they were dead. 75 years ago, more than 100,000 troops boarded almost 5,000 vessels
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in ports and harbours all along the south coast of england. 5thjune was the original date of d—day. in the end, bad weather meant a delay for 24 hours. nonetheless, across the channel, the raf continued their bombardment. the softening up of german defences along a broad stretch of coast... bridges and airfields destroyed in readiness for what would be the largest seaborne invasion in history, and the beginning of the end of the war. the number of d—day veterans is now down to the hundreds. today's events will be one of the last opportunities to commemorate those who liberated europe from nazi rule. graham satchell, bbc news. with me now is historian giles milton. every time i have covered these events, by the end of the day, you realise what it is really about, the vetera ns realise what it is really about, the veterans themselves. we are running out of time because they are in their 90s now and every time we
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meet, they say it will be the last time, but it never is, they are determined to be here. what are we remembering exactly today? so much of the early history of d—day was written by the officer class, the generals, we never heard the voices of the 17—year—old, 18—year—olds, who stormed the beaches. this anniversary is about the terrified young man who put their way inland. terrified because they spent so long where we are in various vessels waiting for the go and the weather on the day, today, 1944, it meant they were delayed for 24 hours, it must have been terrifying. although the weather was slightly better on the weather was slightly better on the 6th ofjune, still incredibly rough on the channel. i read accou nts rough on the channel. i read a ccou nts of rough on the channel. i read accounts of men who had eaten thick meat stew and bricks of chocolate, out on the sea, violently ill, so by
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the time they are arriving on the shores of normandy to go into battle against hitler's army, they are feeling rough, and terrified. behind—the—scenes, months, years, of preparations for this moment. absolutely extraordinary logistical exercise. cooperation between the americans, british, canadians, other nations, to plan this invasion meticulously. it was always going to be high—risk. five beaches were going to be stormed across 60 miles of normandy coast line, so much potential for things to go wrong. there were heavy losses, particularly on one of the american beaches on the day. but following the invasion, of course, intense fighting just to grab a few miles of territory. yes, we often focus on d—day, rightly, it was so important, but after this, great battle for normandy, incredibly brutal, very tough fighting from hedgerow to hedgerow. young men who had not
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really trained for this. as a historian, how important is it events like this are still happening? i think we need to mark these events, it is very important young people are brought up knowing about them and recently we have had the last veterans from the first world war pass away and the great war has passed into history and that will happen very soon with d—day as well. all the veterans are in the 90s, well. all the veterans are in the 905, i well. all the veterans are in the 90s, i look forward to speaking to you later. thank you. preparations are well under way here in portsmouth for the events to mark the 75 years since d—day. around 300 normandy veterans have already arrived by sea into portsmouth. they'll bejoining the queen and president donald trump and other dignitaries at a special event here in southsea. it will culminate with a special fly—past,
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where some of the original planes used during d—day willjoin the red arrows display team. later this evening, veterans will board a ship to normandy especially chartered by the royal british legion, repeating the voyage they took 75—years ago. let's hear now from our correspondent robert hall, who sent this report from on board the ship, called the boudicca. jim grant's d—day began on board a landing craft lumbering through the surf towards the normandy beaches. 75 years older, he was afloat again, guest of the royal marines on a windswept ride across poole harbour. it would have taken us about four times as long. the boudicca's arrival in poole gave the 300 veterans and their companions a taste of what was to come on both sides of the channel.
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makes you feel so proud and yet so humble at the same time. you feel humble? can you imagine how i do? i don't deserve to be here. they are the heroes of d—day. everything that we are celebrating now, just really, really excited to be this part of this and be with my grandad and have memories we can keep forever. if you have got any questions or you want to play with anything, just let me know. on the quayside, men who had stumbled ashore weighed down with weapons and equipment, men who had helped supply the bridgehead, examined the tools of modern warfare. my goodness! i couldn't have run with that. the excitement among veterans was infectious. men in their 90s scrambling to get in on the action. some could not quite believe they were here.
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wished could come here, but i thought i passed it, can't do that. didn't think he would be able to make another voyage to normandy. we cannot comprehend what these ladies and gentlemen did for us, to give us our freedom. we have no comprehension. not far away, curiosity of a different kind. it is humbling to hear what they remember so clearly and to then remember what that did for the rest of our lives, the rest of all of our lives thereafter, so they are amazing people. we are privileged to meet them today. back on the water, 95—year—old june denby who served as a driver. she landed in normandy via the huge artificial harbour codenamed mulberry. had a low—slung limousine to carry the people from london, generals and colonels and things. and i lost my exhaust on the mulberry harbour. for three days, the veterans have
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shared their stories... twin brothers, same regiment. ..forgotten their health worries and grown closer to family companions. today the focus shifts to the port where many of the men boarded ships in 1944. boudicca's veterans believe it is their duty to be here and remember. robert hall, bbc news, portsmouth. well, a little earlier this morning, some of those veterans arrived in portsmouth onboard the mv boudicca — the ship chartered by the royal british legion. and this morning, hundreds of d—day veterans willjoin world leaders to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the d—day landings, gathering here in southsea common.
