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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  June 17, 2019 10:00am-11:01am BST

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hello it's monday, it's ten o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. we neet the family of four with no electricity or gas bills. living entirely off grid — generating all the energy they need to power their home themselves. this is the shower. and it's cold water. we've got hot running water. this is hot water in this outdoor shower? yeah, yeah, yeah. of course. so, a biodigester essentially means that you are creating gas from your food waste. exactly. what we've essentially got is an artificial cow's stomach. the government says it wants to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to almost zero in the next 30 years. so is this a model for the way we could all live? health secretary matt hancock — who wanted to be prime minister himself — is now backing
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borisjohnson‘s bid for the top job. but where wasjohnson last night? the other five remaining candidates all turned up to the channel 4 leadership debate. where is boris? if his team won't allow him out to debate with five pretty friendly colleagues, how will he fare with 27 european countries? and in his first broadcast interview sharif lanre, who was booted off itv2‘s love island last week. he admits he kicked a fellow contestant, molly—mae, in the groin, and used an offensive phrase but he thinks the incident has been blown out of proportion. he's live in the studio today we will talk to him after 10.30. hello. welcome to the programme. we're live until 11 this morning. thank you about your messages on the
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story about the family with no electric and gas bills. current e—mails to say i have just read your article about this family living off grid in pembrokeshire, which struck a chord. my partner and i have built an off grid b&b, because we want to encourage people to try it and explore it in more detail. planning was difficult. as it was a new build, it looks very different from the house in your article, this did use up our life savings. on twitter, 68 million people cannot live in a remote 68 million people cannot live in a re m ote off 68 million people cannot live in a remote off grid farms, you need the space on the knowledge to live that lifestyle. stay tuned for our exclusive film in the next few minutes. send us an e—mail. or message us on minutes. send us an e—mail. or message us on twitter. first carrie gracie has the news. borisjohnson‘s campaign to become prime minister has received a boost, despite his refusal to appear in last night's tv debate. the former leadership contender, the health secretary, matt hancock, gave his backing to mrjohnson, saying he had the "unique personality" to unite
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the conservative party. a further ballot will be held by conservative mps tomorrow to further whittle down the remaining candidates. a renewed push for labour to back a second eu referendum will be made by the party's deputy leader tom watson. in a speech today to the centre for european reform mr watson will say labour's members and its values have always been pro european and that the only way to break the brexit deadlock at westminster is to put the issue back to the people. an investigation by the bbc has found evidence that young people on merseyside are being offered hundreds of pounds to stab each other by older gang leaders. the claims, which were recorded by youth workers in the city, were studied by the bbc‘s beyond today podcast and have been linked to at least one recent stabbing.
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nearly two million people are thought to have taken part in a mass protest in hong kong over the weekend against a controversial extradition bill. they turned out despite the suspension of the bill which would allow extradition from hong kong to mainland china. hong kong's leader carrie lam has apologised over her handling of the case. every new teacher in england will be trained to spot the early warning signs of mental illness. the plans will be unveiled by theresa may later today. other measures include extra support for social workers, local authorities and health care services. britain's andy murray says "life changing" surgery rekindled his love of tennis as he prepares to make his comeback five months after he was seemingly set for retirement. murray will play doubles with spain's feliciano lopez at queen's on wednesday. the three time grand slam champion had planned to retire because of hip pain, before having an operation in january. he's been speaking to sally nugent.
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people that have had arthritic hips and stuff will know how difficult it can be and i probably didn't realise it at the time, but how unhappy it can make you as well, and how long and tiring some of the days feel. i can go do you think it ever affected you mentally? did it affect your mental health? definitely did. at the time i probably didn't realise it as much. thatjust became the norm. i wasn't living life like i would want to. good luck to andy murray. that is the summary. now back to victoria. imagine life without electricity or gas bills. imagine generating all the electricity you need to charge your mobile phone using solar panels, and using the gas from your food waste to power a hot outdoor shower, you oven and your hob. last week the prime minister theresa may announced that the uk is aiming to be carbon neutral by 2050. a big part of achieving this target
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will be reducing the amount of energy we use in our homes. some people are already making radical choices to lower the amount of carbon dioxide they produce, including households going off—grid by producing all their own electricity or gas. 0ur reporter mike cowan has been to see the watkinson family who gave up their dayjobs to live off grid in wales. we're in pembrokeshire, in the far west of wales, to meet the watkinson family. now, they've lived completely off—grid for two years now. but their place is so remote that we've been told this trusty car won't get up the hills. so we've been given the directions to a field and then they're going to come and pick us up. we are in yourfield, i think.
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matthew and wife carys both used to be vets until they gave it all up to live here, along with daughter elsa and son billy. it's basically... junk. talk me through it. so the first thing we got up here was the horse lorry, an old horse lorry. we also have a little camper van which is butted up against it. that's our bedroom. with the family growing, we got two great big huge flatbed trailers and slid them in behind. and then i built a little cabin on top. and these are all footpaths. 0n the left is a spare bedroom. that is like a full double mattress. so this is the shower. and it's cold water? we've got hot running water. this is hot water in this outdoor shower?
