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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 7, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — these are today's main stories: i woman who killed her husband in a hammer attack after decades of emotional abuse has her murder conviction reduced to manslaughter and will not face a retrial. there has been a significant campaign waged today by supporters of sally challen and they can feel some sense of victory today. she is still a convicted killer of manslaughter by diminished responsibility but she is not a murderer. i hereby declare that lisa forbes is duly elected memberof that lisa forbes is duly elected member of parliament. labour wins the peterborough by—election — seeing off a challenge from the brexit party with a slim majority.
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an attempt to prosecute boris johnson for lying about brexit is thrown out by the high court. the brother of the leader of the london bridge attack tells the inquest that his family are saudi from the depths of their heart. and the sport. johanna konta has missed the chance to reach the french open final after being beaten. more to come. and all the weather. stormy skies, heavy downpours across parts of the uk and a windy start to the weekend on the way. the forecast plus when israel did not rain? in fact, when can rain be alive? —— when is rain not rain? the women's world cup begins in paris today with hosts france taking on south korea.
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sally challen who killed her husband after what was said to be decades of emotional abuse has had her murder conviction reduced to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility. she had appealed against the murder conviction with her lawyers arguing that throughout their 30 year marriage her husband had subjected her to his coercive control. her two sons have long campaigned for her release and for her murder conviction to be quashed. in the past, david, one of her sons said asa in the past, david, one of her sons said as a family we are overjoyed at today's verdict, it has brought an end to the suffering we have endured together for the past nine years. our story has become the landmark case society needs to realise the severity of coercive control. sarah campbell is at the old bailey for us. campbell is at the old bailey for us. tell us more. it was an earlier
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hearing of this case after that murder conviction was quashed that sally challen had pleaded guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility in august 2010 and just before the court he at the old bailey broke for lunch, the crown prosecution service explained that due to the conclusions of a psychiatrist they had appointed to look at the case, they would accept that plea and so that meant that sally challen will not face a retrial for her husband's killing. he was my colleague with the background to the case. eight years ago, sally challen was jailed as a murderer. today she arrived at the old bailey with her family. her two sons have always supported her mother who from the start admitted killing their father in a frenzied hammer attack. other relatives and friends were waiting to meet her. "i will not cry," she said.
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at the court door, her lawyer. inside the packed courtroom, the prosecution announced it would accept her plea of guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility, so no new trial. sally and richard were married for 30 years and made their home in surrey but she was said to have been emotionally abused by her husband throughout their marriage. on the surface, he was a typical suburban father but he subjected her to decades of psychological abuse known as coercive control. he was unfaithful throughout his marriage, visiting brothels and even posing with glamour models on his christmas cards. in 2009, sally challen finally moved out but was said to still be emotionally dependent on her husband and she appealed for a reconciliation. she set off for her old family home
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but in her handbag was a hammer. still suspicious of her husband, she discovered he had been in touch with another woman. she hit him more than 20 times with the hammer. at the appeal court, her lawyers produced new psychiatric evidence that she was suffering from two psychiatric disorders at the time of the killing and it is said her condition was likely made worse because she was a victim of her husband's coercive control. this has only became a crime in recent years. now, with no retrial, lawyers will have to wait to see coercive control tested in future as a factor in a defence to murder. our system is full of checks and balances. when parliament makes new laws, as in the case of coercive control, it is helpful if that goes to court so that the judges can interpret that law. this case will lead to renewed debate on the damage done by domestic abuse
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when there are no physical injuries. many of the frames and family are here to support sally today. supporters can feel a sense of victory. she is still a convicted killer but not a murderer. both her sons have stood by her throughout this whole court ordeal. david has tweeted that, "as a family we are overjoyed today's verdict and it has brought to an end the suffering we have endured together for the past nine years." the hearing is continuing now after lunch as well as her sentencing for the reduced charge. she has already served eight yea rs charge. she has already served eight years and seven months of the original sentence plus time in custody before the sentencing. she has always admitted her guilt and the cps said she should be credited for that so the issue now is whether
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she should be freed on licence so that at the age of 65 she can now be allowed to resume her life with her family who, as i say, have stood with her throughout. family who, as i say, have stood with her throughoutlj family who, as i say, have stood with her throughout. i know you will bring is that outcome as soon as you get it. thank you very much. labour has narrowly won the peterborough by—election — holding off a challenge from the brexit party. it held the seat by 683 votes. the conservatives came third. the new mp lisa forbes says it shows people have rejected the politics of division. it was called the previous mp was ousted under recall rules. our political correspondent reports from peterborough. the victory was narrow but labour's campaign was wide—ranging. who are we looking at? jeremy corbyn met lisa forbes, the successful candidate, in peterborough
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this morning. instead of battling it out on brexit, she'd highlighted council cuts and concerns over crime. and the labour leader had a robust message for his political opponents. all the experts wrote labour off yesterday. write labour off at your peril! we are strong, we are very determined to offer that politics that invests in decent services, in decent housing, in decent health care. labour won here in peterborough, but their vote share tumbled from the general election. the key to their victory seems to be an ability to motivate their own core vote, and to bringing activists from other parts of the country from as far away as north wales and the south coast. overnight, as the prospect of victory ebbed away, the brexit party leader kept a low profile, but today he took to the airwaves trying to explain why in an area where six out of ten voters backed brexit in the referendum his party had
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failed to secure an mp. the labour party don't want to talk about brexit because they're losing votes to the brexit party, votes to the liberal democrats, and the whole brexit issue has become a nightmare for them. the reason labour won is they've been knocking on doors in this town for many, many months, building up their data because they knew this by—election was coming. you know, in the end, these very localised campaigns are about getting out your vote. that's what they succeeded with last night, not much more. some voters here in peterborough say they were motivated by a desire to see brexit delivered, but others said that wider issues were uppermost in their minds. the health service, look at that. i was in the health service for 36 years, and it's a disaster, yeah? and then the schools — people having to buy their own stuff to go to school! that's what they've got to look at. but they've forgot about all that, haven't they? in effect, the conservatives came third in a two horse race. in living memory, peterborough has always been a labour—conservative marginal. so could the change here have national significance?
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labour's vote is up by nine points. in the constituencies compared with what happened in the european elections, enough for the labour partyjust to win the constituency but, by the way, on the smallest share of the vote that has ever been sufficient to win a general election in post—war british politics. one of the conservative leadership contenders had his own analysis for the party's poor performance. i'm very sorry that our excellent candidate, paul bristow, didn't win in the peterborough by—election. he would have made a superb mp for peterborough. i think the result reminds us of two things — the vital importance of delivering brexit, and also the vital importance of making sure that we have a strong conservative government that can prevent jeremy corbyn from getting into downing street and ruining this country. the election was a poor parting gift for theresa may, who stands down as conservative leader today. but it's still not clear if brexit really has claimed its last prime ministerial scalp. ian watson, bbc news, peterborough.
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are corresponded is in peterborough. it is lonely and soggy. jeremy corbyn was hit about two hours ago doing a lap of honour in the rain. nigel farage would have loved to have been here today. the brexit party had high hopes for this. the momentum from the european parliamentary elections in which they came top they hoped would carry them through, smashing through the 2—party grip on this because it has beenin 2—party grip on this because it has been in existence for about a century and get them their first seat. labour had a very good campaign and they know where their voters are, they got them out and put some political firepower out.
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you had gordon brown, ed miliband was here yesterday, jeremy corbyn, labour took this seriously and they we re labour took this seriously and they were relieved that they did today. brexit party had higher hopes year, they wanted to take it but in the end couldn't quite and among people who voted for the brexit party, i think there is some concern that while it's clear theyjust want out of the european union as soon as possible, they don't have much more beyond that at the moment and that concerns people and constituencies when they are thinking about what they want their mps to be doing and thinking about public services and schools and a number of people raised that about the brexit party. as we know from political history and our2—party as we know from political history and our 2—party first past the post system, electoral politics is cruel, it's not good enough to do well enoughin it's not good enough to do well enough ina it's not good enough to do well enough in a 2—party system, you've got to be one of the top two parties
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at the end of the day. and the history of by—elections shows there are smaller parties who have done brilliantly in by—elections. the liberal democrats through the ‘90s, the sdp, it is the smaller parties that tend to have sensational back through —— breakthroughs. ukip in a way suffered the same fate, nigel faris's old outfit. it did well when there was pr being used in the 2014 parliamentary elections. it got the cla cton parliamentary elections. it got the clacton by—election. i think the brexit party might face the same hurdles that smaller parties face but let's not underestimate the impact the brexit party are having on british politics, the fact they
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can come so close to on british politics, the fact they can come so close to winning here after being in existence for a few months shows how they are shaping the actions of the two main parties and certain the tories now. they don't need to tell any of the candidates running for the tory leadership, the brexit party and the anger they are tapping, the sense of betrayal among many lever voters is acute and that is framing, to a large extent, the argument within the tory partyjust now. the brother of the leader of the london bridge attack khuram butt have said the family is sorry from the depths of their heart for what he did. giving evidence, his brother also described a barbecue three weeks before the attack at which a guest of his brother talked about gutting unbelievers. eight people were killed in june unbelievers. eight people were killed injune 2017 when three men drove into pedestrians before launching a knife attack. our home affairs correspondent daniel
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sa ndford affairs correspondent daniel sandford is at the old bailey for us. sandford is at the old bailey for us. tell us more about what has been said. his brother has been the only witness so far today giving evidence about what the family knew about his brother khuram butt who led those attacks on london bridge. he was repeatedly challenged as to why he and other members of the family hadn't informed the authorities about the growing radicalisation of khuram butt. in the end, two families had contacted the authorities but his brother had not and he said that he tried to monitor his brother but never felt he needed to co nta ct his brother but never felt he needed to contact the authorities even though at one point the family were so though at one point the family were so concerned that khuram butt was going to take his wife and family to join islamic state that they took away his passport. he described his brother is very fun loving and
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a lwa ys brother is very fun loving and always the life and soul of a party but who fell in with a group of extremists around anjem choudary and became increasingly ha rdline extremists around anjem choudary and became increasingly hardline in his views. his family heard there was a curtain that his wife sat behind when there were male visitors so that they could not see her. saad but describes how three weeks before the attack he was present at a barbecue at khuram butt‘s home and another guest stuck a skewer into a piece of meat at the barbecue and said that is how you gut eight khufar. the family claimed asylum in britain. saad but said when he realised it was his brother who carried out the london bridge attack, his daughter was only one—month—old at the time and he
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thought, only god knows what he was thinking. full stop these are our headlines. i woman who killed her husband and a hammer attack after day —— decades of emotional abuse has her crime reduced to manslaughter. labour win the peterborough by—election with a slim majority. an attempt to prosecute boris johnson for lying about brexit is thrown out by the high court. and in sport, johanna konta loses in the semifinals of the french open. she was hoping to become the first british woman to reach the grand slam final since virginia wade. raphael is leading, roger federer in the semifinals, their first meeting in eight years.
