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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 16, 2019 6:00pm-7:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 6pm... tory leadership contender, dominic raab — says his party will be history if britain isn't out of the eu by the end of october and accuses parliament of trying to ‘steal‘ brexit from the voters. the damage it is doing to businesses, many of whom come to me and say we just want to know what you are doing. but also this corrosion of public trust, and the tory part will be toast unless we're out by the end of october. hundreds of thousands stage another protest in hong kong against proposed changes to the extradition law. the territory's chief executive apologises for the upheaval. i confess we have not been as
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effective as we would like, to communicate to people to justify thatis communicate to people to justify that is very good objective which is worth doing. hundreds of people in lincolnshire still can't go back to their homes because of flooding, descibed by the environment agency as "unprecedented". most of argentina and uruguay, together with regions of paraguay and brazil — have been without electricity after a massive power failure. good evening. five of the 6 conservative leadership candidates are preparing to go head—to—head — in their first televised debate tonight. however, borisjohnson, the frontrunner in the race, will not be taking part.
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the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, has said choosing mrjohnson as the next tory leader would mean britain leaving the eu without a deal. our political correspondent, nick eardley, reports. catch him if you can. boris johnson is the frontrunner to be our next pm, and he still is keeping his head down. he won't be at the first tv debate tonight, but his rivals know he is the man to catch. jeremy hunt thinks he can make up the ground, but unlike mrjohnson, he's not promising brexit will be done by the end of october. this morning, he wouldn't even commit to definitely leaving this year. why? because he wants a new deal and believes europe could be open to it. they say that if they were approached by a british prime minister, someone they're willing to deal with, who had ideas as to how to solve the northern irish border, they would be willing to renegotiate the package. the problem — time and time again europe has ruled out reopening the withdrawal agreement, and some tories fear this could go on and on and on. when people voted, they voted to leave.
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we haven't left yet and that is why we are seeing notjust the uncertainty for the economy and the damage it is doing to businesses, many of whom just want to know what we are doing, but also this corrosion of public trust and the tory party will be toast unless we are out by the end of october. dominic raab questioned borisjohnson‘s brexit plan and others have too. like rory stewart, the unlikely celebrity of the leadership race. he says he wouldn't serve in a johnson government and believes his brexit strategy doesn't stand up to serious scrutiny. because nobody has yet had the chance to question him, and as soon as you question him, as soon as i sit down with him and ask the big question how, how are you going to deliver brexit, how are you going to get no—deal through, then it begins to come off the rails. there is a clearfrontrunner in the race to call this place home, but borisjohnson‘s rivals insist there is a long way to go. tonight, without him, they will take part in the first tv debate,
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hoping they can do something to stop this contest becoming a foregone conclusion. nick eardley, bbc news. our political correspondent is in stratford in london where tonight's debate is taking place. what is going to happen tonight? good evening and welcome to what they are calling the spin room. this is down at the studio, where they will have all the supporters, and peas and advisers will gather and watch the programme on a tear monitors behind and studios are on the other side of the building and there will be 116 audience members drawn from across the country and all of them say they are floating voters who are amenable to voting conservative and they will be able to put questions to the candidates and they have a chance to answer before going into a free—form debate on that and the candidates who are coming, remember no borisjohnson,
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they have been arriving in the last hour or so they have been arriving in the last hourorso andi they have been arriving in the last hour or so and i caught up with michael gove and murray stated —— rory stewart. the opportunity to exchange ideas with fantastic candidates. and boris johnson? what are you going to prove tonight? that ican win are you going to prove tonight? that i can win an election and unify the country, people elect notjust a conservative leader but a prime ministerandl conservative leader but a prime ministerand i want conservative leader but a prime minister and i want you to be able to trust me in the public to be able to trust me in the public to be able to trust me and it is a great opportunity for the public to learn the candidates. i think he is a great communicator and a great debater and great communicator and a great debaterandl great communicator and a great debater and i would like to have a chance to show that and have an opportunity to have a chance to ask him some questions. how are we expecting them to deal with tonight's no—show? expecting them to deal with tonight's no-show? had a few moments inside the studio and we are not
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allowed to show you the set and tell the channel for programme is on air at 6:30pm but they have a semicircle of podiums and the candidate will be an alphabetical order and where borisjohnson will be, it will be empty and it is a physical piece of evidence that he decided not to turn up evidence that he decided not to turn up and he said he feels there would be too much of a cacophony of blue on blue if this many people were debating. has an edge will be projected onto the wall behind the set at the man himself will not be here. but there will be of course plenty of time for him to answer other questions on tuesday when the second television debate takes place on the bbc. thank you. tens of thousands of protestors are back on the streets of hong kong a day after the territory's chief executive, carrie lam, suspended highly controversial plans to allow extraditions to the chinese mainland. carrie lam has apologised
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to the public with "utmost sincerity and humility". the demonstrators are calling for the proposals to be completely withdrawn and for mrs lam to resign. our china correspondent, stephen mcdonell, has spent the day at the protests. hong kong's streets are again a sea of protest, a day after the government was forced into a humiliating back—down. it's delayed a bill to allow for people to be sent to mainland chinese courts, where demonstrators say a free trial is not possible. but those marching are demanding more. they want the plan scrapped altogether. basically, we shouldn't let the government have all power to us because we have our own freedom of rights and freedom of speech and this is why we are out here. if the bill is passed, hong kong will have no democracy anymore. this is not acceptable. i have come here today and also my parents, and all my friends came here today.