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and later tonight, the boudicca sets sail from portsmouth with 300 veterans for normandy — retracing their steps on the journey taken 75 years ago in 1944. robert hall was suggesting some were having a great time, they want to poole harbour, we have pictures to show you later, some got on inflata bles, show you later, some got on inflatables, having a great time, with those serving with the royal navy, current day servicemen, and a p pa re ntly navy, current day servicemen, and apparently there were lots of smiles and laughter. tomorrow, the prime minister and president macron will unveil a new war memorial overlooking gold beach. it will carry the names of 22,400 people who lost their lives in the battle of normandy. remarkably, only two of those names are women. they were nurses who died when their hospital ship hit a mine and sank off the french coast. with me now is navel
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reservist sarah charters. from the royal air force. the role of women is not often talked about but it was crucial. it absolutely was. the first two women to land on the normandy beaches where raf nurses and they had volunteered to work with a mobile field hospital, they left gosport on the 11th of june, and they arrived onjuno beach 12th ofjune, stayed overnight in a bunker, and then joined 12th ofjune, stayed overnight in a bunker, and thenjoined the 12th ofjune, stayed overnight in a bunker, and then joined the field hospital to start reaching the trauma casualties. how did they find themselves taking part in that mission 75 years ago? one lady, called at the time iris, sadly she became a war widow, her husband was working with bomber command and was shot down over holland. after that happened, she felt she wanted to give more and she volunteered to join the mobile field hospital and
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server normandy. what did they find when they got there? what sort of things where they having to deal with? very serious casualties, she remembers not being frightened, actually, as she prepared to leave the landing craft, stood at the top of the ramp waiting for the go—ahead, remembers her feet touching the sand, and i think around her really a scene of devastation and there were fighter aircraft flying overhead, still naval ships bombarding the coast. and more fighting around her. they stayed in the trench overnight, joined the field hospital, and then started treating very seriously injured casualties. the day after fluffy a nd injured casualties. the day after fluffy and molly arrived, three nurses flew in on the dakota plume and landed in normandy on the 13th ofjune, one nurse per aircraft, and they were the first women to fly
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into normandy. parachuted in? the casualties were brought to them on the aircraft and they provided in—flight nursing care, the nurse on the back of the aircraft caring for the back of the aircraft caring for the patient as they went back to the uk. what sort of stories... what do they remember of those days and the days that followed ? they remember of those days and the days that followed? for the mobile field hospital, they had a series of setting up the field hospital, treating casualties, and as the front moved forward, packing up, moving in convoy, setting up again. they remember how important it was for them to provide a smiling face, just giving lovely nursing care, whilst delivering injections of morphine and antibiotics, giving intravenous infusions, attending to wounds, the same stuff we do these
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days. and the nurses who flew on the aircraft remembered the troops cheering as they came into british airspace, they knew they would be safely home. important we remember their role today. absolutely, really important. and the role of raf nurses on the whole because we still do the same work these days, working in field hospitals, providing medical evacuation services, in—flight nurses, which is what i have the honour to do. great to talk to you about it, enjoy today. it is going to be quite something. sarah, thank you. that is one of the aspects of what is going to be remembered today. as i was saying to giles earlier, if you cover these events as i have over many years, both here and of course where many of the commemorations will be tomorrow and in cemeteries along the
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normandy coast, it is the veterans who become the centre of attention, while we inevitably focus this morning on the world leaders gathering here, it is those men, mostly men, in their 90s, some more than 100 years old, they will be here, remembering, and many of them returning for the first time, many of them having never really spoken to even their own members of the family, and if you talk to the vetera ns, family, and if you talk to the veterans, some of them talking about it now for the first time because everybody is now talking about it. it isa everybody is now talking about it. it is a remarkable aspect of this, that the veterans themselves have their own thoughts, their own memories, but now feel able to share, even after 75 years. let us talk about this more. with me now is major alexander owen, head of armed forces engagement at the royal british legion. thank you forjoining us this morning. why is it so important we have services and moments like this?