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in france and south korea prepare to meet in the opening match of the women's world cup which takes place in paris tonight. more to come on all of those stories that have passed. theresa may officially steps down as leader of the conservative party today although she remains prime minister until her replacement is elected. her resignation triggers the start of the party's leadership contest with 11 mps currently in the running. our political correspondent is in westminster for running. our political correspondent is in westminsterfor us. let's running. our political correspondent is in westminster for us. let's talk about theresa may. this is a big day for her. in some ways it is but there is certainly not going to be any big moment, she is going to be walking out onto the steps of downing street and making a big speech. downing street made it clear that that has already happened a couple of weeks ago. what she will
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be doing is there will be an exchange of letters between her and the 1922 backbench committee. excuse my cough, is one of... there will be an exchange between her and the 1922 backbench committee and that will be the start of the leadership contest. that contest has been going on on officially for quite some time but now there will bea quite some time but now there will be a call for nominations and if we just go through in a moment the timetable for what is going to happen next in terms of the process of choosing the party leader and prime minister, on the 10th ofjune, candidates hand in the nomination paper which is on monday and candidates need eight mps to be backing them and they will be a series of ballots whittling down the field to just two candidates and then the final say goes to the tory
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membership which is around 160,000. they will grow the last two contenders over a series of hustings on the week beginning the 22nd of june and a new leader will finally be elected the week commencing the 22nd ofjuly so a while to go yet, important to emphasise theresa may isa important to emphasise theresa may is a standing down as conservative party leader today but she is still prime minister until her successor is elected and she has gone to the queen to offer her resignation. do you think the peterborough by—election has any consequences for the 11? does it change the way they think about the contest?” the 11? does it change the way they think about the contest? i think leadership candidates will particularly read into the results are an interpretation that may be will suit their argument that already exists. you often see that. i noticed this morning, for example, borisjohnson i noticed this morning, for example, boris johnson saying i noticed this morning, for example, borisjohnson saying we must deliver brexit by the 31st of october. the brexit by the 31st of october. the brexit party has come second at the peterborough by—election so some
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conservatives, the current conservatives, the current conservative leadership will be breathing a sigh of relief, but they camea breathing a sigh of relief, but they came a close second and beat the conservatives so it will be a cause of concern for a lot of contenders but i think a lot of the leadership contenders no that they need to resolve brexit and we are already deeply conscious that it would be a mighty risk, for example, to go through a general election before trying to resolve brexit. i don't think it will change their minds and how brexit will be resolved so whether a candidate is a saying they need to a no—deal brexit or candidates are saying that would be damaging, i don't think it would change their mind on this but i think it will reaffirm that sense of urgency for the conservatives that they feel in terms of being able to deliver brexit before going back to the electorate. an attempt to prosecute the conservative leadership candidate borisjohnson for lying conservative leadership candidate boris johnson for lying during conservative leadership candidate borisjohnson for lying during the eu referendum campaign has been thrown out by the high court. commenting on twitter a short while
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ago, the home secretary sajid javid said... our legal correspondent gave us the background to the case. last week it was decided that boris johnson had to be investigated for suggesting that £350 million a week is sent to the eu during the eu referendum campaign when boris johnson was in part the mayor of london and an mp. it related to an offence called misconduct in public office, the allegation was that mr johnson had mis—conducted himself within those two public offices in such a way that he had abused the trust of the public held in those
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offices. what was extraordinary and it was brought up this morning is that misconduct in public office has never been used in circumstances like this. it has never been used in relation to an assertion within a political debate on a political campaign and this morning mr johnson's lawyers were arguing that the districtjudge got the law wrong made much of this fact. they said the assertion made by mrjohnson was put up for challenge within the referendum campaign, it was batted about, it could be questioned and that this was not a proper use of the criminal law to use this particular offence which had never been used in these circumstances to seek to prosecute mrjohnson. they also said that parliament had had the opportunity to criminalise this kind of speech, if you like, this kind of speech, if you like, this kind of speech, if you like, this kind of assertion within the offence of misconduct in a public office and had failed to do so. we haven't had
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the final ruling from the court but they gave pretty short shrift to lawyers acting on behalf of marcus paul, the gentleman who brought this private prosecution, and this result today will obviously give great encouragement to mrjohnson and his supporters who made it very clear that they really felt that this was a politically motivated private prosecution, echoed by his barrister in court today. we have had the decision, the summons mrjohnson can proceed through, the conservative leadership campaign and indeed perhaps on to becoming prime minister now without the threat of a legal case, a criminal case hanging over his head and that would have taken upa over his head and that would have taken up a considerable amount of his time so there will be enormous relief on his side. many people will feel that... and indeed his lawyer said today in court, you may think someone said today in court, you may think someone is doing theirjob badly or reprehensible about this criminal offence is about the abuse of the
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powers that go with the office and that simply was not the case here and that's why the decision made last week was unlawful, being quashed today. women who experience domestic abuse are three times more likely to develop a serious mental illness according to a new study. research from birmingham university also identified a significant gap between the percentage of women who suffered domestic abuse in england and wales and cases recorded by family doctors. it suggests opportunities may be being missed to support vulnerable women. it's described as an insidious crime which affects around a quarter of women in england and wales. now new research suggests that domestic abuse is not only under—recorded by doctors, but victims are also three times more likely to develop a mental illness. emma says she was in abused physically and emotionally by her ex—boyfriend, who later took his own life. my bruises would heal and the scars would go,
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but what i was left with was no self—esteem, no confidence in myself. i believed everything that he said, which was that i was unlovable, i was worthless, it was my fault that i was being abused, you know, it was my fault that he was acting that way because it was me that made him do that. emma didn't seek help for years. she suffered post—traumatic stress disorder and later received counselling. according to crime figures, around one in four women experiences domestic abuse in a lifetime. but the study found it was recorded in less than 100 gp patient files. survivors are three times as likely to develop mental illnesses such as depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. victims can often take months if not years to come forward, which means that they've been experiencing that type of abuse, repeated patterns of physical and emotional, sexual, financial abuse, living in that environment of control and fear for a severely long period of time. the royal college of gps say doctors
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are highly trained to understand the signs of domestic abuse, but often it can be well hidden. those behind this research say it could be the tip of the iceberg, and are calling for a better screening process. one of the reasons why this piece of work is so important is actually with such significant underreporting, gps, health professionals in primary care can do a lot to support survivors of domestic abuse, and actually this could possibly mean that a huge cohort of women have got a seriously unmet mental health need that actually we could support. earlier this year the government published a new domestic violence bill to protect victims. emma now runs a refuge for survivors. she hopes today's research will influence future policy and raise awareness about the women who may not be getting the help they really need. laura moss, bbc news. time for the weather.
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0k oka ok a pertinent question would be, what's on the weather map? this is the rainfall radar. people across the rainfall radar. people across the southern parts have seen rain so far. this is what is detected. you can see the rain has been moving further north across parts of england and wales and there are some heavy downpours out there at the moment. towards northern france and into the channel, clumps of rain. there are thundery downpours heading oui’ there are thundery downpours heading our way so there are thundery downpours heading our way so quite a bit going on in the uk weather. we talked about the rainfall radar, let me show you another picture.
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so this is another rainfall image here. this is from southern california so that shows what? rain? actually no because there wasn't any rain in southern california when this was taken. what is it? a lot of people are wondering what's going on in that radar picture, especially southern california. let me turn about how radar works. this is a radar installation in texas. it sends out a beam into the atmosphere and if it detects a raindrop, it
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feeds back and can tell how big it is, so it can pick up anything that is, so it can pick up anything that is out there and in this particular instance, the theory is that it was a swarm of insects. that sounds biblical! this is a very large ladybird. it's not set in stone because nobody actually saw this small ladybird but the theory is that there was a massive swarm of ladybirds intersected by this radar beam and that's what it was. butterflies have been detected on radar before, migrating birds, it just has to be the right elevation. the theory is, some experts have said we are not used to that, it would need to be millions of ladybirds, they tend to move around a little bit more sporadically than in the millions and i think it was night time so it's hard to know for sure. we are not to talk about
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ladybirds all afternoon so you need to give us the forecast. the collective term for ladybirds is a loveliness. if you want rain on the garden, this low pressure is producing stormy weather across spain and france on its way to the uk. it has produced quite a bit of rain in england and wales so far whether strengthening as well. much of scotland and ireland are having a lovely day so far. cloud increasing from the south but a lot of dry weather around. most of the wet weather is in england and wales. these are the storms coming into parts of southern england, south—east wales, pushing towards the midlands. it may brighten up a little bit, but there isa brighten up a little bit, but there is a risk of torrential downpours
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that may produce a few spots of travel disruption. overnight, the spiral of wet weather continues across much of england and wales and into southern scotland. fringing eastern parts of northern ireland. ona part eastern parts of northern ireland. on a part that gets windier, and a blustery start to the weekend. strong winds for the time of year and further outbreaks of rain affecting part of scotland, northern angban, north wales and into east anglia. south wales and southern england, brighter skies. one anglia. south wales and southern england, brighterskies. one ortwo showers moving through on gusty winds. some will be in excess of 40 mph in places. anybody saying autumn? it is not particularly good for this part ofjune at all. part two of the weekend, low pressure is pulling away northwoods and the isobars are opening up which indicates the wind isn't going to be as strong. it is getting a better story on sunday. still a few showers
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getting going, particularly into parts of scotland, northern ireland and western parts of england and wales. catch on it could be heavy with the rumble of thunder but the winds are light on sunday and more in the way of sunshine around across a large part of england and any showers towards the north and west. it will feel warm and if you are in some of the sunshine and the winds are light. if you are wanting flamingjune to are light. if you are wanting flaming june to arrive, it's not going to come next week. it is staying unsettled and if anything, next week those temperatures are going down. that is your latest forecast.
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good afternoon, you are watching bbc news. the headlines: a woman who killed her husband in a hammer attack, after decades of emotional abuse, has her murder conviction reduced to manslaughter and will not face a retrial. there has been a significant campaign waged today by supporters of sally challen and they can feel some sense of victory today she is still a convicted killer, manslaughter, by diminished responsibility, but she is not a murderer. ido hereby i do hereby declare that lisa forbes is elected abbas khan winning the peterborough by election with a slim majority. an attempt to prosecute the conservative leadership candidate boris johnson for lying about brexit is thrown out by the high court. the brother of the leader of the london bridge attack, khuram butt, tells the inquests that his family are sorry from the depths of their hearts.
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with the women's world cup kicking off in paris today, we will bring you the numbers behind the tournament. now it is time for the sport an afternoon light. it is all happening in france, tell us about the tennis, very disappointing? we will come to the world cup in a moment, disappointing forjohanna konta, the chance to get to her first grand slam final. she was hoping to become the first british woman to do so since virgina wade in 1977. it will be a case of opportunity is missed. she was a break—up in the first but lost the set. the same happened in the second, but lost it on a tie—break. the checker plays her first grand
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slam final against ashleigh barty. we will see another first—time winner crowned at roland garros. unlikely though in the men's draw. rafael nadal through and he knocked out roger federer in the last four. he took it in straight sets and even the great roger federer couldn't stop rafa nadal, who is imperious on the clay courts. with novak djokovic against dominic dean, the likely upset only to confirm the austrian. he promised us the women's world cup, so what's on that? it is the opening match. a bit of talk in the build—up, france in action against south korea before scotland and england meet in their opening group game on sunday. this is the venue for that much later. in the french capital. the usa, the holders will
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be the favourites. england will be right there as well. the third—ranked team finished third four years ago take on scotland who are much improved. as jane dougal can tell us. we are here because both of the england and scotland caps have their bases here in nice. both the team hotels are just across the road from the speech, so not a bad place for the players to have some downtime. it starts tonight in paris where france take on south korea and it has sold out. 48,000 people will watch. france are probably one of the favourites of the tournament, possibly because so many members of their squad play the lyon, the current holders of the champions league. england are one of the favourites. they arrived on tuesday and trained on wednesday and there is a genuine belief in the camp they can go at least one better than four years ago in canada when they got to the semifinals. as for
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scotland, this is the first time they have ever qualified for world cup so they are desperate to get out of the group stages and they face each other on sunday. i don't think anyone discount the usa, they are the favourites overall for this tournament. they are such a dangerous side when they raise their game in tournaments. the difference between this world cup and the previous ones is a visibility and the publicity. almost 1 previous ones is a visibility and the publicity. almost1 million tickets have already been sold and it starts tonight in paris and the coverage is live on the bbc. we will have more from jane dougal in the builder. chelsea have gone to the arbitration of sport to appeal their window transfer ban. they are not allowed to buy any new players until the end of january next year. they failed with their first appeal because of an investigation into signing foreign players under the age of 18. it comes at a time when ed and hazard is on the verge of leaving, he is expected to complete
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his move to real madrid in the next few days for £88 million. not a huge fee like you might expect, with his contract is due to expire next year. coventry city have confirmed they will ground share with bay maiming —— birmingham city next year. the clu b —— birmingham city next year. the club say the move to st andrews, 20 miles away was necessary for them to stay in the league. that is all for the moment, i will be back with more support in the next hour. the west midlands mayor andy street has claimed protest against lgbt eating at a birmingham primary school are illegal. demonstrations have taken place outside anderton park school in the sparkle area since january. in his first interview, he told the bbc they were homophobic and did not reflect the
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modern and inclusive place birmingham is. andy street, the mayor of the west midlands gave his first interview on this incredibly controversial issue that has been taking place in birmingham, but making headlines across the world. in the interview, he said the protests had been homophobic and they must stop now. he said they we re they must stop now. he said they were deeply upsetting. andy street is gay himself and he said they had affected him personally because he said he didn't realise that homosexuality was still an issue for some communities in the city, which he loves very deeply. he also called on the department for education to make its guidance clearer about what schools should do in regards to a quality teaching and in line with what nick gibb said in the times yesterday, he said he was very much aware of what was going on and he felt people needed to come out in support of the school, rather than
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stay silent. if you look at the literature and the banners, your first reaction is disbelief. you just can't credit that it could be said in this day and age. you look at what is being said and it is really upsetting. but it is actually, ultimately homophobic. it is illegal and it has to stop now. so no ambiguity there whatsoever. incredibly clear about how he feels about this debate. i think for him, it isa about this debate. i think for him, it is a very personal issue, it is something he has been sitting along on the sidelines, witnessing what has taken place but not getting involved. i understand he had a meeting with the head teacher from anderton park primary yesterday, in which they had a very intimate discussion about how they could move forward with this. today there are further protests taking place just metres away from anderton park. you
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may recall a week ago an injunction was put in place which bans parents and campaigners protesting immediately outside the school. they are now protesting just outside the exclusion zone. that is taking place this afternoon and for them, the argument is about it not being age appropriate for primary school children to be taught about lgbt relationships. police investigating the grenfell tower fire image 72 people died say they have carried out 13 interviews under officers had said it could be 2021 before any criminal charges are brought. they wa nt to criminal charges are brought. they want to wait until the second phase of the public enquiry until the fire is complete. the group known as the new ira has claimed it planted a bomb under the car of a senior police officer in northern ireland last weekend. the device was discovered at a golf club in east belfast, and removed by bomb disposal experts. in a statement to the irish news
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using a recognised code word, the ‘new ira' said it was behind the attempted attack. two cars linked to the incident were found on fire in north belfast on saturday. one of the vehicles was fitted with dublin number plates and police have begun a cross border investigation. police in london are investigating a homophobic attack on a lesbian couple, who were beaten up on a london bus after they refused to kiss. the attack on melania geymonat, 28, and her girlfriend chris, happened on the top deck of a night bus in camden. a group of young men began harassing them when they discovered they were a couple. miss geymonat posted on her facebook page, "in an attempt to calm things down, i started making jokes. i thought this might make them go away. chris even pretended she was sick, but they kept on harassing us, throwing us coins and becoming more enthusiastic about it". both women were taken to hospital for treatment and the police are appealing for witnesses. the head of the new york police department has apologised
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for a notorious raid on a gay bar 50 years ago. it led to riots which became an important catalyst in the growth of the gay liberation movement. injune 1969 trouble broke out after new york police raided the stonewall inn in the city's greenwich village district. the police commissioner has said the force's actions were wrong "pure and simple". jamie is here now and will tell us about employment figures in the united states. we can talk about those in a second. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a woman who killed her husband in hammer attack after decades of emotional has had her conviction reduced to manslaughter. she will not face a retrial. nigel farage has
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come second in the by—election in peterborough. on the charges against borisjohnson peterborough. on the charges against boris johnson overlying during peterborough. on the charges against borisjohnson overlying during the brexit campaign are thrown out. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. bank overdraft fees are to undergo a major shake up, which the uk financial regulator is calling the biggest overhaul for a generation. banks and building societies will no longer be allowed to charge fixed daily or monthly fees for overdrafts. the uk's financial regulator "should have been awake" to problems at neil woodford's investment fund, according to former city minister lord myners. the peer said the financial conduct authority failed to spot "clear warning signs that things were going badly". mr woodford, one of the uk's best known stockpickers, suspended his largest fund this week after rising numbers of investors asked for their money back. in the us the monthly employment numbers have come out lower than expected, the economy still created 75,000 new jobs last months, but that's less than half
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of what most people had hoped for. also the numbers for the month before april have beeen revised dowwards by a small amount. that is what you want to start with, thejob report? they come out that is what you want to start with, the job report? they come out and they get revised as each month goes by. you are looking back, these figures are for may, but the figures for april have been revised down. why do they get revised? they are taking into account more aspects of the economy and some of these figures are slower to come in. so we are getting more stuff coming in and figures showing that things aren't what they used to be. down to 220,000. this is for april. the figures for may, the latest figures, i have been reading
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different accounts. some are saying it isa different accounts. some are saying it is a shock and they are bad. but people are saying, it is what they expected. but to put it bluntly, people were expecting about 185,000 jobs to be created last month and they only got 75,000. it's not that impressive. we saw wage levels beginning to tip downwards a little bit. and the reason why we are getting this, trade. is it mexico or china? it is both. china first because that is beginning to have an effect but mexico hasn't come into effect yet but it will as the tariff start to get ratcheted up. they start on monday? yes, they start a 5% and it goes up and up. as it goes up, you would expected to have more impact. we have seen a lot of reductions in the ofjobs in retail, which is interesting. that could be having an effect on prices
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going up and people having more problems selling stuff. stuff becomes more expensive. you are seeing this feeding through a little bit into consumer behaviour and into the way in which things are selling. if thejob the way in which things are selling. if the job numbers are coming the way in which things are selling. if thejob numbers are coming down it hits confidence? the job numbers aren't going down, but it is a slowing of growth. we haven't got to that point. but in a way, it is a warning sign and people are looking at the federal reserve. the federal reserve, we thought a year ago, the whole of this year we would be seeing interest rates going up. that is not going to happen and we will see interest rates in the united states to go down so we are expecting a slowdown going on this year and it could be one of the early signs. it is not dramatic, but it isa early signs. it is not dramatic, but it is a softening i think is the best word. of the market softening alongside? not at all. all looking very healthy. the dow up half of 1%.
