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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 12, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you are watching bbc news, 11am, their main stories... borisjohnson prepares to make his pitch to become the next conservative party leader, he will promise to deliver brexit without delay. he is a positive optimistic person who will not only deliver brexit but make our country more successful and positive about the future. we will bring you the speech by borisjohnson live. new plan to tackle climate change, the uk commits to cut greenhouse gas emissions ten net zero by 2050, the first major nation to commit to the
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target. police in hong kong fired tear gas and rubber bullets at protesters angry at plans to make it easier to send people to mainland china to stand trial. well pull order to recall half a million tumble dryers over concerns the appliances pose a fire risk well pull. the fate of sir philip green's empire is expected to be decided today. good morning, welcome to bbc news. in the next few moments, the front runner in the conservative party leadership race, boris johnson, runner in the conservative party leadership race, borisjohnson, will officially launch his campaign. ahead of his speech, he has warned any further delay to brexit will
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speu any further delay to brexit will spell disaster for the conservative party ahead of the launch of his leadership campaign. he will tell supporters the uk must leave on the sist supporters the uk must leave on the 31st of october and any more canon kicking will mean defeat for the party at her general election —— khan. he will say his victories as london mayor marked him out as the pessimist able to beatjeremy corbyn. he is the favourite in the race. these are not quite picture so i hope they stabilise before boris johnson appears and we can bring you his speech. the slogan for his campaign, but boris, let us bring in oui’ campaign, but boris, let us bring in our system political editor, norman smith —— back boris. quite a long time since he has faced the questions ofjournalists and quiet since he announced he would be standing as leader. deliberately so because his team want to keep him out of the public gaze or media
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gaze, there is a fear he might do something that might damage his position as a front runner. when he arrived, his car pulled up at another building, he was pretty much washed out before anyone realised what was going on, a deliberate policy —— rushed out. he will have to a nswer policy —— rushed out. he will have to answer questions in the next hour and for both his supporters and opponents, it is a pivotal moment because for his supporters, the moment they hope he will be able to demonstrate he is a potential prime minister in waiting and for his opponents, they hope it will be the moment he full is flat on his face oi’ moment he full is flat on his face or the first signs of cracks in his sta nce or the first signs of cracks in his stance —— falls. indication that perhaps his position as the frontrunner is not quite as secure as the numbers might expect. a big for borisjohnson. as the numbers might expect. a big for boris johnson. his as the numbers might expect. a big for borisjohnson. his team have been trying to explain away the fact he has not been doing media
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interviews. this was one of his backers, chief secretary to the treasury, liz truss, this morning. he has been working 24/7 to bring over our he has been working 24/7 to bring overourmps he has been working 24/7 to bring over our mps because this is the stage where we have got to convince members of the party to support borisjohnson, he is the best candidate, a positive optimistic person, who will not only deliver brexit but also make our country more successful and more positive about the future. mrjohnson will be taking questions this morning, i am not entirely sure he will be doing one—to—one interviews afterwards, who knows if we do not manage to get the feed organised from the press conference, maybe it will be difficult to see what sort of questions and answers take place. difficult to see what sort of questions and answers take placem has stabilised at the moment, hopefully we will be all right. some might say that if his supporters are worried about what he might do in front of the media in the run—up to
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the leadership campaign, why do they think he should be leader?” the leadership campaign, why do they think he should be leader? i think all of the doubts and difficulties and question marks about his character have been factored in by tory mps, they have taken it on board, but i think that viewers as it is trumped by two things. they have formed the view he will deliver on brexit and the brexiteers in particular are clinging to the hope and his claim he will take britain out of the eu by the 31st of october, that is one big plus in his favour. the other quite simply as they think he is a winner, they look on the other candidates and they posed the question, who is it who can see offjeremy corbyn and nigel farage and the answer they have come up farage and the answer they have come up with is borisjohnson. for a very simple sort of survival instinct, thatis simple sort of survival instinct, that is quite a lot of motivation to back borisjohnson that is quite a lot of motivation to back boris johnson and that is quite a lot of motivation to back borisjohnson and the belief he
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can save tory seats. that has been the pitch from mrjohnson‘s team in the pitch from mrjohnson‘s team in the campaign, saying, what happened in london, predominantly a labour city, mrjohnson managed to win quite comfortably against a big name like ken livingstone. the argument is, yeah, he can do it again. for that reason, even though many of them privately i think are a little bit uneasy, a little bit queasy, he does at the moment seem to have by far the largest number of mps backing him. what does he say in a nswer to backing him. what does he say in answer to the question about how he would ensure the uk leaves the eu on the 31st of october, with or without a deal, when today there are moves afoot in parliament to try to block afoot in parliament to try to block ano afoot in parliament to try to block a no deal brexit? how can he guarantee that date? that is a very good question and i am sure that will form part of the questioning
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because it is all very well to say, we will leave on the 31st of october, but as everyone knows, westminster, brussels, pretty much goes on holiday for the next two, three months, the chance to engage in serious negotiations seems pretty limited. added to which, we know that you have said, forget it, not going to be a renegotiation of the withdrawal treaty, we had that from jean—claude juncker only yesterday, we have heard it from numerous other eu people. there is the question remark about the plan, what is boris johnson's master brexit blueprint that somehow breaks the deadlock when as we know theresa may tried umpteen different permutations to try to wriggle through with some kind of deal and was unable to manage it. the basic arguments over brexit have not really changed on the basic issues around the backstop have not really changed and it is
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not clear yet that mrjohnson has some killer move that will somehow break that impasse. the other default position to leave without any agreement, that is looking increasingly tricky because as we know there is a real possibility now of mps getting together to pass legislation to pretty much thwart any attempt by borisjohnson as prime minister to leave without pay deal. it seems to me he is hemmed in quite significantly —— leave without a deal. still to try to press ahead, still the threat of the nuclear option, a vote of no confidence. although boris johnson option, a vote of no confidence. although borisjohnson is talking a big game on getting two october the sist, big game on getting two october the 31st, being able to deliver will be much harder. i think geoffrey cox is on his feet at the moment, let us listen to what he is saying. receives the full support of the
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conservative party. and they shall have my support full heartedly and unstintingly. but when weighing my choice of whom to support, as our next prime minister, i have had to bearin next prime minister, i have had to bear in mind certain indispensable requirements. first, these are extraordinary times. and we need a personality big enough, strong enough, and with the political imagination to rise to the historic challenge with which our country is i'iow challenge with which our country is now confronted. secondly, there must bea now confronted. secondly, there must be a determination to provide political leadership, a managerial and bureaucratic approach to politics will not suffice.
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applause and that must be accompanied by an unsha keable and that must be accompanied by an unshakeable commitment that full self—government outside of the european union is a precious prize which must be thoughtfully and carefully delivered in the interests of the whole of our united kingdom and whose long—term benefits far exceed the inevitable short—term costs. third, brexit can only be enacted successfully its strategic instinct is allied to a proven willingness to put together a brilliant team and to trust, delegate and inform and involve ministerial and parliamentary
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colleagues at every stage. finally, we need a leader who can unify the conservative family, out campaign and out fight jeremy corbyn and nigel farage in any time and in any corner of our country. applause and for these reasons, i am and for these reasons, lam pleased today, i am and for these reasons, lam pleased today, lam proud and for these reasons, lam pleased today, i am proud today, to introduce the candidate who i shall support to lead the conservative party and our nation. a man who has already shown that he can lead this great global city through two successful terms. great global city through two successfulterms. ladies great global city through two successful terms. ladies and gentlemen, boris johnson.
