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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 17, 2019 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines at eight o'clock. the tory leadership candidates face questions from journalists but borisjohnson is absent again. labour's deputy leader tom watson breaks from party policy and says labour should back britain remaining in the eu. the eu has protected millions of workers for many years and they will need protection in the future and we should be a remain and reform party and we should enthusiastically campaignfora and we should enthusiastically campaign for a confirmatory ballot. egypt's wrote former president president morsi has died during a court appearance —— egypt's former president. chaos and confusion means
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long delays —— meant long delays treating some of the injured during the london bridge attacks. iran says it is reaching a limit on its stockpiling of uranium. residents of lincolnshire are warned of more rain and flooding this week. terrific thunderstorms are forecast and if that river gets any more water, it will burst its banks again. so andy murray tells the bbc he is pain—free ahead of a return to competitive tennis at the doubles at queen's club. candidates for the tory leadership except for the candidate boris
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johnson have been taking questions from journalists ahead of the next round of voting which takes place tomorrow. david levenson says he is backing rory stewart to be the next leader of the tory party —— david liddington. the labour party's deputy leader says the hearts of the labour members are remain. here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. come on boris! come on! the only glimpse you'll get today. minders driving the favourite into parliament. borisjohnson doesn't want to talk to you or me right now. but to screw—down mps, whose backing he needs. he is very deliberately being kept from scrutiny. he is approaching this important event with seriousness and professionalism and using his time wisely, which is to convince mps to support him. the other wannabes use every chance to make their case. but borisjohnson can't make promises without a price tag for long.
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every monday when boris writes his column, he makes another pledge for a lot of money, either a tax cut or a spending pledge. the question all politicians have to answer is where is the money coming from? mrjohnson is way ahead of the pack. the other five candidates scrapping over second—place. i think this tory election contest is a chance for all of us to put forward positive ideas for how we can make the country better. mps will whittle down the numbers to a final pair that tory members will choose from. all of them faced questions behind closed doors today, mainly uncontroversially. the foreign secretary raised eyebrows for not quite condemning yet another tweet from president trump attacking the london mayor. ultimately, though, whether the favourite triumphs or an underdog bites boris johnson, to govern effectively in the longer term, they have to win over notjust the tory party but labour voters, too.
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and labour has its own trauma over leaving the eu, with more and more powerful voices arguing to change the policy and to keep us in. the deputy leader says it's now time to ditch the ambiguity, to fight clearly for another vote and to remain. i think after three years of brexit chaos and paralysis, this is really the only way out. i think putting it to the people is the most democratic way and the most legitimate way of doing that. do you accept you might lose some supporters, you might lose some seats if you go back on what you promised? we certainly might lose some votes if we change position, but i think it's incumbent on us to give an honest account of ourselves. we've changed position because brexit is harder than it looked. in your view, if labour doesn't move to this position, what might the consequences be? i believe there will be a very high electoral price to pay. someone who knows all too well the lonely price of paying the
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price over brexit. but who would do a betterjob? i'm not backing a candidate, i haven't endorsed a candidate. i did vote last thursday, i haven't told anybody who i voted for and i'm not going to. the hardest questions aren't for her anymore. smiling, perhaps, with relief. let's talk to our correspondence and the failure of liz let's talk to our correspondence and the failure of linohnson to talk up the failure of linohnson to talk up to the hustings debate. —— the failure of boris johnson. up to the hustings debate. —— the failure of borisjohnson. none of this seems to affect him? he's the candidate who defines this race and even when he was not there people we re even when he was not there people were asking questions about him, but he did turn up for the 1922 committee hustings, conservative party backbenchers, they had a meeting and all the remaining candidates including boris johnson turned up and immediately afterwards
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gavin williamson the former defence secretary who was sacked, he said it was a commanding performance but of course he is a big supporter of borisjohnson so that course he is a big supporter of boris johnson so that was course he is a big supporter of borisjohnson so that was hardly course he is a big supporter of boris johnson so that was hardly a surprise. he is taking part in the bbc debate tomorrow evening. what was interesting, amber rudd came out from the hustings, and she is supporting jeremy hunt, but she said she felt that we had not really seen enough of boris johnson she felt that we had not really seen enough of borisjohnson as a potential prime minister so far, he has been rationing his appearances, and she said michael gove took a lot of questions and not quite so with borisjohnson. few of questions and not quite so with boris johnson. few feared of questions and not quite so with borisjohnson. few feared he had been —— feel —— a few others feel he has been a bit vague on brexit. but they hope when he gets more scrutiny some of the support he has will ebb away but he looks very difficult at this stage to catch. the race seems
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to be for second place behind him, that will go to the 160,000 conservative party members at some stage. tom watson, deputy leader of the labour party, breaking from party policy, suggesting that labour should become the party of remain. how much trouble is that going to put him in with the rest of the front bench and the leader? i'm not sure at this stage. it did not go down a while ago when he attended a peoples vote rally a little while ago. his position has been evolving, shall we say, from someone who said we should accept the referendum result to then argue it was then difficult to not put the issue back to the people, but he was trying to persuade his shadow cabinet collea g u es persuade his shadow cabinet colleagues that given the electoral challenges that labour faces it was time to change position and to be more of our da remain party. —— more avowedly. at the moment labour are