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yeah, yeah, yeah. of course. it's got a hot tub made out of a tank. you haven't got a hot tub! we've got a hot tub made out of a tank. this is our manual washing machine solution. and then all you do is pull on these ropes. just rotate it back and forth for ten minutes. wales has one of the most progressive policies in the uk when it comes to living off grid. thanks to the decade—old 0ne planet development scheme. in a nutshell, it allows you to build on agricultural land if you can make enough money to live off it whilst living within your ecological means. so a biodigester essentially means that you are creating gas from your food waste. exactly. what we've what we've essentially got is an artificial cow's stomach. that is full of the normal bugs that would be
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in the cow's stomach. those bugs in there are turning what we are feed it into methane. this is a work in progress. oh, wow. this oven works on gas from your old foodwaste? yes. made a hob out of drilled holes in some copper pipe and the gas is piped into them and we can light that and cook off that. wee goes one way. that is the wee toilet. 0h, there's a toilet for number one and number two. yeah. so that will be filled in about two and a half months. two to three months. and you just leave it. then we take outside, leave it for a year, and then it composts down into compost and you put it around the trees. in order to qualify for the one planet development scheme, they have to earn at least £500 a month from the land. the watkinsons sell eggs from their chickens to local shops.
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41. is that about normal? yeah, that's pretty good. that's pretty good. yeah i mean that was one of the most liberating things from moving up here. there's no electricity bills, no gas bills, no water bills. these are our solar panels. i don't think we've reduced our electricity use that much. we charge our phones. we've got the laptop, the tv, the fridge and the freezer. two people, both vets, both had careers, choose to give it all up and live here. why? everybody‘s used to a situation where things are available all the time. and we just suddenly started to feel less and less secure. so we thought actually we'd like to look after ourselves a bit more. but some of the family have more inventive ideas.
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i think we should live on the planet where my toy lives. that sounds sensible to me. where is it? where is that planet? it'sjust by africa. oh, just by africa? i'm on my way to the centre for alternative technology. this is the place you come if you want to know anything about living in a more environmentally friendly way. and we're not here just to ride this water—powered cliff railway. this week, people from all over the world are coming to the centre to learn how to build their own home in a more environmentally—friendly way. and then you connect that... carwynjones is the master carpenter who runs the five—day natural house course.
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what are the environmental benefits of building something like this in this way, compared to traditional building methods? a lot of manmade material, there's a lot of energy going into it. so using natural materials just makes it more sustainable. charlotte is one of the students who hopes to build an off grid house in the future, but knows it's a big commitment. you've got to weigh up how much time you are going to, like, put in to do all of that work on a daily basis and maintaining everything. i find that... tim brewer is an expert in off grid living. i wanted to ask him how we can achieve this on a mass scale. so in our cities, where the majority of the population lives, how can we realistically work towards a carbon neutral future? ok, so two major technologies that are appropriate for households generally are solar electrics, pv, photovoltaics, or solar water heating panels. and both of those technologies are really, really mature and they're really,
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really applicable for 99% of the households in the uk. but in reality if we're going to try and achieve zero carbon britain or reduce our carbon output significantly then we need national government policies. we need to be generating large amounts of renewable energy from our renewable resources that we have around the country. wind, solar, wave. and that needs to be fed into the national grid so that we can all use that renewable energy. you are, to all intents and purposes, average members of society. how long do you think before way more people like you start doing this? the leap, you know, handing in your notice and saying that we're off, don't have a job really, you know, lined up, that's scary. it's a big, brave move. there's loads of people who'd love to do this already. but the planning process is such a barrier that i don't know how many people will end up doing it in time
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to make a big difference. the united nations say we could have as little as 11 years to stop a climate catastrophe. to halt it will take difficult decisions from governments, hard choices from business and a willingness from us as individuals. but the people we've met have showed that living in an environmentally friendly way can be liberating, not limiting. and if we're to halt a catastrophe, it's a way of life that us as society will have to adopt sooner rather than later. that was mike cowan reporting. james tweets this, if the off grid houses using bio digester and to produce methane, how is that helping
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to cut greenhouse gases? it is a fair point, but at least it is renewable. janice on twitter says this is hilarious, the idea everybody in society might have to live like this is bonkers. this is an extreme form of what is desired and spreading this kind of nonsense harms the environment argument. another says living in a house built from old horse boxes, caravans and trailers, the spare room is a 4x4, bogs on a cow's stomach for power? we all have to live like this, flooding the market with eggs and honey? another says we could have a normal home with near zero carbon dioxide with efficient insulation and heat pumps. you can message us on twitter. you can send an e—mail. later in the programme we will talk about how realistic it is for many more people to embrace off grid
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living. also still to come, in his first tv interview, sharif lanre tells us why he was booted off itv2‘s love island. the health secretary matt hancock has become the latest high profile figure to back borisjohnson‘s bid to be pm. mr hancock pulled out of the race last week. there's another ballot of tory mps tomorrow — the candidate with the least votes will be eliminated. last night, five candidates took part in the channel four tv debate — all bar mrjohnson — he said he was concerned the format would lead to to "blue on blue" attacks — the leadership candidates criticising one another, in other words. there was certainly a fair bit of that. whenjeremy when jeremy corbyn whenjeremy corbyn wakes up, he will be scared of me. my wife said, you're never going to get those