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what accounts for that? what am i going to say about this? i was reading one analyst this afternoon he was saying, the markets just haven't got to grips with what this could mean. this guy is saying, if you look at the economics, if these trade wars continue over the next six months it will affect the market and the economy. but the markets are saying, no, it's all right. which one do you believe? i will leave it to you. suddenly they will get into their head, this is an absolute disaster. they are herd animals. they haven't taken fright yet, still
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drinking by the pond. what else do you want to talk about while you are here, other than the jungle that is the markets. we will be talking later on about men's fashion week. the markets. we will be talking later on about men's fashion weeklj shall look forward to that. that will be in about an hour. thank you, jamie. the investigation into sabotage attacks on oil tankers in the gulf last month, have come to the conclusion they were done by a state actor. the trump administration has been increasing its military presence in the middle east saying it wants to deter iranian aggression against allies. jonathan beale reports now from the uss abraham lincoln. america is flexing its military muscle.
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right up close to iran. the bbc was among the first media to fly onto the uss abraham lincoln since its hasty deployment here to the arabian sea. a response, says the trump administration, to credible threat from the iranian regime. an aircraft carrier loaded with war planes is the most potent symbol of american military power and sailing close to iran, just over the horizon, this is notjust a deterrent, it is a warning too. the carrier and its dozens ofjets have also been joined by long—range b—52 bombers, as well as hundreds more troops in the region. the us insists it is not looking for a fight. but to iran, this all looks like sabre—rattling on steroids. so whatjustifies this response? i am absolutely convinced
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the intelligence was credible and that is why we're here. iran was going to do something bad, was going to attack us forces? there was credible intelligence, and that's why we're here. what would happen if iran did do something? there would be immediate consequences. they are not revealing any more details about that intelligence and, whatever the thread, this is also part of a concerted whatever the threat, this is also part of a concerted effort to try to force iran to change its behaviour. the trump administration has already turned its back on an international deal on iran's nuclear programme, and stepped up sanctions instead. the message now is confrontation and that includes, if necessary, the use of military force. we are not looking for war. our key mission is deterrence. we are trying to add stability. however, if the united states is attacked, if our interests are attacked, then we will respond with unrelenting force. with tension simmering, the biggest fear now will be
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miscalculation by either side, one possible reason why so far this aircraft carrier has not sailed through the narrow strait of hormuz, the closest point to iran. jonathan beale, bbc news, on the uss abraham lincoln. patients who would otherwise die from acute heart failure are being given a life saving operation using the world's smallest heart pump. the £15,000 device isn't usually available on the nhs, but a charity has been funding the procedure while it's assessed by the national institute of health and care excellence. our health correspondent matthew hill has been given exclusive access to see a device being implanted. this patient is about to have her life saved. she is suffering from severe heart failure, and is so ill she would not tolerate conventional surgery. the cardiologist drjulian strange
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places the pump into her leg artery and guides it into her heart. once in place the pump is turned on, providing support to the heart while monitoring its pumping action. the pump mimics the natural pathway of blood flow from the heart to the ascending aorta, increasing blood pressure while unloading the heart and providing the blood to vital organs, including the brain. you're looking well today. the left ventricular assist machine has already saved the life of 66—year—old michael nutland from bristol. if it weren't for the research that is going on now, i wouldn't be having this conversation with you now, to be honest with you. how do you feel about that? i'm just pleased it is all in place. dr strange and his team are absolutely fantastic. what do you say to someone who saves your life? but it's not cheap, costing around £15,000 for a one—off use. the national institute for health and care excellence is currently evaluating the device, so it is not available on the nhs.
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that is why the hospital's above and beyond charity has stepped in to pay for about one operation a month. his case would be one that we may not even have attempted. it would've been such a high—risk procedure. because of the severity of the furred up arteries? he had had symptoms for five years, which — i mean, we're all human, we ignore them, and i think he'd done that until he got to a point where it was the final straw that broke the camel's back and his heart was a disaster, really. what's great is we are now in a position where he is sitting up, talking, thinking about going home. this patient has now gone home safely and is angina—free for the first time in years. the device not only saves lives but also means patients have a reduced stay in hospital. that's something that nice is weighing up now, to see if more patients across the country should benefit. matthew hill, bbc news.
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time for a look at the weather. this area of low pressure is why we are seeing rain pushing up across much of england and wales and still to come, potentially heavy thundery downpours to develop in southern parts across the afternoon and into the evening. the area of rain is covering more of northern england and will push into southern parts of scotla nd and will push into southern parts of scotland may be fringing the easternmost areas of northern ireland. further hazy sunshine to come. closer into southern england, south—east wales, this is where we could see torrential downpours getting going in areas which are now brightening up. it could be hit and miss but you could catch one and there could be disruption during the rush hour. we have this area of rain, south—east scotland, perhaps
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into northern england and through wales toward southern england overnight. northern scotland will be mainly dry. the winds are picking up leading to a very blustery saturday. this area of cloud and affecting northern parts of the uk. the sun will come out in south wales across southern england but they will be a few showers rattling a wrong quickly on this gusty wind. the black arrow showing where we have wind gusts on saturday. in excess of 40 miles an hourfor saturday. in excess of 40 miles an hour for some particularly in eastern areas. it is blow it on saturday for this stage in june. eastern areas. it is blow it on saturday for this stage injune. the area of low pressure starts to pull away for part two of the weekend on sunday. things are settling down a little bit. it will be the better day across many parts of the uk this weekend. the cloud will build in scotla nd weekend. the cloud will build in scotland and we will see heavy showers breaking out into northern ireland and more hit and miss through parts of wales in western england but we will see the odd one.
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central and eastern areas of england will stay mainly dry with some sunny spells. when you do get to see sunshine on sunday, most of us will at some stage of the day, it will feel warmer. if it is due in warmth you're after, look at this into next week. it is staying on settle. further rain at times and bad parts of the uk that need the rain, so not a bad thing. temperatures will come down even further than where they are now. that is how it is looking.
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djokovic hello. sally challen, who killed her husband after what was said to be decades of emotional abuse, has had her murder conviction reduced to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility. there has been a significant campaign today by supporters of sally challen and they can feel some sense of victory today. she is still a convicted killer, manslaughter by diminished responsibility, but she is not a murderer. i hereby declare that lisa forbes was duly elected memberof that lisa forbes was duly elected member of parliament. labour see off a strong challenge by nigel farage's brexit party winning the peterborough by—election with a slim majority. an attempt to prosecute boris
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johnson for lying about brexit is thrown out by the high court. the brother of the leader of the london bridge attack tells an inquest that his family are sorry from the depths of their heart. coming up, all the sport. yellow mightjohanna konta has missed the chance to reach the french open final after being beaten in the semifinals. and nick has the weather. it's a wet friday for parts of the uk and for some it could be about to get much wetter. the forecast coming up plus how millions of ladybirds got together to confuse meteorologists. we'll be looking at what the result of the peterborough by—election means in more detail as well as considering what is next for the conservative party.
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hello. let's go straight to these pictures from shannon airport of president trump departing ireland. he has spent the last couple of nights at his golf resort in county clare. he played a round of golf and met some schoolchildren from the local primary school who sang to him and he told them to work hard at school and wish them well before he got on with his game of golf. the school itself is situated within a security cordon. you can itself is situated within a security cordon. you can see itself is situated within a security cordon. you can see marine one and the president of the united states
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has had a very, very busy week. his state visit to the uk followed by the commemorations for the 75th anniversary of d—day and then finally a little rest and respite for him at that golf resort in ireland. some of the visitors at the golf resort overnight said he looked very relaxed, he was chatting a lot and smiling, eating burgers, steak, fish, soup and ice cream. all of those things were on the menu anyway. the president is about to head back with his wife and the rest of his family to the united states after his week in europe and a very relaxed family all round according to irish reports. on wednesday night, two of his sons were visiting pubs, pulling pints for revellers and chatting with villagers and posing for selfies and president trump himself has been posting the
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odd twitter message. some of them obliging, some of them less obliging, some of them less obliging, but they are prepared to board air force one for the flight back to washington, dc. it's after what the president and his supporters would see as a successful trip to europe. earlier in the week, we saw the kind of pictures which will play well in the 2020 presidential election campaign, his bid for re—electionjust presidential election campaign, his bid for re—election just shaping up. here he is with maligning a tramp saying farewell up smack melania trump.
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the president and the first lady are climbing the steps to air force one for theirflight home. climbing the steps to air force one for their flight home. we climbing the steps to air force one for theirflight home. we have no sound so we for theirflight home. we have no sound so we cannot for theirflight home. we have no sound so we cannot listen into his parting words. he waved to the dignitaries on the tarmac and air force one wheels away and will be taking off for the united states. sally challen, who killed her husband after what was said to be decades of emotional abuse, has had her murder conviction reduced to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility. she had appealed against her murder
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conviction with her lawyers arguing that throughout their 30 year marriage her husband had subjected her to his coercive control. her two sons have long campaigned for her release and for her murder conviction to be quashed. her son david took to twitter to say... sarah campbell is at the old bailey. joining me now is our correspondent sarah campbell who has been following the trial at the old bailey. it was an earlier hearing after that murder conviction was quashed that sally challen had pleaded guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility for the killing of her husband in august 2010. just before the court here at the old bailey broke for lunch, the crown prosecution service explained due to the conclusions of a psychiatrist they had appointed to look at the case, they would accept that plea on so that meant that
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sally challen will not face a retrial for her husband's killing. with all the background to this case is my colleague. eight years ago, sally challen was jailed as a murderer. today she arrived at the old bailey with her family. her two sons have always supported her mother who from the start admitted killing their father in a frenzied hammer attack. other relatives and friends were waiting to meet her. "i will not cry," she said. at the court door, her lawyer. inside the packed courtroom, the prosecution announced it would accept her plea of guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility, so no new trial. sally and richard were married for 30 years and made their home in surrey but she was said to have been emotionally abused by her husband
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throughout their marriage. on the surface, he was a typical suburban father but he subjected her to decades of psychological abuse known as coercive control. he was unfaithful throughout his marriage, visiting brothels and even posing with glamour models on his christmas cards. in 2009, sally challen finally moved out but was said to still be emotionally dependent on her husband and she appealed for a reconciliation. she set off for her old family home but in her handbag was a hammer. still suspicious of her husband, she discovered he had been in touch with another woman. she hit him more than 20 times with the hammer. at the appeal court, her lawyers produced new psychiatric evidence that she was suffering from two psychiatric disorders at the time of the killing and it is said her condition was likely made worse because she was a victim of her husband's coercive control. this has only became a crime in recent years.