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because we are really upset about this. if this happened, hong kong is over. many in the crowd have blamed hong kong's leader, carrie lam, for instigating this crisis. they say the chief executive pushed ahead with extradition in the face of clear mass opposition. now they want something else from her. the death of a protester last night contributed to a sombre mood. he had fallen from a building. people wore ribbons and carried flowers in his memory. if the idea was to take the steam out of the protest movement by delaying this bill, as you can see, it hasn't exactly worked. the other people watching this are the politburo standing committee in beijing. these are all chinese citizens and this is a clear act of defiance from people who are saying that any attempt to erode their freedoms will be resisted in the streets. there is a renewed belief
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in the power of protest here and, as long as the threat of extradition remains, a large proportion of the population seem prepared to mobilise in order to stop it. stephen mcdonell, bbc news, hong kong. two teenagers have been charged with the murder of an 18—year old man — who was stabbed to death at wandsworth in south london on friday. scotland yard said 18—year—old mohammed nadir dafallah — and a 17—year—old boy have been charged. emergency services dealing with severe floods in lincolnshire — are now preparing for more rainfall — with storms forecast on tuesday. police drones have been monitoring water levels overnight — after nearly 600 homes were evacuated in wainfleet, near skegness. residents now face more uncertainty, with bad weather threatening to put more pressure on the river steeping. some residents were left with up to a metre of water in their homes — when the river burst its banks — after 2 months worth of rain
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fell in just 2 days. our reporter, luxmy gopal, has been in wainfleet today — and she told us about those who've been evacuated. some of them have been moved to a shelter in nearby skegness, and others have had to stay in friends' houses. some of them are double evacuees, in that they were moved out of their homes on wednesday when the flooding first began and moved to friends' houses, and yesterday those properties were also evacuated. the flooding began on wednesday when the river steeping burst its banks when two months' worth of rain fell in just two days. there is a fear that could happen again. behind me, the pumping station, which emergency crews are desperately trying to keep working to keep the water away to prevent further flooding. there is a concern that at points where the flood defences are weak and vulnerable, the river could burst
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its banks again. that is why the raf chinook returned yesterday to put in gravel and sand to shore up the defences to plug any potential breach. emergency teams say they might be here till friday because we have some weather warnings issued for tuesday with heavy rain expected. the environment agency is doing what it can to try to mitigate the effects of that, bringing in some big hydraulic pumps to help the efforts to channel the water away, but because of the heavy rainfall expected, it is not clear what the situation will be over the next few days, but it is certain that the residents of wainfleet will not be able to return to their homes any time soon. a huge electrical power failure is affecting large parts of latin america. it's left most of argentina and all of uruguay without power — according to a major argentine electricity provider. trains have ground to a halt
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and traffic lights failed. the combined population of argentina and uruguay is about 48 million people. according to reports, brazil and paraguay were also affected. provincial elections were scheduled in parts of argentina, and voting is going ahead, but with some delays. local media have been showing voters filling their ballots in the dark, with mobile phones being used as lanterns. natalio cosoy gave us this update from buenos aires. the traffic lights behind me are blinking as the systems are reset, after power was re—established in this part of town close to the centre of buenos aires. it's been a few hours since a massive blackout, the first of its kind, hit most of argentina as well as parts of brazil and uruguay. it affected millions of people. it started at around 7am local time. it was still dark and it's
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winter now here, so those who were using electricity to heat their homes were particularly affected, as well as elderly people living up in high rises. now, the power is, as i said, slowly being re—established not only here in buenos aires but to other parts of the country. the government says that this was due to a massive collapse of the interconnected power grid, and they say it might be linked to a problem in the yacyreta dam in the north of the country. although we're still waiting for more details on what might caused this massive power outage. iran has complained to britain's ambassador in the country — after the uk government accused it of involvement in the attacks on 2 oil tankers in the gulf of oman. the iranian authorities deny being involved. amid the growing tensions, the british—iranian woman jailed in tehran for spying — nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe —