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it is hugely important for us, not just as a nation but for the vetera ns just as a nation but for the veterans involved and that is what we are trying to do, put the vetera ns at we are trying to do, put the veterans at the heart of this. the royal british legion ship, 250 vetera ns royal british legion ship, 250 vete ra ns o n royal british legion ship, 250 veterans on board, what an amazing environment on board, seven birthdays this week on the ship. the youngest is 91, the oldest 101. the birthday is happening, i think three of them are turning 94, 19 years old when they landed or on the beaches at normandy or flying or sailing. celebrations of course, but for them particularly, huge moments of reflection. i think there will be. at the moment, we have 250 veterans who have been sailors, soldiers, airmen, they are having a wonderful time. there is a bar, i hear. it may have been well used! we have a massive support base providing welfare support that the veterans need long after this week is over,
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they might need welfare support because the veterans are burning the candle at both ends, but i think tomorrow when they get to france and they go to the cathedral, the cemetery, that is when the reflection will really happen. today is more of a celebration. do they appreciate the fact that, as we were saying, donald trump, otherworld leaders, the queen, leading the ceremony today, is that important to them that these sorts of things happen? i think it is important that people of that level are making a note of the sacrifices made 75 years ago but it is not about princes, presidents, prime ministers, it is about the veterans, the most important thing, and that is what we are trying to do. a lot of them have not really spoken about that day 75 yea rs not really spoken about that day 75 years ago, unable or and happy to do so, until events like this, —— and happy. maybe it triggers memories, what do they say to you? that is one
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of the most wonderful things about having these national moments because it makes you more curious about what happened and i have been speaking to veterans, finding out as much as i can about what happened. i used to serve in afghanistan, i thought it would be nothing like d—day 75 years ago, it could not be further from the truth, the soldiers that arrived in the sherman tanks fighting through the hedgerows and the sunken lanes and corn of normandy, very similar to the afghan green zone, the routine they had in normandy, living and fighting beside vehicles, it is reflected as it is today. that is why it is important we are commemorating the d—day vetera ns we are commemorating the d—day veterans and the sacrifices they made but it is important we reflect largely on the armed forces population at large and maintain support for them, whatever conflict they have fought in. fascinating day
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andi they have fought in. fascinating day and i hope they enjoy it, very good to talk to you. thank you for joining us this morning. the success of d—day didn'tjust rely on the invasion by sea. the first allied troops to land on french soil travelled by air and some of the original planes which carried them willjoin a special fly—past this morning. john maguire has been in duxford, near cambridge, from where they'll take off. in 1944, training for d—day, his army paper shows how some of his training took place at another raven airfield in wiltshire. 75 years, harry has returned and is about to return to parachuting. now as then, harry is turned out immaculately, but these days, his uniform is that of the salvation army and his jump today will raise money for it. he meets his modern day equivalents,
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paratroopers from the us and uk who willjump paratroopers from the us and uk who will jump alongside him paratroopers from the us and uk who willjump alongside him and who have much in common. you had to push hard enough to miss the back so that your parachute did not push you forward because it banged your nose on the other side. they called it ringing the bell, by the way. we go through tough training and at the end of the day, it is ourjob tojump out of the aeroplane, it is something we look back on and we remember always they were the trailblazers. the first man to move in on the normandy coast line... full strength of the comrades who never returned from northern france. —— thoughts turn. despite his age, fully aware of what he was being ordered to do on that day. i came to the conclusion very seriously, to my own satisfaction, that i will shirk nothing, i would not surrender. if i had my little
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fight with my german is on my own, i would do it and i would die. i would be true to the traditions that had grown up around our kind of unit and i would pay the price, if necessary. d—day was a low leveljump from a da kota d—day was a low leveljump from a dakota plane. today harry will accept the same aircraft type but free full attached to one of the red devils display team. he has done wonderful last autumn but was 94 then. —— done one before. now he is 95 but still young at heart. it will be cool to see his reactionjumping out of the plane the same area that hejumped, out of the plane the same area that he jumped, all the stories we hear about, guys jumping he jumped, all the stories we hear about, guysjumping in world war ii, it will be amazing to see his reactions. amazing with all that
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time, the amount of detail still remembered. iwas time, the amount of detail still remembered. i was quite amazed. they talk of the brotherhood, a unique bond, the same for these young men today, as it was for the tens of thousands of young men three quarters of a century ago. john maguire the, with one of the groups who will be having their own memories today, and of course, the focus very much here later on will be on the stage behind me, the 300 vetera ns be on the stage behind me, the 300 veterans who will be here, of course, with the queen, the prime minister, donald trump, first lady of the united states, president of france, other world leaders, emmanuel macron, as i say, and the new zealand prime minister, all here for what will be a remarkable moment for what will be a remarkable moment for not just the for what will be a remarkable moment for notjust the veterans but for all of us, just to remember what happened 75 years ago here at
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portsmouth and along the south coast of england. as thousands of men waited for the get go, the moment when they were told, it is on, the moment d—day got under way. scheduled originally for today but because of bad weather postponed until the historic day of the 6th ofjune. join us again from 11am, much more coverage of today's special events. now with the weather, just as important as ever, lucy martin. quite an unsettled picture over the next few days. north — south split, outbreaks of rain which could be heavy and persistent full scotland, northern ireland, drier and brighter further south. wet weather courtesy of the low pressure pushing north as we move through the day. scotland, northern ireland, further outbreaks of rain this afternoon, but becoming increasingly patchy as it works north and west, something drier and
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brighter in southern scotland, chance of a few showers, england and wales, sunny spells, showers particularly for western areas. this evening and overnight, holding onto a lot of cloud in scotland, northern ireland, rain confined to western areas. the next area of low pressure bringing cloud and rain to eastern areas. away from that across england and wales, clear spells, areas. away from that across england and wales, clearspells, one areas. away from that across england and wales, clear spells, one or two showers. bye—bye.
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hello, it's wednesday, it's ten o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire... commemorations begin to mark the 75th anniversary of the d—day landings. later this morning president trump willjoin the queen. senior figures from every country that fought alongside the uk will be attending. 01:00:29,620 --> 2147483052:06:59,525 earlier this morning, 2147483052:06:59,525 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 d—day veterans arrived in portsmouth

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