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applause thank you very much, good morning, everybody. thank you. thanks, everybody. thank you. thanks, everybody. thank you. morning! thank you, everybody. applause thank you. thank you, everybody. good morning, everybody. can you hear me? thank you very much, thank you for that introduction. ladies and gentlemen, a measure of the resilience of this country that since the vote to leave the eu and in defiance of all predictions, the economy has grown much faster than the rest of europe. unemployment has fallen to the lowest level since 1972, exports have soared, english
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football teams have won the champions league and the uefa cup by beating other english football teams. inward investment has soared toa teams. inward investment has soared to a record £1.3 trillion. almost as if the commercial binds of the british people as insulating them from the crisis in politics, yet we cannot ignore the morass at westminster where parties have entered a yellow box junction unable to move forward or back and around the country there was a mood of dissolution, even despair at our ability to get things done. the longer it goes on, the worse the risk that there will be serious contamination and a real loss of confidence because the people of this country deserve better from their leaders. they need courage and they need clarity and they want a
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resolution and that is our mission today and that is why i am standing before you because now is the time to remember our duty to the people and the reasons for the brexit vote. it was notjust and the reasons for the brexit vote. it was not just about democracy, although that was fundamental. it was not just about although that was fundamental. it was notjust about immigration, although people were entirely reasonable in wanting national controls. i remember the campaign vividly and i think i understood some of the feelings of those who voted to leave. they wanted to be heard. they wanted to feel that they too could be part of the astonishing success too could be part of the astonishing success of this country. they wanted to feel their hopes and dreams were as important to the gulf as the desires and priorities of any metropolitan style guo or head of a ftse 100 metropolitan style guo or head of a ftse100 company —— to the
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government. now is the time to unite the country and the society. we cannot begin that task until we have delivered on the primary request of the people, the big thing they asked us the people, the big thing they asked us to do. after three years and two missed deadlines, we must leave the eu on the 31st of october. applause and we must do better than the current withdrawal will agreement —— withdrawal agreement rejected three times by parliament. i am not aiming for no deal, i do not think we will end up with any such thing, but it is only responsible to prepare vigorously and seriously for no deal. it is astonishing that anyone could suggest dispensing with that
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vault to tools of negotiation. —— that vital tool of negotiation. i think this is a great country and we are more than capable of rising to the challenge and it is only by preparing and raising awareness of what no deal might entail that we will ensure we do not resort to that option, it is only if we have the courage to get ready for it that we will carry any conviction in brussels and get the deal we need. they do not want no deal anymore than i do and we will simply not get a result if we give the impression we wa nt a result if we give the impression we want to go on kicking the can down the road with yet delay. delay means defeat, delay meansjeremy corbyn, kick the can again and we kick the bucket, with every week and month that goes by. in which we fail to deliver on our promise, i am afraid we will further alienate not just our natural supporters, driving
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them into the arms of insurgent parties, but anyone who believes politicians should deliver on their promises. the paradox is that we have not allayed the divisions in our society by failing to deliver the outcome which millions voted for, we have made them worse and we risk making them worse again. when we come up risk making them worse again. when we come up with that better deal, i think there will be a sense of overwhelming relief as brexit finally leaves the front pages and becomes a debate about how to get the best possible free—trade deal in brussels. and then there will be the chance to concentrate on the britain we can create for everyone. it is an extraordinary fact that the united kingdom is forecasting a life planned to go neck and neck with germany is the largest and most prosperous economy in europe —— forecast in our lifetimes. a number
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of cutting—edge industries, academia, battery technology, it is enabling us to be world leaders in clea n enabling us to be world leaders in clean power and environmental protection. and yet if i may be permitted to use a metaphor based on the internal combustion engine, we are somehow achieving grand prix speeds but without firing on all cylinders. we all know there is a huge gulf in the prosperity between london and the south—east, most productive region in europe, and the rest of the uk. if we are to respond to that profound message of the brexit vote, to unite our country and society, we must fight now for those who feel left behind, we need to love a lap not to neglect our capital, of course not, but to put in infrastructure lifting every region —— we need to level up. it is absurd spain should have 80%
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coverage of fibre—optic broadband against only 7% in this country. madness that leads should be the largest city in europe with no metro rail system —— leeds. we must end the injustice of our education primary funding the injustice of our education primaryfunding gap the injustice of our education primary funding gap and in secondary, giving young people everywhere the same tools, freedom and confidence to succeed and do more to fund our amazing too often forgotten. it should be our fundamental moral purpose as a government to bridge notjust the wealth gap, not just government to bridge notjust the wealth gap, notjust the productivity gap, but the opportunity gap between one part of the uk and another. i know we can do it. i know we can unite our country and our society because i have seen and our society because i have seen andi and our society because i have seen and i have used exactly those tools to help unite our capital, the
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greatest city on earth. when i became mayor 11 years ago, we had four of the six poorest boroughs in the uk, when i left office after two terms, we had none of the bottom 20. although everybody‘s life expectancy had risen, among the poorest quartile the gains had been fastest. what was the method by which we brought the city together? fantastic investment in affordable mass transit so people on modest incomes could live near the place of work, we out built labour with more than 100,000 affordable homes, we massively expanded the london living wage. a policy plan adopted by the national government. we cut the murder rate by 50%, we cut road traffic fatalities by 50%. when you consider that those calamities full disproportionately on poorer families, you can see everything we did was driven by a desire for
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social justice and did was driven by a desire for socialjustice and promoted that outcome —— fall. at the same time, we defended and championed the businesses and wealth creators who make the investments possible and there was a long period when i was just about the only politician who was willing to stick up for financial services, even though they produce £70 billion in tax for the economy. i did it because that is the symmetry at the heart of modern conservatism. we can fight for the teachers and the nurses and the fireman and the armed service personnel and the police precisely because we are willing to encourage the tech wizards and taxi drivers and bankers as well. we enable the extraordinary success of our private sector with a strong and committed passionate and well funded public sector. it is that synergy, the
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symbiosis, the sizzling synergy that is so fertile in generating further economic growth. that is the formula, that is the way we will bridge the opportunity gap and bring the country together. responding to the country together. responding to the mighty plea of the majority of our people fulfil under mental change on the 23rd ofjune, 2016. —— forfundamental change on the 23rd ofjune, 2016. —— for fundamental change. no town, change on the 23rd ofjune, 2016. —— forfundamental change. no town, no community, no person, no one feels left behind. that is the way we will rename the bonds of this amazing country and in everything we do we will seek to strengthen the union of our four nations —— will seek to strengthen the union of ourfour nations —— reknit the bonds. their wealth was a soft power superpower. i have seen across the world and our armed forces and diplomacy, our cultural impact, how we are so diplomacy, our cultural impact, how
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we are so much diplomacy, our cultural impact, how we are so much more diplomacy, our cultural impact, how we are so much more than the sum of our parts. ourfriends we are so much more than the sum of our parts. our friends abroad we are so much more than the sum of our parts. ourfriends abroad do not think of england or scotland or wales or northern ireland, they think of all of the values expressed by the union flag. economic and political freedom, by the union flag. economic and politicalfreedom, democracy, free speech, human rights, passionate determination to campaign for the protection of the natural world. female education. that is what they know the uk stands for. they admire it deeply. over the last few years, i have seen in ourfriends it deeply. over the last few years, i have seen in our friends the desire for this country to recover its confidence and self belief. the curious thing is very often it has been our friends and partners who have shown more confidence in this country and we have ourselves. —— than we have ourselves. it is time to end the debilitating uncertainty, the doubts and division with clarity and decision. that is why i believe
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iam the and decision. that is why i believe i am the right person to take this country i am the right person to take this cou ntry forward i am the right person to take this country forward and i am proud and humble to have the support of so many of my parliamentary friends and collea g u es many of my parliamentary friends and colleagues here today. indeed representatives of my former team in city hall. though i do not for one minute underestimate the complexity and challenges that lie ahead, i have long experience of managing real short—term difficulties in the confident expectation of long—term success. i took this city through riots and strikes and the teething problems of the olympics which was actually no picnic, as i remember, and with a team of stars, we brought this city together, with new infrastructure, with renewed and relentless emphasis on education and
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technology, we shrunk the opportunity gap. to sum up my mission in a sentence, what i want to do now, with your help, is to do for the whole country what we did in london. releasing the creative energies of our country and its peoples and healing the divisions. i will make one final observation. i know the london labour left, i have studied them and their ways, i know who they are, what kind of people, i know there are sessions with strange far left latin american cow dealers, proto— marxist views, a curious hostility to free speech. in jeremy corbyn, we have a man who is far to the left of ken livingstone in his nihilistic determination to hike taxes to penal rates, to attack wealth creation and private property and in his failure again and again
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to extirpate anti—semitism from his circle. i am afraid what he stands for... applause iam afraid applause i am afraid that he and what he stands for re real threat to our fundamental values and our way of life ——, they are a real threat. i ama life ——, they are a real threat. i am a proud conservative who has campaigned on every seatjust am a proud conservative who has campaigned on every seat just about in the country and i believe in the innate decency of our country, in its genius and hard—won freedoms. i believe in setting people free by equipping them with the education to achieve their dreams. i believe in the vital symmetry between free—market economics and superb public services and i will do absolutely anything i can within the bounds of the constitution and the law to prevent the government of the
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uk from passing into the hands of those who buy their total disdain for wealth creation, their content for wealth creation, their content for the normal aspirations of millions —— their content for the normal aspirations of millions, would compromise our ability to fund the nhs and so much else besides. we cannot let them near downing street. last time, i would remind you, i faced... i defeated him when the conservatives were 17 points behind in london. we can do it again and we must. we can get brexit done and we can win, we can unite our country and our society, and that is why i am standing to be leader of the conservative party and prime minister because this contest is not chiefly about any one person, or even about the conservative party, it is the opening salvo in a battle to restore faith in our democracy.
