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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 7, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines. lisa forbes is duly elected. you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11:ooam and these are the main labour wins the peterborough stories this morning: by—election seeing off a challenge from the brexit party with a slim majority. labour sees off a challenge from the brexit party to win the peterborough by—election what we did was offered the politics with a slim majority. we had a fantastic candidate, a fantastic campaign, of hope, not the politics of fear. and the people of peterborough nigel farage calls their second rejected austerity, and rejected the a no—deal brexit being offered by the brexit party. place "significant" then delivers i am delighted and congratulate a letter to number ten demanding to be involved in the brexit lisa forbes this morning. negotiating team. brexit is the defining issue of our age. labour won because they have data. we have only got five months until labour have won because they know we are due to leave, we would love who their voters are in this constituency, and they managed to help now. we are not a protest party, we want responsibility, we to turn enough of them out. wa nt party, we want responsibility, we want to get involved. the conservatives came third as theresa may formally stands down the conservatives came third — as theresa may formally stands as party leader but stays down as party leader — on as pm for now. deadly diseases like ebola but stays on as pm for now. could become the "new normal" the world health
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women who suffer domestic abuse are three times more likely than other women to develop organisation has warned. major changes to overdrafts as banks a serious mental illness — and building societies are told according to new research. they can no longer charge fixed overdraft fees. major changes to overdrafts — as banks and building societies are told they can no longer charge fixed overdraft fees. the women's world cup let‘s return now to our top story. begins in paris today — with hosts france taking on south korea. and britain's johanna labour has narrowly won konta is in action in the peterborough by—election holding the french open semi—final — off a challenge from the brexit hoping to become the first british party. union activist lisa forbes took 31% women's tennis player of the vote, beating to reach a grand—slam final the brexit party‘s mike greene in over 4 decades. by 683 votes. the conservatives came in third place, followed by the liberal democrats in fourth. our correspondent navtej johal is in peterborough for us now. good morning. jeremy corbyn has been, he is saying welcome to bbc newsroom live. it shows labour cannot be written labour has narrowly won off. how privately, how nervous were the peterborough by—election — holding off a challenge from the brexit party. union in labour they off. how privately, how nervous were in labourthey might off. how privately, how nervous were in labour they might not win this?
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activist lisa forbes how relieved are they that they took 31% of the vote, actually did? beating the brexit party's mike greene by 683 votes. the relief is key. the result was the conservatives came third with 21%, while the liberal democrats were fourth with 12%. very much against the odds, the brexit party was in the ascendancy it seemed and some of the bookies the by—election was held had stopped taking bets for the after labour mp fiona onasanya was ousted after she was convicted brexit party to emerge victorious for lying over a speeding offence. more now from our political such was the confidence it would eventually win this seat, the first correspondent iain watson. seat for the brexit party as an mp. however, it was labour who emerged a result that seemed to be on a knife—edge. triumphant. last night, you might i do hereby declare that have heard as saying a lot of labour lisa forbes is duly elected... cheering and applause. but it was labour that cut through. workers were bracing themselves for a defeat. very much against the a narrow victory over the brexit party — a majority of 683 — odds. jeremy corbyn was delighted. with the conservatives in third place. the result seemed to be and relieved by the result. he was on a knife—edge all night. sometimes, the brexit party here a short while ago with lisa felt they were ahead, forbes the winner who gave an sometimes it was labour. labour supporters are delighted that impassioned speech to supporters. they've held on in this seat. although their vote has tumbled since the last general election. this a seat that used to be
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a two—horse race between labour and the conservatives. does labour take heart from this tonight, it was a two—horse race that in a general election between labour and the brexit party. situation, if the brexit vote is they are delighted that they came out in front. split between the brexit party and brexit party supporters the conservatives, that they could do rather well for the next had high hopes... government? absolutely, labour will take six out of ten voters backed brexit confidence from this. some of the here in the referendum, but, tory leadership hopefuls have been in the end, just too few rallied to the new party. using the result to say it is now the new labour mp put her victory down to not banging on about brexit. labour and jeremy corbyn who are the it did come up, but not as much main opponents and where they should people think it might have done. they care about being able to get focus their energies, that was the a gp appointment, you know, the fly tipping and the litter that's all over the community, message from matt hancock, rory the police — the lack of police on the streets, stewart. but borisjohnson, dominic drug dealing happening raab have been saying this shows without fear of being caught. these are all the issues that people regardless of the circumstances, we in peterborough spoke to me about and this is why need to leave by 31st october, i was campaigning on those issues. so labour hung on in peterborough, but a new party campaigning regardless of the costs that may on brexit has made a big impression entail. every party is reaching for — butjust not enough to secure a conclusion from the result trying the first brexit party mp. to find a line they can spend. iain watson, bbc news, peterborough.
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labour will be delighted by what has our political correspondent ben wright is in peterborough for us now. happened, considering the fact they we re happened, considering the fact they were bracing themselves for a defeat in that huddle behind you jeremy last night. it seems tactical voting potentially corbyn and lisa forbes? can have a much greater impact. what you mightjust sense do you have of tactical voting corbyn and lisa forbes? you might just be corbyn and lisa forbes? you mightjust be able to see the back of the labour leader's head. he here? some say it was not is talking to labour activists who have assembled here in the as the particularly in play. however, the rain begins in cathedral square in lib dems say they thought it was a peterborough. he is here for a celebrate of a tour of the city factor in this constituency with some remain voters going to labour centre and he hasjust to keep the brexit party out. celebrate of a tour of the city centre and he has just said two people gathered here, don't write labour off. write labour off at your some of the labour members seem to peril. he is thrilled. it could very think one of the reasons they won is easily have been nigel farage here this morning. labour won by not many because of the machinery around labour, that they could knock on the right doors, get the voters out, votes, slightly increasing the there was a a8% turnout yesterday majority from 2017. the brexit party which may not seem high compared to had high hopes of winning here. took a huge number of tory votes and 67% in 2017, but it is pretty big
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almost took the seat. but in the end labour got out its court date. for a by—election without a normal labour got out its court date. labour has a very well established general election. the other key thing for labour was the focus on machine here but churning out this key local issues, education, crime, vote and it worked and it got there majority for lisa forbes. for he health. brexit was a topic but not came to peterborough jeremy the only one. that may have allowed majority for lisa forbes. for he came to peterboroutheremy corbyn said a few words in london and this is what he said. labour to carve a distinctive path. we had a fantastic candidate, a fantastic campaign, and the people of peterborough the lib dems had a successful night rejected austerity, and rejected the a no—deal brexit being offered by the brexit party. as well, tripling their vote, they i am delighted and congratulate lisa forbes this morning. i am on the way to peterborough got 12,000 votes last night. showing to tell her that in person. do you know what, she is again some of that remain vote is going to be a bland mp. does this win kill off a second strong. but a bad night for the referendum, for labour? conservatives, not as bad as this win shows labour has support expected, not the collapse some were all across the piece, all across the country. expecting, but not the parting gift and we are ready for a general theresa may was hoping for on her election whenever it comes, final day as she leaves the and we will stop the tories taking this country into a no—deal brexit with all the threats leadership of the conservative party. thank you for that. to jobs that go with that.
