Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 18, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

11:00 am
you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am and these are the main stories this morning. proposals have no open for public consultation over heathrow‘s third runway. boris johnson consultation over heathrow‘s third runway. borisjohnson gets the backing of former rival andrea leadsom ahead of a second round of voting in the conservative leadership race this afternoon.” believe he is an election winner. i think he's someone who can bring the country and the party back together and take us forward in a positive way. the united states will send more troops to the middle east in response to what it calls hostile behaviour by iranians voices. former uefa president michel platini is detained by french police over
11:01 am
the awarding of the 2022 world cup to qatar. labour mp stella creasy says she is being forced to choose between "being an mp and being a mum" because of outdated parliamentary rules. and the science behind puppy dog eyes. new research suggests dog eyes may have evolved to help them appeal to humans. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. heathrow — one of the world's busiest airports — has revealed its expansion masterplan. the project to build a third runway is expected to cost £14 billion, but is facing fierce opposition from environmental campaigners. the public will have 12 weeks to comment on the plans.
11:02 am
the new runway will be situated over a new section of the busy m25, to be completed by 2026. 761 homes will be moved, with their owners compensated. local roads will also be moved, and rivers. a new low emissions zone around heathrow could mean additional charges for many vehicles, and the airport hopes it will be linked up to great western and southern rail. our transport correspondent tom burridge reports. they queue at heathrow. 99% of landing and take—off slots at britain's main airport are full. they're notjust queueing up to take off, they're queueing up in the sky to get in. a plane will arrive or leave heathrow every 45 seconds. it's why heathrow says it needs a third runway. a new runway means potentially 260,000 more flights per year. 0pposition groups say it will mean unacceptable levels of noise and pollution. but heathrow says at night every
11:03 am
local community will have at least seven hours when a plane is not flying overhead. it insists reducing its carbon footprint is a priority. one of the things we'll be producing as part of the consultation today is our preliminary environmental impact assessment, which sets out the implications from an air quality, noise, and carbon perspective. they are really important factors and we have worked hard to make sure that we mitigate those. and, clearly, we won't be able to expand unless we deliver on those environmental limits. heathrow also plans to develop its terminals to cope with the additional traffic. the next step is a planning application. the airport hopes work will begin on the third runway in 2022. tom burridge, bbc news, at heathrow. with me now is paul mcguinness, chair of the no 3rd runway coalition. we know where you are coming from,
11:04 am
but what actual impact can you have during this consultation? we have a very large number of community groups, local councils within our coalition who are very determined to do all we can to stop this. a lot comes down to planning, which is where the matter is to be discussed next. but lots of our local communities are feeling very fed up with this. 20 years ago, the fifth terminal won planning consent by virtue of the fact that promises we re virtue of the fact that promises were made to the planners and residents that they would be no increase in the flight cap, 480,000, and they would not be, in any circumstances, an application for a third runway. to some extent this consultation is viewed as a road map as to how heathrow will renege upon those promises. i don't want to sound brutal but to some extent these have been thrashed over and over and these have been thrashed over and overand ina these have been thrashed over and over and in a way you have lost. there was a clear vote in
11:05 am
parliament, the government is behind it. so are you at least reassured by some of the efforts this masterplan puts in place to deal with overnight noise, deal with emissions. puts in place to deal with overnight noise, dealwith emissions. it puts in place to deal with overnight noise, deal with emissions. it is trying to answer some of your objections. i think possibly there was an inaccuracy in the question if you don't mind my saying. it's got parliamentary approval but the sports like community said it was a fourth proposal and made recommendations. what the government told parliament was not to worry about the qualms, these problems, these environmental and noise issues. these will be dealt with in planning. this is how the process works. those issues have not been properly put down to scrutiny. we know quite a few members of parliament have said the only reason they backed it was because they were aware that all these issues would be discussed at planning. does that reassure you , discussed at planning. does that reassure you, that they will be discussed at planning? it does, and we know there are many more people
11:06 am
who are clamouring to oppose the scheme. remember it's already a controversial operation, and that is with two runways. it is statistically the most highly disruptive airport in the world at the moment. it overflights the most densely populated residential region in our country. 750,000 people are currently significantly impacted by aircraft noise. according to an internal department for transport assessment, up to 2.2 million people may be affected once we have the third runway. members of parliament did not discuss that. it was kicked into the long grass. it interesting your argument is entirely the whole. .. if you your argument is entirely the whole... if you don't mind the expression, the not in my backyard nimby argument, rather than that of the extinction rebellion climate change lobby. do you intersect with that? we do and there are a large number of people in our coalition who are concerned about the environment into macro ways. first
11:07 am