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now, with no retrial, lawyers will have to wait to see coercive control tested in future as a factor in a defence to murder. our system is full of checks and balances. when parliament makes new laws, as in the case of coercive control, it is helpful if that goes to court so that the judges can interpret that law. this case will lead to renewed debate on the damage done by domestic abuse when there are no physical injuries. this has been an emotional day for the family. they have been here to support sally challen today. there has been a significant campaign waged by her supporters and they can feel a sense of victory. she is still a convicted killer but not a
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murderer. both her sons have stood by her throughout this whole court ordeal. david has tweeted, as a family we are overjoyed at today's verdict and it has brought to an end the suffering we have enjoyed together for the past nine years. the hearing is continuing now after lunch to issue her sentencing for the reduced charge so she has already spent eight years and seven months of the previous sentence. she has always admitted her guilt and the cps said she should be credited for that so the issue now is whether she should be freed on licence so that at the age of 65 she could now be allowed to resume her life with herfamily who be allowed to resume her life with her family who have stood with her throughout. emma pearmaine is a family specialist solicitor, who for almost 20 years, has represented clients in matrimonial cases.
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what is your conclusion? i'm really pleased for sally. she has really suffered over the years and this is a landmark case for survivors of coercive control and domestic violence. there are many women who find themselves in a not dissimilar place to sally challen. they haven't had the opportunity to test whether or not they are in a position of responsibility and sally challen has been able to do that. it's a shame that we didn't get to see the test being played out in court. that now was going to be down to somebody else but at least we know that the next time this happens to a woman who requires help, we can test this system. you said it's a landmark, but we didn't see it tested in court. in what way is it a landmark for other women? is it an important precedent? sally wasn't successful
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in her appeal. she was able to effectively overturn a successful prosecution for murder. of course, at the time, the panel decided that the case had to be reheard and that was due to happen at the beginning ofjuly. we was due to happen at the beginning of july. we now was due to happen at the beginning ofjuly. we now know that the prosecution service have decided to accept manslaughter and actually has to be good news for sally but there will be women in a position like sally's who may now be in a position to appeal. when you say there may be, what is your sense of how many women have possibly also been convicted of murder but who may now use the coercive control defence to reduce the conviction to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility? we don't have those statistics, what we do know is that hundreds of thousands of women are victims of coercive
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control in the uk. i don't know how many women have been convicted of murder who are victims of coercive control but i think this is something that we will find out very soon, if there are women who are serving sentences for murder who will say that they acted under diminished responsibility because of coercive control. i hope that they have behind them a successful team like sally challen had to support them in overturning the verdict. sally challen's sons david and james have campaigned so very vigorously and done the work in the background with her defence team to be able to prove coercive control. or at least gather the evidence. that's a real challenge going forward because coercive control is about a series of often small events that occur. it's not generally one big event, it
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happens over a period of time and so to be able to gather evidence to prove coercive control is a challenge, both for those who find themselves in a situation like sally but also for the police and the crown prosecution service. thank you very much for your insight. let's look at the headlines. a woman who killed her husband in a hammer attack after decades of emotional abuse has her murder conviction reduced to manslaughter and will not face a retrial. labour sees off a strong challenge by the brexit party, winning the peterborough by—election with a very slim majority. an attempt to prosecute boris johnson for lying about brexit is thrown out by the high court. johanna konta loses in the semifinals of the french open. she was hoping to become the first british woman to reach the grand
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slam final since virginia wade. rafael nadal is into the third consecutive final. he beat roger fedor in straight sets. no djokovic has just got under way against dominic thiem in the second semifinal and france and south korea prepare to meet in the opening match of the women's world cup in paris tonight. more to come on all of those stories that have passed. back half past three. labour has narrowly seen off a brexit party challenge to hold onto its peterborough seat in a by—election. union activist lisa forbes retained the constituency for labour, beating the brexit party byjust 683 votes. she said her victory shows people have "rejected the politics of division". the conservatives came third. our political correspondent iain watson reports from peterborough. and a warning that his report contains flash photography. the victory was narrow but labour's
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campaign was wide—ranging. who are we looking at? jeremy corbyn met lisa forbes, the successful candidate, in peterborough this morning. instead of battling it out on brexit, she'd highlighted council cuts and concerns over crime. and the labour leader had a robust message for his political opponents. all the experts wrote labour off yesterday. write labour off at your peril! we are strong, we are very determined to offer that politics that invests in decent services, in decent housing, in decent health care. labour won here in peterborough, but their vote share tumbled from the general election. the key to their victory seems to be an ability to motivate their own core vote, and to bringing activists from other parts of the country from as far away as north wales and the south coast. overnight, as the prospect of victory ebbed away, the brexit party leader kept a low profile, but today he took to the airwaves trying to explain why in an area
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where six out of ten voters backed brexit in the referendum his party had failed to secure an mp. the labour party don't want to talk about brexit because they're losing votes to the brexit party, votes to the liberal democrats, and the whole brexit issue has become a nightmare for them. the reason labour won is they've been knocking on doors in this town for many, many months, building up their data because they knew this by—election was coming. you know, in the end, these very localised campaigns are about getting out your vote. that's what they succeeded with last night, not much more. some voters here in peterborough say they were motivated by a desire to see brexit delivered, but others said that wider issues were uppermost in their minds. the health service, look at that. i was in the health service for 36 years, and it's a disaster, yeah? and then the schools — people having to buy their own stuff to go to school! that's what they've got to look at. but they've forgot about all that, haven't
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they? in effect, the conservatives came third in a two horse race. in living memory, peterborough has always been a labour—conservative marginal. so could the change here have national significance? labour's vote is up by nine points. in the constituencies compared with what happened in the european elections, enough for the labour partyjust to win the constituency but, by the way, on the smallest share of the vote that has ever been sufficient to win a general election in post—war british politics. one of the conservative leadership contenders had his own analysis for the party's poor performance. i'm very sorry that our excellent candidate, paul bristow, didn't win in the peterborough by—election. he would have made a superb mp for peterborough. i think the result reminds us of two things — the vital importance of delivering brexit, and also the vital importance of making sure that we have a strong conservative government that can prevent jeremy corbyn from getting into downing street and ruining this country. the election was a poor parting gift for theresa may, who stands down as conservative leader today.
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but it's still not clear if brexit really has claimed its last prime ministerial scalp. well, as we reported there the liberal democrats came fourth in that by—election, but increased their share of the vote. this comes on the day that nominations in the race to become the next lib dem leader close. so far two candidates have announced their intention to run in the contest to replace sir vince cable — deputy leader jo swinson and former energy and climate change secretary ed davey. let's speak now to sir vince cable, who's still leader of the lib dems untiljuly 23rd. it's a merry go round in british politics. yes, indeed. you've had a good analysis of the peterborough by—election, we were quietly pleased by—election, we were quietly pleased by what happened, we had low expectations of peterborough is a traditional tory and labour marginal. we had talked originally
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to have a combined remain candidate, that didn't happen, sadly, but we put our candidate, becky, who was terrific and we got three to 12% of the vote. the bigger picture of the country as a whole, we are up 20% and it's now a four party competition and we are well placed. you say you are well placed but the message of the peterborough by—election is what happened in the eu election doesn't get reproduced at national level. we have a 2—party first past the post system and that is not a friend to parties like yours. well, not in a place like peterborough, but elsewhere the position is very different. you may have seen the constituency level poll that was also published to date that shows there's about 50 conservative whole seats that would fall to the liberal democrats
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because there are large numbers of conservative voters who are disgusted by the brexit policy of their leadership and they want a more moderate alternative and they turn to us. we will do very well. you say that, but what about the division of euwhen of remain loving voters ? division of euwhen of remain loving voters? you said low expectations in peterborough, one of the reasons that you could not get a pact together with those two parties. are you more hopefulfor together with those two parties. are you more hopeful for the together with those two parties. are you more hopefulfor the future? together with those two parties. are you more hopeful for the future7m peterborough, we had an agreement. the candidate chosen was put under quite strong pressure by the labour party and he stood down which is u nfortu nate party and he stood down which is unfortunate but the remain parties worked very well together. we didn't have a problem. you know the history with chains uk that there is
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certainly a group of those mps, the independents we expect to work with closely in future. my door is open to any form of collaboration. sorry to any form of collaboration. sorry to interrupt but you sound very mild on this. do you need to be more assertive about this to make this happen and knock heads together? saying your daughter is open doesn't necessarily persuade people to walk through it. well, it did in the last two elections that we just had. we had a spectacular victory in the local government elections and then again byfarthe local government elections and then again by far the biggest of the remain parties in the biggest european elections that was bigger than the brexit support so you might think my approach is mild, but it works. so, turning to your successor, what do you want to see? what mistakes did you make that they could possibly correct or do better on when you speak tojo swinson or
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ed davey, what will you be saying to them about the street fighting tactics, the strategy or the vision necessary to build on the successes that you have talked about in local elections and eu elections? well, when i took over, we were in not great shape, we had had to difficult general elections but we had a clear strategy which was to build up our base locally, our infrastructure, we've done that very well, and we had a very clear major issue which was brexit and we are clearly defined, we want to stop brexit, make no bones about it, and it's worked for us. my successor will have to take us onto the next level and into the general election and i'm optimistic that we are in great shape. we have to have a clear set of policies and messages about wider issues in brexit. brexit is all—important at issues in brexit. brexit is all—importa nt at the
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issues in brexit. brexit is all—important at the moment but we have to have a wider picture and they will be sketching that out. which is your favourite candidate? i'm not declaring support for one candidate or the other. they are both very good. they were both ministers in my department when i was secretary of state, they were very able, good administrators, good political campaigners. a match for anybody that the conservative party can throw up. thank you forjoining us. some breaking news coming in from our home affairs correspondent on the sally challen case at the old bailey. sally challen will be freed because of time served. she had served eight years and seven months for her murder conviction after the death of her husband, the killing of her husband in 2010, and she had previously been in custody so we now
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learn from our correspondent at the old bailey that sally challen will be freed because of time served. so her murder conviction obviously reduced now to manslaughter on grounds of diminished responsibility. they had been —— there had been due to be a retrial injuly. that there had been due to be a retrial in july. that will now there had been due to be a retrial injuly. that will now not go ahead and sally challen will be freed. we will get more from the old bailey very shortly. theresa may officially steps down as the leader of the conservative party today, though she remains prime minister until her replacement is elected. her resignation officially triggers the start of the party's leadership contest, with 11 mps currently in the running. let's find out more about what happens now, our political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster. jessica, what happens now? as you say, theresa may is stepping down as conservative leader today. she is
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still prime minister and will still be prime minister until her successor is chosen and until she goes to see the queen to offer her resignation but when theresa may stands down today, expected some point later this afternoon, there will be an exchange of letters between her and the chairs of the backbench1922 committee. it's not clear whether we are going to see those letters but we will get some notification that this has occurred and as you were saying, that officially fires the starting gun for the tory leadership contest. nominations will be open now. the tory leadership contest has been going on unofficially for quite some time and pretty openly in recent weeks. let's have a look at the timetable over the next few weeks. on the 10th ofjune, monday, candidates have to hand in their nomination papers and they need eight mps to back their campaign. then there will be a series of ballots which will whittle down the
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candidates to a final two and then the final say goes to the tory membership which is around 150 or 160,000 members. they will grow the last two contenders over a series of hustings from the 22nd ofjune and a leader will finally be elected which is expected to be announced in the week beginning the 22nd ofjuly so it will be that week when a new leader is elected in the conservative party and the united kingdom gets a new prime minister. we were hearing a few days ago that there might be 18 or even more candidates but that seems to be slowing and sobering down a bit now. the peak that we reached was 13 candidates and now we are down to 11 after a couple of people dropped out. james cleverly, so we are down to 11. nominations officially open as people cannot hand in applications until monday so we will have to wait till monday to be certain what the final figure is. the number could change, you could
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see one or two people dropping out or one or two people joining see one or two people dropping out or one or two peoplejoining the race. it's not clear whether the defence secretary penny moore —— mordant might throw their hat in the ring. the 1922 committee and party decided to change the rules and make ita decided to change the rules and make it a slightly more fierce elimination process and up the threshold that mps needed in order to stand because they were worried about how broad the field had become, the contest might appear to the public rather chaotic and that wasn't the kind of sale they wanted to be making to the public when they are choosing the next prime minister when they are going to have to resolve the issue of brexit so the field is still at 11 people, still a pretty wide field but that number could change but it could actually go either up or down. we understand
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from our colleagues below that the private exchange of letters has now happened with the acting chairs of the 1922 committee of backbench tory mps so theresa may has officially stood down but is still acting as conservative party leader. now let's get the weather. he was a story of how meteorologists can have a hard life and getting things right and the wider world can conspire to make that more difficult. let me tell you a story about the weather radar. this is where we see rainfall. you can see it for the uk today. this rain has been pushing across england and wales and it has been a lovely day so wales and it has been a lovely day so farand wales and it has been a lovely day so far and further showers are about to push into southern england. that is the regular radar image. let me show you another one from not long ago in southern california. this area of green, you think it could be
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area of green, you think it could be a heavy shower and that's what many people will think looking at the radar of southern california but meteorologists were scratching their heads because it was clear sky. there was no rain expected in southern california but this was showing up on the radar. it's very spooky. in fact, showing up on the radar. it's very spooky. infact, it showing up on the radar. it's very spooky. in fact, it was identified as quite possibly these little beauties, ladybirds. a lot of them, potentially millions of them in a swarm on the radar and it's understandable if you understand how radars work. this is from amarillo in texas in the usa. it sends out a beam to detect raindrops so it should sit out, detects a raindrop and how big it is and how far away and how big it is and how far away and then creates a map based on the beam coming back, reflecting back.