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three bags in the bin. i was tempted to say believe in the bin, believing britain! we are not going to get a new deal out of europe. we have been talking about brexit for 25 minutes. where is boris? if his team won't allow him out to debate with five pretty friendly colleagues, how will he fare with 27 european countries? this campaign began with a admission from cocaine. if you use it and you have fallen short of standards, you don't lower the standards, you reflect on your mistake. greenock are one of us has done some thing 25 years ago that we wouldn't want our mum and dad to find out about. we should not be trivialising this debate by talking about what we got up debate by talking about what we got up to 25 years ago. women who fear your weakness is that you think feminists are amongst the most obnoxious bigots in the world? feminists are amongst the most obnoxious bigots in the world7m feminists are amongst the most obnoxious bigots in the world? it is easy to take something out of context. i was talking about the double standards we shouldn't have in politics. people criticised that, it was said a long time ago. judge
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us it was said a long time ago. judge us by what we do, notjust it was said a long time ago. judge us by what we do, not just what we say. you begin a figure to be invited to the trump figure. that is ridiculous. that is ridiculous. why let him answer that. it is a challenge, let him answer it.|j don't think that was the reason i wasn't invited to the dinner. some people say as foreign secretary my biggest weakness has been to occasionally get my wife's nationality wrong. my biggest strength is that i have the most amazing unforgiving wife. and ifeel very lucky about that. we can speak now to damian collins mp, who's backing borisjohnson and john lamont, who is backing jeremy hunt. welcome both of you. who won? don't think anybody won. if you like, if the process at the moment is about gaining the support of a wide cross—section of members of parliament, you say the person that won was the person that wasn't there, borisjohnson won was the person that wasn't there, boris johnson is won was the person that wasn't there, borisjohnson is gaining support. who do you think won? i think we demonstrated the great
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strength we have in all of the candidates. who won out of them? the person that didn't win was the person that didn't win was the person that didn't turn up. if we are demonstrating who is going to bat for us with the european union, being prime minister for the whole of the united kingdom, not turning up of the united kingdom, not turning up or something that looks difficult did not send the right message. fairly strong when jeremy did not send the right message. fairly strong whenjeremy hunt said if his team won't let him out to debate with five pretty friendly colleagues, how will he do with 27 eu nations? the reason he didn't go is because a format like that does not allow proper debate or scrutiny of the candidates, there are too many of them. it's much better to do it when there is a narrower field. that is why boris said he will attend the bbc debate on tuesday night. is it not a blow for your man that matt hancock is backing boris johnson? that is a question for matt as to why he is backing boris. what do you think? i'm confident that jeremy is well placed in this contest, he came second in the first
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ballot, he is gaining momentum. i think you demonstrated last night the skills he has is a former businessman, a well—respected foreign secretary, i think he is well placed not only to deliver brexit but to bring the country together after that is finished. brexit but to bring the country together after that is finishedlj wa nt together after that is finished.” wa nt to together after that is finished.” want to ask both of you, the eu said no to reopening the withdrawal agreement, no to changing the backstop. so, how is borisjohnson convincing you that he can get a withdrawal agreement through parliament, the same question to you? he is right to focus on the fa ct you? he is right to focus on the fact that we can't extend this process beyond the end of october. i think the indecision, the uncertainty is what is killing politics in the country. but his preference is not for no deal, so how is he going to get an agreement through? i think he can be clear with the eu, this is what there is a consensus in the house of commons to do, deliver the agreement with the backstop amended. that is the only thing parliament has voted for. and you know, both of you know, and your men are saying they will sort out a new deal, renegotiate, you know the
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eu have said that is not going to happen and the backstop is the backstop. so what parliament has to confront is does parliament want to revoke article 50? i don't believe there is a majority to do that. how is borisjohnson convincing you he is borisjohnson convincing you he is going to get a new deal? the only chance is if we are really clear that we are not going to extend beyond 0ctober. it is in both parties interests to come to a deal, otherwise we will leave without one andi otherwise we will leave without one and i don't think parliament will see fit to revoke article 50. how is it going to work? the current deal is dead, the house of commons rejected it repeatedly. the eu needs to recognise that. the job we have is to pick the person best able to go into europe and persuade them about the changes added to the main deal or to the political statement to make sure we do get a deal approved. there is a difference between the main deal, the eu said you can't look at that again, we are not reopening that, for the declaration in future they might,
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but theresa may tried that? the current prime minister failed to deliver the concessions that the house of commons required. because the eu said no. i would say that mr hunt, given his past experience, is best placed to achieve those concessions. we need to go and negotiate well taking a much harder approach than some of the other candidates. mr hunt has made it very clear if we get to a point at the end of october where there is no prospect of a deal, if it is the choice between no deal and no brexit, he is clear we should leave without a deal. as chair of the culture, media and sport committee, you have looked at fake news. esther johnson posed in front of that bus which said we send the eu through and 50 million a week, let's fund the nhs instead. the uk statistics authority criticised him for a clear misuse of official stats. he also said the british iranian mum currently injail in iran was working as a journalist, not true. is hea working as a journalist, not true. is he a liar orjust poor at
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grasping details? the issue about the bus, it was hotly debated at the time, people have a different point of view. clear misuse of official statistics, says the stats authority. in referendums, politicians hotly debate on facts and statistics. you can't debate fa cts , and statistics. you can't debate facts, they are a fact or not. people have different points they wa nt to people have different points they want to make. we were looking at this information, very important, where people totally fabricate scenarios and stories, information, to try to mislead people. boris johnson and other people on the league campaign made those arguments, they were hotly contested at the time and people voted after those debates. i want to say, this debate, and my reason for supporting borisjohnson, is debate, and my reason for supporting boris johnson, is not just debate, and my reason for supporting borisjohnson, is notjust about debate, and my reason for supporting boris johnson, is not just about the need to resolve brexit, it is looking at the investment the country needs and vital infrastructure, the committee made today to bring forward the acceleration of superfast broadband so every home has it by 2025. it's about looking to the longer term future of what the country needs. in the short term, we desperately need