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jeremy corbyn, as you can see, is 110w jeremy corbyn, as you can see, is now being chased by a scrum of large outbreaks of deadly diseases like ebola are a "new normal" photographers and if you labour according to the world health organisaiton. activists had to head off into previous outbreaks have affected small numbers of people but the peterborough to celebrate this victory. great relief, as i said, democratic republic of congo is dealing with its second largest within the labour party. this would outbreak, just three years after the world‘s have been a terrible result had they biggest outbreak ended. the world health organization says the world is lost because, you know, by—elections entering a new phase are meant to be won easily by and countries need to be prepared for new deadly epidemics. opposition parties that want to win general elections and if labour had lost a seat that they have held on dr oliverjohnson previously co—ran an ebola isolation unit and off for the last 100 years in a in 201a in sierra leone, and he joins us from johannesburg now. very close battle with the tories over decades, i think it would have reinforced the fact that many doubt with a labour in its current you have seen the horrors of this disease first hand. based on your condition could win a general election. for the tories it is a experience, why do diseases like terrible result. they were third, this turned from being outbreaks, to epidemics? two and a thousand votes the brexit that is a great question, one famous party. nigel farage, who would have been your celebrating with a great hullabaloo, spoke and reacted to the result. hullabaloo, spoke and expert said outbreaks are inevitable reacted to the result. by any measure, brexit but pandemics are optional. it is is the defining issue of our age. over 70% other people say inevitable that sometimes a new it is the issue that makes them
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outbreak will spring up, but how it decide how they are going to vote. labour won because they have data. turns from what is a village or labour won because they know who their voters are in this small community experiencing the constituency, and they managed to turn enough of them out. start of something, to expanding we had energy and enthusiasm. across a region and staying put, is but because we are so new, we had no data at all. very much about the politics and either way, two things happened last night. organisational response. the big thing here is there is a lot of one, this result, where labour snuck in by a small number. secondly, there was a national opinion poll published last night distrust amongst communities in the by yougov unbelievably putting the brexit party six points ahead response, and the government, and a in the national opinion polls. whichever way you look lot of politics at local level. that at it, something very significant is happening. issue of distrust is making it hard for the who and national government to engage and work with communities what do you think the big takeaway on the front lines. we have seen from this are for labour in terms of violence against health workers, against treatment units, because of strategy as we approach the next the fear that other things might be brexit deadline, and for the conservative leadership candidates and what their approach should be? going on, conspiracy theories. it is playing into a wider political and social scenario. look, there has been a huge discussion within labour about you can see why the who is talking whether or not it should harden its support for another referendum and about these epidemics becoming the
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it is on the suite of options that new normal. in your experience, what labour would like to see after a general election, of course. can be done to overcome those following the drubbing that they barriers, particularly that perceived that has certainly increased. withinjeremy corbyn‘s fundamental distrust and suspicion team, tom watson, emily thornbury and others, who think that this is around agencies, charities, going in and trying to give medical treatment? a couple of things are going on, the the moment for labour to go wholeheartedly for another referendum, i think had they lost who is right to raise alarm. we have here that argument would have sharpened even more and jeremy quoted bill gates saying there is a corbyn would be under massive pressure, i think, corbyn would be under massive pressure, ithink, to corbyn would be under massive pressure, i think, to shift labour's reasonable probability in the next strategy. the fact they have one 15 years we could see more than 30 here ina strategy. the fact they have one here in a seat that voted 60% for million people die of an outbreak. leave, i thinkjeremy corbyn might they are right to say these are see this as an indication of the getting worse. some of that is to do labour party's with the changing nature of the see this as an indication of the labour pa rty‘s current see this as an indication of the labour party's current position. as far as the tories go, there is at world particularly the climate the moment and effort among the change emergency, deforestation, candidates vying for the leadership we re change emergency, deforestation, were animals living, shifting the to outbid each other when it comes to outbid each other when it comes to being hard on brexit. you had way humans and animals interact, borisjohnson to being hard on brexit. you had boris johnson saying to being hard on brexit. you had borisjohnson saying whatever mosquitoes bringing new diseases to happens the uk must leave in october 31. add the brexit party won here new geographies, an increase in antibiotic drug resistance, our and totally destroy the tory vote i think it would have given impetus to
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outgoing chief medical officer has been raising the alarm many of the those calls. i think the tory party drugs we have been using for decades hq will be further believed today to protect us, are starting to no that this didn't fall to the brexit longer work because we have been party but, you know, for the overusing them. there may even be conservative party the brexit party the end of modern medicine, we could see up to 10 million deaths a year does represent almost an existential crisis. and it does for the two main by 2050 from drug resistant parties. this is a seat that has antibiotics. better research and only ever swung back and forth very, better use of antibiotics is needed. very marginal between labour and the tories any of the brexit party and we are seeing more and more almost smashed through and take it. neither of the two main parties populist governments coming into which have seen their shares of the vote yes lumped completely can be power who are playing fast and loose remotely complacent about what is with science and the truth, often going on in british politics. promoting an anti—vaccine movement. i know you are endeavouring to grab there is a political element. and a a word with jeremy i know you are endeavouring to grab a word withjeremy corbyn as you can within that scrum. as you weave your technological element. in previous way around the centre of peterborough do you think that decades, people got their information from the radio, from the tactical voting played a significant role in this by—election? government. but now people get a lot of information from whatsapp groups. fake news, fears, conspiracies can spread very quickly, for example on it is hard to say at this stage. we
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certainly saw some labour voters go to the lib dems, who are obviously whatsapp groups even in remote villages where there may not be calling for another referendum and an end to brexit. it may be though running water, but people have mobile phones. rethinking how we that ship was not as great as it might be because people did not want engage with that change in the brexit party to win. i've not information dynamic and saying we talked to enough people here to work out whether there is much tactical have to build trust. we have to build basic, strong health systems. voting going on. one reason i think the work my team has been doing is to make sure how do we make sure they did not break do is people who say they like what they say on brexit are not sure their platform eve ryo ne to make sure how do we make sure everyone can access a trained nurse, had any more to offer. and they are can go to a clinic that is open and electing a constituency mp they that has drugs. that is our primary wa nted electing a constituency mp they wanted to hear more about what the party might do for schools, local defence against these outbreaks, to services and all that sort of stuff. make sure every community has a the fact that at the moment they are functional basic health system a single one issue party with no available for everyone. that is how other, might have caused the exit you treat the start of the outbreak and the focus of your response. a party some votes. thank you. generational investment in health systems, acknowledging climate professor sirjohn curtice has change and trust are at the centre analysed the figures from yesterday's by—election. he explained their significance — of any future response and and what they could mean for any preventing the kind of pandemics future general election. being spoken about.
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roughly speaking, what you would what more can parts of the world have expected, given where the with highly developed health systems, not just in labour party stands in the national with highly developed health systems, notjust in the west but evenin systems, notjust in the west but even in urban areas in parts of polls at the moment, given what africa, this latest outbreak is in happened in this constituency in the euro election two weeks ago, the the drc. what more can areas like first thing, crucial thing to this do in terms of investment and realise, the brexit party according getting those messages you have been to the polls is a significant player talking about a cross. do you think there is an element of complacency on average. they're pulling about 2596. on average. they're pulling about from parts of the world where they 25%. but that's 25% is about seven points down what the brexit party feel they are not going to be touched potentially by these achieved nationally in the european epidemics? election two weeks ago. ergo, given that is right. there are different that the brexit party got 37% of the epidemics, emerging diseases like vote estimated in the constituency ebola that spring up from time to in the election peterborough, then time. also measles, the usa thought we would expect them to get 30% last night. end they ended up at 29. they had eliminated measles, that it conversely, the labour party, though was history, but it is coming back it is only running at 23% or so in with a vengeance. in 2010 there were the opinion polls, that is nine points up on what it achieved in the 63 cases of measles. this year there european election for the top of the have been over 900 cases in the usa, ad nine points to the 22 points that the labour party is estimated to the same across europe. there is a
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have gotte n the labour party is estimated to have gotten the convictions in the euro election you end up at 31 which level of complacency, we need to recognise old and new diseases need is exactly what labour got. 31%, by the way, is the lowest share of the to be at the forefront of our attention. we have largely stopped vote that has ever to win a investing in discovering new by—election in post—war electoral history. so here is a result that antibiotics. we need to renew that gives very clear evidence that what the polls had been telling us in the investment in new technologies. that is one part of it. in all parts of last two weeks about what the legacy the world taking this seriously, of the european elections as for westminster is actually roughly investing in really good public right. and that is a picture that says the brexit party is a health institutes, investing in new drugs, being more rational about substantial challenge, running at them. we need to recognise none of about a quarter of the vote, but us are protected unless all of us less tha n about a quarter of the vote, but less than it got in the european are protected. it is not enough to elections and that does mean that in say we in the uk have a functional any elections and that does mean that in many, many places, if you were actually to achieve that in a health system and can end there. if cou nterpa rts general election it could still lose out narrowly in many constituencies health system and can end there. if counterparts elsewhere in any just as it did in peterborough. community even within london if we equally, this also shows that... say within london, certain types of migrants can no longer access health they do better than they did in the services, we are creating pockets european elections but even so, the where these outbreaks will become 26% drop in their vote as compared rooted and a threat to all of us.