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did anyone actually see millions of ladybirds? it's just did anyone actually see millions of ladybirds? it'sjust a theory because it detected something clearly, it painted a picture on the map saying there is something here and the theory was that it could be and the theory was that it could be a swarm of ladybirds but it was dark at the time and nobody really spotted the ladybirds and experts have said it's unusual to have so many of them together. their movement is more sporadic. but insects is a good guess, butterflies have been detected, migrating birds as well, so its use of radar which isn't necessarily used for meteorologists but can pick up other things and the collective noun for ladybirds. .. i know the answer! somebody told me about an hour ago. it's a loveliness which is a lovely collective noun! surprising considering they bite sometimes! this is a long way of avoiding the subject of the rain.
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scotland, northern ireland, for many of us it has been a fine and even warm day. but for many there has been heavy rain. we could also see a brighter gap has developed towards the centre of this area of low pressure. things are brightening up for some of us but don't be fooled because they will be torrential downpours breaking out from south—east wales, the midlands and southern england. not everybody will see them but if you do you could see a lot of rain in a short space of time and the risk of travel disruption. they will ease as the night goes on. southern and eastern parts of scotland, towards the east of northern ireland, affecting part of northern ireland, affecting part of england and wales. northern scotla nd of england and wales. northern scotland is looking dry and it will not be a cold night. will take a
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while to shift this area of rain. it will tend to turn more patchy through the day and south wales and southern england, brightening up and there will be a few showers rattling through on a very gusty wind. unusually windy for this time of year. in particular some gusts in excess of 40 mph, so be aware of that heading out and about during saturday. it will be a cool day in the wind and especially where it is raining. the area of low pressure, it is up here by sunday so it is starting to pull away. the wind is easing and the wet weather is easing as well. there will be showers developing on sunday, especially in scotland, close to the low pressure and some of them may be thundery. in northern ireland also, if you bowing up northern ireland also, if you popping up through wales, central england staying mainly dry and they will be sunshine around some of the showers. the winds are easing through the day and if you see a bit of sunshine it will feel a bit
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warmer. into next week, if it is warmth you're after, there is very little of that showing up in the forecast. it stays unsettled and if you want more rain in the garden there is some of that into next week. temperatures are going down even a bit further than where they are at the moment. it's not going to be flamingjune are at the moment. it's not going to be flaming june next week, makes you feel like autumn at times. that is your latest forecast.
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you're watching afternoon live, i'm carrie gracie. the headlines: a woman who killed her husband in a hammer attack, after decades of emotional abuse, has her murder conviction reduced to manslaughter and will not face a retrial. i hearby declare, lisa forbes is duely elected... labour see off a strong challenge by nigel farage's brexit party winning the peterborough by election with a slim majority. an attempt to prosecute the conservative leadership candidate boris johnson for lying about brexit is thrown out by the high court. and coming up — we'll be looking at what the results of the peterborough by election mean in more detail with the economist's anne mcelvoy and the evening standard's martin bentham.
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before that, let's catch up with the sport. john is here. shall we start with tennis, johanna konta, not very good? she will be bitterly disappointed, a real opportunity missed to reach the french open finalfor missed to reach the french open final for the first missed to reach the french open finalfor the first time missed to reach the french open final for the first time in her career. she lost to marketa vondrousova in straight sets she was hoping to become the first british woman to reach a grand slam final since virginia wade in 1977. it will be a case of opportunities missed, she was a break up in the first but lost the set, and the same happened in the second, losing it on a tie break to the czech nineteen —year—old to the czech19—year—old who plays her first grand slam final. ashleigh barty her opponent in tomorrow's final, where we will see another first time winner crowned at roland garros. unlikely the same will be said in the men's draw,
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rafa nadal through to a third consecutive french open final, the king of clay knocking out roger federer in the last four. rafa took it in straight sets, even the great roger federer couldn't stop rafa who as we know imperious on the clay winning this title a record 11 times. and with novak djocovic up against dominic thiem this against dominic thiem this afternoon, the only upset can come from the austrian. let's go to football, but the women now though. england and scotland, both fielding strong squads? the opening match of the women's world cup the hosts france in action against south korea before scotland and england meet
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in their opening group game on sunday in nice. the usa will be one of the favourites, along with england. they ta ke favourites, along with england. they take ona favourites, along with england. they take on a scotland side much improved. there was a time when england were miles ahead. we could see how far wales pushed us in qualifications and scotland getting to the world cup is an unbelievable achievement for them. when they qualified, i was so happy for them because i have seen the journey they have come on and i am so pleased they get to experience that. they are amazing players and they deserve to be on this stage. but since the draw, not sure howl to be on this stage. but since the draw, not sure how i feel about there being here. you can watch every match on the women's world cup across the bbc. chelsea have gone to the court of arbitration for sport to appeal
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their two window transfer ban. they're not allowed to buy new players until the end of january next year, and failed with their first appeal to fifa. it's all to do with an investigation into signing foreign players who are under 18. meanwhile, eden hazard is on the verge of leaving chelsea. he's expected to complete a move to real madrid in the next few days in a deal worth around £88 million. not a huge fee that you might expect with his contract at stamford bridge due to expire next year. that is probably the best they could have negotiated. and coventry city have confirmed that they'll ground share with birmingham city next season. they had been struggling to agree a deal to stay at the rioch arena in coventry with owners wasps, but the deadline to do that deal has now passed. the club say the move to st andrews, 20 miles away, was necessary for them to stay in the league.
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that is all the support for now, back to you. we have some sad breaking news that three hospital patients have died following a listeria outbreak. an investigation has been launched into the source of the infection. it is a link to prepacked sandwiches. supplied by the good food chain according to public health england. infection was found in six seriously ill patients. have died. they were at manchester foundation trust and aintree foundation trust in liverpool. i am looking to see whether there are any other cases. there is some suggestion from public health england that the good food chain from which these prepacked sandwiches have been bought had been
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supplied with meat produced by north country cooked meats which tested positive for the strain of listeria. three patients have died in that outbreak of listeria and sandwiches and salads linked to the cases have been withdrawn. the supplier, the good food chain has voluntarily ceased production while the investigation continues. so, let's go to another piece of breaking news and this is coming in from the old bailey and relating to our top story, the case of sally challen. she had been sentenced to 14 years for manchester but because of time said she will be free. —— manslaughter. let's go to sarah campbell at the old bailey. we are waiting for them, the court has just
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risen. thejudge hasjust waiting for them, the court has just risen. the judge has just finished giving that sentence so we are waiting for sally challen and her family and her supporters to leave court number five here at the old bailey. we have had a long sentencing this afternoon and this isa sentencing this afternoon and this is a case where sally challoner had a lwa ys is a case where sally challoner had always admitted killing her husband richard back in august of 2010. —— sally challen. she was convicted of murder at the following year and spent the rest of the time in prison. but that murder conviction was quashed in february of this year and that is because new, psychiatric evidence came to light. that has now been accepted by the crown prosecution service. so we are, where we are today. the cps said there wasn't grounds to go forward for a second prosecution for a murder retrial. they accepted this was a case of manslaughter due to diminished responsibility at because sally challen has already served almost nine years in custody since
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the killing back in 2010, that means with the new sentence today, which was 14 years, but he gave her credit ofa third. was 14 years, but he gave her credit of a third. it has now been reduced to nine years and four months. that is the official sentence, nine years and four months. but because she has already served what would equate to that amount of time, she is now free to go. thejudge said having already served a sentence to go. thejudge said having already served a sentence equivalent of a much longer one, therefore you are entitled to be released at once. so sally challen, who is now 65 years old, she has spent almost nine years in custody, but she is now free to leave the old bailey now that her murder trial has been quashed. the plea of manslaughter by diminished responsibility has been accepted. emotional scenes in court. there has been crying in court. her two sons
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have been in there, who have supported her throughout this court case, have been with her. they have beenin case, have been with her. they have been in court number five. also case, have been with her. they have been in court numberfive. also had strong support from the lawyer who will also be coming out, his campaign group has been supporting. one of the aspects of this, we have psychiatric disorders the cps accepted that sally challen was suffering from at the time of the killing. but those psychiatric orders, the defence and the prosecution accepted may well have been exacerbated by her husband's controlling and abusive behaviour and that has been a big part of the defence, talking about it this afternoon. and thejudge defence, talking about it this afternoon. and the judge said when he was summing up, what his sentencing was, he was saying that when you committed the murder, you will no doubt angry, jealous,
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suspicious but you were also ill. you are not delusional, you felt trapped and manipulated, but that is because you were being trapped and you were being manipulated and you we re you were being manipulated and you were capable of rational thought. once again, sally challen is now free to leave the old baby with the a cce pta nce free to leave the old baby with the acceptance of her manslaughter plea due to diminished responsibility and we are expecting her, herfamily due to diminished responsibility and we are expecting her, her family and supporters to come out here at the old bailey to give their reaction very shortly. thank you, we will come back to you for that. let's turn to politics, or rather a court case relating to politics because the attempt to prosecute boris johnson for lying during the eu referendum campaign has been thrown out by the high court. commenting on twitter earlier, sajid javid said, i am glad to see the court case against borisjohnson thrown out. freedom of speech feels increasingly
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challenge. our legal correspondent gave us the background. last week a districtjudge in the magistrates' court decided there was a case to a nswer court decided there was a case to answer for boris johnson in court decided there was a case to answerfor borisjohnson in relation to effectively three counts of misconduct in a public office. it relates to his assertion that as you say, the uk were sending £350 million a week to the eu. that assertion was made during the campaign, the referendum campaign, where mr boris johnson campaign, the referendum campaign, where mr borisjohnson was, the mayor of london in part and he was an mp in other parts. it related to an mp in other parts. it related to an event called misconduct in public office. in other words, the allegation was that mrjohnson has misconduct conducted himself within those two public offices in such a way he abuse the public trust held in those offices. what is extraordinary about this case and it was brought out in court this morning, this conduct in public office has never been used in
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circumstances like this. it has never been used in relation to an assertion within a political debate and within a political campaign. this morning, said johnsen's lawyers we re this morning, said johnsen's lawyers were arguing that the districtjudge last week got them ball run, made much of this fact. they said the assertion made by mrjohnson was put offa assertion made by mrjohnson was put off a challenge within the referendum campaign, it was batted about, it could be questioned. this was not a proper of the criminal law, to use this particular offence, which had never been used in these circumstances, to seek to prosecute mrjohnson. they also said parliament had had the opportunity to criminalise this kind of speech, if you like, this kind of assertion within the offence of misconduct in a public office and had failed to do so. a public office and had failed to do so. we haven't had the final, reason drooling from the court but they gave pretty short shrift to lawyers acting on behalf of marcus ball, the
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man who brought this private prosecution. this result today will give great encouragement to mr johnson and his supporters, who made it very clear they really felt this was a politically motivated private prosecution. that was echoed by his barrister in court today. we have had the decision, the summonses are quashed and mrjohnson can proceed through the conservative leadership campaign and perhaps on to becoming prime minister now, without the threat of a legal case, a criminal case hanging over his head and that would have taken up a considerable amount of his time. there will be a lot of relief on his side. many people feel, and indeed his lawyer said in court today, you may think somebody is doing theirjob badly,, reprehensible, but this offence is abuse of powers that go with the office and that was not the case here and that is why the decision made last week was unlawful and has been quashed today. let's step back
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from that and look at politics across the piece. because we have got the peterborough by—election and theresa may's letter to the acting chairman of the 1922 committee of backbench tory mps and we have got the leadership campaign beginning in earnest on monday. let's get more on labour's victory in the peterborough by election. it was a narrow win labour‘ candidate lisa forbes came just 683 votes ahead of the newly formed brexit party. the conservatives came third, and the lib dems fourth. with me now is anne mcelvoy senior editor of the economist. i'm alsojoined by martin bentham, home affairs editor at the evening standard. i wanted to start with peterborough. i feel like i need i wanted to start with peterborough. ifeel like i need to i wanted to start with peterborough. i feel like i need to show this. one of the things i thought was interesting was we still have the brexit disruption, it is considerable. we saw how it absolutely eroded the tory vote there. we also saw it take a very large chunk out of labour. they will not and they will be very pleased they did so and that canada got through despite controversy of her own along the way. i know through
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labour sources they have to put a lot of resources into that to win just by 700. that is an interesting sign that the brexit party, it is not surging, we shouldn't always go with the hype of the brexit party, and it is not sweeping all before it, but from no organisation, they are doing pretty well. that is a big problem for both the labour party and it is making both parties nervous for a general election. hold a second, let's go over to the old bailey where sally challen has emerged. nine years of this. today recognises a case detailing 40 years of coerced control by a father. as a family we have soughtjustice to understand the events, to stop lives being lost and for victims to be recognised. thank you for everyone's support, we will now go to a press
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conference where we will speak more about this. ijust conference where we will speak more about this. i just wanted to say conference where we will speak more about this. ijust wanted to say how happy i am and i want to thank my legal team and all my family, who stood behind me and stood with me through all of this. thank you. sally, how are you feeling today and your thoughts about richard?” sally, how are you feeling today and your thoughts about richard? i will talk at the press conference. thank you. thank you. so sally challen emerging from the old bailey flanked by her sons and giving a very composed couple of lines, just saying thank you to her legal team. we will just stay with these pictures for a moment because this is now a free woman with her murder conviction, for the killing of her husband in 2010 quashed and no retrial. she has seen her sentence reduced to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility, with the court
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accepting that coercive control was pa rt accepting that coercive control was part of the narrative which led her to commit that killing. so as a result of the years she's already served since the death of her husband, she will not serve any longer, despite the fact that the sentence for the manslaughter was nine years and four months. she is a free woman now as a result of time already served. so a very long campaign, as we had one of her son is saying. gratitude from the family to their supporters and their legal team. they go off now to prepare for a news conference. we will go back to that shortly, but let's leave the scenes from the old bailey for a moment and come back to the politics we we re moment and come back to the politics we were talking about with anne mcavoy and martin bentham. martin, let's bring you in. no capitulation from the brexit party, from a
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standing start, they did quite well even though they didn't win? standing start, they did quite well even though they didn't wimm standing start, they did quite well even though they didn't win? it was interesting listen to clive lewis, he was talking in quite guarded terms really. they have one, which isa terms really. they have one, which is a good result in essence because a lot of people thought they might not. but he was saying we had a lot of homeground advantage and we threw a lot of resources at the seat and in essence, we couldn't repeat that ina general in essence, we couldn't repeat that in a general election. so he was drawing some comfort from it but not a huge amount. obviously for the conservatives it's not a great result either although not as bad as they feared, which tells you something, they have come third in a seat they have historically run at times and is a key seat for them. what it has done has re—energised or even more, the general debate about the leadership of the strategy should be. but boris has been out suggesting that it proves they need to deal with brexit, to neutralise
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this brexit party threat, which is true. they largely will neutralise if they get brexit three. his solution is to get out by october the 315t, but the mathematics doesn't stack up. do you think there are any conclusions the candidate should, the tory leadership candidate should draw from peterborough? yes, i was interviewing jeremy hunt yesterday and what we are seeing is these moderate candidates who are in favour of brexit, who want to deliver it. one of the messages jeremy hunt was interesting on this and michael gove has been in the same territory, you have to say to a baseis same territory, you have to say to a base is fundamentally want to vote for no deal, or two thirds of them do, that you have two, in its closing stages, make the argument with them that is not what they are going to get. they are going to get