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to renew the natural ties of affection that unite the uk and to protect this country from red to thread claude socialism of the labour party and we will do that by articulating a new and inspiring vision —— red toothed socialism. my friends, i ask you know to join vision —— red toothed socialism. my friends, i ask you know tojoin me in that great project. yes, sometimes that great challenge that lies before us. but with your help and with the help of the british people, we will succeed on the whole country will win. thank you very much indeed for your support. applause
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thank you, everybody. applause thank you. thank you very much. i am told we will have six questions from representatives of the media, i am going to go first of all to laura kuenssberg of the bbc. and then bath rugby. -- beth rigby. you suggested brexit would be a straightforward win — win and it has been a chaotic mess. as foreign secretary, you offe nd mess. as foreign secretary, you offend people at home and abroad, you have a reputation for being cavalier with vital detail, and already in this campaign, you are telling simple supporters you will do everything to avoid leaving the eu without a deal and others he will gladly do that. it is a simple question, if you want to be prime minister, can the country trust you? yes, of course, laura. the answer
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perhaps in that great minestrone of observations, one substantive question, which was that, one crouton i picked up, you think i have been somehow inconsistent. somehow inconsistent in saying that ido somehow inconsistent in saying that i do not want a no deal outcome, but i think it is right for our great country to prepare for that outcome. i think what most people understand... applause what most people understand is the best way to avoid a no deal outcome and disorderly brexit of any kind as to make the preparations no that will enable us to leave on a managed way if we have to but above all fb make the preparations we will carry
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the conviction with friends and partners that we are able to make such an exit if we really have to. if we are moved, if we have to go down that route which would be the last resort, not something anybody desires is theirfirst last resort, not something anybody desires is their first option, if we have to go down that route then the best way to avoid it as to prepare for it and be absolutely clear to our friends for it and be absolutely clear to ourfriends and for it and be absolutely clear to our friends and partners what we need to do. that is the way we will get a need to do. that is the way we will geta doi need to do. that is the way we will get a doi think is sensible in the interest of both sides —— get a deal. the team i hope to build or hit the ground running and engage in the friendliest possible way with our colleagues over the channel and i think they will rapidly come to see they have a new government with a mandate and determination to get
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things done. a new optimism and confidence about what britain can do. i think it will respond to that and there will be enthusiasm about getting this thing done and moving forward. it isn't good for the uk or other friends and partners to continue with this kind of uncertainty. that is why i think it is important to be robust and determined and committed to preparations for a no deal and the british people having been told foster many years the adding capable of going down that route will respond to that challenge and rise to it and we will get there. beth. you brandish your brexit credentials but many of your colleagues worry about your character. my palate?
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your character. your formal foreign office colleague said your description of the plan as a suicide vest adapter in britain was outrageous and inappropriate and hurtful. he said this language had to stop but it does not stop. you brought shame on your party when you described veiled muslim women as letterboxes and bank robbers. people who have worked closely with you do not think you are fit to be prime minister. i am delighted that many of my former colleagues seem to descend from that view. applause i want to make a general point, you have asked a fair question and i wa nt to have asked a fair question and i want to pick a point about the way i do things and the one i use.
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occasionally some plaster comes off asa occasionally some plaster comes off as a result of a phrase i use on the wait has been taken out of context and attempted by those who wish for reasons of their own to caricature my views. i think it is vital that we as politicians remember one of these in spiny feels alienating now from us all as a breed as we are muffling unveiling our language. not speaking as we find, covering everything up and bureaucratic platitudes. what they want to hear is what we genuinely think and f sometimes and the course of trying to get that across i used phrases and language that have caused offence then i am sorry for the offence then i am sorry for the
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offence i have caused but i will continue to speak as directly as i can. that's what i think the british public want. applause paul brand itv. in the spirit of this campaign! paul brand itv. in the spirit of this campaign i would like to ask have you done anything illegal in your life? secondly have you done anything illegal in your life ? secondly regardless have you done anything illegal in your life? secondly regardless of the answer to that question, the problem you do have in this contest as much as you might refute it as one of a trust and viability. may i ask do you regret any of the mistakes you have made a new political and personal life and are you saying you would change as prime ministers? excellent questions. have i done anything illegal? i cannot swear i have always observed a top speed limit of 70. i would not want
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to be put on... on your general question, this is the key issue here, do i do what i promise i am going to do as a politician? that is theissue going to do as a politician? that is the issue that you're just italy raise at the answer to that is yes. —— you legitimately raise. we said we would do next and we did plus ten, we said we would do 100,000 homes and we did slightly more. i promised to stop my crime which was out of control, to cut knife crime and 11 years ago when i was first in icy vetera ns and 11 years ago when i was first in icy veterans of that campaign, it was terrible, children losing their
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lives at the days of 30 a year, teenagers stabbed to death. we had to ta ke teenagers stabbed to death. we had to take tough decisions and i am delighted that two of my former deputy mayors who are intrinsically involved in that campaign are both no on ourteam involved in that campaign are both no on our team today and they did an extraordinary job. applause they did an externallyjob, kit had to ta ke they did an externallyjob, kit had to take difficult decisions to encourage the police to take 11,000 lives of the streets of london saving knows how many lives and avoiding how much grief and misery forfamilies avoiding how much grief and misery for families and we avoiding how much grief and misery forfamilies and we did. and search —— stop and search and the government is now putting the emphasis on that in towns and cities
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because there is nothing kinder out more loving that you can do if you see a young kid coming down the street who may be carrying a knife than to ask him to turn out his or her but invariably has pockets and produce that knife. that is not discriminate, that is a kinda compassionate thing to do and it worked. we cut serious youth violence by 32%, my crime went down, the moderate went down 50% and —— knife crime went down. moderate was about 100 a year which is an astonishing thing for a city of the size and that was because the one of the police and one thing about the way i will campaign and hope to be prime minister, i believe is a literal great public services at as
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you job notjust to be the chief consumer to hold them to account but to recognise you are the leader and their champion. we should get behind our police and support them and fund them properly because they do a fantasticjob. applause jason from the daily mail. is he here? can we sort out this drugs question which seems to have doubled this campaign? you told gq question which seems to have doubled this campaign? you told 60 some years ago at after she had taken cocaine that you tried it at university and you remember it vividly and asked whether it had gone up your vividly and asked whether it had gone up your nose vividly and asked whether it had gone up your nose you said yes it must have done but didn't do much for me. when you telling the truth
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then and did you regret the fact that you took a class a drug? the canonical account of this when i was 19 has appeared many times and i think what most people in this country really think what most people in this cou ntry really wa nt think what most people in this country really want us to focus on in this campaign if i may say so as what we can do for them. what our plans are for this great country of ours. i think the prospectus i am setting up this morning of solid and modern conservatism, a one nation visionjob modern conservatism, a one nation vision job championing the wealth sector of our country and extolling the merits of free—market capitalism, i use that one, because we believe that is the way to support the poorest and neediest in society. that is at the core of what we are trying to do, a message i do not think people have heard enough.
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iam not think people have heard enough. i am determined to make at the core of my campaign and all the rest of it is in danger of blowing us off track. let us focus on what conservatism is and what conservatives can do. that's what the public wants to hear and also they want to hear can we find evidence now who can beatjeremy corbyn and deliver a sensible brexit that fights off the threat from the insurgent brexit party? that is a job i believe i am a better suited to do today. that's when i think the public want us to direct our energies. george barker of the financial times. thank you. i
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wondered if i could ask, you mentioned some of your phraseology was the plaster of the ceilings, i will not use the word but she famously said eff business, i wonder what you would say to financial times we does, what exact that you mean when you said eff business?” read your work every day and and everybody i think if you look at my record as a campaigner and politician i do not think there is anybody any the modern conservative party who can be said to have done more to stick up for business even at the toughest of times. applause after the crash i remember vividly,
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there was a feeding frenzy in 2008 on financial services and london, everybody said we should allow the bankers to depart to zurich and new york and singapore and good riddance andi york and singapore and good riddance and i thought that was a disastrous approach. our fantastic city and the uk economy benefits from hard—working people, uk economy benefits from ha rd—working people, not uk economy benefits from hard—working people, not all on massive incomes and financial services, have a million people probably in the city who depend on financial services but not all one massive incomes. put spread on table for people on modest incomes across london and the uk and i will stick up london and the uk and i will stick upfor london and the uk and i will stick up for them and every business in this country and when i was foreign secretary i spent much of my time
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trying to sell, i see michael fallon there because he and i know it is like flying around the world and one of the most imported thing you have to do asa of the most imported thing you have to do as a government minister is to sell the uk abroad. i can tell you ifiam sell the uk abroad. i can tell you if i am lucky enough to become our leader and prime minister will be no more enthusiastic and committed champion and salesperson, man of the uk. that is the mission. last question goes to heather stewart of the guardian. you have promised to exit the eu on october 31 with
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without a deal, but brussels may not be as susceptible to your charms as you hope and mps are already moving to block a no deal exit. what then and how you commit now to resign if you fail to meet that until the 31st deadline? —— october 31 you fail to meet that until the 31st deadline? —— 0ctober31 deadline.” understand that colleagues in parliament have very strong views but ourjob is to engage with everybody and to point out that the real existential threat i now think faces both major parties if we fail to get this thing done. in the end maturity and a sense of duty will prevail and it will be very difficult for colleagues in parliament to obstruct the will of the people and simply to block brexit. we asked the people, we put
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the question out to them and in a senseit the question out to them and in a sense it was right to do so because theissue sense it was right to do so because the issue of membership of the eu does go fundamentally to people is a sense of what their future is at the identity and when they see themselves. it was right to ask, they returned a very clear answer by a substantial majority. parliament voted overwhelmingly to trigger article 50 and get it done and i think that if we now block at as collectively as parliamentarians then we will face the whirlwind and face mortal deprivation from the electorate —— motto retribution and i say let's come together and get this thing done and in brussels they will have a government that will be inspired with a bigger confidence and optimism about what we can do but also total conviction about the way forward and how to get it done.