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ambiguous, and they have said they will contemplate a public vote but only if they can't get a better brexit deal or a general election. tom watson said there should be a referendum and labour should be campaigning to stay in the eu, but he was snookered a little bit. the shadow cabinet meeting has been postponed and tomorrow's meeting is going to be devoted to climate change. there is a debate behind the scenes about whether they should be consulting the members to change their policy in the direction tom watson wants or whether they should put the debate off until their annual conference in the autumn but thatis annual conference in the autumn but that is pretty close to the new date for brexit at the end of october and there will be pressure on the leadership to change position, but so leadership to change position, but so far despite taking soundings amongst mps, jeremy corbyn has not shifted. iain watson, thanks for joining us. you can keep a cross of
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the development in the conservative leadership race here on the bbc news channel. the result of the second ballot is expected at six o'clock tomorrow and we will be building up tomorrow and we will be building up to the announcement. egypt's former president, president morsi, has died at court. he had been facing charges including allegations of spying. while he was being held, activists complained about his prison conditions. the
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muslim brotherhood have the night accused the egyptian authorities of being responsible for his death. last year a british parliamentary panel claimed mohamed morsi was being kept in solitary confinement for 23 hours a day which they said could be considered torture, and crispin blunt says he has previously raised concerns about his health. we investigated the conditions of the detention and we reported on it and the report was made available to the egyptian government and we sought to go and inspect the conditions of his detention and they declined that opportunity. but i think we have produced a report which was based on all the evidence we were able to collect which appears to be com pletely collect which appears to be completely sound. know what we have predicted might happen has happened. their desperately needs to be a serious process of reconciliation in
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egypt, which is a bitterly divided society. the answer to the divisions from the current government has been to incarcerate 40,000 supporters of the freedom and justice party who w011 the freedom and justice party who won an election for the presidency in only 2012, and this is just really a richard example —— wretched example but a markedly important one of why egypt and its current government needs to get a proper reconciliation process under way. the mp crispin blunt. 0ur correspondence is in cairo. first of all, is it clear how exactly he died mr morsi? he was attending a court
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session, and today's case was the one about spying with the neighbouring hamas and he asked the judge to speak. he spoke for a few moments and then the judge adjourned the session and went on a break and during the break president morsi collapsed and he was announced dead shortly afterwards by the prison doctor. the court session was actually taking place in a complex of the prison in southern cairo and thatis of the prison in southern cairo and that is where he has been staying for the past years. the present has a dreadful reputation internationally —— the prison. for the conditions inside. what are we certain of in terms of the conditions that mr morsi was being held in? we are certain that the medical care is of a very low standard when it comes to egyptian prisons and this is no exception to that. this has been a complaint by
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the family of all the detainees, the quality of medical care is very low and very scarce and it does not come by easily even after request. in case of former president morsi it was no exception and his family said his condition was poor and that he needed proper medical care but this did not happen, just the same as with other prisoners, so there was no exception for him, locally the media is not said much about the condition of mr morsi's detention, and wejust condition of mr morsi's detention, and we just heard from crispin blunt about him staying in solitary confinement for 23 hours a day but no details are mentioned like that in local media and it is difficult to find out about the conditions. everyone seems to be in agreement
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that the conditions are harsh there and fora man that the conditions are harsh there and for a man who is elderly and suffering from diabetes and has liver problems, those harsh conditions which others might be able to deal with, they would be particularly difficult for this man. and in particular because he was 68 when he passed away today and so yes, i agree that the conditions are quite difficult and difficult for the former egyptian president who must have been wishing for a different type of life once he became the first ever elected president in 2012 after the arab spring. it is interesting, i remember when he was elected, what went wrong? what went wrong? it was essentially a coup led by the military that brought him down? the military that brought him down? the military did interfere but after a massive protest, so technically it was the hand of the army but it was the demand of the people, in
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millions they took to the street all over egypt, not just millions they took to the street all over egypt, notjust in the capital, they believe the muslim brotherhood was playing with the country in terms of politics but also business, and protests did break as early as december 2012 and possibly five months after he was elected, there we re months after he was elected, there were clashes between the activists and supporters of the muslim brotherhood in front of the presidential palace here in cairo and there were also deaths and injuries and beatings of activists, including females, and the unrest continued and it was not contained by the muslim brotherhood which saw it as by the muslim brotherhood which saw itasa by the muslim brotherhood which saw it as a golden opportunity to announce and declare their own political vision for egypt which would be more islamic than civil when it comes to a state, and this is what prompted people to take to the streets in their thousands and millions in june 2013. the streets in their thousands and millions injune 2013. the largest protest was on the 30th ofjune and
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the army gave the political powers 72 hours to solve the issues which they did not and on the 3rd ofjuly they did not and on the 3rd ofjuly the then minister of defence announced he was removing president morsi as president. and he was instigating an interim president which eventually led to president sisi taking power. thanks for joining us. the tory leadership candidates have faced questions but the frontrunner boris johnson was candidates have faced questions but the frontrunner borisjohnson was a no—show. the former egyptian president morsi has died after fainting in court. an inquest in court has suggested that there were long delays in treating the injured at the london bridge attacks. now time for a bit of sport.