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no deal, and parliament will try to block it, as would others'. they wouldn't necessarily get that. it is their god versus their calculation and they might, if you pull out enough bricks of what is going on at the moment, you might find yourself tilted into a general election which he will lose even ifjeremy corbyn has his own problems. can they lead the base to the position where at the base to the position where at the last moment they might step back and say, we don't want a very quick no deal because that could cause problems. that is the argument that is going to be held in the next two weeks. martin, unless they get through the parliamentary party obstacle course, they don't even get to the base? that is true. just to go back to that, part of the other lesson from this of course, labour has won this by—election despite brexit, although they are officially a brexit supporting party in one
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sense. who knows? they have won it because they were campaigning on housing and homelessness and other issues this is why brexit is so important they cannot get onto the subject while brexit is dominating. it increases the imperative to deal with it so you can talk about the other issues which electors want people to focus on, but they can't do it at this stage. and to your point about the actual mathematics about the leadership context. of course, whoever is going to prevail there has got to get through that before it is then on the agenda. on the bit we are about to see, anne, this period where we whittled down ina hunger this period where we whittled down in a hunger games style down to two, what are we going to see there?” think we will see borisjohnson go through, he is prepared to chance his arm and risk and no deal. doesn't want it but prepared to risk
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it. what does the other person say? this is between michael gove, jeremy huntand this is between michael gove, jeremy hunt and possibly sajid javid. it is possible someone else might come up on the rails. they have to say they are prepared to work with this person who wants to risk no deal but they have to stand for something else anyway. they have the heavy lifting to do and come up with a model that they will deliver brexit and not come up with the risk boris johnson will take. we are hearing brussels doesn't even want to talk to anyone? if you go for the straightforward no deal on october the 315t, then parliament will not allow that. the mathematics suggest it will not happen and therefore the danger is that you do end up having a vote of no—confidence. danger is that you do end up having a vote of no-confidence. you could win and you could be a very brief tory leader. then you fight this election, which last night has
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shown, is not going to be very conducive of the tory party and again, stuart jackson the former mp said we could face extension. before i let you both go, one sentence each on theresa may. she hasjust sent her letter, give her a thought?” think she was in an impossible position from the start. i think she didn't handle it well, it showed her limitations. however, ithink didn't handle it well, it showed her limitations. however, i think about what could happen after october and the possible consequences for british politics, maybe with a bit of time we will look back on theresa may with a bit more understanding andi may with a bit more understanding and i think they should. agree with that martin, yes or no, more or less ? that martin, yes or no, more or less? no, more or less. thank you for being pre—. less? no, more or less. thank you for being pre-. very quick look at the weather. rain spreading across much of england and wales. scotland and northern ireland has seen the driest
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weather. into the high teens in north scotland. soggy weather in england and wales. it is brightening up england and wales. it is brightening up but the threat of torrential, thundery downpours in a few spots this evening. it may produce a lot of rain in a short space of time with the risk of travel disruption. they will ease as the night goes on and further outbreaks of rain across england and wales. eastern side of northern ireland and into northern scotla nd northern ireland and into northern scotland staying dry. low pressure for the start of the weekend. outbreaks of rain around, scotland, northern ireland, into east anglia. south of that you get to see sunshine and a few showers of what will be a very blustery saturday. the wind eases on saturday and still showers around especially in the north and west, but a bit of sunshine.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. a woman who killed her husband in a hammer attack, after decades of emotional abuse, is to walk free and will not face a retrial after her murder conviction was reduced to manslaughter. ijust i just wanted to say ijust wanted to say how happy i am andi ijust wanted to say how happy i am and i want to thank my legal team and i want to thank my legal team and myfamily and i want to thank my legal team and my family and legal team who stood behind me through all of this. lisa forbes is duly elected... labour see off a strong challenge by nigel farage's brexit party — winning the peterborough by—election with a slim majority. theresa may has formally resigned
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as conservative leader in a letter to the 1922 committee. she will continue as prime minister until her successor is chosen. an attempt to prosecute the conservative leadership candidate boris johnson for lying about brexit is thrown out out by the high court. the brother of the leader of the london bridge attack, khuram butt, tells the inquests that his family are sorry from the depths of their hearts. and all the sport. disappointment forjohanna konta who misses out on a place in the french open final. and we will be joining john for a full update at half past and nick has the weather. it has been a wet friday across some parts of the uk and it might be about to get much wetter for some and it might be about to get much wetterfor some of us. and it might be about to get much wetter for some of us. a look at that and a full weekend forecast is coming up. also coming up, we'll be hearing about a dementia village
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being built in kent. sally challen who killed her husband in a hammer attack is to walk free after her murder conviction was reduced to manslaughter due to diminished responsibility. sally challen, who is 65, spent more than nine years injail, until the court of appeal heard new evidence that she endured years of emotional abuse. her lawyers said she was the victim of "coercive control", which became a criminal offence in england and wales in 2015. her two sons have long campaigned for her release and for her murder conviction to be quashed. sally challen, who killed her husband after what was said to be decades of emotional abuse, is to be freed due to time served
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in jail after her murder conviction was reduced to manslaughter. her son david spoke about his relief. we are overjoyed by this verdict. we have endured nine years of this. it details 40 years of coercive control by our father. as a family we have soughtjustice and to understand the events, to stop lives being lost and victims to be recognised. we thank you for everyone's support. we will now go toa everyone's support. we will now go to a press conference where we will speak more about this.” to a press conference where we will speak more about this. ijust to a press conference where we will speak more about this. i just wanted to say how happy i am and i want to thank my legal team and all my family who stood behind me and stood with me through all of this. thank you. sally challen with her sons. helen elwood from the crown prosecution service give this a statement outside of the court. after careful review of new medical
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evidence, the cps has decided to accept her plea to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility. this case has been an extremely complex and emotive one and it's understandably aroused strong views and debate. the role of the cps is to make objective and independent decisions based on the available evidence and the law. as pa rt available evidence and the law. as part of this duty, we keep all cases under continuous review and consider any new information that comes to light. new medical evidence was presented as part of sally challen's recent appeal which is not available at the original trial. the court of appeal heard that in the opinion of a consultant forensic psychiatrist, sally challen was suffering from two mental disorders at the time of the killing. this led to the court's decision to order a retrial. in light of this new evidence, the cps instructed psychiatrist philip joseph to review the case and provide a fresh perspective. doctor joseph met with the defendant, his
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considered opinion was that at the time of the killing, sally challen was suffering from an abnormality of the mind which eventually impaired her mental responsibility for her acts. when considered alongside psychiatric reports obtained by her legal team, including that of the prison psychiatrist after the appeal, the balance of medical opinion now supports a defence of diminished responsibility. this is a significant change from expert evidence previously available and has led us to conclude that there is no longer sufficient evidence to proceed on a charge of murder. lets go to central london where sally challen's family are just taking their seats for the news conference that they mentioned outside the old bailey. we have heard her thanking her legal team. let us just listen because we don't want to miss it.”
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will introduce everybody. on the very left, junior council lucy whibley, we have claire miller who is going to speak on behalf of the justice. claire wade, a counsellor who advocated today and has advocated throughout in preparation for the appeal, what's your name ain? for the appeal, what's your name again? sally! sally challen and david challen. i think we will start, do you want to say a few words first, sally? iwouldn't start, do you want to say a few words first, sally? i wouldn't be here today without my niece who found harriet. iwould here today without my niece who found harriet. i would like to thank from the bottom of my heart harriet and claire and all those around her
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who have worked tirelessly to get me where i am today. it has been a long road. i would also like to thank my childrenjames road. i would also like to thank my children james and david road. i would also like to thank my childrenjames and david and james's partnerjen and her parents, without himl partnerjen and her parents, without him i wouldn't be the person i am now. they have served my sentence with me. their support and visits have kept me going in what has been a long and terrible nine years. i also thank my brothers and other relatives at home and in australia and my friends both in and out of prison who have stood by me and supported me. also, prison mental health teams, officers, the chaplaincy and staff who have helped me to get through this. my thanks also goes tojustice me to get through this. my thanks also goes to justice for women and for the overwhelming support i have received from the public. many other women who are victims of abuse as i was are in prison today serving life sentences and i know this because i have met them. they have suffered abuse and other miscarriages of
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justice and should be serving sentences for manslaughter, not murder. i still love richard and miss him dreadfully and i wish that none of this had happened. applause asa as a family, we are overjoyed at today's verdict. it has brought an end to the suffering we have endured together for the past nine years. this is one of the worst cases of coercive control to be heard, detailing 40 years of abuse from our father. her story has now become the landmark case needed to recognise the true severity of this abuse. it also has exemplified how the criminaljustice syste m exemplified how the criminaljustice system continues to discriminate against women who kill. there is no
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shame in what we have experienced as a family. we have sought forjustice and understanding so in future lives are not lost and abuse is recognised. in not recognising victims of coerced control properly, we are not recognising domestic violence properly and i would like to say a personal thanks. this result would not have been possible without the help of harriet, claire, justice for women, we have been overwhelmed by the public support and wish to thank everyone who has stood with us. thank you. applause this is a sally's day, not my day. ican answerany this is a sally's day, not my day. i can answer any questions about coercive control or the way in which is consistent with this sort of case like sally's and other cases but there is nothing i have to say in particular about what has happened
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today. i'm glad the case has come to the conclusion. it has been a long time coming and i am extremely pleased thatjustice has been done at last. lucy, do you want to add anything? only to echo what james said about it being a landmark case. a line has been drawn and domestic abuse encompasses emotional abuse in abuse encompasses emotional abuse in a way that it hasn't done before and hasn't been recognised. i'djust like to say a few words about justice for women. we had a feminist campaigning organisation that is over 25 years old now and is co—founded by harriet. we campaign to combat the prejudice, discrimination and inequality that women face in the criminaljustice system. in particular and women face in the criminaljustice system. in particularand in women face in the criminaljustice system. in particular and in sally's case, we campaign on behalf of women
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who have wrongly been convicted of murder in circumstances where they have killed an abusive partner. at the moment, we are looking into the cases of ten women who have experienced abuse of a similar kind sally's and, in fact, two of those cases are currently in front of the court of appeal. we invite you to support these cases in the way you have with a sally's because they are just as important and women are just as vulnerable as sally was. we have experienced abuse and what we are hoping to do to change the situation for them is investigate through research that is being done jointly with the centre for women's justice, the way in which the criminal
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justice system is responding to women who kill and i hope we will develop a better understanding of how to deal with these cases properly in court. in 2018, 13 women we re properly in court. in 2018, 13 women were prosecuted for killing a violent partner. some of those women we re violent partner. some of those women were convicted of murder, some were convicted of manslaughter and the sentences these women received varied significantly across all of those cases. that example i hope illustrates the lack of consistency in the response of our criminal justice system to women who have killed as a result of being abused. i would encourage you please to continue to support our work so we can continue to shine a spotlight on
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to this most difficult of issues. thank you. applause i willjust add a reminder that many, i willjust add a reminder that any i willjust add a reminder that many, many men kill their partners than women kill their partners and in most of those cases where men kill, we have figured it's about one every three days that the census has produced and many of those cases, there is a history of abuse but it is an abuse from the person who is killed rather than the victim. in contrast, the rarer cases where women like sally have been driven to kill, the context is that they are the victims of abuse and they have
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been driven as a sally has to mental illness. there is a report out by the royal college of psychiatrists today that says domestic abuse is a very serious cause of mental illness and as we have heard in sally's case, and what i think we need is for abuse to be taken seriously. if it was taking more seriously, if there was more understanding and more intervention, then one would hope that they would be fewer cases like this and also of the many women who were murdered. the crown prosecution service have pursued this case vigorously throughout. even when the appeal was one and when the evidence of coercive control came out, the crown insisted ona control came out, the crown insisted on a retrial and it's only in the
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face of overwhelming psychiatric evidence that they caved in. they haven't considered the public interest and they haven't considered their duty as they have signed up to to tackle domestic abuse and they fail regularly, i'm afraid, to tackle domestic abuse and sexual violence. they failed to prosecute in many cases and yet they wish to pursue this case as vigorously as they have and it has been a very, very long ride, ithink they have and it has been a very, very long ride, i think we initially met in 2012 and submitted grounds of appealfinally in met in 2012 and submitted grounds of appeal finally in 2016. it was three yea rs appeal finally in 2016. it was three years till we got to this point. it's been a long road and sally has been a wonderful client to work with and it's been a very, very tough time and! and it's been a very, very tough time and i really want to pay tribute to both sons. david's
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incredible campaign and commitment to raising awareness around violence against women and coercive in controlling behaviour —— coercive and controlling behaviour. we will ta ke and controlling behaviour. we will take questions. sally, i know it might be difficult, can you begin to explain how you feel today knowing that you are no longer going to prison? are you happy? explain to us how you feel and what you are most looking forward to. i'm just so happy that i can now begin to live my life again. what has kept you strong? gosh, i don't know, i really don't. i've had major ups and i've had major downs and without the support of my family around me who
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have kept me going with their visits and my endless telephone calls to them, at inappropriate times, i don't know howl them, at inappropriate times, i don't know how i would have coped and with harriet and claire and all theirteam and with harriet and claire and all their team supporting me as well it has been a really long road and at 1.i didn't has been a really long road and at i! didn't see any light at the end of it. it was doing the freedom programme that opened my eyes, that was the start of it and i spoke to my niece about it and she found harriet. and here we are today after all this time. what does it mean for you to be free? it such a difficult question. it's wonderful. i can be
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with them, i can see them in a normal environment, i can go shopping with them or they can come shopping with them or they can come shopping with them or they can come shopping with me, rather! your sons have been by your side throughout. i'm so grateful, could not wish for a nicer pairof i'm so grateful, could not wish for a nicer pair of boys to be my sons. what do you want to change or legacy of this to be for women who have gone through something similar?” just hope the justice system will recognise that abuse happens and that they should take it more seriously and cases. i have met many women in prison who shouldn't be there. they know who they are and i'm talking to them now, and ijust hope someone lessons and they can get an appeal. getting an appeal is a very difficult thing to do. we
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failed on the first count, they refused it so it went before the three judges and finally they agreed. if i had been granted, i wouldn't be here today so the justice system needs to listen. seek help from somebody if you are suffering, and i think people around them need to realise and look at their friends and get the person to talk to them if they think it is something wrong. it's difficult for these people as it was in my case to leave the partner. you have to leave the area, and everything that you know, that's the only way and i think because of richard and myself, it was over 40 years we were together, it wasjust impossible for me but i say to these women, seek
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help now before it is too late, seek help now before it is too late, seek help from anybody, see your doctor, make yourgp help from anybody, see your doctor, make your gp understand and get help. have you any idea what you will spend your time doing now? it's not something i've thought about! but i think that's something i can have a discussion about with harriet. indistinct question” indistinct question i was waiting for a call from harriet and trying to stop the dogs barking and harriet told me the good news.