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i think we will get results. i am not going to pretend to you that everything will be plain sailing, there will be difficulties and may be bumps in the road but my team will hit the ground running and have a fantastic team and will work flat out between now and october 31 and i think you will get the result the country needs. i sensible and orderly brexit that allows this country to flourish as a great independent nation but also that builds a new partnership with our friends across the channel. there has been one failing in i would single out any last three years as we have made enough of that future partnership and the benefits that will bring to both sides of the channel, not enough about what we can do to promote a new sense of
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utopianism and conservative sense of europeanism antibody party that took the uk into the common market and evolved anyway that was very much against what had been initially promised to the people but we can still have a fantastic intense intimate relationship with our friends and partners overseas. we should do that and one of the tragedies over 45 years of membership is that some of the bilateral relations have actually not developed any way they could have done. teaching a french and german in our schools has declined paradoxically rather than increased. now is the time notjust to come out the european union but to intensify our trading relationships and friendships and partnerships with those european nations. we cannot do that and that should be the ambition of conservatives as well. —— we can
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do that. applause thank you. borisjohnson boris johnson watching borisjohnson watching his leadership campaign in central london, norman smith listening in. what the jamaica bit? —— what did you make of it? classic boris johnson calling for courage and conviction and an end to doubt and lack of self belief that has bedevilled our approach to brexit suggesting he was the man to give britain its mojo back anti hope that would encourage a different response from the eu which sent it was bereft of any detail on anything. there was no clarity about what is brexit plan might be, how he could go about
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putting together a new deal which the eu might be prepared to negotiate on. he said he would keep no deal on the table and was astonishing that it had been taken off by mrs may when she was prime minister. we did get the character question, very blunt question about remarks he had made about muslim women wearing a broker and whether they were like post office boxes and his suggestion the deal mrs may had done was wrapping a suicide vest around britain, he was challenged about those remarks and his answer was to say that as a plain speaking and people like it when we do not shield everything and carefully calibrated phrases, he told it as it is suggested sometimes his comments we re is suggested sometimes his comments were taken out of context. it seemed this was a man not apologising for
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the way he does politics. what is the way he does politics. what is the impact of that? i suspect not much. many people will have factored in his occasionally colourful forays and will think that is the way he does things and other people will be profoundly offended by that. did anything today significantly change the dynamic and this context? i'm not sure it has, his supporters will be behind him and critics equally will question whether this man is fit to be prime ministers and whether he has a plan for brexit. thank you. more politics at midday, prime ministers questions. for the latest business news.
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the campaign that introduced the living wage is calling for a greater scrutiny on zero hours. uber has said melbourne will become the first market for this flying taxi service. adjoins dallas and los angeles as the third centre. the uk tax centre is booming looking atjob skated across the country. last year more
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than1.7 across the country. last year more than 1.7 million were listed across the uk driven by growth in that you ta ke the uk driven by growth in that you take hubs across the country meaning there are now five uk cities where more than 10% of residents are employed any tech sector. they are oxford, cambridge, reading, belfast and newcastle. belfast reported the highest growth and outside of london the cities that had the most tech openings were manchester and leeds digital commerce and marketing is strong. but speak to the secretary of state jeremy wright. let's talk about these jobs because a welcome boost and we have this on appointment figures yesterday suggesting more people than ever are in work, it is these tech jobs that are creating the new opportunities. exactly are creating the new opportunities. exa ctly a nd are creating the new opportunities. exactly and this is really encouraging, a great opportunity in what is london tech week to talk about how well uk tech companies are doing and how they are creating opportunities but we need to address
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some of the concerns of the tick industry about how we provide the people with skills and abilities to fellas opportunities. we have been talking about how we make sure we continue to promote that training and skills and education that only people to take up jobs. and skills and education that only people to take upjobs. and these jobs are notjust in london, the spread across the country and in these tech hubs, what is it about these tech hubs, what is it about the cities that make them suitable for thesejobs? the cities that make them suitable for these jobs? it is hugely encouraging your seamless growth across the country and what drives that growth and success as these are ecosystems, companies able to get together and access world—class universities, we have four of the ten top universities in the world in the uk and the animal to take advantage of those innovative universities and of each other
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innovation as a developer ideas and progress. if you look at how some of these companies have grown to be very substantial, the so—called unicorns, companies that started small but became billion—dollar enterprises, we have a vast share of those behind only the us and china, about one third of the unicorns in europe and we have seen roughly one unicorn a month since the last london tech week. these are companies doing fantastically well coming from all of the country. going forward given we have a big deadline of brexit, you are listening to boris johnson deadline of brexit, you are listening to borisjohnson launches tony leadership there, calling for a clea n b rea k tony leadership there, calling for a clean break with europe and we wonder what impact that has on business? particularly on technology thatis business? particularly on technology that is doing so well. the most significant impact on business as uncertainties of the quicker we can bring a to an end the better
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business will like it. you hear that as much as i do. the tech sector pots greatest concern is access to talent and it is partly about skills and emigration. as we leave the eu we have the chance to control our own immigration policy and to design it and own immigration policy and to design itandi own immigration policy and to design it and i want to make sure that the interests of the tech sector and helped load and clear and with us deciding that systems within these can be met. thank you. the boom in techjobs. more later. we'll see what is happening in the commons because prime ministers questions begins midday, theresa may answering questions and jeremy corbyn on the other side, it will be an interesting one because the focus for a lot of tory mps will not be on her but on who is going to be
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succeeding her with the leadership contest under way. we were just hearing from borisjohnson. we will be back in the commons at midday when prime as those questions begins. let's catch up with the weather. a lot of rainfall of the last couple of days and more any forecast. this is the satellite imagery, a lot of clout and bright spells to the west but look at the cloud here coming out of france and through the channel, bringing heavy rain this afternoon and some thunderstorms in the far south—east. north and west patchy rain but drier than this morning, maximum temperatures of about 14 to 17. the rain and the south—east spreads north and west and look at the dark blues and greens, heavy rain expected as it moves to north—east england and the
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south—east of scotland where they met office has issued an amber warning. as much is 100 millimetres over higher ground, the potential for flooding through the night into the early hours. more rain throughout thursday, into the weekend things getting better, drier weather and temperatures starting to creep up, about 19 but watch out for heavy rain tonight and tomorrow particularly in north—eastern and south—east scotland.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live. these are today's main stories... boris johnson makes his pitch to become the next conservative party leader and insists he can get brexit done and win the next general election. delay means defeat, delay means jeremy corbyn, kick the can again and we kicked the bucket. a new plan to tackle climate change, the uk plans to cut emissions to net zero by 2050, the first major nation to propose the target. details after prime minister's questions starting shortly, a question on climate change. we will be live in the house
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of commons. the act southampton and peterborough football coach bob higgins has beenjailed for 24 peterborough football coach bob higgins has been jailed for 24 years for sexually abusing young players. police in hong kong fired tear gas and bullets at protesters, angry at plans to make it easier to send people to mainland china to stand trial. the fate of sir philip green's retail empire is expected to be decided today with a crucial vote ona plan be decided today with a crucial vote on a plan to close shops and slash rents. you were watching bbc news with me, joanna gosling. boris johnson you were watching bbc news with me, joanna gosling. borisjohnson has launched his campaign to become the next conservative party leader, promising to deliver brexit.