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bangladesh have kept their hopes alive after achieving the second highest run chase at the cricket world cup, beating west indies. bangladesh were set 322 for victory and they always looked in control thanks to 124 from shakib al hasan. he was well supported, as well, as bangladesh reach their target with eight overs to spare. england play afghanistan in their next group match tomorrow and they will do so without jason roy who is sidelined from the next two games. yon morgan suffered a back spasm against the west indies but he will return —— yon morgan —— eoin. morgan says
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jason roy's tournament is far from over. i certainly believe jason will play again in this tournament and at the moment he will be assessed continuously over the course of the next week. he is out of the next two games so we will see how he pulls up after that. you are optimistic he might be back for australia? absolutely. if not australia, may be the following game. we host france who have qualified for the knockout phase of the women's world cup play their final phase of the women's world cup play theirfinal group phase of the women's world cup play their final group match this evening. they are up against nigeria who can still qualify themselves for the last 16 automatically. it is goalless at the moment. france need a draw to win the group. we can bring you live pictures. france having won their opening group game co mforta bly having won their opening group game comfortably against south korea 4—0
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scraped past norway in their second match winning 2—1 they will want to stamp their authority on the tournament once again. if they can get a result tonight, that is. they will look to get plenty of goals tonight against a team who still have plenty to play for. derby cou nty have plenty to play for. derby county are yet to receive an approach from chelsea with manager frank lampard tipped to replace the rich year saree at stamford bridge after hejoined rich year saree at stamford bridge after he joined juventus. —— rich year saree at stamford bridge after hejoined juventus. —— sarri. derby say they have not received any enquiries about frank lampard and they say they want him to stay for they say they want him to stay for the long term. johanna konta has got her grass court season of to a winning start after beating the world number 20 in straight sets. it is her first match since her defeat in the semifinals of the french 0pen. cameron norrie missed out on
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one of the biggest wins of his career so far, losing one of the biggest wins of his careerso far, losing in one of the biggest wins of his career so far, losing in three sets to last yea r‘s career so far, losing in three sets to last year's wimbledon runner—up kevin anderson. he took the first set but was beaten in three sets by the south african who progresses to the south african who progresses to the second round at queens. we can bring you james ward who is an action against gilles simon in the first round at queens. it is one set each at the moment, on serve. james ward is hoping to do what cameron norrie did not do and book his place in the second round. plenty of support for the british contingent who are playing at queens which serves as the customary warm up ahead of wimbledon to come in a few weeks' time. you can watch that one live via the red button. the tour de france champion geraint thomas says he is ready for the defence of his title next month. his teams preparations were dealt a blow when chris froome suffered multiple injuries ina chris froome suffered multiple injuries in a serious crash and
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thomas says there is no doubt that chris froome will be missed but it means he can stop answering questions about who will lead the tea m questions about who will lead the team in this year's tour de france. he is one of the greatest writers ever so do not have him in the team isa ever so do not have him in the team is a big blow —— greatest riders. it gives us one less option when it comes to the mountain stages. that is the best thing about his crash, really, it stops all those questions, because every interview i've done this year they have asked about that, so that is one thing eve ryo ne about that, so that is one thing everyone can stop asking me now. that is all the sport for now. plenty more in sports day at 1030. thanks forjoining us. iran has warned that it's about to breach the international agreement made in 2015 to restrict its nuclear activities. it says it will exceed the limit on its stockpile of enriched uranium in ten days' time.