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to solve the brexit impasse, but we also need a bold agenda for investing in the country. you followed our work on this programme of uncovering the non—recent abuse of uncovering the non—recent abuse of boys in football. lastly, an abuse victim, and excel have and player, described mrjohnson is a disgrace for describing money spent on non—recent child abuse investigations as money spaffed up a wall. should he apologise question of the element with the words. those are the words. there are genuinely the words that mrjohnson used.” ta ke the words that mrjohnson used.” take these investigations incredibly seriously, borisjohnson does as well. why would he use that word? the bodies have a duty of care to athletes and i take that extremely seriously. should he apologise for using that language? when he launched his leadership campaign, he was clear that he apologises if offence has been caused. i think he
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was clear or not. a vote for either of the menu are supporting is potentially a vote for the break—up of the united kingdom. —— the men that you are supporting. both outdoor candidates have said that they will consider —— both of your candidates have said they will consider leaving, and compared with no deal, brexit will definitely happen, nicola sturgeon says the prospect of leaving with no deal will be a nightmare for scotland. in boris johnson's case will be a nightmare for scotland. in borisjohnson's case in particular, reminding tory leadership contenders that 66% of people in scotland voted to remain in the eu. if we don't deliver brexit, it will rip every community in this country apart. but he said he will leave come what may, that could lead to the break—up of the uk. i think if we don't deliver this, i think it will lead to the break—up of politics in this country, rip communities apart. but the break—up of the uk is a price worth paying? don't believe that as
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a consequence, the consequence of allowing the impasse to drag on indefinitely has far more wide—ranging implications for the country. unless we deal with the surge rise in populist politics in this country, deal with parties like the brexit party, who i don't believe are acting in the best interests of the country, i think the problems are much more fundamental. i don't think the union rests on this. your candidate has not said he will leave with no deal, when will he deliver brexit by? he said he will leave with no deal if there is no prospect of getting a good deal. the best way to protect the union is to leave the eu with a deal. we shouldn't be under any illusions. nicola sturgeon will consta ntly illusions. nicola sturgeon will constantly be asking for referendums, breaking up the united kingdom. nicola sturgeon willjump up kingdom. nicola sturgeon willjump up and down and ask for another referendum. it would be a reasonable change in circumstances to request another referendum ?
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change in circumstances to request another referendum? she stood on a platform of asking for another referendum in 2016, and she lost her parliamentary majority. the people of scotland are sick of referendums. they are sick of having... the opinion polls show consistently that the people scotland do not want another referendum. they want to move on. have you been promised your first ministerialjob for backing mr johnson? not at all, i met with mr johnson? not at all, i met with mr johnson and the other candidates before making my decision, we spoke about his planning for brexit... before making my decision, we spoke about his planning for brexit. .. did he offer you anything, how did the conversation go? you are not going to say what is in it for me, but thatis to say what is in it for me, but that is unpleasant? would you like my personal view? it does not show a lot of faith if you go to a candidate and say i believe you are the best person to leave —— lead the country, but only if there is something in it for me. the way he would resolve brexit, in particular i was pleased to discuss his commitment to investing more in
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education, devolving to the english regions, i thought this was a man serious about the future of the country and i was happy to give him support. do you thinkjeremy hunt will be the second name on the ballot? i am confident he will not only be the second name on the ballot, he will be our next prime minister. really? he has a lot of ground to make up. the conservative party has a great tradition of picking winners, the underdog in scotland won, mr cameron won against the odds, he was not the favourite amongst mps, and he still came through with the membership. i'm confident the membership has a choice and they will see the qualities in mr hunt and pick him as our leader and prime minister. thank you both very much. the next ballot of mps is tomorrow. the former love island contestant sherif lanre has told this programme he feels the producers have an "unconscious bias" in in the way they treat people who appear on the show. lanre was booted off the show last week —
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he says the reason he was told to leave was for accidentally kicking fellow islander molly—mae hague in the groin, then joking about it using bad language, including the c—word. he says the programme handled the incident poorly and claims it "has been blown out of all proportion" and that "he's been made to look like a terrible person." before we talk to him, here's a clip of him in the villa. smart, intelligent. and you haven't really had your head turned by any of these boys. that, to me, is attractive. i love that. do you know what i mean? honestly, honestly, you actually have, like, melted me a little bit. and you've proved to me that you're fully worth it. do you know what i mean? aw, i'm getting a bit shy, you know. this is what you wanted a moment ago. no, honestly, i don't ever get shy but i feel a bit shy. this is what you wanted. so, yeah... that was sherif in the villa with anna, who he coupled up with. and in his first broadcast interview since leaving love island,
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we can speak to sherif now. good morning. thank you for having me on the show. you are there one minute, gone the next, what happened? i told my story. i was mucking about with molly—mae. it has been blown out of proportion. i accidentally caught her in the groin. that was when playing about. yeah, went on to joke about it, using crude language which i don't condone in hindsight. that was against the rules and regulations when i went in there. so, it was between me and the producers, agreed that i should leave. do you feel sorry for what you did? in hindsight, it is not something you should go on a show like love island and say. 0r should go on a show like love island and say. or do. but i should have been more aware of what was going on, and... did it hurt her, or was it the words you used after?” on, and... did it hurt her, or was it the words you used after? i think it the words you used after? i think it was the words i used after. yeah,