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has begun a new hunger strike. she denies any wrongdoing. simonjones reports. outside the iranian embassy in london, a lone tent symbolising the growing tensions between the uk and tehran. the husband of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, camping outside the building to try to make his voice heard. his wife remains injail following her arrest at tehran airport, after visiting her family three years ago, accused of being a spy, which she has always denied. we are camping out in solidarity with nazanin, she has gone on hunger strike in iran, in prison. you can't see that, but we said if she was going to do it, we'd go on hunger strike here. obviously you can see me, and we're doing it in front of the iranian embassyjust all the time she's going through it, we'll go through it with her. nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's case is intricately connected with the difficult relationship between the uk and iran, which has just become even more tense. london has accused tehran
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of being behind attacks on two oil tankers in the gulf of oman, one of the world's busiest waterways. iran says that isn't true — it made its displeasure known in a meeting with britain's ambassador. foreign secretaryjeremy hunt, who met richard ratcliffe yesterday, has urged iran to put any differences aside and show compassion to nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, to allow her to return home to herfamily. for her husband and their supporters the wait continues, with no response yet to the protest from the iranian authorities. simon jones, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... tory leadership contender, dominic raab, says his party will be history — if britain isn't out of the eu by the end of october. hong kong's leader apologises as hundreds of thousands stage another protest against plans for an extradition law, which has now been suspended. hundreds of people in lincolnshire still can't go back to their homes because of flooding —
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descibed by the environment agency as "unprecedented". india are closing in on an impressive victory over rivals pakistant in the cricket world wup. more than 600,000 people applied for 23,000 tickets at old trafford. up to a billion people are thought to be watching across the world. pakistan are chasing a target of 337 runs — after a strong batting performance from india. our south asia correspondent, rajini vaidyanathan has been soaking up the atmosphere in delhi. here and across india, fans are glued to their screens, their laptops and mobile phones, as they watch one of the biggest rivalries in sport. this is a cricket crazy nation and no match matters more than when india plays pakistan. as you can see, the crowds out
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here are out in full force. they are already celebrating, but we still do not know whether india will come out as winners in this match. this cricket match comes off the back of recent tensions between india and pakistan, two nuclear neighbours. right now all the focus is on the sport and they are making sure that their team wins. and in islamabad is our pakistan correspondent secunder kermani. iam here i am here at a cricket in the centre where hundreds of people have been gathering to watch the game on the big screen. the numbers have been increasing as the evening has gone on after a blisteringly hot day. this match as all anyone has been talking about and pakistan including the prime minister who himself as a former cricketing hero. iam joined
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110w former cricketing hero. iam joined now by one of the fans watching the games, if you come overfrom america, visiting family and tell me how important is it for pakistan to beat india, they never have done so in the world thing, it is like beating your brother, it does not matter how many other people you beat, as long as you beat your brother. they have always had a tense relationship and we saw a flare—up between the two countries earlier this year and could cricket bridge the divide between the two countries or is this something that will further inflame the tensions? it should bridge it because in the us my friends are all pakistani and dead does not matter, we tease each other about the teams but at the end of the day, we are all playing cricket and having fun and it should bring unity and not devices that —— divisiveness. they help they will
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resume playing matches against each other in front of the home crowd because it has been years since it has been able to do so because of ongoing tensions. just to update you, pakistan are 86 runs behind. but rain has stopped play. a surgeon who served time in prison for killing a patient before his conviction was quashed — has raised concerns about the way black and ethnic minority doctors are treated by the professional regulator. figures obtained by the bbc — suggest the general medical council is more likely to investigate complaints against bame doctors — than those who are white. here's amara sophia elahi. i had lost my salary, i had lost my reputation, i lost myjob. david sellu is a respected colorectal surgeon with over a0 years of experience in the nhs and private sector. in 2010 a patient died under his care. he was investigated by the gmc,
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then charged and convicted of gross negligence manslaughter. he was later cleared on appeal after serving 15 months of a two—year prison sentence. he believes his race played a part in the way his case and others have been handled. the general medical council, our regulator, investigates a disproportionate number of black and ethnic minority doctors. we should all proportionately take the blame for when things go wrong, and things do go wrong in medicine after all. black and asian doctors make up around a third of the workforce in the uk, yet they are overrepresented in fitness—to—practise cases. figures obtained by the bbc show that over a five—year period, 44% of complaints made against black doctors led to investigations. for asian doctors it was a0%. for white doctors it was just 29%.