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to the general election two years this is everybody‘s business. we in ago is very, very clear evidence of how the brexit party is doing severe the global community need to damage to the conservatives recognise it is not only a prospects in any immediate general humanitarian principle to say we need good health care everywhere, it is in ourown need good health care everywhere, it is in our own interest as well and election. the conservatives will we need to redouble our efforts on have to deliver brexit before they can face it. the liberal democrats, this. measles is a good example. given a lot better than two years ago. your expense of treating ebola down a bit on where they were in the patients and what the who is saying european elections was that they equally cannot necessarily expect to do as well as they did in the wretch experience. european elections but that said, so, we should be scared. we should they are back as a significant be concerned. this is a great player. at the moment come across moment, the who is right to raise the uk as a whole, for westminster, this concern. it has to be at the we have four parties, all of whom are not that far apart from each forefront of our political agenda, other and we now await to see over climate change, investing in the the course of the summer weather nhs, health systems around the this legacy of the european election world, in overseas and aid, that has remains in place or whether the support for brexit, and may be the to be front and centre. only a democrats, does actually fall away. at the moment, very clear legacy was century ago, 1918, spanish not as dramatic as the european influenza, that killed up to 100 election but more than enough to million people around the world,
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disturb the regular rhythms of british 2—party politics. more people than the second world war. we have to be alert to the fact theresa may officially stands down as leader of the conservative party today. these outbreaks are of serious she announced her resignation last concern. we have the solutions that month, but will remain we have to take action. but climate in downing street as prime minister until her successor has been chosen. the race to find the next leader change front and centre, health officially begins next week, systems front and centre. without although 11 mps have already that we are at risk and we should be announced they will be running for thejob. we can go to westminster now alarmed. and talk to our political really interesting to talk to you, correspondentjessica parker. thank you for your time today. thank you. in any other week, the leader of one of our main parties standing down or breaking news from the courts, a woman who killed her husband in a remaining is by ministerfor the hammer attack after what was said to moment would be a really big deal but in the week we've had with the be decades of emotional abuse, has had her murder conviction reduced to trump visit and the d—day anniversary, this all feels rather manslaughter, on the grounds of low— key. yes, and it is going to be low—key. we are not expecting any kind of big diminished responsibility. this is sally challen, 65, she appealed moment. we're not going to see against her murder conviction, the theresa may onto the steps of downing street to make some big conviction for killing her husband speech. downing street saying, look, that happened a couple of weeks ago
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richard in august 2010. here she is when she announced she would be with her two sons who had been her standing down. what we will see perhaps later on although it is not supporters throughout this process. clear whether we will get sight of them yet, is an exchange of letters and today, sally challen has had her between theresa may and the chairs murder conviction reduced to of the backbench 1922 between theresa may and the chairs of the backbench1922 committee manslaughter on the grounds of outlining her resignation. and that diminished responsibility. she said is when formally the call for nominations will open for them as her husband richard had subjected you are pointing out, nominations to be submitted on monday, for those her husband richard had subjected her to coercive control when, in who want to succeed. currently 11 people in the race, that figure 2010, she struck him with a hammer, could change and see people dropping at the family home in surrey. she out of peoplejoining could change and see people dropping out of people joining the race, then was in court today. we don‘t know at of voting amongst conservative mps as they whittle it down to two candidates and those two candidates this point, but given she has then set to be presented to the wider conservative party membership already served time in prison, and for a vote and ending up with the that her murder conviction has been result, the leader towards the end reduced to manslaughter, there is a ofjuly. as you say, no big moment question weather she may well be freed at this point, but we do not today. very, very low—key but it is know that at this time. earlier this significant. theresa may resigning as conservative party leader, year, the appeal court overturned staying on as prime minister until her murder conviction on the basis
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her succession is chosen and she has of new psychiatric evidence. she had gone to the queen. brexit the issue that has been her been due to face a fresh murder own doing is also a feature of the trial. but today at the old bailey, two senior conservatives who oppose a new deal brexit with potentially votes in their constituencies about the crown prosecution service said it would accept her plea of guilty to manslaughter, on the grounds of this. tell us more. we have seen this before. conservative mps, diminished responsibility. we hope potentially those who have voiced opposition to a new deal brexit who to hear from diminished responsibility. we hope to hearfrom our correspondent sarah campbell who is at the old bailey, are seen opposition to a new deal brexit who are seen by some to be a bit soft on very shortly. but let me just bring the idea of brexit, being challenged by the local conservative you again that breaking news from associations. dominic grieve, who is the old bailey that shyly! it‘s sally challen who killed her husband talking a lot about not being in ina hammer sally challen who killed her husband in a hammer attack after what was favour of brexit. he is facing a said to be decades of emotional discussion about his future by his abuse, has had her murder conviction local conservative association reduced to manslaughter, on the tonight. david gorka, who is the grounds of diminished responsibility. the crown justice secretary, facing a prosecution service today at the old potential no—confidence motion. in bailey saying it will accept her this all speaks to this wide plea of guilty to manslaughter, on attention in the conservative party. this feeling that may be at a local the grounds of diminished responsibility. this has been a very conservative association level a lot of tory members are pro—brexit and high profile case. her two sons
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what their mps to be pro—brexit and are therefore challenging them when they see them to be too inclined speaking about their mother‘s case, towards the remaining side of the and fully backing her throughout argument. these votes, though, just this process. the subject of to be clear, are not binding was that they do not automatically lead to the ousting of the sitting mp but coercive control, and its effect on it does apply quite a substantial amount of political pressure on her mental state, which has been key those individual mps and potentially course feed into the wider debate in to the changes in this case. her the conservative party about how hardline they need to be brexit and how hard—line hardline they need to be brexit and how ha rd—line potential future leaders need to be on the issue of tea m to the changes in this case. her team arguing that her husband brexit as well. richard had subjected herfor years to his coercive control, before she thank you. killed him in 2010, at the family the headlines on bbc news... labour claims a narrow win in the peterborough by—election — beating the brexit party by six—hundred—and—eighty—three home. we will go to our correspondent when votes. we can. we may not be able to do women who suffer domestic abuse are three times more likely that before one o‘clock. we will than other women to develop bring you much more detail about a serious mental illness — this case which has been a very according to new research. major changes to overdrafts will come in to effect next april — high—profile one here on bbc news. with fixed overdraft fees scrapped.
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a recap on the headlines. labour claims a narrow win in the and in sport british number one johanna conte has lost the first set peterborough by—election beating the against the czech teenager. that is brexit party by 683 votes. nigel farage called their second place significant and delivers a in the last four. she is 3—1 up in letter to downing street demanding to be involved in brexit the second set. the women's football negotiations. deadly diseases like ebola could world cup begins today. england play become the new normal, the who has scotla nd world cup begins today. england play scotland in their opening group game on sunday. and it was more semifinal heartache but england's men as they warned. lost 3—1 to the netherlands in extra time. gareth southgate's side will the us has been steadily increasing its military presence in the middle east face switzerland in the third—place since the beginning of may, play—off. i will be back at 1130. when the trump administration said join us then. it needed to send a clear message to the iranian regime that any women who suffer domestic abuse are three times more likely attack on united states interests — than other women to develop a serious mental illness, or on those of its allies — according to researchers would be met with what it called at birmingham university. "unrelenting force." data collected anonymously our defence correspondent by doctors also suggests the scale jonathan beale has been granted of violence against women access to the uss abraham lincoln, by partners is hugely under—recorded. one of the american aircraft lauren moss has more.
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carriers now stationed in the gulf. america is flexing it is described as an insidious its military muscle. crime that affects one in four women in england and wales. right up, close to iran. now new research suggests that domestic abuse is not only unrecorded by doctors, the bbc was among the first media to fly onto the uss abraham lincoln but victims are also three times since its hasty deployment here to the arabian sea. more likely to develop a mental illness. we know that over half of women that a response, says the have experienced physical or sexual trump administration, violence will meet the diagnostic to credible threats criteria for at least one mental health disorder. from the iranian regime. that can range from stress an aircraft carrier loaded with war and anxiety to ptsd to serious planes is the most potent symbol mental health conditions. of american military power, and sailing close to iran, just over the horizon, this is notjust a deterrent, domestic abuse was recorded in just it is a warning too. 0.5% of more than 90,000 anonymous patient records, far lower than crime figures indicate. the carrier and its dozens ofjets researchers say this could be the tip of the iceberg have also beenjoined by and are calling for a better long—range b—52 bombers, as well as hundreds more screening process. troops in the region. one of the reasons why this piece
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of work is so important is with such the us insists it is not significant underreporting, gps and health professionals and primary care can do a lot looking for a fight. to support survivors of domestic but to iran, this all looks like sabre—rattling on steroid. abuse and this could possibly mean so whatjustifies this response? then a huge cohort of women with a serious unmet mental health need who we could support. i am absolutely convinced the royal college of gps say doctors the intelligence was credible and that is why we‘re here. iran was going to do something bad, are highly trained to understand was going to attack us forces? there was credible intelligence and that‘s why we‘re here. the signs of domestic abuse what would happen if iran did do something? but often it can be well hidden. there would be earlier this year the government immediate consequences. published its draft they are not revealing any more domestic violence bill. details about that intelligence and, whatever the thread, this is also part of a concerted effort to try to force charities hope that these findings could influence future policy and raise awareness about the women suffering in silence who may not iran to change its behaviour. have been getting the help the trump administration has they really need. already turned its back on an international deal the national audit office says on iran‘s nuclear programme, and stepped up sanctions instead. preparing for brexit has cost the government £97 million so far. the message now is confrontation and that includes, if necessary, the use of military force. the cabinet office had said £67 million was earmarked for getting ready to leave the eu. we are not looking for war. our key mission is deterrence. much of the cash has been spent on hiring external consultants