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justjoking about it was the words i used after. yeah, just joking about it, it was the words i used after. yeah, justjoking about it, making it seem like it was a lot less of a thing done it was to the producers. i don't know how they saw it. i don't know who saw it and what context they took it in. she definitely wasn't in pain. she was uninjured. we left the villa on good terms. we had a good friendship. do you want to apologise or do you not think it's necessary? i've already issued my public apology and it's out there for people to see.” have looked at some of the tweets, what do you think of the kind of abuse that you have received?” what do you think of the kind of abuse that you have received? i am not on twitter, i try to refrain it, it's a violent place at times but yes, i've seen a couple of people who think it's not acceptable, yes, it's a bit vile what i did but i think that's completely taken out of context. yes, people who saw me on the show, people who know me personally will know that's
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something i would not have done with malicious intent. that's an interesting point, anyone defending him from loved ireland, is an idiot, it's so obvious that you hate women. so, i don't know where that has been pulled from, anyone who knows me personally knows that it's quite the opposite i have a good relationship with all my female friends, i've been raised by a strong, loving mother, she's done one heck of a job to bring me up to respect women, i definitely don't hate women. i don't know how you go on a show like that and hate women. in the series last year, elliott used the same word in an argument with another woman, georgia, she wasn't kicked out, why do you think it was handled differently. i think there's this whole thing, i was saying about an unconscious bias, but more so, i what does that mean? i feel like the people in charge of the show maybe
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have an unconscious bias around the rules and regulations for boys and girls. maybe different races and stuff like that. but yes, ifeel with the ellie situation, i didn't know about it until i came home. i think in that instance, i feel it was directed at someone and yes, that was used with a bit more malicious intent whereas mine was used more as a kind ofjoke. in hindsight, it wasn't acceptable. we don't know why it was used last year in terms of the intent behind it, maybe there was no intent but are you saying men are treated differently to women in the villa?” feel like there's a lot less for men and you can get pulled up on things and you can get pulled up on things a lot easier. that's interesting, why do you think that, what kind of evidence from the series? for example, not that i was offended or i had example, not that i was offended or ihad any example, not that i was offended or i had any problem with that, my bum
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was slapped a few times while i was in the villa but i feel like if that was a boy doing that to a girl it might have been seen a different way but it's all to do with the perspective of the people in charge of the show. women were slapping your bum but if it was the other way round you don't think it will be allowed ? round you don't think it will be allowed? even if it was ok with the girland allowed? even if it was ok with the girl and someone did that to a girl, i feel like people in girl and someone did that to a girl, ifeel like people in charge girl and someone did that to a girl, i feel like people in charge of the show may have had a problem with it, evenif show may have had a problem with it, even if the girl didn't have a problem. do you feel there is an element of unconscious racial bias? i'm not going to point any fingers but i feel like in the casting process they expect you to couple up based on what you've said and what they think is the norm. but yes, i also think with airtime, statistically i know that there is 24 statistically i know that there is 2a hours a day you are filmed and recorded and only one hour is shown
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at that each night. but yes, i feel like the airtime which contestants of my race and racism similar to mine wasa of my race and racism similar to mine was a very disproportionate to our value in the villa. i feel we did a bit more a lot more to keep the villa together, we did a lot more in terms of socially envelop. are you actually saying black people get less airtime, black contestants get less airtime, black contestants get less airtime on love island?” haven't kept up—to—date with the first few seasons before i went in there i obviously did a bit of research but i don't feel like statistically, they do get less airtime. why that is is down to the people in charge, the producers and whatnot. they obviously want to give the viewer is the content that they feel they want. don't most people come out of recorded reality shows say i don't wait more than ...” feel that is to do with the statistics of it, you are filmed and
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recorded 2a hours a day and only one hour of that, that's12li, recorded 24 hours a day and only one hour of that, that's 124, they have hour of that, that's124, they have a duty to edit and give the viewers what want. itv say he fully accepted what want. itv say he fully accepted what he did. we have a duty of care. we would strongly refute any accusation of racism. we are unaware of any islanders using racist language. all of them are treated fairly and in accordance with a duty of care. we would like this to be made abundantly clear. another former contestant said similar, said she could relate to an experience that producers are failing in their addition process to find contestants who desire women who are not blonde with big boobs and i cold her. and marcel said when it came to the first coupling there was something racist going on. in other words, black contestants were rejected in the first coupling. what do you think of that? i think the race
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thing is more to do with the people in charge finding people that actually want to be with people of colour. we do ask you a lot about what your type is and who you would usually go for and stuff like that but in regards to the itv comment about, stuff that went on in there, i don't expect them and i'm not struck in the slightest that the review did it but luckily there was witnesses in there. so yes. you were ina witnesses in there. so yes. you were in a couple with anna, i think you knew her a little bit before you are dead. do you want to see her again, do you feel bad you weren't able to say goodbye because you were just sort of taken out. i definitely feel bad the way in which my removal from the villa was handled. i didn't get to say goodbye to anyone, i didn't get to pack my bags and i think that let everyone a bit confused. specifically anna, i feel like let everyone a bit confused. specifically anna, ifeel like it
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wasn't fair on her. i'm not sure whether they told her the reason i was removed. but yes, i do want to catch up with her, have a chat and set the record straight. and ifeel like she would appreciate the same. don says if any of the boys acted like one of the female contestants on this year they would be booted off for sexual harassment. hashtag shocking double standards. thank you for talking to us. thank you for having me on the show. i appreciate it. back to our top story today. the prime minister theresa may has announced plans to make the uk is aiming to be ‘carbon neutral‘ by 2050 — which will mean many more of us will need to generate our own gas and electricity ourselves. earlier in the programme we met the watkinsons — a family of four who live off grid in rural wales — using food waste to create gas, and solar to create electricity. i've been talking to nick rosen who lives off grid himself, alexandra phillips who is a green party mep, and dr sharon george, an academic who is sceptical about whether off grid living could actually be