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last year president trump withdrew the us from the nuclear deal and imposed new economic sanctions on iran. we can go to washington and talk to a man who was the us state department lead under president 0bama. the us under president trump, they pulled out of the iran nuclear deal and they say to put maximum pressure on tehran to desist from destabilisation of the middle east, is this policy bearing fruit? no, the policy is an evident failure and you see further regional destabilisation including the crisis in the gulf and now iran is threatening to pull out from the nuclear restrictions that have constrained its nuclear programme and have been absolutely critical for maintaining at least nuclear stability in the region. they say
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the european union and european countries have not pulled out of the deal unlike washington but they are not doing enough to implement their side of the deal. that is right. we have always known that a lot of the economic benefits that iran expected to receive from the deal flowed from us action decisions and not eu or un decisions, and so with the us out iran simply is not getting the economic benefits it expected and it wa nts to economic benefits it expected and it wants to see more economically and politically from europe and russia and china, and it is using the suggestion that it will breach its enriched uranium limit in ten days' time to see whether there might be additional concessions it can extra ct additional concessions it can extract from the remaining participants in the deal. what more could they do? that's a good question and there are things which the participants can do, you don't hear much about china from iran but it is critically important to the
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iranians economy, whether china decides to buy iranians oil and that is part of the conversation, i'm sure, but on the european side there has been slow progress towards establishing a financial mechanism that would allow certain kinds of transactions to go forward between european companies in iran and the iranians would like to see that progress a bit faster and in terms of whether or not the iranians have reached the limit in ten days' time, the question is not is there anything that europe, china and russia can do, but is there anything they can practically do which would be sufficient to satisfy iranians demands and expectations. at the same time we do know tehran is backing proxies in the middle east and helping to destabilise the region. are they cognisant of european unease about that? there is no question that iran's policies in the region are a reason for the united states and for europe to be troubled, they are destabilising the
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region, and what my european collea g u es region, and what my european colleagues would say in response to your question, we have fewer tools now with the us out of the deal and we did before, and given that the first priority has always been and should be constraining iran's nuclear programme, if you put the programme back on the table then of course europe is going to scramble to try to make sure that iran's programme stays constrained and that means other tools that might be used to focus on other issues are instead being thrown at the nuclear problem which we had successfully solved at least for the time being. we will leave it there. next macro. —— thanks forjoining us. chaos, confusion and communications problems hampered the efforts of emergency services to help victims of the london bridge attacks. a senior london ambulance service manager told the inquest that it
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took too long to reach some of the victims, more than three hours after the attackers had been killed. but he also praised ambulance crews who volunteered to go into a potentially dangerous area despite the possible risk to themselves. eight people died and nearly 50 were injured in the attacks injune 2017. 0ur correspondent richard lister has more. it was already a busy saturday night for the london ambulance service when calls began coming in reporting an accident on london bridge. it soon became clear this was a terror attack. 22 ambulances and other paramedics were sent in, but some of those who needed their help the most, never got it. sara zelenak, sebastien belanger, james mcmullan, alexandre pigeard and kirsty boden were all fatally stabbed close to the same courtyard at the edge of borough market. but it was almost three hours before this area was declared safe for paramedics to enter and by then it was too late. treatment for those injured was given by police officers and ordinary people who'd been
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on a night out. but they were left on their own. what the bereaved families don't understand is why the police officers and members of the public who were frantically trying to save lives down there, were never told that there were ambulances assembling up here, just down the street. and why the paramedics who arrived at those railings just minutes after the attack, were unable to help. keep moving. keep moving that way. the police evacuated the area, concerned there might be more attacks. the paramedics had to leave along with everyone else and never saw the group of casualties. the court heard the emergency services were overflowing with conflicting information about a range of casualties and never got a precise report about those in the courtyard. the london ambulance service operations director, paul woodrow, said today... he admitted, though, it took too long to make a decision
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to commit specialist teams to find those injured. helen kennett, who was stabbed in the neck after confronting one of the attackers, told the court previously she'd had to make her own way to an ambulance almost two hours later. the question that still haunts the families is whether any of their loved ones could have survived if medics had got to them in time. the court heard today that was unlikely, though emergency teams did save at least 19 people who'd been critically injured. richard lister, bbc news, at the old bailey. emergency workers in lincolnshire say there may be another breach in the walls of the river this week. two months worth of rain fell last week forcing a thousand people out of their homes and weather forecasts are predicting more rainfall tomorrow and wednesday. in wainfleet, it's a waiting game. hundreds of homes have been evacuated because of fears of