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the former foreign secretary is currently considered the favourite of the 10 candidates to succeed theresa may. let's llisten to what he had to say. iam not i am not aiming for a no deal outcome, i do not think we will end up outcome, i do not think we will end up with any such thing, but it is only responsible to prepare vigorously and seriously for no deal. it is astonishing anyone could suggest dispensing with that vital tool of negotiation. i think this is a great country and we are more than capable of rising to the challenge and it is only by preparing and raising awareness of what no deal might entail that we will ensure that we do not resort to that option. it is only if we have the courage to get ready for it that we will carry any conviction in brussels and get the deal we need because they do not want no deal anymore than i do and we will not get a result if we give the
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impression we want to on kicking the can down the road with yet more delay. delay means defeat, delay meansjeremy delay. delay means defeat, delay means jeremy corbyn, kick delay. delay means defeat, delay meansjeremy corbyn, kick the can again, we kick the bucket. he was supported by the attorney general, geoffrey cox, and later the home secretary, sajid javid, is also making his pitch to mp5. there is going on while they are still serving, some of them, in the government of theresa may and she is about to start prime minister's questions in the commons. lots of empty seats on the tory benches. while we wait for theresa may to stand up and start answering the questions, let us get a few thoughts from norman smith. strange, all of these people in her government campaigning and some of them saying things that do not reflect very well on her but she is still out there doing prime minister's questions. on her but she is still out there doing prime minister's questionsm is funny, the extent to which once power m oves is funny, the extent to which once
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power moves away, interestjust disappears. this pmqs is going to be a bit ofa disappears. this pmqs is going to be a bit of a sideshow, let us be honest, all of the attention was on the big launch of borisjohnson, he had some fairly harsh words to say about mrs may's approach to negotiations, saying it was astonishing she had taken no deal off the table and while he said he would not rule out no deal, that was not his intention. again reaffirming his commitment to get a deal by the 31st of october and that is his call pitch to say to tory mps, look, i will deliver brexit, come what may, by the 31st of october —— his core pitch. otherwise the conservative party is facing defeat, we kick the can down the road, we kick the bucket, his central pitch. we did not get any detail on the sort of deal he is going to negotiate. some
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of his team say today is not a day for that sort of technical detail but down the line he will be pressed about how exactly he is going to break the brexit deadlock, what is he going to do about the vexed issue of the backstop? a lot of his pitch was around his time as london may, trumpeting his record on the grounds of improvements in public transport, drop in the murder rate —— london mayor. a lot is perched on his record as london mayor. that too will come under scrutiny because many people take a differing view of his time as london mayor and there isa his time as london mayor and there is a view he did not achieve that much. a long way for borisjohnson
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to go. my senses today there was no real killer blow, no moment when he appeared to wobble. nor was there that sort of moment when he sealed the deal. i suspect his supporters will be happy and his opponents will ta ke will be happy and his opponents will take the view that there is still some way to go, they will have to be more detail, more press conferences, live broadcast interviews. today we we re live broadcast interviews. today we were curtailed to just sex questions ina were curtailed to just sex questions in a comparatively controlled environment —— six questions. live debates being organised by the bbc and itv and others, iam debates being organised by the bbc and itv and others, i am told by his team, in principle, he has agreed to the itv debate, there will be lots more questions for borisjohnson down the line. the key question facing all of the candidates right now is how to handle brexit. later
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today, labour tabling a motion in the commons, cross—party motion, to try to prevent no—deal brexit. obviously, the question is, is it likely to succeed in the commons, and if it does get passed, how can it stop brexit with no alternative, because the legislation is there for us because the legislation is there for us to leave on the 31st of october? if this plan worked out, namely that mps if this plan worked out, namely that m ps voted if this plan worked out, namely that mps voted to set aside a day, june 25, i think, mps voted to set aside a day, june 25, ithink, when mps voted to set aside a day, june 25, i think, when backbenchers could introduce their own legislation, in theory, it would enable them to put ina new theory, it would enable them to put in a new legal default. the current legal default as we leave without any sort of agreement. what they would do is insist that the prime minister would have to go back and ask for an extension. let us mull over a little bit about how the borisjohnson press conference went.
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iamjoined by borisjohnson press conference went. i am joined by a supporter, priti patel, what did you make of it?” thought he was very clear today in terms of the direct —— direction of travel, talking about britain beyond brexit as well, standing up for economic and political freedoms, confront jeremy corbyn, some economic and political freedoms, confrontjeremy corbyn, some of economic and political freedoms, confront jeremy corbyn, some of the hostile issues and challengesjeremy corbyn is posing, the threats to our country, so i think today we have heard from boris very clearly the road map, the direction of travel, the conviction he has as a person as well to get us out of the eu, but actually raise our standard in the world all over again and deliver for our country. a lot of big picture stuff, what we did not get was any detail or clarity about how he brea ks detail or clarity about how he breaks the brexit deadlock, what he will do about the backstop. right now, this is the launch of his campaign, so you have to set as well, they detail will come. does he
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have a plan? he has been very clear about leaving on the 31st of october and there was something else, he spoke very strongly today about the type of team he would have that will get behind brexit in a way in which we have not seen get behind brexit in a way in which we have not seen over get behind brexit in a way in which we have not seen over the last three years. let us be clear, his style would be fundamentally different to the style we have seen thus far over the style we have seen thus far over the brexit negotiations and discussions as well. we have to leave, he spoke about the conservative party, the established political parties being extinct if we do not leave on the 31st of october. it is not a negotiation, it is about rebuilding trust and confidence with the british public, the electorate, to deliver brexit and his point was about the focused way in which he and his team will deliver brexit and get us out of the eu. priti patel, i will stop deliver brexit and get us out of the eu. priti patel, iwill stop you there, in the commons, theresa may is on herfeet there, in the commons, theresa may is on her feet for one of her last pmqs. may i associate myself with my
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right honourable friend's earlier comments, if not the birthday greetings for which i think her? the we st greetings for which i think her? the west midlands was the very first region in the country to launch its industrial strategy. i think it is actually the best regional industrial strategy. as this strategy is a shared endeavour between the region and the government, what further help can she give and the government give to realise its full potential? my honourable friend is absolutely right to highlight the government's industrial strategy and recognise the shared work that goes into the strategies between government and the region and business. we will be investing £20 million towards this region becoming the uk's first future mobility zone, introducing new technology to encourage more sea mless new technology to encourage more seamless and efficient journeys, investing up to £50 million to put the region at the forefront of 5g
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developments, and to the uk's first multi—city 5g test bed, 332 million from the transforming cities fund to extend the metro system. it is the shared vision for inclusive growth showing how we can reach our potential and in a way that benefits all communities. mr speaker, today would have been the 90th birthday of anne frank, had she survived, but died in the nazi concentration camp bergen—belsen in 1945. in her diary, she wrote many things, one which really does apply to all of us at all times, human greatness does not lie in wealth or in power, but in character and goodness. we should remember herlife and character and goodness. we should remember her life and all she has inspired and so many others since the second world war. later this week, i will be joining the families
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and survivors commemorating the second anniversary of the grenfell tower fire in which dozens died. as sunday's fire in barking reminds us, much more to do to ensure people are safe in their homes in all parts of this country. as is traditional, i'm sure the whole house willjoin me in welcoming the new member for peterborough, sitting behind me. the country is in crisis over brexit. manufacturing is in crisis, the prime minister's government has brought us to this point and now the conservative party is once again in the process of foisting a new prime minister on the country without the country having a say through a general election. this prime minister created the department for business, energy and industrial strategy injuly, 2016. has the prime minister actually delivered an industrial strategy since then? can
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i first of industrial strategy since then? can ifirst of all industrial strategy since then? can i first of all echo the comments in recognising what would have been the 90th birthday of anne frank? nobody can have read the testimony of anne frank in herdiary can have read the testimony of anne frank in her diary without being deeply moved and deeply shocked by what she had to live through. that is, it seems to me, another reason why everybody across this house and across our society should do everything we can in the fight against anti—semitism. can i also take, my first opportunity to welcome the new honourable member for peterborough in her seat in this chamber? he mentioned the business department and industrial strategy, quite obvious he had written his question before he had the answer to the question from my honourable friend which of course referred not only to our national industrial
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strategy but also to our regional industrial strategies which are making a real difference in creating record levels of unemployment we see in this country. the answer she gave has unreality about it. let me explain, i has unreality about it. let me explain, lam has unreality about it. let me explain, i am trying to help you. if the members opposite could contain their excitement for a moment, the members opposite could contain their excitement fora moment, i thought i would remind them that since 2016 when the department was set up, the labour survey shows there are 147,000 fewer people working in manufacturing in britain, apprenticeships starts are down 25%, manufacturing output fell by 3.9% in march and april of this year, the largest full for two decades. in the
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la st largest full for two decades. in the last year, jaguar land rover, ford, nissan, they have all announced uk job losses. does the prime minister think her department for industrial strategy has been good for that industry? i think this reveals an awful lot about him and the labour pa rty‘s awful lot about him and the labour party's approach to these issues. the point of the industrial strategy is to make sure we have the economy with the jobs of the future and that is why it is good to see that in the industrial strategy we have key challenges such as artificial intelligence and data, underpinning the work we are doing in clean growth, mobility, the health service, as well as so much more. on monday, i was pleased to attend london technology week and to speak and doa london technology week and to speak and do a round table with technological businesses to welcome the unicorns developed in london, the unicorns developed in london, the five in manchester, and to
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welcome the over £1 billion of investment in the tech centre in this country announced at that time. we are looking to the jobs of the future —— the tech sector. that is where the jobs future —— the tech sector. that is where thejobs are future —— the tech sector. that is where the jobs are and that is what this government has developed bleep delivering. last week ford announced it would end production at its bridgend plant —— this government is delivering. ford has also said that a new deal brexit would put a further 6000 ukjobs a new deal brexit would put a further 6000 uk jobs at a new deal brexit would put a further 6000 ukjobs at risk. with thousands more at risk in the supply chain. nissan, toyota, bmw and glr have all said similar. the prime minister take opportunity to reiterate the government's assessment that no—deal brexit would be disastrous for britain? —— jlr. i think some of her colleagues need