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adopted by a lot of us. i asked nick rosen what made him want to try living off—grid in the first place. the reason i tried it originally was i couldn't afford anything else but when i tried it i found it was co mforta ble, when i tried it i found it was comfortable, delightful and i would recommend it to everybody. it's hard, challenging? it is not challenging any more. the technology is so good it's very easy to live pretty much like you would even if you are on the grid. what are the main barriers? knowledge, really. knowing this option exists. it's there. it's relatively easy. and of course, you know, not everybody is an electrician and can manage their own water supply so you're probably going to need a bit of help, not that you wouldn't need if you just phone up a utility company and ask them to come in. why do you say it is easy, what specifically is easy? connecting solar panels and a wind turbine and powering your home using
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your own power, running your own power station isn't difficult. got to wa nt power station isn't difficult. got to want to do it. and it's likely to bea to want to do it. and it's likely to be a community of people that would find it most easily rather than just one household on its own. which is why it's groups of people who can easily go off grid and why all new housing in this country should be of great. we can worry about existing housing later. do you agree, alexander, all new housing should be of great? i think of credit is great for some people. it's not there for everyone. but new housing. i think new housing needs to be rethought in terms of what energy supplies it should be on, 100% renewable energy is for example but the government is getting in the way of positive climate action so for example, they've cut the feed in tariff, they don't incentivise people at all, really, now. what does that mean,
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the cut in feed in tariff? if people put solar panels and that might be a big outlay for them in the first instance and they are not necessarily going to gain a lot of money in the short term. because at that. as the first people who did do that. as the first people who did do that were gaining quite a lot of money from it. there's a lot of things that the government can do and they are not at the moment. they've got this 2050 net zero carbon tariff target. which, you know, sounds great. but they've not really got a plan in place to get there. and i think certainly for people in fuel poverty, which includes a lot of pensioners and so forth, people who aren't earning a lot of money, that plan really needs to be in place and that plan is part ofa to be in place and that plan is part of a renewable energy transition. just so unclear, why aren't you backing all new housing being off grid? off grid is for some and that's great. i think what really needs to happen is to have a shift
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for people living in council accommodation, for everyone in the country no matter what their background, their income, their education, what we really need is this transition into renewable energies. we've been told we've got ten years to act. it's much, much less expensive than connecting a whole electricity grid. it's quicker as well. you know, to get a community going. we are supposed to have a housing crisis in this country, off grid can solve it. how? because you can get off grid homes are also likely to be smaller, by the way, because they are cheaper to heat and maintain. and we could build far more houses for the same money. using of great techniques. let me bring in doctor sharon george. keele university. you have written that going off grid is impracticalfor most written that going off grid is impractical for most people, why? mostly it's because of the cost. as
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nick said technology has got better and there's battery storage which is massively making a difference. making it possible for people but still cost is a massive barrier. it's not practical for everyone to put ina it's not practical for everyone to put in a wind turbine and a lot of people don't live where they have the space to do that. cost is a big barrier. it's quite right to emit in communities is a good weight that you can chip in but you don't have to go completely off grid. you can't put every little bit of help. supplementing your energy. what could people do watching right now thatis could people do watching right now that is practical and realistic? in the uk one of the big issues is heating. we waste an awful lot of energy in this country. a lot of us are running inefficient systems, lighting. we are not insulating the way that we could and again, the government can have a part to play
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in that, talking about the fit subsidy, that was massively successful to kick—start peavey but we could do without again right now. to get boilers and heating systems as efficient as they can be. what is peavey? photovoltaic solar panels. not everyone can afford those. people live in fuel poverty, they need help to access this technology and that could have a massive difference. from what you are saying this has got to come from the government, they got to start incentivising people or else, because effectively, the fact that there is a climate emergency is not enough, not enough people are incentivised by simply that knowledge? and if you accept off grid as part of the solution, the first thing the government has to do is allow planning permission for off grid communities in areas where land is cheap which is mainly agricultural land. and the laws
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would stop property developers from buying up a load of agricultural land and putting a load of houses on it are also stopping proper equal developments from taking place and if we accept there is a climate emergency in the government should be able to say, right, you've got land and you've got a housing development which is truly ecological and you can prove it, you've got planning permission in 24 hours. like they've done in my to some extent but going further. 0k. thank you all very much for coming in. low impact and sustainable way of living, like your family in. low impact and sustainable way of living, like yourfamily in pembrokeshire is something that needs to be normalised. we need to learn about this to be educated on how to adapt lifestyles. thank you for bringing this to the mainstream. hilary says recent studies have proven the easiest cheapest and most effective thing everyone in this country can do right now to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is to go vegan. farmers greenhouse gas emissions is to go vegan. farmers can greenhouse gas emissions is to go vegan. farmers can be helped to
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adapt and shift over to planned agriculture are set up renewable forms like solar farms. robert says we are making field of solar farms. when there are warehouses with empty rooms, tower blocks with nothing on top of them. this seems a simple idea to me. and the of yourself developing your own shantytown in the middle of the welsh wilderness is not my idea of sustainable behaviour. thank you for all others. next emily hunt has been campaigning to get prosecutors to charge a man who has admitted secretly filming her, as she slept naked.the crown prosecution service has decided not to pursue a charge of voyeurism , despite the suspect‘s admission to police that he recorded the mobile phone video with the intention of using it for sexual gratification. she was told by the cps that if you have sex with someone, you "by extension" consent to them seeing you naked and filming you, and that she did "not have a reasonable expectation of privacy".