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another flood in the next few days. not everyone has gone. some people don't want to leave, preparing for the worst, but hoping for the best. we've been told the river could breach at any moment if there's any more rain, which we're expecting on tuesday or wednesday. and they've forecast terrific thunderstorms and rain so if that river gets any more water, it's going to burst its banks again. the fear is that the forecast rain will put too much strain on the high river banks. they've plugged one breach, but the authorities are worried about others. there is a large crack that's probably about half a kilometre in length running away from where the repair took place and we're monitoring that on an hourly basis and we're looking at what can be done to repair that. this is the room we've been allocated... derek has been moved from his home in wainfleet to emergency accommodation in nearby skegness. that's all we've got,
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we've got no cooker, no fridge, but it's clean and dry. his dog is so traumatised, it won't eat and he and his wife june are finding it tough. we just grabbed what we could because the bags and shoes were floating. just put a few bits and bobs in a plastic bag and we was took out by the firemen. i'm an easy going guy, but we've got to do it. i'm upset. police say people may have to stay away from their homes here until at least friday. but that does depend on how much rain falls between now and wednesday. we heard from one of the evacuees in that report and we can now get a bit more on his story. he and his wife have been moved into a hotel and he joins me now on the line. derek, thanks forjoining us. take us
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through the moment you realised you we re through the moment you realised you were going to have to leave when all the water started coming in. were going to have to leave when all the water started coming inm happened through the night, actually, we had a few inches in the garden when we went to bed, and when icame garden when we went to bed, and when i came downstairs in the morning there was two feet of water in the living room, it had come through the sandbags which we had put in, and thatis sandbags which we had put in, and that is when the breach of the river had come, and the level of the water changed. we saw the water in the living room. how do you manage to sleep that night? you said you played sand bags down and were hoping that the latter was going to be held at bay as it we re was going to be held at bay as it were and you will get the following day and it was flooded? yes. we were expecting... the firemen had come
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before, and he said that they were going down soon. and it was high tide at the time and he said the tide at the time and he said the tide was going down and that the water would subside and would make it at that easier. i understand. said there was a sense that everything was in control when you went to bed that night in. that is right. two or three inches in the garden and we already put some sandbags out like i said. around the door and we were quite comfortable. we went upstairs and we were in a 2—story house and we went upstairs because it was cold downstairs. and fell asleep. and we woke up at about
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six and went down and i could see the water at the bottom of the stairs before i went into the living room. what a shock it must've been for your wife and your poor dog. are you insured? now. because it is a flood plane right? that is right. i am as she room —— i am assuming you try to get insurance. we had entrance years ago. it was 2007, and the water was really high then and after that, it wasn't insured. bearing that in mind, do you think enough has been done by the environment protection agency to tie down i feel that this kind of thing? no. it was supposed to be ten foot
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deep and now it is only about three foot deep. so what has been going into the river has not been cleaned out. you have any idea when you make it back home? no idea. but at least we are now dry. we are dry, and the people are very nice but we have no proper sink or cooking. you have to go down to the left and go downstairs to get to a kitchen. but we are dry. we are safe and dry. at least that is something. good luck to you and everyone there. thank you so much forjoining us. goodbye. good luck. let's get a look at the
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weather forecast. showers stating this evening in many places becoming dry overnight and it is going to stay that way everywhere all night long because i have another whether it disturbance coming towards northwest scotland later tonight and outbreaks of rain moving and and some low cloud msc mass —— nastiness. and it all looks fairly quiet as tuesday starts but it will not stay that way. a band of showers working across scotland and northern ireland. northern england staying fine and elsewhere in england, cloud increasing from the south and outbreaks of rain moving and and south east wales and midlands and some may be heavier bursts and 20 celsius at vast. at some torrential foundry downpour is pushing and particularly across central and eastern england. it could lead to some flooding disruption spots. and
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a few more thunderstorms around during wednesday. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the tory leadership candidates face questions from journalists but borisjohnson is absent again. labour's deputy leader tom watson breaks from party policy and says labour should back britain remaining in the eu. the eu has protected millions of workers for many years and they will need protection in the future. we should be a remain and reform party and we should enthusiastically campaignfora and we should enthusiastically campaign for a parliamentary power. egyptian state television has said that the former egyptian president, mohammed morsi, has died after fainting in court. the london bridge attacks an inquest hears that chaos and confusion meant long delays in treating some of the injured. iran warns it is about to breach a limit on its stockpile of enriched uranium a year after the us withdrew