of all the appalling air quality. heathrow is in regular breach of air—quality targets. it will be a lot worse with three runway is pumping what noxious pollution into the lungs of london children. carbon in many ways is the big elephant in the room. the government and any other government will go for this net zero target by 2050. it is inconceivable that heathrow, which is the country's largest single emitter of carbon gases, will be able to expand, unless aviation outgrowth is restricted —— aviation growth is restricted, and industrial activity. i suppose that raises the question for you and others, who oppose this expansion, to make the argument. for those who don't live in london. to make the climate change argument is perhaps one that directly affects them in a way the overnight flights in london over your residence doesn't. we find some
11:08 am
quite high profile people as well as communities from around the country are joining communities from around the country arejoining ourcampaign communities from around the country arejoining our campaign stop communities from around the country are joining our campaign stop andy burnham, the mayor of manchester, he was lukewarm about this and he has now come out against. he has come out because he realises the south—east centric project will be damaging to the regions and he is also very aware of the carbon issue and believes if it were to go ahead it would be bad news for the country's of policy. we have to leave it there but thank you for talking to us. some breaking news from newcastle from north tyneside magistrates' court. paul crowther, aged 32, has pleaded guilty to common assault and criminal damage after throwing a milkshake over the brexit party leader nigel farage during eight newcastle city centre walkabout. you may remember the moment when the
11:09 am
milkshake was thrown during the electioneering last month. paul crowther, aged 32, has pleaded guilty. common assault, criminal damage. now to the more central issue of politics. former conservative leadership hopeful andrea leadsom has confirmed she's backing the frontrunner, boris johnson, for the leadership of the conservative party. mrs leadsom failed to make it through the first round of voting for the job. the second round will take place later today, with six candidates competing. whoever finishes last — or fails to secure at least 33 votes — will be eliminated. the successful contenders will go on to appear on a debate on bbc tv this evening. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith joins us now from westminster. is it isita is it a form of hunger games, norman? maybe not hunger games but to day will be a hugely important day because we will learn a number of things. we will learn hopefully some sort of detail from boris
11:10 am
johnson about his plans for brexit, because at the moment he has avoided any meaningful scrutiny. we should learn who is emerging perhaps as the candidate to challenge him, who is moving clearly into second place, and we should also learn whether that rory stewart surge is just immediate fiction or whether he is actually beginning to really develop some momentum, possibly paving the way for some sort of upset. what is clear is he seems to be getting nerves jangling amongst some of his rivals. sajid javid this morning, who could be in some danger tonight, he suggested that rory stewart was really the remain candidate making brexit seem so difficult that we'll just have to give up and stay in the eu. also suggesting that of his background, his educational background, his educational background and that of the other candidates, the tory party really didn't wanta candidates, the tory party really didn't want a final contest in the country where the final two
11:11 am
contenders had all been to the same sort of school and the same sort of university. if we end up in a situation where the final two, three, four even are sort of people from similar backgrounds with... somebody that used to go to 0xbridge, all that. and... yeah. it'll look like a debate at the oxford union. ijust don't think that's healthy for the tory party, and what we need is notjust to look like we represent modern britain. i think when we get to that final two, whoever emerges — and some of my colleagues say, "listen, sajid, it's going to be boris anyway," — they may well be right. and if it is boris, i'm happy to work with boris. i don't have a problem with that. it'll be fair and square. but even if it is boris, he needs to be properly tested. there cannot be a coronation. michael gove also sounding a little bit edgy about the emerging threat from rory stewart. the times this morning suggesting you want don't wa nt to morning suggesting you want don't want to candidates in the final ballot he will be polarising and force people into extremes. in other
11:12 am
words, borisjohnson force people into extremes. in other words, boris johnson and force people into extremes. in other words, borisjohnson and rory stewart. this was mr gove this morning. i'm feeling confident. i'm looking forward to a good debate with the other candidates later. i'm looking forward to making a case for a positive conservative vision to ensure that we get a good brexit deal and that we reform this country for the better. are you being overtaken by rory stewart? how many more supporters have you gained since the last round? you gained, mr gove? who would you back if you get knocked out today? lovely to see you. bye — bye. are you being overtaken by rory stewart? thank you. so is mr gove in danger of being overta ken so is mr gove in danger of being ove rta ke n by so is mr gove in danger of being overtaken by rory stewart? i'm joined by one of rory stewart's supporters. isn't the case for rory stewart really that he is the stop borisjohnson stewart really that he is the stop boris johnson candidate and stewart really that he is the stop borisjohnson candidate and that is why people are beginning to consider him? i think he is a what is right for the country candidate. what is
11:13 am
significant is that my constituency office has ta ken significant is that my constituency office has taken cold calls from my constituent who watched the debate on sunday and were impressed by rory, saying he struck them as a man of integrity. i think he has that reach across to a younger generation of voters. as a former party chairman i know that is important. he is distinct and different, but people like what he has to say. do tory mps like him? he has pitched his campaign very much outside of westminster, may be to non—tory supporters but in this context it is tory mps that matter. we are professional politicians so we have to appeal to the outside, get outside the bubble, and listen to what is important to people in our own constituencies and beyond. 0ne of the things we test for in candidates who want to be mps of the things we test for in candidates who want to be mp5 is their ability to perform on the media. that is an important skill andl media. that is an important skill and i think we saw on sunday that rory is good at that but also he has