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it was very emotional. i was with james andjen and it was very emotional. i was with james and jen and david was up in london and it was wonderful, absolutely wonderful. it was the 28th, but we weren't allowed to tell anybody. you said you still miss richard. is there anything more you would like to say? i have been in therapy in prison for nearly five years. throughout it all, i had difficulty moving on from the past. i'm now much stronger through that.
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i want to thank pamela and karen for their support and listening to me endlessly. i'll always love richard, i think. he's a part of me. any other questions? looking forward at future cases, this is a landmark case. although the final outcome of the case has focused on diminished responsibility, i think through the campaigning work and through the advocacy at the court of appeal and through the expert evidence, we have been able to show the reality of coercion and controlling behaviour
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and its impact and the concept that was not widely understood was much more widely understood now so that is very important and when it arises, i hope lawyers will look to understand the contexts and dynamics of the relationship so that in future when defending these cases and when taking decisions around prosecutions, that will be taken into account. it's a highly relevant context into account. it's a highly relevant co ntext a nd into account. it's a highly relevant context a nd u nfortu nately into account. it's a highly relevant context and unfortunately our criminal justice system context and unfortunately our criminaljustice system and the way in which prosecutions happen are a simple way and that means there are victims of miscarriages ofjustice because you are not able to look at the context. in cases like this where there is a dynamic over many
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yea rs, where there is a dynamic over many years, it's critical that the work with justice for women will be able to educate to defend and prosecute these cases fairly, taking into account the context of abuse. would you like to see the cps change their approach? yes, i would. see the cps change their approach? yes, iwould. i see the cps change their approach? yes, i would. i think the way this case was run and many other cases we have seen, they have a policy, it's a written down policy that says they have a commitment. there are
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international treaty obligations that are signed up to around discrimination against women and around abuse, there is something called a bangkok rule which is about recognition of the number of women incarcerated as a consequence of abuse. cps have a commitment and an understanding as it signed up to around those things, but we don't see it in practice and we see them going ahead as though theyjust want to win these cases and convicted without consideration of that context so i would like to see them actually honour their commitments that they've made and which they are signed up to and which they are obligated to consider. we did write to the director of public prosecutions and made a series of representations before this plea was entered and we made representations not just about the evidence in entered and we made representations notjust about the evidence in the public interest, but also with
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reference to the duty to discriminate against —— duty not to discriminate against —— duty not to discriminate against —— duty not to discriminate against women. he has not responded to our letter but i understand he has received it and that he sanctioned the decision to offer a plea ultimately but i'm not sure on what basis. this case is so important for women who are still in abusive relationships. could you explain... indistinct question a lot of the problem is that they don't know and its family and friends who notice it. somehow, they have to speak to that person and try to convince them to leave. i know of
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cases where this has been done. they have left, they have started a new life and then two months later they have gone straight back to exactly what they had left. they don't need to be able to break the tie, it's a very strong tie and these women are very strong tie and these women are very vulnerable. the only thing that ican very vulnerable. the only thing that i can say is that friends and family and anyone who notices something, however small, they should try and talk to that person and until that person listens. what more do you think and be done to educate people? schools, for example ?” think and be done to educate people? schools, for example? i think it should be, ithink schools, for example? i think it should be, i think girls as well as boys suffer from the same thing. it's not something that's talked about because it is not a physical
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scar on someone's face or arm or a broken arm but they are damaged and it isa broken arm but they are damaged and it is a damage that is done to them for the rest of their lives. teachers should also be aware and to look around their classrooms and make the children aware of what can happen. one more. tomorrow morning you will wake up as a free woman. what's the first thing you want to do? oh, my goodness! what day is it? saturday. there is a carnival or something where we live so i might go along to that! if you have been such a vocal advocate. can you put into words how it feels to finally be here and have your mother free?
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it's incredible. thejourney has been so long, it has been so torturous, the weight from appeal until now has been torturous —— the wait. it has been inhumane in recognising the abuse, or not properly recognising the abuse when it is their duty to, and we want to make sure this is viewed as a landmark moment and get people engaged and create a bigger issue about this and get people talking. it's not just about this and get people talking. it's notjust a women's issue, it's a men's issue two, that's talking about it, men and women talking about it, men and women talking about it, men and women talking about it, address the balance. it affects all of us and coercive control is the bedrock of it and we cannot hope to understand domestic violence without understanding coercive control but you have my mother back is... —— to have my
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mother back is... —— to have my mother back... there are no words. back to being a son again and back to her being the curating mother! i think that has probably covered it. thank you. so ijoke at i think that has probably covered it. thank you. so i joke at the i think that has probably covered it. thank you. so ijoke at the end of what was quite an anguished press conference in some ways with some very powerful points being made by sally challen and by her son david. along the way, sally said that she would always love the husband richard who she killed in that hammer attack in 2010. "he is a part of me," she said, but she also said
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that it was very hard for women who we re that it was very hard for women who were subjected to domestic abuse or coercive control to escape from their circumstances. she advised people to look around, she said it is very difficult to leave and this is very difficult to leave and this is everything you know and that you would have to leave your neighbourhood, he would have to leave your friends and family if you we re leave your friends and family if you were to leave an abusive partner. she has commented on her own case that they had been together for over 40 yea rs that they had been together for over 40 years and it was impossible at the time for her to seek help. she talked about the therapy she had had in prison, five years of therapy, and she said that had helped make her stronger. she was very grateful to her legal team and to her sons, obviously, and other members of her family and to the support of other women in the prison mental health teams. another point she made, probably the last one to mention, she said that she hopes the justice system will recognise that abuse
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happens. she said she had met many women in prison who should simply not be there. that is a point, of course, echoed by her legal team and by the justice for women campaigners, the group that campaigned for her for nearly a decade, who point out that they kept —— a point they kept making, they wa nt —— a point they kept making, they want this to be a landmark moment in which the criminaljustice system wa kes which the criminaljustice system wakes up to the effects of coercive control and to the long—term influence of domestic abuse. we will leave the sally challen case there and come back to it possibly later. labour has narrowly seen off a brexit party challenge to hold onto its peterborough seat in a by election. union activist lisa forbes retained the constituency for labour, beating the brexit party by just 683 votes. she said her victory shows people have ‘rejected the politics of division". the conservatives came third.
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with me is peter kellnerformer president of public opinion and data firm yougov. what do you think this means? what do you think this mean57m seems odd and somewhat awkward to move from the authenticity of sally challen to the artificial world of spin. alice in wonderland, the caucus race and in the end of the dodo says, everybody has one, everybody must have prizes. peter barrett is a sort of anti—caucus race because in a way, nobody has one. “— race because in a way, nobody has one. —— peterborough. labour has held the seat, but their share of the vote tumbled from 48% at the
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general election 231% yesterday, thatis general election 231% yesterday, that is a 17 drop. even their winning the seat, if i was a labour, i would be terrified. we had jeremy corbyn saying they were ready for a general election now on the back of peterborough. he has to say that. the conservatives are in worse trouble. relatively speaking, you could say peterborough has done less damage to labour than the conservatives. both main parties have done very, very badly. if you add up the ukip vote, you get 17.5. if you add up the greens and the liberal democrats, 15,000 votes. so 2500 more people voted for the brexit party. because we are the
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first past the post system, labour won, not because its cause is popular but it swept up more of the left of centre vote than the brexit party did at the right of centre vote. that was more divided. if one is looking for the underlying state of public opinion, it would be a mistake to say this has been a great result for labour. it would be a mistake to say this was an anti brexit verdict. the brexit party, we had nigel farage saying he was buoyed by the result, even though they didn't win. do you think that isa they didn't win. do you think that is a legitimate verdict from him? statistically, he has a point. if you regard brexit as a continuity of ukip rather than a new party, and you look at what ukip did at by—elections when he was taking labour seats, there was only one seat where it did better than i did yesterday in peterborough. everywhere else did worse off and
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quite a lot worse. if you compare like with like in labour defended seats, this was a good result for the brexit party. but, losing is losing. had they won by 600 votes rather than losing by 600 votes, they would have had a voice at westminster, they would have had momentum. nigel farage would be saying something different about having the actual importance about having the actual importance about having an mp at westminster. we cannot say that and i think the momentum is lost and the outlook for the brexit party is significantly worse because it lost narrowly than had it been if it had won narrowly. because of the length of the press conference, that is all we have got time for now, but we will have more on another day. now we are going to get the sport with john on another day. now we are going to get the sport withjohn watson. all the focus falling on france for the world cup, the women's welcomes you to get under way there later.
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johanna konta missed the chance to reach the french open final. she lost to marketa vondrousova in straight sets she was hoping to become the first british woman to reach a grand slam final since virginia wade in 1977. it will be a case of opportunities missed, she was a break up in the first but lost the set, and the same happened in the second, losing it on a tie break to the czech19—year—old who plays her first grand slam final. ashleigh barty her opponent in tomorrow's final, where we will see another first time winner crowned at roland garros. it is always tough to lose a match, any match. it is also tough to lose matches where you do have opportunity, you do have chances. however, i feel very, very co mforta ble however, i feel very, very comfortable and very assured in the fa ct comfortable and very assured in the fact that i did do the best that i can. it has been a good tournament forjohanna konta. unlikely the same will be
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said in the men's draw, rafa nadal through to a third consecutive french open final, the king of clay knocking out roger federer in the last four. rafa took it in straight sets, even the great roger federer couldn't stop rafa who as we know imperious on the clay winning this title a record 11 times. and with novak djocovic up against dominic thiem this afternoon, the only upset can come from the austrian. chelsea have gone to the court of arbitration for sport to appeal their two window transfer ban. they're not allowed to buy new players until the end of january next year, and failed with their first appeal to fifa. it's all to do with an investigation into signing foreign players who are under 18. and coventry city have confirmed that they'll ground share with birmingham city next season. they had been struggling to agree a deal to stay at the rioch arena in coventry with owners wasps, but the deadline to do that deal has now passed. the club say the move to st andrews, 20 miles away, was necessary for them to stay in the league.