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we are trying to add stability. because government departments lack the staff needed. the group known as the new ira has claimed it planted a bomb under however, if the united states is attacked, if our interests are attacked, the car of a senior police officer in northern ireland last then we will respond weekend. with unrelenting force. the device was discovered at a golf club with tension simmering, in east belfast, and removed the biggest fear now will be by bomb disposal experts. miscalculation by either side. in a statement to the irish news using a recognised code word, one possible reason why so far this the ‘new ira' said it was behind aircraft carrier has not sailed the attempted attack. through the narrow strait of hormuz, two cars linked to the incident the closest point to iran. were found on fire in jonathan beale, bbc news, north belfast on saturday. one of the vehicles was fitted with dublin number plates and police have begun on the uss abraham lincoln. a cross—border investigation. thirteen interviews have been let us return to the news from the carried out under caution by detectives investigating old bailey, sally challen who killed the grenfell tower fire, police say. her husband after what was said to the questioning forms part of the criminal investigation be decades of emotional abuse, has into the tower block blaze in west london, which claimed had her murder conviction reduced to the lives of 72 people. manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility. our correspondent at the court sarah scotland yard have not campbell says it means she will not disclosed how many people have been spoken to, but say more interviews are scheduled. face a retrial because of time it added thatjust over 7,100 statements have been taken from witnesses, served. our home affairs
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community and family correspondentjune served. our home affairs correspondent june kelly members, emergency services served. our home affairs correspondentjune kelly has been personnel and others. the fire happened nearly two following the case. we can see her report now. eight years ago, sally challen was years ago, injune 2017. jailed as a murderer. today, she arrived at the old bailey with her family. her two sons have always supported their mother who, from the start, admitted killing theirfather the financial watchdog has ordered ina start, admitted killing theirfather in a frenzied hammer attack. other banks to overhaul the way relatives and friends were waiting they charge for overdrafts. meet her. the financial conduct authority says the reforms are needed to fix, what it calls, "a dysfunctional market". i won‘t cry, she said. at the court one change will mean banks and building societies are stopped from charging more door, her lawyer. inside the packed for unarranged overd rafts. earlier i asked our business presenter, maryam moshiri, to explain what's happened courtroom, the prosecution announced it would accept her plea of guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of here in a bit more detail. diminished responsibility, so, no new trial. sally and richard were married for 30 years and made their home in surrey. but throughout her what the financial conduct authority has said is currently is that the £2.11 billion that banks marriage, sally was said to have make annually from overdraft been emotionally abused by her currently comes from 1.5% of customers, overwhelmingly husband. on the surface he was the from deprived areas. they have said they want to do typical suburban dad but the family something about it. there are two types of overdraft, authorised and unauthorised. say richard subjected his wife two
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authorised are agreed with a bank you will go overdrawn and you know decades of psychological abuse. what what you will be charged for that overdraft. is known as coercive control. the main problem for many people richard challenge was unfaithful arises when you get into an unauthorised overdraft charge. throughout his marriage, visiting people get charged a lot of money, brothels and even posing with they often don't know what they are being charged. glamour models on his christmas what they are saying now is banks cards. in 2009, sally finally moved will not be allowed to charge different rates for unauthorised out. said to be emotionally dependent on her husband, she overdrafts than authorised ones. appealed for a reconciliation and richard agreed. she set off for her also, they will ban banks charging a fixed daily rate, say, old family home but in her handbag £5 a day you see on your bank statement, monthly rates was a hammer. still suspicious of for an arranged overdraft. her husband, she discovered he had beenin her husband, she discovered he had been in touch with another woman. she hit him more than 20 times with the hammer. at the appeal court, her also, they will put pressure on lenders to only charge fees for refused payments in line lawyers produced new psychiatric with the actual cost to lenders. evidence sally challen was suffering they are bringing it in line from two mental disorders at the with what people can afford. time of the killing and it was said also, the average payment now is £5 per day. they are planning on bringing her condition was likely to have been made worse because she was a victim of her husband‘s coercive that down to 20p a day, control. this has only become a i think that is if your crime in recent years. now with no overdraft is £100. on the face of it, good news
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for people who do use retrial, lawyers will have to wait an overdraft facility to see coercive control tested in whether it is authorised or not. the future as a factor in a defence but the suspicion will be the banks will have to claw back this money some other way. to murder. what are the banks saying? the beauty of our system is it is the banks still have to make full of checks and balances. when a profit and the £2.11 billion a year they were making from overdrafts, parliament makes new laws as it did according to the financial conduct authority's and figures, in the case of coercive control it is an awful lot of money. is really helpful if that goes to so, the question arises, how will they make this money otherwise? court so that the judges can it has to be said these changes which are coming interpret that law. into effect in april next year, this case will lead to renewed we knew about them already. banks have been starting debate on the damage done by to make changes. we have had comments from uk finance domestic abuse when there are no which represent the banks. physical injuries. they have said overdrafts can june kelly, bbc news, at the old provide a convenient way bailey. we will have the weather forecast for customers to smooth their short—term cashflow, and there is a highly competitive coming up in a moment. market in the uk with over 96 products on offer. we would always urge customers to speak to their bank and arrange first, a border collie who was named an overdraft in advance, britain‘s fattest dog has shed dozens of pounds and found a new home. bopper the whopper to ensure payments are honoured. weighed eight stone in november last year, when she was taken into a rescue centre in plymouth. the world health organisation says bopper has since dropped down to five stone and has been rehomed. that humanity is entering a ‘new phase', where large outbreaks she still has some weight to lose, of deadly diseases like ebola have but plenty of walks on the moors
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to be considered as normal. with her new owners are keeping her it says greater effort needs to be on the road to fitness. made to prepare for epidemics, made more likely by climate change, conflict and large, mobile populations. the two largest ever outbreaks here is hoping she has many happy of ebola have taken place in africa in the past five years. walks. the weather forecast now. the weather has really gone downhill an investigation led by the united arab emirates, today. there are a few thunderstorms into sabotage attacks on four oil tankers off its coast last month, lurking. this unsettled weather is says it's very likely they were carried out by a "state actor". expected to last through the preliminary findings suggest limpet mines were attached to the vessels weekend, particularly saturday, a by divers operating from fast boats very windy day with gale force winds. this is due to this weather — an operation described in the report as highly sophisticated. the investigators don't system affecting france right now, blame a specific country, but the united states has accused damaging winds and heavy rain, and iran of being behind the attacks. our washington correspondent the northern edge of this low pressure is affecting parts of the chris buckler has more. uk. that is the heavy rain we have the details of these had so far. over the next 2a hours attacks could have come from a movie screenplay, this low pressure will drift thanks frankly, rather than official reports. it says that fast votes northwards bringing strong winds to were used to navigate southern parts of the country. the difficult waters in the gulf,
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up southern parts of the country. up to gale force. here is the rain and specialist divers were deployed this afternoon. heaviest around the from those votes to fit limpet mines midlands and wales. thunderstorms to the holes of the ship below affecting southern parts of the country and the midlands. one minute the water line. sunshine, then a downpour of thunder and pictures have now been released and lightning. this unsettled of the damage caused to the saudi, weather continues overnight, the norwegian and emirati vessels. winds will pick up especially in the you can see from the photographs the impact of those naval mines south, coming in from a westerly exploding after they have been fitted to the ships using magnets. no one was injured but suddenly they caused destruction and an operation like that direction, blowing for most of the would have required expertise, coordination and indeed day across england and wales. the intelligence about the vessels. that is why the preliminary findings of this report suggest strongest gas along the south coast what they call a state actor was probably involved. basically, an individual exceeding 15 miles an hour. possibly or organisation linked to state government. 55. inland, a0. a few have any plans while they do not name a country, suddenly, afterwards, outdoors on saturday, marquees, the ambassador to the un, from saudi arabia, suggested as far as he was concerned, tents, it will be blowing around with strong winds for the time of iran bore responsibility. year. some sunshine around, not raining
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all the time. plenty of showers and that echoes some of what has been suggested by the white house national security adviser here in washington, across northern areas. saturday evening, the winds will die down and john bolton, who pointed the finger very firmly at tehran. it should be pointed out that has the weather will slowly improve. been firmly denied by iran itself. into sunday, that no pressure is out one of its allies at the un, russia, said that no evidence had been presented during this closed—door of the way, it moves across briefing to show that iran had been involved. scandinavia. the winds will be much nonetheless, you can imagine that this report lighter on sunday, still a breeze is going to heighten tensions in the region. and showers brewing. sunday is it will also fuel concerns in washington about tehran. suddenly looking a lot better. temperatures could still get up to fifty years on, the head of the new york police 20 degrees in london. department has apologised next week, in a word, unsettled. for a notorious raid on a gay bar, that led to riots and was a major catalyst for the gay rights movement. injune 1969 new york police raided the stonewall inn to enforce laws against serving alcohol to homosexuals. the trouble is reported to have begun when a lesbian — who was being arrested — shouted at others ‘why don't you do something?‘ the police commissioner has said the force's actions
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were wrong, pure and simple. the award—winning american musician, drjohn, has died of a heart attack at the age of 77. he was an influential member of the new orleans music scene, and created a unique blend of blues, pop and psychedelic rock that won him six grammy awards. he was an influential member of the new orleans music scene, and created a unique blend of blues, pop and psychedelic rock that won him six grammy awards. he had an american top ten hit in 1973 with "right place, wrong time". now it's time for a look at the weather. it is not looking too great today. we have got an area of low pressure bringing some wet and windy weather in from the south. you can see it here on the radar, that rain quite
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heavy and persistent, pushing its way north through this morning and threw this afternoon it will continue to work its way north. across parts of wales, into northern a woman who killed her husband and a england, southern and central parts hammer attack after years of abuse of scotland. perhaps into eastern areas of northern ireland later in will not face a retrial. her murder the day put up for northern scotland and western parts of northern ireland some sunny spells and the temperatures reaching a maximum of conviction was quashed. we‘ll have around 18. a bit of clearance the very latest from the old bailey. further south. with that some gusty winds and the potential for some also this lunchtime... lisa forbes quite heavy, thundery downpours later in the day. they could cause a is duly elected. labour sees off a strong challenge little bit of disruption. it does push its way north and east, though, by nigel farage‘s brexit party winning the peterborough by—election as we move into tomorrow. there will be clouding our base of a with a slim majority. particularly for northern and central parts of tomorrow. a fairly windy day in the showers and central lawyers for boris johnson tell the high court the attempt spells. the easy for sunday, though, to prosecute him for allegedly lying with sunny spells and showers. about brexit should be thrown out.