11:14 am
a really strong vision for this country and a very realistic one about the situation we are in and how we can move forward. what he doesn't seem to have and boris johnson doesn't is a clear plan. because his proposal is to try to push ahead with mrs may's deal but there is no real evidence that they will be any more successful than her. it shows a gritty reality of the situation, and since we had the european elections it is painfully clear to a european elections it is painfully cleartoa numberof european elections it is painfully clear to a number of mps, including the labour mps clear to a number of mps, including the labourmps in clear to a number of mps, including the labour mps in constituencies which voted leave, that they would lose their seats to the brexit party unless we can actually leave the eu. rory is an advocate for the withdrawal agreement because it allows us to leave in an orderly fashion. as we heard from gareth snell yesterday, there are labour mps, i snell yesterday, there are labour mp5, i believe, who if they were givena mp5, i believe, who if they were given a choice, they had the whip lifted from them, would vote for the withdrawal agreement which would actually allow them to deliver to
11:15 am
their electorate what it said it wanted. isn't the difficulty that he is hugely inexperienced at the top? he only had just under two months in cabinet. how can anyone expect him to step into the job of prime minister, given his lack of experience and given the challenge of brexit? let's not forget his experience before politics. ithink that counts for something. he has a lifetime of public service, he has served in very difficult positions asa served in very difficult positions as a diplomat in afghanistan, iraq, war zones. as a diplomat in afghanistan, iraq, war zones. he as a diplomat in afghanistan, iraq, war zones. he knows as a diplomat in afghanistan, iraq, war zones. he knows what it is like to be ina war zones. he knows what it is like to be in a tough place and how to help a country that you are serving move forward. he has held some difficult briefs. the prison is brief, for example. he knows what it is like for people who do feel left behind, who feel they haven't got a second chance in life and i think you can see clearly through what rory has today, there was one nation values coming through. caroline spelman, thank you. when rory
11:16 am
stewart was coming out of cabinet this morning said it was on a knife edge. he clearly thinks it will be close. he has been citing the example ofjeremy close. he has been citing the example of jeremy corbyn. close. he has been citing the example ofjeremy corbyn. we know mr corbyn, a bit like rory stewart, pitched his successful campaign outside the party up against perhaps four less than dynamic candidates, so there are parallels, although you have to say time is very, very short for rory stewart to build up the momentum needed to put himself in a position to challenge borisjohnson. norman, thank you. we'll be keeping you across all the developments in the conservative leadership race here on the bbc news channel. the result of the second ballot is expected at around six o'clock this evening — we'll be building up to that announcement throughout the bbc news at 5 — bringing you the result live, as well as analysis and reaction. and you can watch tonight's live tv debate between the remaining candidates here on the bbc news channel and bbc one at eight o'clock. that's our next prime minister, hosted by emily maitlis, followed by a full reaction
11:17 am
programme here on the bbc news channel from 9pm. the headlines on bbc news... heathrow airport reveals its masterplan for a third runway, which includes diverting rivers and rerouting the m25 — the proposals are now open for public consultation. borisjohnson is backed by former rival andrea leadsom before tory mps vote again in the conservative leadership contest. the united states will send more troops to the middle east in response to what it calls hostile behaviour by iranian forces. and in sport the former head of uefa michel platini is being questioned by french police who are investigating possible corruption be behind the award of the world cup 2022 to qatar. france secured top spot with a controversial win over nigeria. a missed penalty was reta ken nigeria. a missed penalty was retaken because the keeper had
11:18 am
stepped off her line. and england have won the toss, they are batting first against afghanistan but they are already one wicket down. 54—i first against afghanistan but they are already one wicket down. 54—1 at 0ld are already one wicket down. 54—1 at old trafford. i'll have an update on that and the rest of the sport in the next 15 minutes. the former head of european football — michel platini — has been arrested in paris as part of inquiries into the bidding process for the 2022 world cup — which was won by qatar. it's reported that french prosecutors are investigating allegations of corruption and bribery. mr platini led uefa until he was banned four years ago for separate ethics breaches. jane dougal is outside the police station in paris where michel platini has been taken. tell us more. it's been reported that michel platini has been brought here to the premises of the anti—corruption
11:19 am
office of thejudicial premises of the anti—corruption office of the judicial police, based in this building, that ministry of the interior. we understand this is following the award for the 2022 world cup to qatar. that decision was taken back in december 2010. it has been primarily a surrounding human rights concerns. following investigations including by american officials, 16 of the 24 members of the executive committee of fifa at the executive committee of fifa at the time have either been struck off, suspended, or remain under investigation. currently this morning there is a number of french media surrounding the opposite street of this building. you can see the security outside stopping us from going any closer. we have been waiting for michel platini to emerge, but no sign as of yet. we are keeping an eye on that. in 2015, the event uefa president was banned by fifa along with the former president sepp blatter, following a verdict from the governing bodies