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they also revealed 12% of black doctors were suspended or erased from the medical register after an investigation by the medical practitioners tribunal service. that is more than double the proportion of white doctors. the gmc said it is not complacent about its own processes being free from discrimination, which is why it regularly and independently gets them reviewed. it has commissioned research to understand better why black and asian doctors are disproportionately complained about, investigated and sanctioned. they destroyed my profession, they destroyed my career. somebody surely should have been held to account for that, but nobody — i didn't get any apology, nothing. amara sophia elahi, bbc news. us president, donald trump has once again taken to twitter — to criticise the mayor of london, sadiq khan. retweeting a post from the right—wing commentator, katie hopkins, he said: "london needs a new mayor asap.
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khan is a disaster — will only get worse!" mr trump later followed it up with another post, saying: "he is a national disgrace who is destroying the city of london!" the president's comments came after 5 attacks in london in less than 2a hours left 3 men dead and 3 others injured. earlier i spoke to adam quinn, senior lecturer in international politics at the university of birmingham, who said we shouldn't be surprised by the president's behaviour. it brings together a few things, i mean donald trump has made his political career whipping up a lot of energy on the right, fear of violent crime and often glaring issues and to immigration and race and he has also been quite incontinent on twitter, he has amplified and retweeted messages many times from other parts of the
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far rightand many times from other parts of the far right and has been chastised for that and that they're part of the picture is he also likes to pick fights with people in public life who have been critical of ten and the mayor of london has been pretty vocally critical of him and this brings all these political things together, a perfect storm in a way. what do you think is his motivation behind this because a lot of people would say you are criticised by trumpeting your credit goes up. would say you are criticised by trumpeting your credit goes upm has been noted many times that he has been noted many times that he has a symbiotic relationship with the people he criticises, stepping back from the situation is clearly not good that the president of the united states should be attacking you, or that he should behaving this way and general but from his point of view, like pretty politically, on one level it elevates and because of course you are the mayor of london and the president of united states is in and the president of united states isina and the president of united states is in a higher office so being treated as where the other direct
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exchange and ascendancy status and on one level he gets to rise above it and say i am a serious political figure and trying to grapple with serious issues in my city and he gets to represent himself as a defender of liberal and progressive values which is galvanising that whole side of the political spectrum is when donald trump ataxia, those who do not think he is a good thing, they will rally behind it and that is what is probably not happen here. when it comes to donald trump and this era of politics, there are no rules but for other politicians who are trying to navigate international relations via twitter, how should they be conducting themselves?m depends on what your priorities are, i suppose. one school of thought would say it is very important to have the words of public figures
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matter, to make them a very consequential and at the president of the united states speaks, you wa nt of the united states speaks, you want them to be presented carefully and be taken seriously so you should be sober and reserved and calm and say things when you think through and you know what you want that effect to be but on the other hand donald trump has blown through the careers of many more experienced politicians to become the president of the united states by disregarding that an enormous public attention comes from not being like a normal politician and one other lesson that they can learn as you get a great deal of attention by doing this kind of thing either by proactively begetting it or by responding and kind when you are attacked. so there can be short—term party political benefits or individual benefits but i doubt it does the institution of politics or diplomacy a lot of good though. a man has died during an extreme hailstorm in the southeast of france, which caused widespread damage across the region yesterday. the 51 year old german tourist
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was at a campsite in the town of tanninges when a tree fell on his camper van during wind and hail. a mayor of one of the affected towns said the hail was ‘as large as tennis balls' and had caused ‘major damage throughout the town.‘ passengers on—board one plane are guaranteed the kind of in—flight entertainment most of us would want to avoid, stalling in the air and spiralling towards the ground. what sounds like a white—knuckle ride is in fact an airborne lab designed to give aeronautical students a taste of what it is like when things go wrong. the aim, to help them design planes that are safe in the sky. here's our science correspondent, richard westcott. it is an extraordinary lesson in an extraordinary classroom, with very different teachers.
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should you feel unwell, bags are provided in the seat pocket in front of you. the whole point of having a flying classroom is that the students can experience first—hand some of the strange thing that aircraft can do, and now we are about to experience some of those strange things. it starts gently enough, with the downward spiral that doubles your body weight. then the pilots start doing this. three, two, one, go. if you want to design a safe and comfortable aircraft, you need to feel how it is going to react when things go wrong. this plane is full of sensors that give real—time data to the engineers on board. in fact, many of these passengers are university lecturers, who want their students to experience the ride.