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reminding of that. can i say first of all, obviously, the issue of the announcement by ford is very worrying and an uncertain time for workers and families in bridgend? they have committed to supporting employees through the consultation process and beyond, including with redeployment opportunities to other sites in the uk. the business secretary and the welsh secretary has spoken to ford and we are working closely with them and the welsh government and i spoke to the first minister of wales on these issues and working with local stakeholders and trade union representatives to ensure the skills and value workers are supported through the process. he then goes on to talk about no deal and his concerns about a no deal situation. cani concerns about a no deal situation. can ijust concerns about a no deal situation. can i just say, concerns about a no deal situation. can ijust say, it concerns about a no deal situation. can i just say, it would concerns about a no deal situation. can ijust say, it would come a little bit more sincerely from him if he had not gone through the lobbies regularly and consistently voting to increase the chances of no
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deal by voting against the deal? the prime minister may not have noticed but her deal was rejected three times by parliament. shouting mr speaker, another industry failed by the uk government is that of uk steel, why didn't the government to agree a deal to support our steel industry? can ijust say, ithink the point he makes is exactly the point i was making? the fact that had the right honourable gentleman really believed that we should believe in the eu and doing it with a deal, he would have voted for the deal. we could have left the eu and actually be on to the brighter future already. we did work with
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british steel, we worked with the owner, and lenders, to explore potential options to secure a future for british steel and we were willing to act. we continue to work with the official receiver and with british steel support group, management, trade unions, and companies in the supply chain and local communities, to pursue every possibility to secure the future of the valuable operations insights at scunthorpe the valuable operations insights at scu nthorpe and teesside the valuable operations insights at scunthorpe and teesside and elsewhere and i will be meeting a group of members of parliament from the region whose constituents are affected later today. since the government did nothing to protect the steel industry in redcar, i hope they will do better on scunthorpe where 5000 jobs are at risk. the select committee raises questions about whether the government entered into the negotiations in good faith. another sector that has been failed
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by the government is not of the renewable industry. solar installations are down by 94%, onshore wind coming to a grinding halt, they have failed to back the very important, very exciting and innovative swansea bay tidal lagoon. they are failing on cars, steel, on renewables. i know the tory leadership candidates have been falling over themselves to confess to their past indulgences, but can the prime minister name an that is legal that her government ministers actually backed? -- name and industry. he talks about solar power, look at facts. 99% of solar power, look at facts. 99% of solar power deployed in the uk has been deployed under a conservative government. last year, renewables
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generated a record amount of electricity. this is indeed a record this government can be proud of, but while he is talking about renewables, i'm surprised he has not taken the opportunity to stand up and think this government for our announcement today that we are going to legislate for net zero on emissions by 2050. the legacy of her government is one of failure. they claim they would tackle burning injustices, they have failed. they told pensioners their benefits were safe. now they are taking away the tv licences for the over 75s. they promised action on grenfell tower and two years on, still flammable cladding on thousands of homes across this country. they promised a
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northern powerhouse, they have failed to deliver it. every northern newspaper is campaigning for this government to power up the north. they promised net zero by 2050, yet they have failed on renewables and... the right honourable gentleman will not be shouted down, it is not going to happen, do not waste your breath, not productive, terribly boring. jeremy corbyn. mr speaker, they promised net zero by 2050, yet they have failed on renewables and they are missing climate change targets. they promised an industrial strategy, output is falling, which does the prime minister see as the biggest industrial failure of her government? the car industry, steel industry, or renewables industry? he
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can pose for his you —— youtube clip as much as he likes, let us look at what this government has delivered. what we have to live it is a racial disparity audit dealing with the inappropriate inequality of public services for people from different communities, record investment in transport infrastructure in the north, a record employment rate, lowest unemployment for 45 years, wages growing faster than inflation, record cash boost for the nhs, better mental health support, more homes being built, stamp duty cuts, higher standards in our schools, leading the world on climate change. that is a record of conservatives in government that we are proud of and we will never let him destroy it.
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shouting may i congratulate the prime minister on introducing legislation for net zero? it is a fantastic achievement that we can all be proud of and passing on the planet in a better state to our children. she agreed that whoever follows her at the dispatch box, some may be sitting here this morning, they must place policies to achieve this at the heart of the programme of government, does she agree? can i thank my honourable friend for her words, iam thank my honourable friend for her words, i am very proud we are committing to end our contribution to ensure that we make our contribution to dealing with climate change by laying the legislation for net zero target by 2050 today. this puts us on the path to become the first major economy to set a net zero emissions target in law. once again, this is the united kingdom
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leading on this issue of tackling climate change and it is delivering on the conservative promised to leave the environment in a better state for the next generation. this is about long—term climate targets, we are proud of the worlds leading record we have, but i absolutely agree it is vital we continue this work and make sure we protect our planet for generations to come. thank you, it is right we mark the 90th birthday, what would have been her birthday today, anne frank, she got a her birthday today, anne frank, she gota diary her birthday today, anne frank, she got a diary for her 13th birthday. we should never forget the trials and tribulations of those who paid the utmost price, under that genocide and the genocides that have followed since then. an attack on women's rights, tax breaks for the rich, paid for by raising national insurance in scotland, closing down parliament in order to ensure that a catastrophic no—deal brexit can be
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imposed, does the prime minister think any of these policies are respectable, never mind acceptable? i say that time will come when he will be able to ask my successor questions at this dispatch box but he raises the issue of people playing in scotland, i have to remind him, only one party in scotla nd remind him, only one party in scotland that has a policy to ensure people in scotland pay more tax and it is the scottish nationalists. after the time the prime minister spent at the dispatch box, you would think she would know you are supposed to at least try and answer the question. the state of politics in this place is humiliating, the tory leadership race is a total horror show, the eu was clear, use the time wisely. and yet the tories are obsessing with themselves at the
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expense of people across these islands. just when we thought things could not get any worse, they are even lurching further to the extremes. the prime minister once described her party as the nasty party, with candidates like the one announcing today it is about to get announcing today it is about to get a whole lot nastier. does the prime minister agreed the fantasy fairy stories of the tory party's candidates are nothing more than an assault on our common sense and tonight will she vote to stop any no deal madness? can i say, first of all, the motion on the table tonight is about whether or not the government should hand control of business in this house to the labour party and scottish national party and that is something we will not do? cani and that is something we will not do? can i also say, he talks about the need to use this time wisely,
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well, he could have been using the time wisely, had he voted for them deal we negotiated with the eu, we would have left the eu and we would be out with an orderly exit? the prime minister has led the fight against... studio: leaving prime minister's questions, we will be back in the commons in a little while for a statement on climate change. the government committing to a target by 2050 of net zero emissions. that is what we will talk about right now. the uk is promising to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2050 under a new government plan to tackle climate change. it means emissions will have to be eliminated com pletely emissions will have to be eliminated completely the macro offset by planting trees or removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. britain is the first g7 nation to put forward such legislation amending
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the 2008 climate change act. the move is being hailed as historic by campaigners, critics say the action is being taken too late and feel the target will never be met. our environment analyst roger harrabin. electric and hydrogen vehicles, the end to natural gas in the home, much cleaner industries — they will all have to happen as the uk pledges to produce almost zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. scenes like the wild weather in australia have helped convince the government that the threat of climate change is urgent. protesters from the extinction rebellion group rammed the message home and so did the striking schoolchildren. mrs may says young people will get a say in her carbon cutting plans. some say the task of insulating all homes well by 2050 is impossible, with not enough people to do the work. others say the low carbon
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drive is too expensive, at perhaps £1 trillion. but if the government produces the policies to back up its climate pledge, society will have to change. roger harrabin, bbc news. the chancellor was asked about the prime minister's climate plans today atan prime minister's climate plans today at an event in london. we will now be the first large economy with all due respect to the swedes who have already done it, the first large economy to connect to net zero in 2050 and i think that will be a wake—up call to others around the world, the french are heading in the same direction, i hope the eu will be not far behind. let's get the thoughts of the united nations secretary for sustainable energy. thank you forjoining us. what is your reaction to the new commitment from the uk government on
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this? i think it is very welcome, it is the first major economy to set this target which is the target which will get us to where we need to be globally, it sends a very strong message to developed countries, you need to do this as well add it sends an important message to developing countries that developed countries are ticking responsibilities seriously and we have a chance to work together to try to curb emissions globally which are not be easy. but it has to be done. there are some who doubt it is achievable particularly when existing targets to try to hit the goal of reducing emissions by 80% are not being hit. obviously one has to choices, sit on the sidelines as it is difficult and cannot be done or trying to do what government has done is set a long—term target and
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encourage the private sector to innovate and secure research and development for new technologies and move more quickly perhaps. what is important about the target as it is commensurate with need to be as science has told us and gives eve ryo ne science has told us and gives everyone a chance to work together. obviously the uk is missing its targets, the body has a so but we know we have to do better and this is the first country to say we are all in and everybody has to be part of this. when you say everybody has to be part of it, there is no onus on anybody to follow suit when we look at the united states pulling out of the paris agreement, if other countries do not follow suit, what then? the whole climate change diplomacy as a collective effort of countries moving forward and not getting too far ahead of each other by bringing everybody together. this
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becomes important because in september the secretary general called for a summit of heads of state and here we have one of the leading economies, g7, g20 economy saying this is now our declared target and legislation. this means france has to say whether or not they will do it as well and germany, they will do it as well and germany, the eu. this sends an important second to china and india and a signal to the us and adjust to the white house but all the states and cities who are actually trying to do much to combat climate change. it sends an important signal to the vulnerable countries that if developed countries will move in this direction that they have the time and support to be able to do very difficult things which is to re—engineer their economies whilst they are still trying to grow and meet basic needs. i think it sends a signal around the world and i think it will be heard in capitals and developed countries and developing countries. the price tag put on it by the chancellor as £1 trillion.