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hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines.
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labour wins the peterborough by—election — seeing off a challenge from the brexit party with a slim majority. we had a fantastic candidate, a fantastic campaign, and the people of peterborough rejected austerity, and rejected the no—deal brexit being offered by the brexit party. i am delighted and congratulate lisa forbes this morning. brexit is the defining issue of our age. labour won because they have data. labour have won because they know who their voters are in this constituency, and they managed to turn enough of them out. the conservatives came third — as theresa may formally stands down as party leader but stays on as prime minister for now. women who suffer domestic abuse are three times more likely than other women to develop a serious mental illness — according to new research. major changes to overdrafts as banks and building societies are told they can no longer charge fixed overdraft fees.
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sport now. good morning. let's bring you up—to—date with events in paris first wherejohanna konta's playing in the semifinals of the french open. it's not gone too well so far against the czech teenager marketa vondrousova. konta lost the first set despite having a couple of chances to win it herself. but the british number one got an early break in the second and she currently leads by 4—3. it's live now on bbc radio five live and via the bbc sport webiste. and later we have the men's semifinal between roger federer and rafael nadal. the women's world cup kicks off in paris later with the hosts france taking on south korea, before scotland and england begin their campaigns when the two sides meet in nice on sunday, and jane dougall is there. we are here because both the england and scotland caps have their base here. both team hotels are across
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from this beach, not a bad time to have down time. it starts tonight in paris at the parc des princes where the hosts take on south korea, sold out, 48,000 the hosts take on south korea, sold out, 118,000 people will watch as they play each other. france are probably one of the favourites of the tournament possibly because so many of their squad played for the current holders of the champions league. we have to say england are one of the favourites for the tournament as well. they arrived on tuesday, trained on wednesday and there is a genuine belief within the camp they can go at least one better than four years ago in canada, the semifinals. for scotland, the first time they have qualified for a world cup, theiraim is time they have qualified for a world cup, their aim is to get into the group stages. they face each other on sunday. a huge amount of interest. no one can discount the usa, world number ones, favourite for this tournament, such a dangerous side and they raised their game in tournaments. the difference
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with this world cup is visibility and publicity, almost 1 with this world cup is visibility and publicity, almost1 million tickets have been sold and it starts tonight in paris, coverage is live on the bbc. gareth southgate says his england side won't abandon their style — despite a couple of real defensive clangers ruining their chances of winning the nations league. they lost their semifinal 3—1 to the netherlands in portugal, and natalie pirks was watching. it may not have been the world cup but there was a trophy at stake, leading the nation out was raheem sterling as a reward for his 50th cap. and with harry kane dropped... marcus rashford stepped up. but the dutch were building pressure, and looking to make amends for a mistake. but then drama, england were back in the lead and fans went wild. var did its thing. mere centimetres denying england the winner. with extra time looming, england were playing with fire. john stones's moment of madness gave the dutch the lead.
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and it was put beyond doubt in the dying minutes of extra time with yet another mistake. 3—1 the final score, england out, at the same stage as 12 months ago. this semifinal defeat won't hurt nearly as much as russia but england were the architects of their own downfall here. the wait for a trophy continues. natalie pirks, bbc news. a couple of stories to bring you from chelsea this morning. they've gone to the court of arbitration for sport to appeal their two—window transfer ban. they're not allowed to buy new players until the end of january next year, and failed with their first appeal to fifa. it's all to do with an investigation into signing foreign players who are under 18. meanwhile, eden hazard is on the verge of leaving chelsea. he's expected to complete a move to real madrid in the next few days in a deal worth around £88 million. not the huge fee that you might expect with his contract at stamford bridge due to expire next year. one game at the cricket
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world cup today. pakistan playing sri lanka in bristol, but it's been delayed by rain. when it does start you can follow it on the bbc sport website and app. and i can tell you johanna konta is serving for the second set, it looks like she is back in. and the warning from the who that the world is entering a new phase where outbreaks of deadly diseases will become the new normal, diseases like ebola. why is the who issuing this warning which frankly is pretty scary? yesterday, i asked them. we have
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seen the two biggest ebola outbreaks in human history, the west african outbreak, 28,000 people, that finished three years ago. the democratic republic of the congo is dealing with another large ebola outbreak affecting 2,000 people. some estimates suggesting this could be going on in two years. my be going on in two years. my question was why have outbreaks been so small and yet are so big now? the response is we are entering a new phase where these high impact epidemics will become far more common and we have to accept this is the new normal, it won't change. we will see large outbreaks of ebola, colour and yellow fever. tell us about the current outbreak in africa, are any of the lessons learned from the outbreak which ended three years ago being applied to limit the effects of this outbreak? the biggest thing the previous outbreak has benefited from is the
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vaccine, the trials at the end of the large outbreak showed it was effective. the vaccine has been used, 130,000 people have been vaccinated to contain this virus in congo. there is no doubt we will be facing a significantly larger outbreak if it wasn't for that vaccine. things have progressed since the last time a bowler reared its head. so many challengers are the same, some particularly complicated in the drc. there is a lot of conflict in the region, a lot of attacks on health care facilities and health ca re health care facilities and health care workers, some have died as part of it. there are significant challenges each time you go into one of these areas, getting trust between the people who are flying in, and the local populations. it is a big challenge still in the drc. what does the who propose it should be done, what should the response be globally?
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you use the word response. we need to change our focus away from responding each time there is a new outbreak rearing, we need to be thinking strategically, how do we prepare better, how do we minimise the risk? so it isn't the case of pressing the panic button to react. it is about being better prepared. how do we deal with nipper virus emerging in india, what about new infections? it is about how we prepare for the next wave of diseases, the next large outbreaks so the world is in a better position now rather than waiting until something happens. does the who say whether there is any sense of greater complacency in the western world, although clearly it warns with ease of global movement, potentially there is that
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scenario where diseases can be spread quite easily and over long distances? there is no doubt many of these things we are seeing, driving the risk of these outbreaks, are obvious. with larger populations that move more freely around the world, we can see more infections appearing and spreading. if you look at what is happening in the drc, the wit who would say it has not enough money to deal with this effectively. a fraction that it would take to finish off this outbreak. there is concern not enough countries are giving the money needed to deal with this. james, thank you very much. our health and science correspondent.
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we can go to downing street where the leader of the brexit party, nigel farage, and the brexit party mep richard tice, say they are delivering a letter to number 10 calling for the brexit party to be added to the government's negotiating team. the party has meps but no mps, their candidate being defeated narrowly by 683 votes in the peterborough by—election overnight. although, at times, it was difficult to tell whether it would be labour or the brexit party candidate who would win. in the end, it was labour. nigel farage in that letter, suggesting the brexit party should be included in brexit negotiations. i wonder if that came up in his conversation with president trump earlier in the week. we can hear
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what nigel farage had to say to reporters. on the 31st of october, we will see if we can leave. let us be ready for it, be prepared. we have a lot of experience in negotiations. we have got 55 days now of total impasse while the government spends its time working out who the next prime minister is. we only have less than five months when we are due to leave. we would love to help now. we are not a protest party. we want responsibility, we want to get involved. yesterday, you lost in peterborough. did we? if you think 29% is losing. from nowhere, we produced a
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phenomenal result. if you look at the opinion polls, they showed us six points in the lead across the country. astonishing figures for an organisation we launched eight weeks ago today. what, who do you think will be the next leader of the conservative party? i haven't got a clue. can i ask about your meeting with president trump, what did you say? how was your meeting?” trump, what did you say? how was your meeting? i do meet him a couple of times a year. i am a friend of his, i get on well with him. i won't discuss the content of it. he was on great form, very brilliant, loving his trip to the uk, making the point of all the american presidents he is the one with the closest link here. he is offering as a generous negotiation towards a free trade deal with the usa, without single market rules, without a foreign court having any
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say over us. given how difficult things have proved with brussels, maybe we should be thinking if we go with wto terms, there is a big world out there. we have sold off our water, gas and public utilities to french and german companies and they themselves have bid for nhs services. when a trade negotiation, it starts with everything on the table, and you take things. if we feel we don't want american firms tendering for nhs services, we take away. why did you decide not to be in the same group as mr sal vini in the european parliament? we decided being in that group is not for us. there are some successful parties there, i won't be derogatory about them. but politically the brexit party is more centrist.