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we have got a flight to but that isjust on the ground. they do theory, laboratory sessions. this is the real thing. we do a lot of the theory and i teach dynamics and control of aircraft, and we can do that on scale models in wind tunnels, but what a calculation might say is ok, is not ok for a person actually in that vehicle. we had just started to relax when they went for the big one. point the nose up until the plane nearly falls from the sky. then the safety system kicks in and we start to float. some loved it. some didn't. in their new digital control tower, these aerospace experts say the industries were £35 billion to the uk economy, and the plane is critical for the next
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generation of engineers. it takes them into flight test regimes that you would never get that experience of, and then they see why it matters. there is nothing like the physical experience to make you realise why something really matters. they now want to raise money to buy a new airborne classroom. so tomorrow's plane design it'll have a lesson they will never forget. i tightened my seat belt, i thought i was well strapped in, and then i thought my head would hit the ceiling because it was so extreme. it really is a fantastic experience. you just don't get this in a simulator. how do you think students would react to that? it would be the highlight of their degree course. i think it would be the thing they always remembered. the spice girls ended their sell—out reunion tour at wembley stadium by inviting their mothers and children on stage last night.
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the group performed their hit singles ‘wannabe' and ‘spice up your life' in front of 80,000 fans in the stadium. as the concert came to a close, the artist known as ginger spice apologised to her bandmates for leaving the group in 1998. she said she was a brat. the duke of cambridge has paid tribute to his children and his father on social media today. on the palace's social media account he shared pictures of him playing with his son louis, on a swing, and another of himself in his raf uniform walking on the runway with his own father — the prince of wales. the pictures were shared with the simple message happy father's day. the duke and duchess of sussex also shared a picture of their six week old son, archie mountbatten windsor with a message ‘wishing a very special first father's day to the duke of sussex‘.
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special weather forecast, here special weatherforecast, here is stealth. —— here is phil avery. let‘s bring up—to—date with how things are looking across british isles. and we continue with the theme of a real mixed bag. not all doom and gloom by any means at all but sunday‘s satellite imagery shows an area of low pressure still anchored out to the western side of the british isles. an area of cloud running its way into towards the southwest and pepping up the showers, perhaps giving longer spells of rain and ahead of that, it is a mixture already of sunny spells and showers. persistent rain, perhaps more there foor the northwest of scotland, perisitent rain beginning to show its hand from increasing cloud across the southwester quarter through the rest of the evening and overnight so we will push that rain up and across the western side of england through wales into the heart of scotland and norhtern ireland too. it will leave a trailing portion of the front to keep the rain going into parts of wales, into the northwest of england and all the while still have the persistent rain arcing its way across parts of western northern ireland and across the northern half of scotland. not a great deal changes as we get on into the body of monday. a few isobars there.
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the wind will be a noticeable feature and at its worst could be in noticeable shows, and we could well see a gust of a0 or 45 mph. here‘s the problem with the persistent rain across central and western part of scotland and northern ireland, that weatherfront, although it tends to weaken through the day, it may well be the case that before it finally fizzles away we could see 20—30mm of rain associated with that on the high ground of wales and somewhere in scotland could end up with the total of closer to 40mm of rain. on we go into tuesday, and pressure still close by northwest of scotland, and parts of northern ireland still seeing a fair amount of rain and later in the day this is rain with some embedded thunderstorms which could well cause something of an issue otherwise between those two extremes, it is a decent sort of day with some sunshine but already the met office have the yellow warning up but look at the extent and look at where it is covering. some of those areas already badly affected by flooding and there is more rain to the course
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of the evening and overnight through on into wednesday. as that clears the way, it may well be that as the heat of the day comes through that we may spawn more thunderstorms and again somewhere in the warning area, widely 20—30mm but somebody could get 50.
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the first televised debate in the race to be conservative leader and prime minister gets under way, but the front runner, borisjohnson, refuses to take part. the contenders have been arriving to field questions from a studio audience, on their vision, for the future of the country. there were calls for mrjohnson to take his place at the last minute, despite saying too many candidates would make the debate "cacophanous". very disappointed. i would like to have an opportunity to ask him some questions on his plan. more huge protests in hong kong, despite its leader backing down and apologising for plans to allow extradition to mainland china. tens of millions are left without power in four south american countries, after the failure of a hydroelectric dam.
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0h, oh, that has gone. and at the world cup, india are on the verge of victory against arch rivals pakistan, in one of the biggest games in cricket. good evening. in a crucial week for the conservative leadership race, the candidates are going head—to—head in their first televised debate. the eventual winner, to be decided next month by party members, will become prime minister. there are six candidates still in the running, with all of them divided on how best to deliver brexit. the frontrunner, boris johnson, has refused to take part in tonight‘s channel a debate, saying he‘ll instead participate in a bbc event on tuesday.