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that is either going to require substantial government spending and i'm getting taxpayer money away from other commitments or else energy users paying their bills are companies paying, either way it is going to mean big changes and when targets a re going to mean big changes and when targets are not currently being met, ultimately that is nothing, no punishment of the government does not reach these targets and decides it is too politically difficult and expensive. i am not to quibble with the treasury pots numbers are the chancellor's maths but he talked about the costs, there was not a discussion of the benefits and we know from past ten years investment and the clean green economy creates jobs and are struggling more and more investment and so the lack of a cost benefit analysis on the right of the chancellor said to number ten
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was disappointing but the statutory body, the climate change commission has said this is going to cost perhaps one or 2% of gdp but also outlined the advantages of living to a cleaner economy and to a net zero target. yes that is going to be transition, jobs which will disappear and new jobs created transition, jobs which will disappear and newjobs created and we will have cleaner air and move around congested cities and a different way. we will eat different diets and young people are already voting with the way their lifestyles are developing. we should not underestimate this is a significant transition of the economy and life will be different but i think to suggest it isjust will be different but i think to suggest it is just going to cost more and cannot be done is not really looking at the evidence of what is happening in those countries that are setting long—term targets and moving forward. the government advisory committee on climate change
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has said even if other countries are do follow suit and go for the same target there is a 50—50 chance of staying below 1.5 degrees celsius rise by 2100. even if everybody does it targets still be had. —— may not be hit. around the world when moments set aggressive targets and are moments set aggressive targets and a re clear moments set aggressive targets and are clear about the direction of travel, and most cases the private sector and government together have been able to outperform the target. we can see whether is clarity and no equivocation on backsliding over the amount of renewable energy in the mix that countries are able to get there faster. the second thing is there faster. the second thing is the costs of climate change without action are going to be inexorable. they will be the costs of communities having to let their
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communities having to let their communities were back into the sea because of sea—level rise and tremendous storms. it is going to be the cost of extreme weather events in cities and buildings, the cost to the health service of trying to find ways to grow in hospitals as it gets hotter and hotter in the summer. —— cruel hospitals. the cost of action fund raise the cost of inaction. we know we are causing climate change from carbon pollutants and it would be remiss of us notjust economically but politically and morally to not act when we know this is the evidence and that is with this reported about this announcement in the year before every country is going to be asked to come with more ambition. the secretary—general said do not come to united nations with speeches,, plans and we are not on track yet, it is not perfect but at least the uk motor not in september with a
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plan and legislation. thank you. a court has sentenced a former youth court for the decently assaulting boys. bob higgins was convicted of a further count last year. we can go to winchester crown court. tell us more about what happened. the sentencing has just come through in the past few minutes and bob higgins has been given that very long sentence, no reaction from him when it was read out by the judgment clearly this has been a devastating case for all these men involved, they were boys in the 70s and 80s and middle—aged men now. you got a sense of the impact on them during
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their witness impact statements which they have been reading to the court of the past couple of days, spoken of their anger and frustration, some had suicidal thoughts as a result of the abuse by bob higgins. much of that anger also directed at the footballing authorities asking where were southampton football club and the football association, why did they not stop pagans? bob higgins has been stop and given 24 years in jail. these are some of the men his boyhood dreams of playing football at the highest level were crushed by the men they trusted. bob higgins abused young footballing hopefuls for 25 years. from the 19705 until the 19905 he went from club to club and used as position as youth coach to assault boy5. he was head of
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youth helmet at southampton and train future england 5tar5 youth helmet at southampton and train future england stars like alan shearer of there is no suggestion they were abused by higgins. have you ever engaged in any behaviour... he also worked for peterborough but refused to answer police que5tion5 has been found guilty of indecently assaulting a 25 boys. during sentencing tho5e boys who are no middle—aged men were tearful in their condemnation of higgins. one looked at him and said i had a dream to bea looked at him and said i had a dream to be a footballer and you created a nightmare. others spoke of the depression and anger and thoughts of suicide. one asked where was southampton football club and the fa, another lamented his lost football career and said i can only look back and wonder what might have been. that sense of yearning came
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through from nearly every man who spokein through from nearly every man who spoke in court as did their anger directed at the football authorities. the fa says it is carrying out its enquiry into all abu5e carrying out its enquiry into all abuse and football while southampton football clu b abuse and football while southampton football club 5aid abuse and football while southampton football club said it was a deeply sorry for what had happened. the5e men have spent 30 years trying to ove rco m e men have spent 30 years trying to overcome the damage inflicted on them but now they have been listened to on demand who exploited the innocence and crushed their aspirations i5 innocence and crushed their aspirations is finally facing the consequences. one or two of those men have now waived the anonymity to speak out including a youth team player for peterborough who said football was our lives and dream but ican football was our lives and dream but i can use that to exploit u5 football was our lives and dream but i can use that to exploit us for his own sexual gratification. the judge described higgins a5 cunning and innovative and said she had not
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5hown onejot of innovative and said she had not 5hown one jot of remorse, it really has been an off speed is for these men with not one but two trials phased at all of them left without feeling what if, what could i have i achieved if i had not come into the sphere of bob higgins? many of them full of remorse and anger and bitterne55 over what he did to their live5. thank you. thousands of protesters in hong kong are having a stand—off about a bill. huge crowds have gathered blockading the government headquarters and main road5 nearby and riot police have responded by using pepper spray and 5aid responded by using pepper spray and said they are prepared to use force. a report that sent us this report.