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from the nuclear deal. the residents of wainfleet in lincolnshire are warned of more rain and more flooding this week. more now on our top story. conservative leadership contenders have today faced further questions about brexit and their personal beliefs ahead of tuesday's second ballot of mps. but borisjohnson chose not to attend the hustings of westminster journalists, having also missed sunday's channel 4 tv debate. speaking earlier pippa crerar the political editor at the daily mirror said the journalists meeting with the tory leadership candidates didn't highlight many surprises. it did not really shift the dial massively although we did during all sorts of interesting things and a few of the candidates put their foot in itand few of the candidates put their foot in it and a few of them were really entrenched and had solid credentials
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amongst the tory party. i think that rory stewart again shows that he has momentum in the race. it was quite interesting because he has been presented to the outside world as a fluffy, fairly liberal candidate and i think it is quite clear today that he rolled out a second referendum and that spending pledges from some of his rival candidates was not as far as he was concerned the way forward. and of question might argue he needs to do it in the particular race. jeremy hunt came second to borisjohnson in the next round of votes a nd borisjohnson in the next round of votes and put in a strong performance. michael gove was one of the couple that mentioned boris johnson refusing to appear at one of these hustings and a lot of people said to hand that these castings
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were. . . said to hand that these castings were... and reminded journalists president dominic present. dominic ride was not as strong as he has been but he was relaxed but not as strong as he has been previously. there were some good remarks by javid, referring to his personal back story. he has seen himself as an outsider and does not think the two final candidates should be... it is fascinating to see them up close andi is fascinating to see them up close and i will be reporting online and in the papers tomorrow what went on. it isa in the papers tomorrow what went on. it is a shame borisjohnson felt that he should not be there to face the press's scrutiny and we hope it does not continue. joining me to take stock of the leadership race so far from our studio in cambridge
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is dr sheila lawlor, who directs the economic, education, constitutional and social policy programmes of politeia, and is author of deal or no deal? the battle for britain's democracy. also i'm joined by mark thompson who is a political commentator hejoins us via he joins us via webcam. hejoins us via webcam. it is he joins us via webcam. it is good to see you both and thank you for being with us. if i could start with you sheila, what do you make of the race so far, to fairly important gatherings of the contenders, westminster journalists today and channel for debate last night and the front reiner are nowhere to be seen. i do not think that is surprising. borisjohnson seen. i do not think that is surprising. boris johnson has seen. i do not think that is surprising. borisjohnson has gauged the pitch in the country and he wa nts to the pitch in the country and he wants to talk, it seems to me he wa nts to wants to talk, it seems to me he wants to talk, it seems to me he wants to talk to the country and not to what we called the westminster battle, and he is talking to each other and talking to the press. that
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dialogue if he may call it that was discredited really during the european parliamentary referendums. the country thought otherwise and the country that the brexit party the country that the brexit party the top of the polls. so i think he is onto something and i think he has been onto it for quite a while. the big test for the other is whether they can continue to paint him as irresponsible or not playing the game the way he ought to. 0r weather and the fact that matters. is that mud that could stick to boris johnson, not turning up to these events so far? i think it could become a problem because it is off—brand become a problem because it is off— brand for become a problem because it is off—brand for him. if you think about borisjohnson off—brand for him. if you think about boris johnson he off—brand for him. if you think about borisjohnson he is all about the media and about appearing on television and having a witty remark about things and able to make speeches and he comes across like
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that to people, like that sort of politician and that is how he connects with people. and so i think it will be a bit strange to people that he has had last night's opportunity to appear on television with the contenders and we saw during the 2017 general election when theresa may decided not to attend the debate and send amber ride in her stead, and people thought she was frightened to appear and to actuallyjustify her policies and to actuallyjustify her policies and talk to people directly via the television and i think he could become a problem for borisjohnson. it is not a surprise that opponents are highlighting this fact and as i say it is off prime for him. and you are nodding according to what he is saying and it did not work for theresa may. and borisjohnson says that he will take part in the debate tomorrow for the bbc. but he is certainly cannot be seen, i think it
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is likely you will get down to the last two, but... i do not know, this is about a big national question, it is about a big national question, it is about a big national question, it is about brexit and the voters know what they think and they know what the country thinks. what we have seen so far is that the voters want to leave the european union and they are perfectly prepared to leave without a deal at a decent deal cannot be agreed. but they had seen asa number of cannot be agreed. but they had seen as a number of candidates lining up almost like sitting union politics trying to outbid each other on the fine print but not tackling the national issue of the day. that is what he sees. but part of the criticism of theresa may and part of the reason that she is having to read in the middle of her time as the fact that she singularly failed to bring the country together. she simply appealed in the minds of some to that 52% that voted to reap. the
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bottom line is 48% did not... and if he did not bring those two wings of the country together, he will fail wa nt the country together, he will fail want a quick sale of british democracy has historically been founded on a different premise that the people who win general elections are the people who win the prize and get five years or longer to prove that they can govern and we saw great dramatic changes in the 20th century, the liberals, labour coming and in1923 and century, the liberals, labour coming and in 1923 and 24 and again in 1945 and in 1923 and 24 and again in 1945 and the tories put up with it and got on with working with the other side. but that did not happen in 2016 is the net of the problem. theresa may was a remainder and try to have a remaining type deal to leave with a remained type house of commons behind her and that has not please the country which is used to when in votes to being listened to you by the political classes.|j