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the truth is, with the different cultures around europe, no one country is the same as the other. we have put together a coalition of formerly conservatives and formally labour. nigel farage in downing street, he arrived there a few minutes ago saying the brexit party would love to start helping now with brexit negotiations. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. labour claims a narrow win in the peterborough by—election — beating the brexit party by 683 votes. women who suffer domestic abuse are three times more likely than other women to develop a serious mental illness — according to new research. major changes to overdrafts will come in to effect next april — with fixed overdraft fees scrapped. time now for the business news.
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bank overdraft fees are to undergo a major shake—up, which the uk financial regulator is calling the biggest overhaulfor a generation. banks and building societies will no longer be allowed to charge fixed daily or monthly fees for overd rafts. the uk's financial regulator "should have been awake" to problems at neil woodford's investment fund, according to former city minister lord myners. the peer said the financial conduct authority failed to spot "clear warning signs, that things were going badly". mr woodford, one of the uk's best—known stockpickers, suspended his largest fund this week after rising numbers of investors asked for their money back. more in a moment. the competition and markets authority says it is planning to extend protection for four million prepayment customers beyond the end of 2020. the prepayment price cap was initially expected to be in place until the end of 2020 by which time the cma said it had expected the roll—out of smart meters to be
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"substa ntially completed". last week, neil woodford, one of the best—known stockpickers in the uk, suspended his largest fund this week after rising numbers of investors asked for their money back. today, former city minister lord myners has said the uk's financial regulator "should have been awake" to problems at the fund. on monday, mr woodford stopped people from taking their money out of the woodford equity income fund. he said the move was "necessary to protect investors‘ interests" after they withdrew about £560 million from the fund over four weeks. ian sayers is the chief eexecutive of the association of investment companies. you have written about this and said basically about the dangers of retail investment in open—ended funds, what are the dangers? i don't think there is any problem
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with open—ended funds as such but the problem that arose with this one wasn't just the fact there were lots of people who wanted to take their money out, it was the type of investments neil had made, some of those assets were quite hard to sell and in the structure he was using, ifa and in the structure he was using, if a lot of people want their money back, eventually, the fund manager has to sell those assets to get the cash to return it to shareholders. if those are hard to sound like unlisted companies, smaller company shares, you get a problem which is why the fund is suspended to give time to the fund manager to give time to the fund manager to give time to the fund manager to give time to sell those in an orderly fashion but not in a fire sale. that is there to protect investors. the question we are asking, because we don't represent that kind of fund structure, is whether or not there was a better structure you could have put those assets into. can you jargon buster for viewers wondering what an open—ended fund is? if you want to invest in that fund,
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you hand over the money to the fund manager and they invest it into assets so the fund gets better, there is more money going in. if you wa nt there is more money going in. if you want your money back, the money will come out of the fund, the manager has to sell assets. the fund is co nsta ntly has to sell assets. the fund is constantly getting bigger and smaller which is why it is open—ended. my association represents close ended funds, we don't have to sell assets to give money back to shareholders, our shares are traded on the stock market, that has no impact on the underlying portfolio. the london stock market is one of the most successful in the world. you don't worry about hoarding these hard to sell assets. our question to regulators is to stop this problem emerging again, would it be better to use a structure that is purpose—built to hold these harder to sell assets. given what has happened this time and in the past, what do you think the next move should be?
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you are right to say this has happened before, not with the type of fund neil is running but open—ended property funds, after the financial crisis, after the brexit referendum when people thought property wasn't a good asset class. there have been warning signs. you need to look at the whole structure of how products are structured. we have said if you are going to invest in harder to sell assets, the product, the provider should justify which structure to use, open or close ended, and explain to consumers why you have made that choice. there are lots of good reasons to put it in a close ended structure but the majority of money has gone into open ended. there have been problems in the past and i'm afraid there will be more in the future. the rules the radiator has put in place since brexit referendum will make suspensions more common —— the brexit regulator.
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thank you, good to have you on the programme. preparing for brexit has cost the uk government £97 million in consultancy fees, the national audit office has revealed. the money has been spent on hiring external experts because government departments lack the staff and skills needed, the nao said. it criticised the government for a lack of transparency, saying details of contracts had not been published in a timely fashion. house prices rose 5.2% in may on an annual measure, according to halifax, the uk's biggest mortgage lender — which shows on a monthly basis, house prices rose by 0.5%. the news from halifax, part of lloyds banking group, contradicts other house price surveys which show a stagnant property market. bad news from the factories of germany. industrial production was down 1.9% in aprilfrom the previous month — the biggest decline in four years.
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economists had been expecting a much more modest decline of 0.5%. a quick look at the markets before we go. the london markets are up sharply. sharp rises in shell and bp shares helped britain's main stock index gain for the fifth consecutive session on friday, as signs of a softening in the us—mexico trade tensions lifted markets globally. we are expecting tariffs on mexican goods to be implemented on monday. this is reflected in share prices at the moment. that's all the business news. let us return to the peterborough by—election and the labour candidate beating the brexit party candidate by 683 votes. the labour leaderjeremy
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corbyn has been spending the morning in peterborough to congratulate the party's newest mp for the city lisa forbes. speaking as crowds gathered near the main square mr corbyn said the party will stop the tories taking this country to a no—deal brexit. i want to say a big thank you to all of our fantastic labour team who worked so hard throughout this campaign, and so hard yesterday to encourage labour supporters to come out and vote. what we did was offered the politics of hope, not the politics of fear. we offered the politics of hope to end austerity, to fund our schools properly, to employ our police properly, to give our young people a future in this country. that is what this is all about. everybody, all the experts wrote
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lisa off, all the experts wrote labour off. write labour off at your peril! we are strong, we are very determined to offer that politics that invests in decent services, in decent housing, decent health care, and good quality jobs decent housing, decent health care, and good qualityjobs for the future. and a relationship with europe that doesn't take us over a cliff edge, that protects jobs, protects investment, and gives our young people their future. yesterday, the labour party came together on the streets of peterborough. the labour party came together in this campaign. and on the day that theresa may ceases to be leader of the conservative party, my message is to all the squabbling contenders for the tory party leadership, bring it on! we are ready for a general election!
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jeremy corbyn in peterborough a little earlier. a border collie who was named britain's fattest dog has shed dozens of pounds and found a new home. bopper the whopper weighed eight stone in november last year, when she was taken into a rescue centre in plymouth. bopper has since dropped down to five stone and has been rehomed. she still has some weight to lose, but plenty of walks on the moors with her new owners are keeping her on the road to fitness. we hope she will be very happy in her new home. now it's time for a look at the weather. we have got some wet and windy weather in the forecast over the
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next 24—hour is. you can see rain working its way north. heavy and persistent, pushing northwards, courtesy of this area of low pressure. pushing northwards, bringing heavy and persistent rain and gusty winds. this afternoon, that rain continues northwards into northern england and eastern parts of northern ireland and central southern parts of scotland. further north, some sunny spells and one or two showers for northern scotland, western northern ireland. temperatures up to 18 degrees. we will see brighter weather feeding in further south. the rain will persist in south—west england and western wales. with more brightness we will see heavy and thundery downpours moving from the
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south, the winds picking up, gusts of 55 mph in the south. that low pressure continues to move northwards this evening. further rain to come. a cloudy night with outbreaks of rain and showers, the rain is persistent through southern scotland, northern england, wales and northern ireland. a scattering of showers. temperatures are generally up to 11 degrees. moving into saturday, we still have that area of low pressure bringing outbreaks of rain, and blustery conditions. mainly cloudy in the north and central england, further showers and spells of rain. further south, sunny spells and showers. a blustery day. we could see gusts of 55 miles an hour. temperatures up to 18 degrees. that area of low pressure clears out
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towards the north east moving into sunday. that means we will see things settling down. there will still be showery outbreaks of rain first thing particularly in the north and west. more in the way of sunshine. a scattering of showers through the day. the winds will be lighter. temperatures at a maximum of 20 degrees in the south—east. goodbye.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live — these are today's main stories: labour wins the peterborough by—election — seeing off a challenge from the brexit party with a slim majority. what we did was offer the politics of hope not the politics of fear! nigel farage because their second play significant dent delivers a letter to number ten. we've only got less than five months until we are due to leave and we would love to start helping now. this is a saying to you we actually
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wa nt this is a saying to you we actually want responsibility, we want to get involved. deadly diseases like ebola could become the "new normal" — the world health organization has warned. major changes to overdrafts — as banks and building societies are told they can no longer charge fixed overdraft fees. the women's world cup begins in paris today — with hosts france taking on south korea. and britain's player crashes out of the french open. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. labour has narrowly won the peterborough by—election — holding off a challenge from the brexit party. union activist lisa forbes
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took 31% of the vote, beating the brexit party's mike greene by 683 votes. the conservatives came third with 21%, while the liberal democrats were fourth with 12%. the by—election was held after labour mp fiona onasanya was ousted after she was convicted for lying over a speeding offence. more now from our political correspondent iain watson. a result that seemed to be on a knife—edge. i do hereby declare that lisa forbes is duly elected... cheering and applause. but it was labour that cut through. a narrow victory over the brexit party — a majority of 683 — with the conservatives in third place. the result seemed to be on a knife—edge all night. sometimes, the brexit party felt they were ahead, sometimes it was labour. labour supporters are delighted that they've held on in this seat. although their vote has tumbled
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since the last general election. this a seat that used to be a two—horse race between labour and the conservatives. tonight, it was a two—horse race between labour and the brexit party. they are delighted that they came out in front. brexit party supporters had high hopes... six out of ten voters backed brexit here in the referendum, but, in the end, just too few rallied to the new party. the new labour mp put her victory down to not banging on about brexit. it did come up, but not as much people think it might have done. they care about being able to get a gp appointment, you know, the fly tipping and the litter that's all over the community, the police — the lack of police on the streets, drug dealing happening without fear of being caught. these are all the issues that people in peterborough spoke to me about and this is why i was campaigning on those issues. so labour hung on in peterborough, but a new party campaigning on brexit has made a big impression — butjust not enough to secure the first brexit party mp. iain watson, bbc news, peterborough.