11:20 am
ethics committee. michel platini's ban was reduced to four years and that ban expired in march of this year. this morning it has been reported that investigators looking into corruption in world football have taken him to this building and are reportedly lessening him on suspicion of corruption, looking into how qatar won the right to host the world cup in 2022. we are waiting for any sign of mr platini to emerge from the building. there is an official car that has pulled up is an official car that has pulled up outside. we are keeping an eye on that and if he emerges we will bring that and if he emerges we will bring that news directly to you. thanks, we will come back to you as and when. with me now is our sports news correspondent alex capstick. 2010, this bid was given to qatar and it has been fraught ever since. i was and it has been fraught ever since. iwas in and it has been fraught ever since. i was in the room went sepp blatter, the former president of fifa, now banned from football, made the announcement that katai would host the 2022 world cup. everybody was
11:21 am
surprised, shocked. this was boiling hot there in the summer. it has been moved to the winter months because of the temperatures. it was a huge, huge surprise, and ever since then, the country's officials have denied all allegations of wrongdoing. they have been plenty of suggestions that that vote was rigged. michel platini at the time was part of the decision—making process. he was a senior member of fifa's executive committee, he was president of uefa, as well as being a former great footballer, one of france's greatest ever footballers. a big footballer, one of france's greatest everfootballers. a big figure in football. he was, it was suggested, going to vote for the usa for 2022 and seem to change his mind shortly before the vote took place and it went to qatar. there have been suggestions he was leaned on by the french president nicolas sarkozy. he has denied this, saying that
11:22 am
football had to go to a new territory and it was right that qatar got it. they were french media reports that there was this critical lunch several days beforehand. yes, with nicolas sarkozy and a senior official from the qatar bid team. the suggestion was that there was a contract up for grabs, that nicolas sa rkozy‘s contract up for grabs, that nicolas sarkozy‘s son was involved in that company and the former french president said, look, we would like you to vote for qatar. all of that is being denied by michel platini, although it was known and he did not deny the fact that nicolas sarkozy was leaning towards qatar but he denied he was influenced by anything the french president said. we will leave that there. some breaking news on some sentencing. two extreme neo north sea teenagers have been sent to prison after admitting encouraging terrorism on the internet. 0n social
11:23 am
media, they suggested that prince harry should be shot and that white women who mix with other races should be killed. they were members of the ultra—extreme revolutionary north sea group exposed bite bbc news in december —— ultra—extreme revolutionary nazi group exposed by the bbc news in december. the united states is to send a thousand extra troops to the middle east amid rising tensions with iran. the white house said it was in response to what it described as "hostile behaviour " by iranian forces. yesterday iran revealed it was close to breaching a key part of the international agreement to restrict its nuclear activities. 0ur north america correspondent, peter bowes, has this report. more evidence that iran is to blame. these are the photographs the pentagon says offer further proof that the attacks on two tankers in the gulf of oman were carried out by iranian forces.
11:24 am
this image shows what the us military describes as the remnants of the magnetic attachment device of an unexploded limpet mine placed on one of the tankers. the pentagon says it proves that iran has the resources and proficiency needed to quickly remove the unexploded mine. iran continues to deny any involvement in the attacks. announcing a further 1,000 troops to be sent to the middle east, the acting us secretary of defense, patrick shanahan, said the recent iranian attacks validated credible intelligence on hostile behaviour by iranian forces, threatening united states personnel and interests across the region. you have to get to the bottom line of what the us is trying to accomplish. the whole thing about maximum pressure and bringing pressure to bear on the regime and pointing all these fingers when things happen. the fact is, whether iran this or not, because it is
11:25 am
conflicting information, it could have gone either way. but what is clear is that when you put too much pressure on, you can actually cause the very things you are trying to prevent. and the objective should be stability in the middle east, not pushing closer towards a war and i think that is what we are getting close towards. the extra troops come on top of 1,500 announced last month. the us military says their role will be defensive, addressing air, naval, and ground—based threats. the us is insisting it does not seek conflict with iran, but with tensions rising, the region is looking increasingly unstable. peter bowes, bbc news. nathalie tocci is the special advisor to federica mogherini who's the foreign policy chief of the european union. thank you very much for talking to us. what is the position of the european union on this? can i interrupt you? we are not... we have a slight audio
11:26 am
problem. we will try again. can you begin your answer problem. we will try again. can you begin youransweragain? problem. we will try again. can you begin your answer again? yeah. that's great. can you hear me? i can now hear you, so if you could answer the question. what is the european union policy on the current rising tensions between the us and iraq? we have to look at this in context. we have to look at this in context. we have an escalation going on and it has been very unfortunately caused at the very start from the us‘s a violation of thejoint at the very start from the us‘s a violation of the joint comprehensive plan of action with iran. this has led to mounting tensions in the gulf. we obviously don't know yet, we do not have definitive proof as to who has actually committed this. it is reasonable to expect that iran has been behind the attack of the oil tankers but of course we do not definitive proof. essentially what