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would say that at the referendum vote is not listened and britain does not leave rapidly and creamy, the democracy will be discredited. and both main parties will suffer. and both main parties will suffer. and in fact overall, the country will be far less stable than if it was done with and we got on with things. i am sure you heard that and the suggestion is that theresa may was not enough and the fact that she should have been reaching out to the other 48% of the country is erroneous. do you believe that, do you believe that the next leader of the conservative party, the next mp should simply focus on the 52%? absolutely do not and she just said that the majority of this country wants to go for no deal and that is not the case, during the referendum campaign no deal was never really mentioned, it was all about best
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deal ever and we all remember what was said and the majority of no deal is for the birds and i think that borisjohnson because it is looking like he is going to become the prime ministerand if he like he is going to become the prime minister and if he is not willing to face the people and actually argue his case and try to bring as you said, the two different sides of this debate, this country has become very polarised and he is not good for democracy, whoever does become prime minister is going to have to try to bring this people together and try to find a way through because the idea that you're going to do what probably not only 52% but just address what they want is no recipe for stability to the coming years and decades this decision is going to affect. you are definitely not nodding when he was speaking there. let's move away from 52% or 48%. borisjohnson
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there. let's move away from 52% or 48%. boris johnson more there. let's move away from 52% or 48%. borisjohnson more than likely it would seem we get to the last two, who do you think is going to join him? that is a tricky one. will it bea join him? that is a tricky one. will it be a remainder, will it be a cabinet minister, a leaver or i would have thought there would be a big push to have one remain air type and then and whether that isjeremy hunt or it could be the outsider who did not want to vote leave and support was pivotal in the leave campaign, michael gove or part of the main campaign team if you would like, with the... it is not clear who will win but from what i see, jeremy hunt looks the most plausible to make it to the final two. but
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michael gove has great strengths and is very intelligent and extremely persuasive and he knows how to when when he fights but when he fights on brexit i do not know. what do you reckon? first of all nine of the remaining candidates are remainders, they are all leavers. they want to leave one way or another, some with a dealand... leave one way or another, some with a deal and... i think she means someone advocating a software brexit. stay within the customs union. it is important for those who are voting leave and campaign to leave are being described as remainders and that is silly. and i think that rory stewart's campaign has been interesting, he has done what borisjohnson has not done which is go up there and talk to people and it is paying off, he comes across as natural and a very
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effective campaigner and he has interesting answers and honest sounding answers. i would not be at all surprised if he comes through. i see more tory mps on the record saying he is backing him because of his campaign and i think the most interesting final two to go around the country would be borisjohnson facing rory stewart because i think rory stewart would do his best to force them to answer the questions that so far he is refusing to. that would be a good choice within it, for the members of the conservative party to have a proper choice between the two? no because it would ta ke between the two? no because it would take the country right back to the referendum campaign. we would be back where we started and there would be discussed i think with politics at the highest level. instead of looking at how we leave and when we leave, i think that rory
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stewart, for all his great talents and he is a talented person, he still believes he can force that may deal with the real and it has been rejected by parliament three times and it will keep the country subject to brussels and laws would be subject to trade law and it would not be an independent country. you do not want a rerun of the 2016 campaign and let's not do it tonight as well. it is good to see you, thank you forjoining us. thank you both. the final two hospital trusts in which people died after an outbreak of listeria linked to sandwiches and salads have been named by the government. one patient died at the university hospitals of the derby and burton nhs trust. another had been receiving treatment in leicester. health secretary matt hancock said there would be a ‘root and branch review‘ of hospital food. hong kong's most prominent student activistjoshua wong has been released from prison and has
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immediately called for the territory's leader to resign. mr wong, who was jailed for five weeks for contempt of court, is backing the days of mass protest against new legislation which would allow people to be extradited to face trial in mainland china. from hong kong rupert wingfield hayes reports. joshua wong was mobbed by the media as he walked free after 31 days in jail. many here see him as hong kong's first political prisoner, sent to jail for organising a pro—democracy sit in. his release came less than a day after vast numbers took to the streets here, demanding the withdrawal of a controversial extradition bill. joshua wong told me axing the bill will now not be enough. hong kong's chief executive must go to. she needs to pay the price. she needs to step down. if she doesn't step down, i believe the demonstrations, the rally that happened yesterday, is not the largest number of participants.