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we saw one officer who looked like he had been hit in the head and was carried off by conrad's, policeman arrest one of the protesters to an office which encounter the wrath of opposition lawmakers 5tarted shouting at opposition lawmakers started shouting at the police, how did you occu py shouting at the police, how did you occupy our parliament building the police are using the parliament as a police are using the parliament as a police base from which to attack the protesters and the sense to me this is worse than beijing. at least one police officer appears to be injured at the police had barricaded themselves inside the legislative council building. let's take you to live pictures that we are getting,
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you can see many people out on the streets and hong kong, police fired rubber bullets and tear gas at protesters amidst this anger over that new extradition bill. protesters have blocked key roads around government buildings and bricks and other things have been thrown at police. let's bring in a reporter from thrown at police. let's bring in a reporterfrom hong kong broadcaster, thank you forjoining us. you are inside the council building, tell us what you can see what is elitist. the legislator building has become a police base and i am outside the chamber when the meeting was supposed to take place. they have been riot police surrounding the building and the adjacent government
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headquarters so they closed almost all entrances and everyone's permits we re all entrances and everyone's permits were checked before being allowed in. it onlyjust got quite up just now, at one point protesters were targeting directly to the chambers so we targeting directly to the chambers so we started to see armed officers matching and i was indoors and could hear rubber bullets being fired and could see smoke from outside. i also witnessed policeman escorting to protesters into a room. opposition lawmakers tried to interfere but they were kicked out by the police and adding them to cooperate with the police operation. opposition lawmakers are questioning the
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legality of the move and also urged dialogue. we were seeing the pictures of the violent protests and police reacting against those protesters. hiring rubber bullets and tear gas, looking at the live pictures, he mood seems a much more calm, how would you describe how things are evolving? it settle has become a quieter but a moment ago marrying mum and dad as it lawmakers and urging people to come up again tomorrow urging them until the government withdraws the controversial bill. what are the signs from the government? she still has not come out to face the media
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but she did an interview with broadcasters and said she has not betrayed the hong kong people it was an exclusive interview and opposition lawmakers called her a liar but mrs lam said she had not tried to betray hong kong. they were not convinced by her and also she was not happy that mrs lam watched a dialogue with lawmakers, at the office earlier. why didn't you tell the protesters to go home? and discuss what to do next and the opposition is not into that. thank
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you. borisjohnson mixes pitch to become the conservative party leader and assists you can get brexit done and when the general election. the uk convinced to cut greenhouse gas emissions unit zero by 2050. excess hampton and peterborough football coach bob huggins has beenjailed for 24 years for sexually abusing young players over a 25 year period. the future of arcadia could be determined by its slang wants roger to decide whether to cut rent on some branches of topshop and dorothy perkins and others. if energy them arcadia could collapse. arcadia are the backbone of hundreds
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of high streets across the uk. it's notjust topshop but miss selfridge, burtons, wallis, evans, and dorothy perkins. 20 years ago they were churning out big profits and peak high street fashion. but topshop has been falling out of fashion. they faced big competition from online retailers. a lot of people say they haven't invested enough to make their stores swanky and the boss, sir philip green, has had a lot of negative publicity. all of that means that this store is one of nearly 50 he is hoping to try and close. that is why he is hoping to convince his landlords to sign a deal agreeing to close some stores and pay less rent for others in order to save the rest. the trouble is his biggest landlord isn't keen on the idea. arcadia bosses have spent the last week making last—ditch attempts to try and convince landlords to support the plan. and they say, if it is not approved
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by 75% of investors, then the whole business could go into administration. that is nerve—racking for staff. they're sat there on the sidelines while their employer is having the negotiations with landlords over the future of their jobs. there is a bigger issue here as well, cause we're seeing lots on the high street disappearing and that impacts on locals community and high streets like this. it's full of doom and gloom at the moment. the only shops you see now are pound shops, betting shops food shops and charity shops. fewer and fewer shops, less and less choice for consumers. whatever happens today, a big chunk of arcadia stores will close, puncturing more holes in struggling high streets. colletta smith, bbc news. the most men found here shortcomings by the former trust. it uncovered a sustaining failure to tackle
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repeated and critical feelings over an unacceptable of time. an a—grade student, matthew leahy became delusional after smoking cannabis as a teenager. admitted to the linden centre in 2012 and found diead seven days later. serious failings into his care were uncovered by police and a coroner. now, the ombudsman says an investigation into his death indicates wider systemic failures. it has been hard. today has probably been one of the hardest because i have got to that "someone is actually listening" stage and maybe we might get something done now. my son had to die for this to happen and i don't want it happening again and again and again. the safety risk to patients at the unit was first highlighted in 2004. in 2015, the health watchdog inspected.
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last year, some safety improvements still hadn't been completed. it is that delay the ombudsman has called in "inexcusable failure". the frightening thing is there were lots of reviews telling the trust that they had behaved inappropriately. the cqc, a coroner's report, phso, us — the ombudsman, all came to roughly similar conclusions but the trust failed to deal with it. a few photographs and a recording of a school news report, all melanie has to remember her son. words cannot describe the devestation that is taking place. this is matthew leahy, for news at ten... if i have to spend the rest of my life fighting, trying to find the answers, i will. he was my life. nhs improvement will lead the review, looking at lessons that could be learned. the new trust that runs mental services in the area says it will support it in every way. nikki fox, bbc news.
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his documentary about amy winehouse won him an oscar, now director asif kapadia has turned his attention to another troubled celebrity.—'diego maradona' looks at the life of the argentine footballer, who won the fifa world cup for his team in 1986, knocking england out on the way with that famous ‘hand of god' goal. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson went to meet asif ahead of the release to find out more. diego maradona — many believe the greatest footballer of all time. after the director asif kapadia won an oscar for his documentary about amy winehouse, he decided the perfect subject for his next one was maradona. when he rose to the top, when he became the best footballer in the world, and what were the reasons for his fall?
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what were the things that started to go wrong? where did the problems of addiction come from? that's the time and everything starts to go wrong. diego maradona focuses on his playing years for napoli in italy, using footage shot by argentinian cameramen for a film which was never completed, and it turns out that amy winehouse had a crucial role in maradona deciding to allow this one to be made. i'm not a girl trying to be a star or trying to be anything other than a musician. his daughters had seen amy and really liked it and i knew there were pictures of one of his daughters in camden, next to to statue of amy winehouse, so i knew, it was in the ether and i think they probably had a word with him and he watched it. and i think he found amy quite tough, it's a tough film to watch. and honestly, i feel like he was a little bit worried, thinking, "well, what kind of film are you going to make about me?" drugs, paternity disputes and run—ins with gangsters — they're all in there, as is his most notorious goal. this is diego's shirt for, i guess, the quarterfinal
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against england, this is it. in 1986, england were knocked out of the world cup by the hand of god. his strip from the match is kept at manchester's national football museum. what i can tell you is that having done so much research on diego maradona, i've seen him do that trick five times. three times he got away with it, twice he got blown and he got caught. so, it's not the first time he's hand balled a shot coming in and made it look like a header. and that speaking voice is maradona. he agreed to give three three—hour interviews for the film. he's really charismatic, he's a really good storyteller. what was interesting was trying to pin him down on kind of the key, let's say the more challenging aspects of his private life or things that went on. and despite having had the chance, maradona has still not seen the film, but asif hopes to sit down with him and show it to him. i might leave a bit of distance between us, just in case,
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and keep my eye on the door, but, you know, it would be fascinating, because i'm sure they'll be things he might find difficult. but there's a lot of stuff i'm sure he'd be crying kind of tears of happiness and joy. he won the world cup, will it be the oscars next for maradona? colin paterson, bbc news, manchester. some parts of the uk have had a month worth of rain in the cars you days and the same areas and likely to see more torrential rain in the coming 24—hour us. numerous flood warnings, several met office warnings, several met office warnings because of the day and heavy showers following, then in his moved further north so there are considerable see further river flooding and localised flooding and we already have a lot of standing water to watch out for on the roads. this is the developing area of rain, also following on behind some very
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lively showers which are turning a thundery, could be some hail and lightning and torrential downpours. what persistent rain sets in across east anglia and the midlands with that has also been so wet, into lincolnshire and moving north and west through the night. ahead of that rather cloudy and it really, and the rain further north across scotla nd and the rain further north across scotland and northern ireland so more limited like this. further between the showers look as it developing, persistent and heavy for several hours so no surprise we have an amberwarning several hours so no surprise we have an amber warning from the met office, a mild night as well with a keen north—easterly wind. the met office issued the amber warning for particularly and east of scotland with as much as potential it in the metres of rain is expected. most areas can expect another between 20 and 40, up to two inches falling throughout the night and into
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tomorrow. more rain developing across south—western england and wales, perhaps drier and brighter further south and east and the west of scotla nd further south and east and the west of scotland and northern ireland but all relative, the north—easterly breeze holding temperatures down in the north and in deleting where it may be 18 with sunshine between insurers. to the end of the week, below audience to the north—west so we pick up a south—westerly wind and the north—easterly is switched and the north—easterly is switched and the showers will be in different areas, maybe northern ireland seem wetter weather later but we will see temperatures starting to recover, and of the south—westerly wind which would take us into the weekend which is by no means dry but perhaps a little more dry and don't show a with the warnings on the website.
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an ambitious new plan to tackle climate change — the uk commits to cut greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050. britain is the first g7 nation to propose the target, which the prime minister says is essential for protecting the earth's future. this puts us on the path to become the first major economy to set a net—zero emissions target in law. we'll ask whether it's possible to meet such ambitious targets. also this lunchtime... borisjohnson unveils his pitch for the conservative party leadership — insisting he would deliver brexit at the end of october. delay means defeat. delay means corbyn.
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kick the can again and we kick the bucket. hong kong police use tear gas and rubber bullets,

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