11:27 am
the european union and its member states are seeing is an escalation that... states are seeing is an escalation that. . . that states are seeing is an escalation that... that is so unfortunate. i do apologise... 0h, back again. hang on apologise... 0h, back again. hang on a minute, lets try once more. we are having trouble, i apologise. we lost to about five seconds back. just because of that interruption, can i just pick up on a couple of points that you made? first off, on the violation of the nuclear deal, you just said that that was the united states which violated the deal, obviously it pulled out a year or more ago. meanwhile iran is about to breach its uranium enrichment limit. next week, we understand, on the 27th. is that iran breaking the deal, or do you regard the deal as already having being broken? clearly if you are in an international agreement and the agreement has a
11:28 am
certain bargain at the heart of it, if there is one side that violates it, and as we know the united states has been the party violating it, thenit has been the party violating it, then it is in a sense only reasonable to expect that it gets to a point that the other side will start saying, hang on a second, something is not quite right. in my view, and this is what we have been saying to the iranians up until now, not only do we expect them to consider the macro expect them to continue living up to their side of the agreement but they have to recognise they have to have something in return. europeans are trying to make an effort and work on trying to make an effort and work on trying to make an effort and work on trying to circumvent the effect... cani trying to circumvent the effect... can i interrupt you? the iranians say you are not making enough of an effort because they have put pressure and demanded that the other signatories to the deal should step up signatories to the deal should step up and help them get round us economic sanctions, but they feel
11:29 am
their economy is crippled and europeans are not doing enough on their part. i think it is fair to say, looking at it from an iranians vantage point, certainly not enough has been done. looking at it from our european angle, i think it is also fair to say we are looking at something that is extremely complicated not only politically, because obviously this puts us at loggerheads with our closest partner and ally, the united states, but it is also very complicated technically to do because essentially what we are trying to put in place, there is are trying to put in place, there is a very complicated to track budget mechanism essentially to try to circumvent the effect of secondary sanctions. precisely on the day in which the two oil tankers were attacked, actually there was a european allegation in tehran negotiating with its iranian cou nterpa rts negotiating with its iranian counterparts because the establishment that is essentially a
11:30 am
two track vehicle. there is a european side to this but also an iranians side. and therefore... can i just... iranians side. and therefore... can ijust... thank iranians side. and therefore... can i just... thank you for clarifying that. just before i let you go because the line is unstable, i want to pick up on something else you said. you mentioned the tankers and you said there was not conclusive proof that that was an iranians action against those tankers. 0f course the us believes it does have conclusive proof. and the uk is minded to agree. are you seeing the european union does not agree? the european union has not expressed a position on this. i think that in order to do so, one essentially needs to see proof that comes from more, probably more than one side and it has to be somehow certified
11:31 am
internationally. all i am saying that as of today that position has not been expressed. i think for very valid reasons. it is also fair to say that it is a reasonable to expect iran to retaliate to a situation such as this for the escalation i have been referring to concerning the iranian deal. i would not be surprised if iran did it. as of today we do not have definitive proof that this is the case. thank you so much forjoining us and thank you so much forjoining us and thank you for being patient with our technical difficulties. just a brief line of whether on the michel platini story. this is a uefa comment which is in effect say no comment. uefa has no comment to make on their detention of senior executive michel platini in paris.
11:32 am
right now here is the weather. some of us have got sunshine at the moment. this is the radar imagery from earlier on. thundery showers pushing in from the channel. those will continue for the afternoon, drifting north and east words. the odd rumble of thunder here. sunny spells to the east of southern scotla nd spells to the east of southern scotland and northern ireland, chalmers coming into the west. temperature 21 degrees, feeling humid towards the south east of england. that is where the focus will be far more thunderstorms this evening. could be as much as 50 millimetres falling and this will have intense downpours with lightning. these showers which are moving through the early hours of wednesday, rain to the north and
11:33 am
west ahead of that. tricky conditions into tomorrow morning. goodbye for now. hello this is bbc newsroom live with carrie gracie. the headlines: proposals have no open for public consultation over heathrow‘s third runway. former conservative leadership hopeful andrea leadsom has confirmed she's backing the frontrunner, boris johnson, for the leadership of the conservative party. former uefa president michel platini is detained by french police over the awarding of the 2022 world cup to qatar. two teenagers who proposed an attack on prince harry for one —— like
11:34 am
marrying a woman of mixed race have been sentenced. stella creecy says she is being forced to choose between being an mp and being a mum because of parliamentary rules. we speak to the deputy leader of the liberal democrats jo speak to the deputy leader of the liberal democratsjo swinson who was the first mp to take her baby into parliament weather last year. sport now, here's 0llie. are you going to start with michel platini? no, we are going to start with the cricket. good morning. england won the toss and are batting first against afghanistan in their cricket world cup match at old trafford. james vince is the man to replace the injured jason roy and he was the first wicket to fall, caught off the bowling of zadran.