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in the future, there will be more than a million of hong kong citizens coming to the street again. this afternoon the hard—core protesters returned to the streets, vowing to press on until their demands are met. the much smaller number of protesters still out here today may not feel it yet, but they have already won. the hated extradition bill is in effect already dead. the question now, is what happens to hong kong chief executive, carrie lam? even pro—government lawmakers are now blaming mrs lam for the current mess. now she's created a problem. if she leaves, who's going to come and take up the problems? all right, if it was me, i won't, i don't want to touch it. 0k, let her clear that up first. after three of the biggest protests this territory has ever seen in the space ofjust one week, time may be running out for hong kong's embattled chief executive. rupert wingfield—hayes,
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bbc news, in hong kong. every new teacher in england will be trained how to spot the early warning signs of mental illness, as part of plans unveiled today by theresa may. there will also be a push to offer nhs staff training in suicide prevention. labour say the prime minister is only offering ‘warm words' and that mental health services are ‘stretched to breaking point‘. lauren moss reports. last week, it was bold targets to tackle climate change. today, theresa may has announced how she wants to overhaul mental health support in schools before she leaves number ten. we are pledging that every new teacher will be trained in how to spot the signs of a mental health issues. the next great revolution in mental health has to be prevention, because if we make prevention a top priority at every stage of life, we can ensure that everybody has the opportunity to reach their full potential. according to research by the charity the children's society,
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almost a third of parents of children between the ages of four and 17 say their child has been affected by a mental health issue in the last year. this secondary school in cheshire already has a teaching assistant trained to support pupils. i think there's lots of pressures on young people at the moment. there's a lot of pressures from home life. there's a lot of pressure from expectations. social media, they never turn off from social media, which is constant. and i think young people now have great expectations about what they want to do in the future. and all these things can be quite daunting. but teachers say the new plans need financial backing. it's really good today that we are looking at improving teacher training, but without proper funding, this really is a sticking plaster approach. at the moment, the cuts have led to really long waiting lists for children for specialist mental health provision. there will be an extra £1 million for students' mental health support at university. with 1,000 teachers due to start training this summer, the prime minister says the strategy is about prevention.
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but those who will be delivering it are cautious that it is not enough to tackle what is a growing problem. lauren moss, bbc news. the queen has been joined by other members of the royal family for the annual order of the corridor service. hundreds of spectators watched as the garter knights arrived in the grounds of windsor castle for the service at st george's chapel. newly invested members of the order, king felipe of spain and king willem alexander of the netherlands, also attended the event alongside their wives. an unwanted by—product of the cheese making process will be powering homes and industries across north yorkshire. whey from the wensleydale creamery will be turned into methane gas. our business correspondent ian reeve reports. it deals in big numbers, 35 million lof milk
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it deals in big numbers, 35 million l of milk a year is turned into 40,000 tonnes of cheese and now the vast by—product of that will soon heat and power local homes and industry. it will go from the factory here to a local bio energy plant that turns it into methane gas and content into the grid for generation. it comes from the farm and many of them are extremely local to the creamer here and every part of that product from the cheesemaking protein to the water at the end of that is being used and we are producing energy to heat homes at the same time which is a fantastic story. but the process of preparing it takes here, indicate that costs many pounds. this is where it ends up at this giant fermenter and north yorkshire. gas is produced as well as a fertiliser by—product for local farmers.
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is produced as well as a fertiliser by-product for local farmers. the value of that is immense and crops are thriving and the soil condition is getting better said there is a positive to that. it will supply more than 20% of biogas plants need and the gas displaces fossil fuels, carbon emissions are cut and is a cracking environmental resort. if you are waiting for high—pressure and settled leather and warmth and sunshine, that is not the plan this week. sunday spells for a time but it will be wet at times and low pressure close by. one area of low pressure close by. one area of low pressure close by. one area of low pressure close to scotland and another coming at us from the south and this one can get some torrential foundry rain for east of england with tuesday night into wednesday morning and we will look at that in a moment. the rest of tonight is shaking up but where we have had showers during the day there are
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going to be, at least many places will become dry and some nastiness around southwest england and a few spots dipping down into single figures and an area of rain bearing down on northwest scotland. and then this area of showers pushing across scotla nd this area of showers pushing across scotland and northern ireland during the day and sonny's bells, and northern england staying mainly fine and lots of cloud around and pushing northwards and southeast into anglia and temperatures at best around 20 degrees and looking where he made down towards the southeast and concerned going on tuesday night into wednesday morning and the yellow shaded area, at the met office warns for thunderstorms and some areas could get as much as 50 mm of rain as torrential foundry showers spread and a risk of flooding as well. one area of rain as we take a closer look and showing
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up as we take a closer look and showing up on rainfall picture and it will va ry up on rainfall picture and it will vary from one place at the next but potential is there for some disruption going into wednesday morning with these torrential downpour is. during wednesday here it could be further from the storms developing, turning dryer, sunnier and further showers to come in scotla nd and further showers to come in scotland and northern ireland on wednesday. can be foundry and mostly around 17—20d. looking at their say, you will see more showers around again and close to the area of low pressure is sent into northern scotla nd pressure is sent into northern scotland but it should be a quieter picture into england and wales. at some looking fairly isolated here and looking around 17—20 and many places looking dry.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source. egypt's former president mohamed morsi has died. state tv said he collapsed after appearing in court in cairo. mr morsi's been injail ever since he was ousted by the military in 2013. hong kong pro democracy activist joshua wong is released from prison and had this message. the hong kong people will not stay silent under the suppression of president xi and carrie lam. iran says that in 10 days it'll break the limit on its uranium stockpile breaching the nuclear deal brokered in 2015. this as tensions grow after the attacks on two oil tankers

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