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mr corbyn said the win for labour shows the party cannot be written off in shows the party cannot be written offina shows the party cannot be written off in a future general election. i want to say a big thank you to lou, vernon, holly, teddy, to all of our fantastic labour team who worked so hard throughout this campaign, and so hard yesterday to encourage labour supporters to come out and vote. what we did was offered the politics of hope, not the politics of fear. we offered the politics of hope to end austerity, to fund our schools properly, to employ our police properly, to give our young people a future in this country. that is what this is all about. everybody, all the experts wrote lisa off, all
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the experts wrote labour off. write labour off at your peril! nigel farage says despite labour's when brexit is still the dominant issue in voters minds. by any measure, brexit is the defining issue of our age. over 70% other people say it is the issue that makes them decide how they are going to vote. labour won because they have data. labour won because they know who their voters are in this constituency, and they managed to turn enough of them out. we had energy and enthusiasm. but because we are so new, we had no data at all. either way, two things happened last night. one, this result, where labour snuck in by a small number. secondly, there was a national opinion poll published last night by yougov unbelievably putting the brexit party six points ahead
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in the national opinion polls. whichever way you look at it, something very significant is happening. our correspondent navtej johal is in peterborough for us now. calling for the brexit party to be pa rt calling for the brexit party to be part of the brexit negotiating team. the letter says the electorate have asked for us to come into the negotiating team and we are ready to do so immediately. in addition, nigel farage calls for an immediate review of the state of the government's no deal preparations that there is no further delay to brexit be on the 31st of october. it has also addressed to the 11 candidates standing for the tory leadership. and one of those is michael gove who has given his reaction. the environment secretary and contenderfor the reaction. the environment secretary and contender for the conservative leadership says the result shows how
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important it is for his party to deliver brexit. i'm very sorry that our excellent candidate did not win in the peterborough by—election put up you would have made a superb mp and the result reminds us of the vital importance of delivering brexit and the vital importance of making sure we have a strong conservative government that can prevent jeremy corbyn from getting into downing street and ruining this country. professor sirjohn curtice has analysed the figures from yesterday's by—election. he explained their significance — and what they could mean for any future general election. roughly speaking, what you would have expected, given where the labour party stands in the national polls at the moment, given what happened in this constituency in the euro election two weeks ago, the first thing, crucial thing to realise, the brexit party according to the polls is a significant player on average. they're pulling about 25%.
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but that's 25% is about seven points down what the brexit party achieved nationally in the european election two weeks ago. ergo, given that the brexit party got 37% of the vote estimated in the constituency in the election peterborough, then we would expect them to get 30% last night. end they ended up at 29. conversely, the labour party, though it is only running at 23% or so in the opinion polls, that is nine points up on what it achieved in the european election for the top of the ad nine points to the 22 points that the labour party is estimated to have gotten the convictions in the euro election you end up at 31 which is exactly what labour got. 31%, by the way, is the lowest share of the vote that has ever to win a by—election in post—war electoral history. so here is a result that gives very clear evidence that what the polls had been telling us in the last two weeks about what the legacy of the european elections as for westminster is
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actually roughly right. and that is a picture that says the brexit party is a substantial challenge, running at about a quarter of the vote, but less than it got in the european elections and that does mean that in many, many places, if you were actually to achieve that in a general election it could still lose out narrowly in many constituencies just as it did in peterborough. equally, this also shows that... they do better than they did in the european elections but even so, the 26% drop in their vote as compared to the general election two years ago is very, very clear evidence of how the brexit party is doing severe damage to the conservatives prospects in any immediate general election. the conservatives will have to deliver brexit before they can face it. the liberal democrats, a lot better than two years ago. down a bit on where they were in the european elections was that they equally cannot necessarily expect to do as well as they did in the european elections but that said,
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they are back as a significant player. at the moment come across the uk as a whole, for westminster, we have four parties, all of whom are not that far apart from each other and we now await to see over the course of the summer weather this legacy of the european election remains in place or whether the support for brexit, and may be the democrats, does actually fall away. at the moment, very clear legacy was not as dramatic as the european election but more than enough to disturb the regular rhythms of british 2—party politics. theresa may officially stands down as leader of the conservative party today. she announced her resignation last month, but will remain in downing street as prime minister until her successor has been chosen. the race to find the next leader officially begins next week, although eleven mps have already announced they will be running for thejob.
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the west midlands‘ mayor, andy street, says protests against lgbt teaching at a birmingham primary school are homophobic and illegal. demonstrations have been taking place outside anderton park school in the sparkhill area of the city since january. in his first interview about the protests, mr street told the bbc they don‘t reflect the "modern, tolerant inclusive place that birmingham is". our correspondent, sima kotecha, is in birmingham. this follows on from the schools minister saying something fairly similar yesterday. tell us more about what he has been telling you. andy street, the mayor of the west midlands today gave his first interview on this incredibly controversial issue that has been taking place in birmingham but making headlines across the world. in the interview, he said that the protests had been homophobic and that they must stop now. you said
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that they must stop now. you said that they must stop now. you said that they were deeply upsetting and he is gay himself and he said that they had actually affected him personally because he said he did not realise that homosexuality was still an issue for some communities in the city which he loves very deeply. he also called on the department for education to make its guidance clearer about what schools should do in regard to equality, teaching and in line with what nick gibb said in the times yesterday said that he was very much aware of what was going on and he felt that people needed to come out in support of the school rather than stay silent. he was a snippet from the interview which we carried out shortly, a while ago. so if you look at the literature and the balance, the first reaction is disbelief, actually. just can't credit that it could be said in this day and age. look at what is being said and it's really upsetting but it is actually, ultimately
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homophobic. and that is illegal and it has to stop. now. so no ambiguity there whatsoever. incredibly clear about how he feels about this debate and the pink for him, as! about this debate and the pink for him, as i said, it is a very personal issue. it is something has been sitting along on the sidelines, witnessing what has been taking place about not getting involved was a bandstand he had a meeting with the head teacher from anderson park primary yesterday in which they had a very intimate discussion about how they could move forward with this. today there are further protests taking place, just meeting away from the park. a week ago an injunction was put in place which bans parents and campaigners from protesting immediately outside the school, but they are now protesting just outside of that exclusion zone. that is taking place this afternoon and remember, for them, the argument is about it‘s not being age appropriate
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for primary school children to be taught about lgbt relationships. thank you. more on today‘s main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. the group known as the new ira has claimed it planted a bomb under the car of a senior police officer in northern ireland last weekend. the device was discovered at a golf club in east belfast, and removed by bomb disposal experts. in a statement to the irish news using a recognised code word, the new ira said it was behind the attempted attack. two cars linked to the incident were found on fire in north belfast on saturday. one of the vehicles was fitted with dublin number plates and police have begun a cross—border investigation. 13 interviews have been carried out under caution by detectives investigating the grenfell tower fire, police say.
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the questioning forms part of the criminal investigation into the tower block blaze in west london, which claimed the lives of 72 people. scotland yard have not disclosed how many people have been spoken to, but say more interviews are scheduled. it added thatjust over 7,100 statements have been taken from witnesses, community and family members, emergency services personnel and others. the fire happened nearly two years ago, injune 2017. the headlines on bbc news. labour claims a narrow win, beating the brexit party by 683 votes. nigel farage because their second play significant and delivers a letter to number ten demanding to be involved in the brexit negotiating team. deadly diseases like ebola could become the new normal, the world health organization has warned.