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and the cricket world cup cricket match at as bashed and has been abandoned. —— edgbaston. in formula 1. abandoned. —— edgbaston. in formula 1, lewis hamilton was fastest in first practice ahead of the grand prix. they have won all six races this season. he pipped his team—mate va ltteri this season. he pipped his team—mate valtteri bottas. second practice gets under way at seven o'clock. of course, all the build—up to come ahead of the opening match for the women's welcome. south korea against france. it is live on the bbc later, as is the big one on sunday, scotla nd as is the big one on sunday, scotland taking on england. every world cup live across the bbc. that is all the sport for now. now on afternoon live,
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let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to ben schofield from look east who joins us from peterborough where local byelections have been taking place. and we have south east today's health correspondent mark norman, who is live with us from tunbridge wells and will be telling us about a new dementia village in kent. we will comeback to mark in just a moment, first ben. welcome to a rainy cathedral square in peterborough city centre. my day involves being up in the wee small hours at the vote count and declaration when lisa forbes thought raqqa found out she had snuck past the brexit party. there were jubilant scenes when the results we re jubilant scenes when the results were announced and that you could
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really be forgiven for mistaking that the labour party had secured the keys to downing street. they hadn't of course, they had won by 683 vote. seeing their vote share tumble and only narrowly beating the brexit party, that insurgent new force designed by nigel farage, to try and put pressure on the government to deliver brexit. in her speech, lisa forbes, the new mp described how the vote was a vote against the politics of division. but if you look at some of the numbers around who voted which way, almost 10,000 people voted for the brexit party in this constituency. lisa forbes' polled just 684 more than them. doesn't it show that the electorate here is as divided as we all thought it was much about let's have a listen listen to what lisa forbes said after the results.
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despite differing opinions across our city, the fact that the brexit party have been rejected here in peterborough, shows that the politics, shows that the politics of division will not win. that was heard delivering that message on divisions no longer, how have you found it covering it, a bit wet? you know what, it has been glorious weather up until now. yesterday it was brilliant sunshine for the get out the vote campaigns that each of the parties will have mobilised to try to get their supporters to the polling stations. if you had joined me here on saturday, this is one of the main shopping thoroughfare is through peterborough city centre, you would have been negotiating a gau ntlet you would have been negotiating a ga u ntlet of you would have been negotiating a gauntlet of political activists. there was an army of turquoise brexit supporters. people from the
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labourcamp in the brexit supporters. people from the labour camp in the suburbs. if you didn't have a leaflet pushed through your door, if you were not accosted in the street by an activist, then you got off quite locally. this is the third time the people of peterborough have been asked to vote injust two months. they peterborough have been asked to vote in just two months. they have peterborough have been asked to vote injust two months. they have had the european elections, the local election and the by—election. it was only prompted because of a recall petition was successful and that needed 19,000 people to sign it, or rather 19,000 people chose to sign it to oust the last mp. talking to people on the streets of peterborough, i spent the day asking people to deliver their thoughts down the barrel of a camera and may be one in four wanted to talk about brexit. the other three quarters we re brexit. the other three quarters were talking to me aboutjobs, the economy, education, health care, crime and those domestic issues. maybe that is how lisa forbes managed to win this campaign and
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focus on the local issues rather than the national issues. there was also, certain element within the city that wanted to see off nigel farage, not to be known as the first place that put his brexit party in the house of commons. but as we saw last night from the result, 9801 voters in the city decided that nigel farage deserved their support and that they really wanted brexit to be sorted above all else. thank you very much for the analysis. let's go to tunbridge wells. and mark, can you tell us about this dementia village? really interesting, they are building one in kent, a gated village, six houses refurbished with five residents in each. everyone will have a front door so they can go down the road within the secure compound, go to the allotments, maybe see the animals, when it all gets off the ground. in the middle of it, a community hub, a cafe. it is about giving choice to people,
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choice to the families and choice to those living with dementia diagnosis. but as you can see, it is still a building site. yes, i agree it isa still a building site. yes, i agree it is a building site in dover but the nhs and its partners believe what they are building is a new way of living and caring for people with dementia. dementia village. and for the first time, local campaigners from dover living with a diagnosis of dementia, join me to see what was on offer. it is a whole new concept, i believe came from holland. if it helps, then you know, i think the proof of the pudding will be six months further down the line when it is up and going. i like the rooms, they were airy and you get the option to walk around and still be free. a care home, you have got your bedroom and usually a large room with so many people in. i am not really a people person, so i would
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hate that. no, i think it is lovely. the dementia village idea began in holland. experts from kent travelled to holland to learn from the idea, twea ked to holland to learn from the idea, tweaked it for their budget, tucked into european funding and came up with harmonia village, six houses, each with five residents, community hub and supported by nursing home —type care. hub and supported by nursing home -type care. the take-home message from holland was try to create a normal environment. it looked totally different to any care home we had seen in the uk. what stood out was when we met the manager. one of her introduction messages was the important thing about our village, we have a front door on the house. we laughed. she said, you don't get it. it is important, because if it is raining, people can go and get wet. the village is interesting, innovative, a learning curve for
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eve ryo ne innovative, a learning curve for everyone involved and is opening this autumn. mark, there is a dutch example i understand, how similar is this one to the dutch version? the dutch started this off, and they are more insular, they have a supermarket and a cafe on site. in dover they will try to integrate the community, so if you want to go to the pub or buy something from the local shop, they will try to do that, so the community get use to you being there and the people living in this particular village, will also get used to going into the community. that is part of the clever bit but it is all a learning process and it will open later this year and i think they will have to tweak it as it goes along. if it does succeed, do you think it will be a model for others to follow? i think they wa nted others to follow? i think they wanted to be sustainable, they have health trusts coming down from all over the country to see if they can roll it out elsewhere. private companies are going to try and do the same thing so i think it will be an increasing model we will see around the country. thank you for
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bringing that on the dementia village. mark, the rain is getting heavier. get inside. if you'd like to see more on those stories, you can get them on the bbc iplayer. the brother of the leader of the london bridge attack, khuram butt, has said his family are sorry from the depths of their hearts for what he did. eight people were killed injune 2017, when three men drove into pedestrians before launching a knife attack in nearby borough market. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford told us more about the evidence given by saad butt at the old bailey today.
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he has been the only witness so far today giving evidence about what the family knew about his brother, who led those attacks on london bridge. he was repeatedly challenged as to why it was that he and other members of the family hadn't informed the authorities about the growing radicalisation of his brother. in the end, two families had contacted the end, two families had contacted the authorities, his brother in law but saad butt had not contacted the authorities. he said he had tried to monitor his brother, but said he didn't feel the need to contact the authorities until the point when his brother said he was going to take his wife and children to join so—called extremists in syria. he fell in with a group of extremists
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and he became hardline in his views. at the family home there was a curtain hanging in the home to rich's wife sat behind when they we re rich's wife sat behind when they were male visitors in the home so they couldn't see his wife. he was ata they couldn't see his wife. he was at a barbecue and one of the other guests had stuck a skewer into a piece of meat at the barbecue and said, that's how you gut a nonbeliever. but he said he never imagined he would try to attack the country that had given his family refuge. they had claimed asylum from pakistan. saad butt said when he realised it was his brother who had carried out the london bridge attack and his daughter was only one—month—old at the time, he thought only god knows what he was thinking. an attempt to prosecute
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the conservative leadership candidate boris johnson for lying during the eu referendum campaign has been thrown out by the high court. commenting on twitter earlier, home secretary sajid javid wrote, "very glad to see the court case against borisjohnson thrown out. freedom of speech feels increasingly challenged". boris johnson's lawyers borisjohnson's lawyers said they are disappointed by the district judge's decision and they are happy it has been rectified so quickly. last week a districtjudge in the magistrates' court decided there was a case to answer for borisjohnson on three counts of misconduct in public office, relating to his assertion that the uk was sending £350 million a week to the eu. that assertion was made during the campaign, the referendum campaign where mr boris johnson campaign, the referendum campaign where mr borisjohnson was the mayor of london in part and he was an mp at other parts. it related to an
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offence called misconduct in public office. in other words, the allegation was mrjohnson had mis—conducted himself within those two public offices in such a way he had abused the trust that the public held in those offices. what was quite extraordinary about this case, and it was brought out in court this morning, was misconduct in a public office has never been used in circumstances like this. it has never been used in relation to an assertion within a political debate ora assertion within a political debate or a political campaign. this morning mrjohnson's lawyers, who we re morning mrjohnson's lawyers, who were arguing the districtjudge last week simply got the law wrong, made much of this fact. they said the assertion made by mrjohnson was pa rt assertion made by mrjohnson was part of the challenge within the referendum campaign. it was battered about and could be questioned. really, this was not a proper use of the criminal law, to use this particular fence which had
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the criminal law, to use this particularfence which had never been used in these circumstances, to seek to prosecute mrjohnson. they said parliament had had the opportunity to criminalise this kind of speech, if you like, this kind of assertion within the offence of misconduct in public office, and had failed to do so. jamie is here in a moment, telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: a woman who killed her husband in a hammer attack, after decades of emotional abuse, walks free from court, after her murder conviction was reduced to manslaughter. labour sees off a strong challenge by nigel farage's brexit party winning the peterborough by—election with a slim majority. and the brother of the leader of the london bridge attacks, says a family are sorry from the depth of their hearts. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. bank overdraft fees
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are to undergo a major shake—up, which the uk financial regulator is calling the biggest overhaulfor a generation. banks and building societies will no longer be allowed to charge fixed daily or monthly fees for overd rafts. the uk's financial regulator "should have been awake" to problems at neil woodford's investment fund, according to former city minister lord myners. the peer said the financial conduct authority failed to spot "clear warning signs that things were going badly". mr woodford, one of the uk's best—known stockpickers, suspended his largest fund this week after rising numbers of investors asked for their money back. in the us the monthly employment numbers have come out lower than expected, the economy still created 75,000 new jobs last months, but that's less than half of what most people had hoped for. also the numbers for the month before april have beeen revised dowwards by a small amount. when we were here an hour ago you said you were going to talk about men's fashion week and i had my notebook out to get some tips to
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pass on to simon mccoy, and now? we barely mentioned it. we must the opportunity, we had the person here, the founder of men's fashion week i was going to talk about this industry which is doing enormously well here. i am drawing a little graph of your performance today. where is it going? you tell me. what are we talking about? let's move on to the global economy. i cannot talk to the global economy. i cannot talk to you about fashion, the time has passed. we miss that particular boat. but we can talk about the global economy because the figures about employment, they are disappointing. i want to talk to our gas from royal london asset management. can you pick apart these figures? they are quite significant,
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a bit ofa figures? they are quite significant, a bit of a surprise compared because most of the employment figures we have had out of the us for a year or so? it is an impact from the trade was we are seeing so? it is an impact from the trade was we are seeing here. they are definitely a disappointment. the wage earnings was ticking down slightly but the unemployment number was pretty much unchanged. i really think it indicates the trade was we are seeing between china and the us and mexico, are having an impact and and mexico, are having an impact and a drag on the economy. surprisingly, the markets actually reacted positively to the news so we saw stock markets go up. why is that? the markets are now anticipating rate cuts. we had already started to see this earlier as the trade war escalated particularly the rhetoric between the us and the chinese. the fed have come out and actually said if we do see a negative impact on
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the economy, they will step in and try to support the economy by cutting rates. we saw bond yields go down and we saw equity prices go up. on the trade was, if they continue the way they are going, we are only about half way through what could happen, this could get quite a lot worse? it could, because it doesn't look like they are coming to any agreement with the chinese. we could be seeing a load of other tariffs put on 3 billion worth of goods. there are various estimates about how big an impact that could have on the chinese economy in particular. it could take 1.5% of their gdp potentially. it has negative implications globally, not just the chinese he will be impacted. we are already seeing the impact in the us and the jobless numbers we had earlier. the job creation numbers. we have got to leave it there, but thank you for that. the markets.
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your guests was good. the markets are up and we talked about this last time and! are up and we talked about this last time and i was a bit stumped. she wasn't stumped. she did know. a cut in interest rates, that is what they are expecting and that is why the markets are up. we do have the two things fighting against each other. in the one hand, slowing economy and the interest rates will be up. or because you will have lower interest rates, things will get easier for companies therefore you buy the market. the pound against the dollar, it hasn't moved very much. that's it. thank you, jamie. he finished somewhere about here, seven. finished somewhere about here, seven. room for improvement.
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now, time for a look at the weather. it is quite warm in north—west scotland, temperatures into the high teens in some spots. the soggy weather into england and wales. it is brightening up now but the threat of torrential and thundery downpours this evening that may produce a lot of rain in a short space of time with the risk of travel disruption. they will ease as the night goes on with further breaks of rain across england and wales may be the eastern side of northern ireland and southern scotland as well. northern scotla nd southern scotland as well. northern scotland staying dry. low pressure so scotland staying dry. low pressure so close by for the start of the weekend. scotland, northern ireland, north wales and parts of the midlands and east anglia but south of that you get to see some sunshine and a few showers of what will be a very blustery saturday. the wind eases on saturday but still some showers around especially in the north of west but a bit of sunshine
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also. today at five: sally challen, the woman jailed for killing her husband after years of emotional abuse, has her murder conviction reduced to manslaughter. applause and cheering her lawyers argued she was subjected to "coercive control" throughout her 30—year marriage. today she walked free from court due to time already served. without the support of my family around me, who kept me going, and my endless telephone calls to them, at inappropriate times.” endless telephone calls to them, at inappropriate times. i don't know how i would have coped. we'll have the latest from the old bailey, and we'll be talking to a lawyer representing women subjected domestic abuse.

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