11:35 am
captain eoin morgan passed a late fitness test after a back spasm. root and bairstow at the crease now. england 76—1. you can follow england's match with afghanistan across the bbc today. coverage has started over on test match special on 5live sports extra and you can see in play video clips on the bbc sport website. the former head of uefa, michel platini, has been detained by french police investigating the award of the 2022 world cup to qatar. michel platini has come back from a ban michel platini has come back from a ba n after michel platini has come back from a ban after receiving what was termed a disloyal payment formula four bars said blatter. jane dougall is outside the government building where platini is being questioned. you are in france covering the women's world cup. what has the reaction been to this breaking news? michel platini, one of the country's most famous footballers? it is a
11:36 am
fifa organised event. the news broke not that long ago and alreadyjust outside these offices there are a great number of french media. it has been reported widely. security stopping the media from going to close, we are all waiting to see weather michel platini will come out of here. it has been reported he has been brought here at the offices of the anti—corru ption offices been brought here at the offices of the anti—corruption offices of the judicial police. we understand this is foran judicial police. we understand this is for an questioning over the awarding of the 20 20 world cup. a number of issues have come up over that decision. —— 2022. some have been that when —— like human rights concerns that concern qatar. he was banned by fifa along with their
11:37 am
former president following a verdict from the governing bodies ethics committee. following investigation including by american officials, 16 of the 24 members of the fifa committee became leading dishes and to award qatar with the 20 22 world cup have either ben suspended remain under investigation. michel platini was given a six—year ban after the committee found him guilty of a series of breaches. that was reduced to four, after he appealed to the court of arbitration for sport. that expired in the march of this year. 0fficials expired in the march of this year. officials are still investigating corruption in world football. we understand that he has been taken for questioning. we understand that he is in this building, which is the ministry of the interior, and it is the anti—corru ption office ministry of the interior, and it is the anti—corruption office of the judicial police who are questioning him. we are waiting to see weather michel platini will emerge from this
11:38 am
building are not. a few official ca rs have building are not. a few official cars have when pulling up. french media awaiting his departure. we will bring it to you. jane live from france. that's all the sport for now. ahead of the second round of voting this afternoon and this evening's television debate here on the bbc — let's get the thoughts of mo hussein — a former chief press officer at number 10 under david cameron — now at public affairs agency plmr, and conservative media adviser turned writer and political journalistjo—anne nadler.
11:39 am
thank you both so much for coming in. what is going to happen this afternoon? this afternoon is interesting. i would say that because i am a bit of a political anorak. if you think back over the last few leadership campaigns, they have all been fairly predictable. today introduces a degree of real jeopardy for the candidates because there are a lot of different games being played out here. some conservative mps would like to see a real kind of hate for a boris johnson's soul if you like in the last place, and therefore people are saying that perhaps rory stewart might make it to the final. although i think he has a long way to go before he can get there. alternatively, you should try and outflank boris johnson on alternatively, you should try and outflank borisjohnson on the right and try and promote dominic rab
11:40 am
campaign. 0n the face of it, i think dominic and sergeant javid campaign. 0n the face of it, i think dominic and sergeantjavid are all very vulnerable. —— sajid javid. i think anything could happen this afternoon. you are sitting on the fence, anything could happen? rory stewart is an interesting prospect. the others are the black cab model, and he has coming disrupting the whole thing. a few weeks ago he was a bit of an oddity, quite funny and now he is a real contender. that is interesting you think he is. he does have a long way to go but he is further now than you would have thought a week ago. the risk that there is and the mood among some mps, does he go too far? do we want this on a blue on blue attack with candidates taking chunks out of each other. the only person who winds and thatis
11:41 am
other. the only person who winds and that isjeremy other. the only person who winds and that is jeremy corbyn and all the labour attack lines. i think that might be the risk of yes rory wants to challenge boris. there are certain people who want him to do that but does that go to far? they do not seem very clear about that. 0n the one hand they want a proper contest, someone needs to be tested before they can become leader and prime minister as method theresa may problem three years ago. but on the other hand they do not want a conflict. that has to come within certain parameters and those para meters certain parameters and those parameters are that you do not representative —— might represent the conservative party. i think that is the challenge to mps who might be thinking that rory stewart has emerged as the next kind of hopeful staff. i think whoever winds in the final analysis let's face it is
11:42 am
pretty much on trent to be boris johnson. then that person should really promote rory stewart and to make a big feature of him. clearly he has a fantastic capacity to reach out beyond the wider conservative base but it is the conservative base at this point that is making the decision. his first day with detail for borisjohnson. decision. his first day with detail for boris johnson. i believe all highs will be on that later today. i do think there is a logic to what he has been doing. he has been spending a lot of time talking to mp5, the mps are the ones he needs to get on board, which he has managed to do over the last few days. also i think he is thinking about the day after the contest. normally you are thinking about the first 100 days of a new premiership. the working majority are still five, so here's talking about what the mp5 think. it
11:43 am
will be interesting to see the tone of the debate tonight. many were attacking dominic's approach. we will see if boris is a lightning rod because people will be thinking well self—preservation kicks in, so they will be looking at how others disrupt boris will be interesting. word about the other candidates. we heard sajid javid talking about rent it be bad to have a race where they all had gone to the same school or wore the same time? that is the question of social diversity, does it matter? i would like to see sajid javid go through to the round where the membership has to make the final vote. he has a strong candidate regardless of his ethnicity and background. nevertheless, it adds to