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but his rivals claim he‘s ducking scrutiny, with some saying he can‘t deliver on his promise to leave the eu in october with or without a deal. here‘s our political correspondent, ben wright. he turned up. so did he. do you think there is any point to these debates without boris? very much, yes. five of the tory candidates vying to be the next prime minister arrived for the first tv debate of this leadership race. and all the candidates noticed that the frontrunner wasn‘t there. how disappointed are you that you don‘t get to debate with borisjohnson this evening? very disappointed. i‘m still hoping he is going to turn up because i think he is a great communicator and a great debater and i‘d like him to have a chance to show that. but above all, i‘d like to have an opportunity to ask him some questions on his plan. boris johnson thought this crowded stage would be too much of a scrum between tory politicians. an empty podium has been put in his place. other candidates will attack mrjohnson‘s absence, and he has done no tv interviews since the campaign started,
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but that hasn‘t stopped him romping ahead of the other candidates. and after the first round of voting last week, boris johnson easily topped the poll. four contenders have gone and there will be further votes this week as rivals to borisjohnson try to break out of the pack. brexit is dominating this contest. this morning, the foreign secretary jeremy hunt said he thought the eu would be willing to renegotiate the brexit deal despite the eu repeatedly insisting they will not. but mr hunt did not commit to leaving on october the 31st come what may. i am not committing to a 31st of october hard stop at any cost because i don‘t think you can make that guarantee. and if you do make that guarantee... if you go with the wrong approach then you are committing us to nothing other than a hard brexit, a no—deal brexit. but borisjohnson has said the uk must leave at the end of october
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whether a withdrawal deal has been passed in parliament or not. promises are being made by the people who want to be prime minister, and there are four weeks to test and interrogate them. our political correspondent, matt cole is there watching the debate. what is your sense of how things are going so far? we are still very much in the early exchanges. you can probably see the monitors behind me in this, the spin room, where advisers and supporters can gather after the event to tell us how well they think they are candidate did. the first question, a blunt one. how will you beat nigel farage and jeremy corbyn? each candidate will ta ke jeremy corbyn? each candidate will take questions from the audience. 160 people from across the country, floating voters. they each get a chance to answer before a free for all debate. they have made clear borisjohnson is all debate. they have made clear boris johnson is not all debate. they have made clear borisjohnson is not here but said if he turns up at any time he can
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join in. all these candidates, can they get enough support for tuesday when they have to have at least 33 mps backing them to get through to the next round? hundreds of thousands of protestors are back on the streets of hong kong, a day after the territory‘s chief executive, carrie lam, suspended controversial plans to allow extradition to the chinese mainland. the demonstrators are calling for the proposals to be completely withdrawn, and some want mrs lam to resign. rupert wingfield—hayes reports from hong kong. in the sweltering heat of a sunday afternoon, they came out again in their hundreds of thousands. a sea of black t—shirts, the now unofficial uniform of these protests. today they wore no facemasks or helmets, and had just one chant — withdraw the bill, withdraw the bill.
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these are truly remarkable scenes we are seeing here in the centre of hong kong again this afternoon. it is notjust this street that is jammed with protesters. it is the next one over and the next one beyond that. all of these people chanting, "withdraw the bill," all heading to the centre of hong kong to surround the government offices. this is a massive display of discontent with carrie lam and her government. your message for her today is what? it is to stop it. to stop hong kong people from from being two groups, going out and fighting with each other. we are one hong kong, we are not two hong kongs. yesterday carrie lam said she will suspend... not acceptable. withdraw! totally withdraw! not acceptable. we need to withdraw it. tonight, under immense pressure from these new protests, the hong kong chief executive released a grovelling apology.
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as night fell, the sea of protesters surrounded the hong kong government. the police were on their best behaviour, no riot shields or helmets, the barriers cleared away. but if today‘s protest shows anything, it is that public anger here will not be assuaged until the hated extradition bill is gone. after severe flooding in lincolnshire, there‘s the prospect of more heavy rain this week, with storms forecast. hundreds of people have been forced to leave their homes at wainfleet, after the river steeping burst its banks. luxmy gopal is there for us this evening. as you can see, the road behind me looks like a river and these houses are among the 600 properties
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evacuated since the river steeping burst its banks four days ago. today residents have been told it could be another four days before they can safely return to their homes because there is a risk of further flooding to come. more than 500 workers have helped with their rescue operation but theirjob is farfrom over as with their rescue operation but theirjob is far from over as there isa theirjob is far from over as there is a risk of yet more flooding to come. this is the worst flooding we have seen from rain in living memory. we are in a situation that 2-3 memory. we are in a situation that 2—3 months of rain has fallen in a short period of time, landed on the ground and is overflowing everywhere you can imagine. just under 600 homes have been evacuated. residents have been told they should not return until wednesday at the earliest. businesses have also been affected. most of the things u psta i rs affected. most of the things upstairs is ok but downstairs it is waterlogged. it is hard because it is an online business and people are
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still buying but i can‘t get down to get them out. high volume pumps have been brought channel way water. flood defences are holding for now but in the coming days that could change. the flood defences held out overnight thanks in part to the raf chinooks shoring them up yesterday afternoon but with weather warnings issued under heavy rain forecast in the next few days it is a question of how long those defences will hold. tens of millions of people across south america have been affected by what‘s being described as a "gigantic" powerfailure. some reports suggest much of argentina and uruguay are without mains electricity, while parts of brazil and paraguay have also been hit. chris buckler has the story.