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bad news for the british number one. she lost her semifinal she had chances to win both sets. britain still waiting for a female finalist ina grand still waiting for a female finalist in a grand slam. the last person to do that was at wimbledon in 1977. roger federer is at quartet rafi in the dial in their last tie. nadal has in that first set. the women‘s world cup kicks off later with france taking on south korea. fans are joint favourites. france taking on south korea. fans arejoint favourites. you can france taking on south korea. fans are joint favourites. you can watch live on bbc one. it is also on bbc five live for you. it is the eighth time at the tournament has been held in almost1 million tickets have
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been sold so far. the us are the reigning champions in the most successful cou ntry, reigning champions in the most successful country, having won it three times before. gareth southgate says his england men‘s side will not abandon their style despite some defensive clangers ruining their chances of winning. gifting the dutch the lead after it finished one all in normal time. and then, with just a few minutes to go, ross barkley, also made a costly mistake in his box and that result means the netherlands play portugal in the final. england have a third or fourth place play—off against switzerland. it was, you know, tough to take in the end. because you get into a semifinal and it should be a positive but of course everybody leaves even more deflated and i can understand that but i‘ve got to look at the bigger picture of what the players have given me and the way that they‘ve tried incredibly for their country.
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stories from chelsea. they‘ve gone to appeal their two window transfer ban is that they‘re not allowed to buy new players into the end of january next year and failed with their first january next year and failed with theirfirst appeal. january next year and failed with their first appeal. this also gives an investigation into signing foreign players who are under the age of 18. meanwhile, the bad news continues the chelsea. one player on the verge of leaving the club. a deal worth around £88 million. not fee that you might expect. that is all this but for now. we will have more in the next hour. see you then. thank you. women who suffer domestic abuse are three times more likely than other women to develop a serious mental illness, according to researchers at birmingham university. data collected anonymously by doctors also suggests the scale of violence against women by partners is hugely under—recorded. lauren moss has more. it is described as an insidious crime that affects one in four women in england and wales.
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now new research suggests that domestic abuse is not only unrecorded by doctors, but victims are also three times more likely to develop a mental illness. we know that over half of women that have experienced physical or sexual violence will meet the diagnostic criteria for at least one mental health disorder. that can range from stress and anxiety to ptsd to serious mental health conditions. domestic abuse was recorded in just 0.5% of more than 90,000 anonymous patient records, far lower than crime figures indicate. researchers say this could be the tip of the iceberg and are calling for a better screening process. one of the reasons why this piece of work is so important is with such significant underreporting, gps and health professionals and primary care can do a lot to support survivors of domestic abuse and this could possibly mean then a huge cohort of women with a serious unmet mental health
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need who we could support. the royal college of gps say doctors are highly trained to understand the signs of domestic abuse but often it can be well hidden. earlier this year the government published its draft domestic violence bill. charities hope that these findings could influence future policy and raise awareness about the women suffering in silence who may not have been getting the help they really need. the financial watchdog has ordered banks to overhaul the way they charge for overdrafts. the financial conduct authority says the reforms are needed to fix, what it calls, "a dysfunctional market". one change will mean banks and building societies are stopped from charging more for unarranged overd rafts. earlier i asked our business presenter, maryam moshiri, to explain what‘s happened here in a bit more detail. what the financial conduct authority has said currently said is that the £2.11 billion that banks make annually from overdraft
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currently comes from 1.5% of customers, overwhelmingly from deprived areas. they have said they want to do something about it. there are two types of overdraft, authorised and unauthorised. authorised are agreed with a bank you will go overdrawn and you know what you will be charged for that overdraft. the main problem for many people arises when you get into an unauthorised overdraft charge. people get charged a lot of money, they often don‘t know what they are being charged. what they are saying now is banks will not be allowed to charge different rates for unauthorised overdrafts than authorised ones. also, they will ban banks charging a fixed daily rate, say, £5 a day you see on your bank statement, monthly rates for an arranged overdraft. also, they will put pressure on lenders to only charge fees for refused payments in line with the actual cost to lenders. they are bringing it in line with what people can afford. also, the average payment
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now is £5 per day. they are planning on bringing that down to 20p a day, i think that is if your overdraft is over £100. on the face of it, good news for people who do use an overdraft facility whether it is authorised or not. but the suspicion will be the banks will have to claw back this money some other way. what are the banks saying? the banks still have to make a profit and the £2.11 billion a year they were making from overdrafts, according to the financial conduct authority‘s and figures, is an awful lot of money. so, the question arises, how will they make this money otherwise? it has to be said these changes which are coming into effect in april next year, we knew about them already. banks have been starting to make changes. we have had comments from uk finance which represent the banks. they have said overdrafts can provide a convenient way for customers to smooth their short—term cashflow, and there is a highly competitive market in the uk with over 96
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products on offer. we would always urge customers to speak to their bank and arrange an overdraft in advance, to ensure payments are honoured. an investigation led by the united arab emirates, into sabotage attacks on four oil tankers off its coast last month, says it‘s very likely they were carried out by a "state actor". preliminary findings suggest limpet mines were attached to the vessels by divers operating from fast boats — an operation described in the report as highly sophisticated. the investigators don‘t blame a specific country, but the united states has accused iran of being behind the attacks. our washington correspondent chris buckler has more. the details of these attacks could have come from a movie screenplay, thanks frankly, rather than official reports. it says that fast votes were used to navigate the difficult waters in the gulf,
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and specialist divers were deployed from those votes to fit limpet mines to the holes of the ship below the water line. and pictures have now been released of the damage caused to the saudi, norwegian and emirati vessels. you can see from the photographs the impact of those naval mines exploding after they have been fitted to the ships using magnets. no one was injured but suddenly they caused destruction and an operation like that would have required expertise, coordination and indeed intelligence about the vessels. that is why the preliminary findings of this report suggest what they call a state actor was probably involved. basically, an individual or organisation linked to state government. while they do not name a country, suddenly, afterwards, the ambassador to the un, from saudi arabia, suggested as far as he was concerned, iran bore responsibility. and that echoes some of what has been suggested by the white house national security adviser here in washington, john bolton, who pointed the finger very firmly at tehran. it should be pointed out that has
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been firmly denied by iran itself. one of its allies at the un, russia, said that no evidence had been presented during this closed—door briefing to show that iran had been involved. nonetheless, you can imagine that this report is going to heighten tensions in the region. it will also fuel concerns in washington about tehran. patients who would otherwise die from chronic heart failure are being given a second chance at life, thanks to a new operation involving the world‘s smallest heart pump. the £15,000 device is not usually available on the nhs but it‘s currently being funded by a charity. our health correspondent matthew hill has been to see how it works. this patient is about to have her life saved. she is suffering from severe heart failure and is so ill she would not tolerate conventional surgery. the cardiologist drjulian strange
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places the pump into her leg artery and guides it into her heart. once in place, the pump is turned on providing support to the heart while monitoring its pumping action. the pump mimics the natural pathway of blood flow from the heart to the ascending aorta, increasing blood pressure while unloading the heart and providing the blood to vital organs including the brain. the left ventricular assist machine has already saved the life of the 66—year—old man from bristol. if it weren‘t for the research that is going on now, i wouldn‘t be having this conversation with you now, to be honest with you. how do you feel about that? i am just pleased it is all in place. dr strange and his team are absolutely fantastic. what you said to someone who saves your life? but it is not cheap, costing around £15,000 for a one off use. the national institute for health and care excellent is currently evaluating the device, so, it is not available on the nhs. that is why the hospital‘s above and beyond charity has stepped in to pay for about one
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operation a month. his case would be one that we may not even have attempted. it would have been such a procedure. because of the severity of the furred up arteries. yes. so, i think he already mentioned he had had symptoms for five years. we are human, we will ignore them. he had done that until he got to a point where it was the final straw that broke the camel's back and his heart was a disaster, really. what is great is we are now in a position where he is sitting up, talking, thinking about going home. this patient has now gone home safely and is angina free for the first time in years. the device not only saves lives but means patients have a reduced stay in hospital. that is something that nice is weighing up now to see if more patients across the country should benefit. matthew hill, bbc news.
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the award—winning american musician, drjohn, has died of a heart attack at the age of 77. he was an influential member of the new orleans music scene, and created a unique blend of blues, pop and psychedelic rock that won him six grammy awards. he had an american top ten hit in 1973 with "right place, wrong time". tributes have been paid across the music world. ringo starr said god bless... now it‘s time for a
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look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom. the weather, however, is all over the place today. i‘m telling you i think there is something for everyone. we have got heavy rain, a bit of sunshine, thunderstorms are lurking around southern parts of the uk as well and a star as this weekend is concerned it is going to bea weekend is concerned it is going to be a real mix as well. very strong winds on the way. a little blow before the time of year, i have a copy of his divine right now and this afternoon it will be moving further north. to the south we have got downpours for the forecast today and really it is a mishmash of weather tonight. you can see where the areas of a now but there will be spells around committee. typical temperatures around ten and then tomorrow low pressure here. a real blast of strong winds across southern parts of the uk. coastal gusts could exceed 50 mild an hour
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and certainly a0 in land which for this time of here is certainly very strong. showers on the horizon. as far as strong. showers on the horizon. as farasi strong. showers on the horizon. as faras i can strong. showers on the horizon. as far as i can say, be prepared almost 01:30:09,713 --> 2147483052:21:50,122 anything for the next couple of 2147483052:21:50,122 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 days.
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