11:44 am
the sense that the conservative party isn't as representative of the wider community as it should be. with having predominantly middle—class white, middle—aged men involved in this contest again. we will have to leave it there. thank you for coming in and discussing it with me. a lack of training for doctors on how to treat eating disorders is contributing to avoidable deaths, according to a committee of mps. their report says that medical students may getjust a few hours of training on issues such as bulimia or anorexia, and that the nhs has failed to act on recommendations to improve services. 0ur health correspondent, dominic hughes, reports. for the past decade, hannah has lived with an eating disorder. it's a potentially very serious condition, and yet she struggled to get the help she needed. there was a long wait, actually, when i was 19, to get help. so the wait was about six months for some cbt group therapy,
11:45 am
and by that point, that wasn't really sufficient. and also, within six months i was extremely unwell, and by that point i was having, you know, suicide attempts. for those suffering with an eating disorder, getting treatment quickly is vital. but the eating disorder charity beat says, last year, one in five adults in england had to wait longer than 18 weeks, while one in ten had to wait longer than 24 weeks. the average waiting time in england was nine weeks, but the charity says patients face a postcode lottery for treatment. what we found was that, for some areas, people are being seen within two weeks. for others, they're waiting almost six months. it's a real variety across the country, and that's having detrimental impacts upon people's health. for those like hannah, who are living with an eating disorder, a clear understanding of their illness is key. but a report from a committee of mps says the training medical students receive can amount to just a few hours. they warn that, without better training and more joined—up services
11:46 am
to help people like hannah, the nhs is risking avoidable deaths. dominic hughes, bbc news. we have got some reaction. it makes a key pa rt we have got some reaction. it makes a key part of the gp curriculum but more resources and funding are needed to deliver the best possible care. instagram "can't solve bullying on its own" — that's according to the social media company's boss, adam mosseri. in an inteview with bbc radio 1's newsbeat, mosseri, the head of instagram, says that online bullying needs the head of instagram, says that online bullying needs to be tackled as part of a wider plan, and he welcomed regulation in some areas. tell us more about what he had to say. there was quite a lot of issues recovered, regulation is an
11:47 am
interesting one. social media companies thrown at independent regulation but there has been pressure on instagram. there was an incident that bbc reported on, a girl who hanged herself in 2017. her family said there was content of suicide on instagram. that sparked a chain of events. with ministers were contacted chain of events. with ministers were co nta cted to chain of events. with ministers were contacted to see what they could do. there was a white paper that came out in april which said you cannot do this on your own, their era of self—regulation is over. if you do not do something, you could face fines, we can block your content. he accepts that the level of scrutiny is acceptable but only to a certain extent. at a high level, this is scrutiny and it is scrutiny that makes sense given our scale. a lot of people use instagram every day, they use it for a decent amount of time and i think that is going to come along with a lot of attention from,
11:48 am
not only governments and regulators, but all sorts of organisations. and sometimes it's not always comfortable for us to be criticised and to have our mistakes aired in public, but i think fundamentally it is a healthy dynamic. 0n the issue of bullying, he says we cannot solve it on our own. it is a societal problem. but he did say we do not want instagram to be a people for people who are depressed. a very highly followed person on instagram, she found that it made her feel bad about her body. that has given him pause to think. they are introducing lots of new features to tackle bullying. he said that lots of people have said they are reluctant to unfollow, block, reporter billy because if they know them in real life, it can escalate issues. he is
11:49 am
conscious of the problem of bullying. bullying has existed for a long time, it has changed and evolved with the intranet. to address that issue i think there are address that issue i think there are a lot of interesting things we can do on instagram and we are excited to look at that space. but instagram alone cannot deal with bullying. it has to have the involvement of parents, schools. it is broader than just instagram, that sometimes gets mist. it is interesting to see the tone. it is very kind of thoughtful and open and self—aware. that is the kind of energy is to present. he has beenin kind of energy is to present. he has been in thejob kind of energy is to present. he has been in the job for a less than a year. so he definitely, the impression i got from chatting to him,i impression i got from chatting to him, i have not thought about this. that is a good point. he is conscious of all the problems, all
11:50 am
the challenges with instances like selena gomez and their child heard of molly russell. if you think about the number of people using instagram,1 the number of people using instagram, 1 billion people worldwide, that gives you the scale of the challenge. and the scale of the power as well. thank you very much. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first, the headlines on bbc news. heathrow airport reveals its ‘masterplan' for a third runway, which includes diverting rivers and rerouting the m25 — the proposals are now open for public consultation. borisjohnson is backed by former rival andrea leadsom before tory mps vote again in the conservative leadership contest. former uefa president michel platini is detained by french police over the awarding of the 2022 world cup to qatar.
11:51 am
the business news. a report by mps has urged the uk government to end the era of throwaway clothes and poor working conditions in the fashion supply chain. the mps' proposals are designed to force the fashion industry to clean up its act. up to 180 jobs are at risk after allied bakeries — which makes kingsmill bread — announced plans to halt production at its site in cardiff. the company said it wanted to move its bread making operations to "largerfacilities in the uk". the cardiff facility would be used as a distribution depot for wales and south—west england. middle—aged people are increasingly being lured into becoming "money mules" and their bank accounts used to launder proceeds of crime, according to a report. more than 40,000 cases which "bore the hallmarks" of money mule activity were reported to uk fraud prevention service cifas last year, up 26% on 2017.