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at first light, argentina and uruguay were left in darkness. a massive power outage across both countries left tens of millions of people without electricity and crippled communications in the city after city. in argentina, people were preparing to go to the polls, but with trains halted by the power cuts and in the streets all the traffic lights out, several provinces took the decision to temporarily delay local elections. this was a failure on a quite remarkable scale. translation: everything came to a halt. elevators, water pumps, everything. we were left adrift. translation: the fridge thawed and i couldn't go out because the elevator wasn't working. i could only come down when the power came back. it is notjust here, it was everywhere. shops have been scrambling to fire up generators in order to save their supplies. energy companies say a limited number of their customers have been reconnected, but it‘s likely to be hours before many have their power restored.
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the authorities are still investigating the cause of these unprecedented problems. like so many others, they are still in the dark. it‘s one of the world‘s most intense sporting rivalries, as india take on pakistan at the cricket world cup. more than 600,000 people applied for 23,000 tickets in manchester. up to a billion people are thought to be watching across the world. andy swiss is live at old trafford. welcome to old trafford where, as you say, we have seen the most anticipated match of this cricket world cup. india against pakistan, one of the biggest rivalries in world sport, but it has been very much india‘s day. if you wondered exactly how much this game it means, well, here is your answer.
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for india and pakistan fans, all roads led to manchester. whatever their transport, theyjust had to be there. this means a lot for us. we are from india, only to watch the match. only to win the match! its more than a cricket match, this is war! no, it's the biggest match in the world. can't beat it. the best part of a million people had applied for tickets, with an estimated billion watching on tv. talk about pressure. but india‘s batsmen didn‘t seem to be feeling it, the favourites off to a flyer. a brilliant century from rohit sharma, before virat kohli showed why he is officially the world‘s best. india were heading for a mammoth total, but they were slightly stalled by a rain delay, and then kohli‘s bizarre dismissal. he thought he nicked it... he has declared himself out. ..when replays later showed he hadn‘t. frustrated? just a little. pakistan still needed a hefty 337. briefly it seemed they mightjust do it, as fakhar zaman
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blazed his way to a half—century. but after he fell, the rest tumbled around him. a clatter of wickets and india were in sight of what would be for them the sweetest of victories. we have had more rain here but even that can‘t save pakistan. india will surely win this match. obviously there has been huge interest in this game around the world, especially in india and pakistan. our correpsondent secundar kermani is in islamabad, but first let‘s talk to rajini vadyaniathan in delhi. the crowds are already celebrating as if india has won this match. every time a pakistani wicket has fallen, people here erupted into spontaneous dancing. much of india has come to a standstill to see this
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match. more than 15 million people viewing this online alone. it comes just months after tensions escalated between india and pakistan. a few months ago, many wondered whether this match would even go ahead. hundreds of people had gathered in this park in islamabad to watch the match but most have gone home looking rather subdued. the game has been all anyone has been talking about today, including prime minister imran khan, a former cricket hero, who took to twitter to offer tactical advice earlier. the rivalry between pakistan and india is political as well as sporting but fans have told me all day that they hope matches like this and a shared passion for cricket can bring the countries closer together. the chelsea football manager,
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maurizio sarri, has left the club after just one season. he‘lljoin the italian champions, juventus. sarri led chelsea to a europa cup win, and third place in the premier league, but made it clear he wanted to return to his native country. the bbc understands a compensation fee in excess of £5 million has been agreed. the british heavyweight boxer tyson fury put on an impressive show in las vegas, beating the undefeated heavyweight tom schwarz. fury dominated from the start, in a bout that didn‘t last long, as patrick gearey reports. tyson fury isn‘t big on subtlety. the boy from manchester wants to crack america so in las vegas he dressed like apollo creed, a character in the rocky movies. what followed was more a trailer than feature length. his german opponent, tom schwarz, was not in fury‘s class. no vegas pokerface here. fury fights with a punch and a wink, smiling and swaying, then waiting for the right moment to bring down the curtain.