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emily alleges she was drugged and raped by the man who later recorded a 62—second clip of her lying face down on a hotel bed. a 35—year—old man was arrested on suspicion of rape in 2015 but denied the allegations and was not charged for lack of evidence. now emily — backed by the centre for women'sjustice — has decided to fight the decision not to charge the man for secretly filming her. she's taking it to what's known as judicial review. let's talk to emily hunt now and kate ellis, her solicitor at the centre for women's justice. tell our audience about how you felt when you learned that your alleged rapist had filmed you naked and unconscious on the bed. it was the year after i was right, i was in a meeting with the police and i thought i was meeting with them on something else and they mentioned that he had taken this one minute
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and two seconds long video of me and i was horrified. i am private. as far as i was horrified. i am private. as farasi i was horrified. i am private. as far as i know there are no naked videos or photos of me anywhere ever andi videos or photos of me anywhere ever and i was terrified to find out. the police could not guarantee he had not uploaded it to the cloud are anything so for all i knew he still had it. iwalked anything so for all i knew he still had it. i walked out of the meeting and contacted the crown prosecution service to ask them to consider going forward with a charge against my attacker on voyeurism for that video. that's not possible because why? i met with the cps in november 2016. they told me while bizarre and it was their word, not mine. it was not illegal in the uk to video someone not illegal in the uk to video someone naked if you were in the same room as them. how did you respond? i was again, same room as them. how did you respond? iwas again, sort same room as them. how did you respond? i was again, sort of stunt. it took me a little while to grapple with it but i have a young daughter
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at home. itjust seems ridiculous that this was true. what i ended up doing as i started lobbying different members of parliament to try and change the law because if the cps said, it wasn't against the law, the only thing i could think of doing was to make sure it would be andi doing was to make sure it would be and i had absolutely amazing cross— party and i had absolutely amazing cross—party support, five different parties in parliament have spoken up on my behalf. since we spoke to last you had a letterfrom margotjames, the ministerfor digital you had a letterfrom margotjames, the minister for digital and creative industries which suggest she disagrees with the view of the from the cps, the government believes the law already provides for situations involving nonconsensual photography for example, the offence of voyeurism is available to prosecutors in appropriate circumstances.” available to prosecutors in appropriate circumstances. i did not know what to do with that letter when i got it. it was again, just sort of shocking, how can the cps and government disagree so much on it but at the same time, what it did, it opened up the world to me
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because at the government says its already legislated on this, that i don't need to have a great big fight in parliament to get a new law, it also means my attacker can be prosecuted for four so what i did was, ifind in prosecuted for four so what i did was, i find in a prosecuted for four so what i did was, ifind in a police report on the voyeurism case and thought, clearly, clearly he has admitted all of the facts, this is going to go forward. but i was wrong. the cps in their first forward. but i was wrong. the cps in theirfirst decision, forward. but i was wrong. the cps in their first decision, said that it wasn't possible, they disagreed with the facts initially and that it wasn't against the law, in the second decision they agreed with me that it was really clear on the fa cts , that it was really clear on the facts, he knew i did not consent to the video, he took the video for the reason of personal sexual gratification, he met all of the requirements but they still thought it wasn't against the law. which is potentially where you come in, kate. the nub of this judicial review, if you end up going that far. the nub of this judicial review, if you end up going that fanm the nub of this judicial review, if you end up going that far. it all comes down to the cps analysis of
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what is a reasonable expectation of privacy. they accept that emily '5 attacker admitted to the fact he had taken this video, he admitted to the fa ct taken this video, he admitted to the fact he knew she hadn't consented to it and he admitted that it was for his sexual gratification before the cps are saying is that in circumstances, whether you've had consensual sex with someone or not, if you are in a scenario where you are in bed with someone or they are your intimate partner, you don't have a reasonable expectation of privacy because you are committing private acts with them already. even though you alleged he raped you, he says it was consensual. the way it's come down from my reading of what the cps has said and the way i describe it to people, if you cannot prove that you did not consent to being ina prove that you did not consent to being in a room naked with someone they have the right to video you and keep that video forever. that just seems extraordinary, or to use the
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cps word facade. it seems extremely wrong, i think we think they have got the long run, we first came to that conclusion on a common—sense basis. they've interpreted it incorrectly? the law the sexual offe nces incorrectly? the law the sexual offences act contains this race reasonable expectation of privacy, legal precedents establishes that phrase has to be interpreted on the facts of an individual case but the key point is the nature of the observation that is going on, of course, in circumstances where someone course, in circumstances where someone is in bed with someone the other person is going to glance at the naked, they are going to see them naked but that's a very different thing to recording them on video naked. what we would say is there's a president which shows where someone has overstepped that line, knowing very well the other person would not consent to that, that illegal. do you know where the footage is now? so i asked the police to look into it, to look at the data from his phone. i am i
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would say 75% certain that he does not have a copy but i'm unsure and they weren't completely sure either. has the original been deleted or do you have that? my lawyers have it, it's something i've asked not to see personally, i've had it described to me. but it's not something i ever wa nt to me. but it's not something i ever want to see. is it true that the man that you allege raped you and he says it was consensual, tried to contact says it was consensual, tried to co nta ct you says it was consensual, tried to contact you recently? yes, he tried to co nta ct contact you recently? yes, he tried to contact me on twitter but you know, it's kind of disturbing. and i kind of can't begin to imagine why anyone would do that. so. 0k. what has to happen for you not to go forward with this judicial review? the cps would have to come back to us the cps would have to come back to us and say we the cps would have to come back to us and say we were wrong on the cps would have to come back to us and say we were wrong on the low and we are going to prosecute this man. one of the most shocking things we've learned recently, we approached this case is a kind of one of, there haven't been that many voyeurism prosecutions certainly in
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re ce nt voyeurism prosecutions certainly in recent years but we've discovered la st recent years but we've discovered last year, a man was prosecuted after he found a number of women he had had consensual relationships with, it was never an issue those women were having sex with him consensually but video recordings we re consensually but video recordings were ta ken consensually but video recordings were taken and that was found to be illegal and he was convicted in a court. we can't understand why they've ta ken a court. we can't understand why they've taken a different approach, they've taken a different approach, they don't seem to know what they are doing in relation to voyeurism offences. thank you very much, we'll see what happens. thank you for coming on the programme, emily and kate. thank you for your time. thank you for your messages today. most of them, by the way, the cps spokesman says the sexual offences are some of the most complex and challenging we persecute and we want hesitate to bring a case to court where there is sufficient evidence and it is in the public interest. we never take lightly the decision to stop the persecution and recognise this can have a significant impact on a complaint but if a case is reviewed and found not to satisfy illegal tests we cannot continue.