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schwarz tried to carry on but was helpless when faced with fury‘s final frenzy. the towel was thrown and fury‘s first fight of a lucrative new tv deal was over inside two rounds. fury tends to follow his greatest hits with an encore, to the world and his wife. # and i don‘t want to miss a thing #. i don‘t take myself that seriously, as you can tell. i‘m just a chubby guy who comes and has fun. i‘m relaxed, i don‘t care about fighting, it‘s bred naturally, what i do. it‘s fun and games for me in there. a rematch against heavyweight champion deontay wilder looks likely next year for fury. he is a complex, controversial character who will never be universally adored, but with every fight and every show he is becoming harder and harder to ignore. that‘s it. now on bbc one, time for the news where you are. bye for now.
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dubbed as the ‘delhi downton‘, a new period drama set in india comes to our televisions next week. the six part series ‘beecham house‘ covers life in the sub—continent before the british raj. it has attracted some big name actors from britain, india and beyond. bbc asian network‘s shabnam mahmood
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has been behind the scenes. you will learn that i‘m a private man. now i should like to see the house. beecham house centres around the lives of a wealthy english family living in dehli in 1795 in the days leading to british rule. i am playing john beecham in beecham house, who is the lead protagonist, he used to work for the east india company but he has left them because he doesn‘t like how they operate so he struck out on his own and has come across quite a few adventures in india, which we will discover. it features a diverse cast. pallavi sharda is an indian—born australian actress. i really believe so strongly that, you know, women of colour all over the world deserve roles and they deserve to play different kinds of women, not just the archetypal stereotype, you know, indian doctor or, you know...
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we are feminine, powerful, we have a voice and that‘s how i want indian women to be portrayed on screen. while some of the filming took place on location in the rajasthan region of northern india, other scenes were shot in less exotic places, like ealing studios in west london. tv pundits have already dubbed it dehli downton. how different is this one to downton abbey? very. from my point of view, i am playing a very different character, a different class, different time, different period. the six—part series depicts a vibrant mix of cultures both it isa
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it is a hot pot of all wonderful diversity. the six—part series depicts a vibrant mix of cultures both on and off the screen. we had a ceremony before the first take where we smashed coconuts in a sort of good luck blessing ceremony which i had never done before, and then i watched the first take, the indian actors would kiss the camera and i said, "what is that about?" they said, "it is respect, the camera gives us our work." it gives us the roofs over our head andi it gives us the roofs over our head and i thought that was so wonderful. beecham house is a fictional drama but hopes to provide a glimpse of the period leading to britain‘s colonisation of india. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with phil avery. let‘s bring up—to—date with how things are looking across british isles. and we continue with the theme of a real mixed bag. not all doom and gloom by any means at all but sunday‘s satellite imagery shows an area of low pressure still anchored out to the western side
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of the british isles. an area of cloud running its way into towards the southwest and pepping up the showers, perhaps giving longer spells of rain and ahead of that, it is a mixture already of sunny spells and showers. persistent rain, perhaps more there foor the northwest of scotland, perisitent rain beginning to show its hand from increasing cloud across the southwester quarter through the rest of the evening and overnight so we will push that rain up and across the western side of england through wales into the heart of scotland and norhtern ireland too. it will leave a trailing portion of the front to keep the rain going into parts of wales, into the northwest of england and all the while still have the persistent rain arcing its way across parts of western northern ireland and across the northern half of scotland. not a great deal changes as we get on into the body of monday. a few isobars there. the wind will be a noticeable feature and at its worst could be in noticeable showers, and we could well see a gust of a0 or a5 mph.
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here‘s the problem with the persistent rain across central and western part of scotland and northern ireland, that weatherfront, although it tends to weaken through the day, it may well be the case that before it finally fizzles away we could see 20—30mm of rain associated with that on the high ground of wales and somewhere in scotland could end up with the total of closer to a0mm of rain. on we go into tuesday, and pressure still close by northwest of scotland, and parts of northern ireland still seeing a fair amount of rain and later in the day this is rain with some embedded thunderstorms which could well cause something of an issue otherwise between those two extremes, it is a decent sort of day with some sunshine but already the met office have the yellow warning up but look at the extent and look at where it is covering. some of those areas already badly affected by flooding and there is more rain to the course of the evening and overnight through on into wednesday. as that clears the way,
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it may well be that as the heat of the day comes through that we may spawn more thunderstorms and again somewhere in the warning area, widely 20—30mm but somebody could get 50.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 7pm... the first televised debate in the race to be conservative leader and prime minister is taking place right now, but without boris johnson. iam here i am here in the spin room at the olympic part studios where the main event is taking place. this is where advisers will take place to cheer on their man. the exchanges on brexit. hundreds of thousands stage another protest in hong kong against proposed changes to the extradition law. the territory‘s chief executive apologises for the upheaval. i confess we have not been as effective as we would like, to communicate with the people, to justify this very good objective that is worth doing.

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