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most of your comments have been about living off grid. the family we talk to producing energy themselves. dennis says it doesn't miss the point. we have to reduce waste. this we can do with effort. i'm19 years old. my gas and electricity bill combined are under £20 a month. my brown recycling bin is full to overflowing my requires emptying once every six weeks. these targets are more achievable and will help the planet. more than the thing on your programme today. thank you, dennis. steve says, really good issue. a couple of issues that barely get a mention, the global population, surely it's time we discussed one population and help many people this planet can sustain. the big oil companies by up patents for super efficient technologies that could change the world. they
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hide these technologies away so they can't be used. time to open up the patent office files for the good of the planet. another viewer says how is living off grid and generating your own gas helping climate change? appoint someone else has made and another beer says why doesn't the government make it law that all new—builds must have solar and or heat pumps fitted ? new—builds must have solar and or heat pumps fitted? thanks for your m essa g es heat pumps fitted? thanks for your messages about who our future prime minister it may be. this one says paris is lying low, on the basis it's better for him to stay silent. and be thought a fool than to open his mouth and remove all possible doubt. obviously borisjohnson didn't turn up the channel for leadership debate but says he will be at the bbc event tomorrow night. pete says jeremy be at the bbc event tomorrow night. pete sasteremy hunt be at the bbc event tomorrow night. pete says jeremy hunt with be at the bbc event tomorrow night. pete sasteremy hunt with sajid javid as deputy prime minister and offer a good balance to appeasing liberals like myself until the next general election and proportional representation. restricted 0k last night but hasn't got the presence to
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be prime minister. court says only one person telling the truth, not playing to the audience, showing intelligence, keeping it real, rory stewart so much better than the others and they know it. another viewer says the debate was so boring and senseless, boris was right to stay away. here you are, a bunch of people with your own agenda saying nothing. boris wogan. john says why do we need a bumbling politician who seems to have little control. and leadership. an ability to put the country before personal ambition. it's not about personalities, it's about doing what's best for the country. a couple more for now, alec says he was best, rory stewart without question, total realist but the idea of having a citizen ‘s assembly give parliament direction on brexit will be swallowed by the electorate. we need to ask the electorate. we need to ask the electorate if they want another site. how could anyone back boris johnson, his rude, arrogant enough
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to believe he doesn't have to be involved. he is a liar, lives in a world of fantasy and you cannot trust him. i voted conservative all my life and would not vote for him ever as prime minister. the tory party is backing a loser. thanks for your messages. coming up next. thank you for your company today. have a good day. hello, good morning. some rain in the forecast for some of us throughout this week but also a lot of dry weather. some dry and sunny weather for this of dry weather. some dry and sunny weatherfor this morning in the south—east of england. that is in cambridgeshire. you can see here
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plenty of sunshine continuing into the afternoon. for of the north west midlands come into northern areas of england, patchy rain continuing this afternoon, the far north of england drier and brighter, some showers into scotland and northern ireland, some of those could be heavy and thundery with gusty winds. especially in central and southern parts of scotland, temperatures here i6-i8d, parts of scotland, temperatures here 16—18d, reaching 21—23 in the south—east. throughout tonight showers continuing across scotland and northern ireland, elsewhere clear spells, going into tuesday, a trite start for many of us, we see some showers moving on from the south. later in the day showers could be heavy with intense thunderstorms moving into south—eastern areas. we'll keep a close eye on those. goodbye.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's 11am and these are the main stories this morning: are you embarrassed to have been an mg chair last night, mrjohnson? after missing last night's tv debate, borisjohnson receives a boost in the conservative party leader contest as health secretary matt hancock backs him. labour's deputy leader, tom watson, urges his party to make a strong case for staying in the eu. released from prison and ready tojoin the protests — democracy activistjoshua wong calls on hong kong's chief executive to resign. iran announces that it will soon breach the limit on its stockpile of enriched uranium, that was capped under the nuclear deal with world powers. every new teacher in england will be trained to spot early warning signs
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