11:52 am
heathrow airport will construct a third runway by 2026 and complete its expansion by 2050, according to its "masterplan" published on tuesday. the plan includes diverting rivers, moving roads and re—routing the m25 through a tunnel under the new runway. heathrow‘s expansion has faced fierce opposition, but the airport says it has engaged with local communities and other stakeholders. the proposals are now open to public consultation until 13 september. david wells is the chief executive of the freight transport association. could capacity be built in other airports? transport association. could capacity be built in other airports? are you pleased with this new plan? heathrow is a huge port in the uk. bigger than dover. we have heard how important dover is for brexit. heathrow is bigger than dover. how do you want heathrow to look in 20 yea rs' do you want heathrow to look in 20 years' time. heathrow as part of the
11:53 am
vitality. the importance of heathrow is itself so many destinations. in freight terms, an hundred 85 destinations. post brexit we need to be gauging —— like engaging with countries outside the eu, particularly china, south america and india. so the importance of heathrow is that it needs to keep growing and expanding but it also needs to be aware of the environmental impact and the impact to locally caught —— communities. you say it needs to keep growing and expanding. the environmental impact is too great on the local area. the way that heathrow works is that it isa way that heathrow works is that it is a habit for many aeroplanes coming in and going out. so 80% of aircargo coming in and going out. so 80% of air cargo travels in the early hold
11:54 am
of passenger flights. heathrow is the uk's major hub. it competes with paris, frankfurt and schiphol in amsterdam. it is important it maintains for uk plc that competitive place in the air cargo market. what role does brexit play in all of this? brexit will make those markets further afield like south america, china, india and australasia. it will make those much more important to us as trading partners and as many of the products are perishable that come from those places, they will need to come by aircargo. places, they will need to come by air cargo. thank you. that's all the business news. there will be more through the afternoon. the labour mp stella creasy — who is pregnant — says she is being forced to choose between "being an mp and being a mum" because of outdated parliamentary rules. stella creasy says the body
11:55 am
which regulates mps' pay has told her it does not recognise when members go on maternity leave — meaning no paid cover will be available for the time she is off. jo swinson is the deputy leader of the liberal democrates and has been campaigning to modernise the rules surrounding mps with families — and was the first mp to take her baby into the house of commons with her last year. shejoins me now from our westminster. jo swinson, thank you for talking with us. are you disappointed by the a nswer with us. are you disappointed by the answer that stella creasy got to her question? not surprised. congratulations to stella on her bread and see, wish every piece of good luck with this pregnancy and thatis good luck with this pregnancy and that is wonderful news. not at all surprising knowing stella's campaigning, knowing she is taking on the authorities to make things better for people in the workplace
11:56 am
of parliament who become parents. it is important we do that, notjust because we should have a parliament that should be truly representative of the different types of lies of the people around the country that we are representing. when we know there is such a problem of pregnancy and maternity provision in the country, actually parliament should ta ke country, actually parliament should take a lead rather than lagging behind and by not providing any kind of maternity cover, it means parliament is behind what those workplaces do. what exactly the problems. list yourtop... workplaces do. what exactly the problems. list your top... we heard from stella creasy‘s immediate problems. where are the other areas where it is becoming difficult for women or indeed parents of either gender to be parents at the same time as being a good constituency mp. the first thing i would say it is difficult for any parent. parenting is just difficult, combining it with anyjob, painting
11:57 am
at home full—time, it is always challenging and there are different elements of thejuggling challenging and there are different elements of the juggling of that responsibility that will be different and difficult in different jobs. within parliament, we are often managing the fact that you are working into locations. i have my constituency which is 400 miles from london, so that travel and logistics as an additional element of confusion and things to sort out and of course the logistics of dealing with children often stacks up. and the key thing here is about cover. when you are on leave, if you are on maternity or paternity leave our shared parental leave, then no one is doing yourjob. we have dealt with live voting through proxy votes, that is an uniform we got in in february. that we had to fight tooth and nail for. in february. that we had to fight tooth and nailfor. in in february. that we had to fight tooth and nail for. in terms of being able to take your constituency surgeries, listening to local issues
11:58 am
and taking actions on those, you are creating more work for your constituency team, to deal with that. but there is no support to come with that. that feels like an unfairness and we should not be in a situation where constituencies feel like that if there member of parliament has a child, becomes a mum or dad, that they will get good service as a result and it should be something that parliamentary authorities are thinking about how to solve. it is important that this issueis to solve. it is important that this issue is pushed for change. is it the parliamentary authorities that can the parliamentary authorities that ca n process the parliamentary authorities that can process this one. we have this discrimination which does not let people be themselves at the workplace, culturally we expect people to be robots. jo swinson, i am sorry. i have been told i have to get to the weather. i am sorry i have cut you off. take care.
11:59 am
now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. i have some important news. we have some heavy and intense thunderstorms moving in through today. it could cause serious problems for tomorrow morning. heavy showers moving into southern areas at the moment. further north, drier and bright, sunny spells in southern and eastern areas of scotland and showers moving into the west of scotland. those heavy showers continuing across the south. warm and humid, maximum temperatures up to 21 degrees. through tonight there is a warning from the met office, more thunderstorms moving in, we could see 50 millimetres of rain in some spots. that has been falling in areas we have seen a lot of rainfall over the past few days. showers initially moving away north and east then heavy down pours. intense rain into the early hours of tomorrow
12:00 pm
morning with lightning. goodbye for now. you're watching bbc newsroom live — these are today's main stories. heathrow airport publishes detail of its controverisal plans for a third runway, which includes diverting rivers and re—routing the m25 — the proposals are now open for public consultation. borisjohnson gets the backing of former rival andrea leadsom ahead of a second round of voting in the conservative leadership race later this afternoon. i do believe he is an election winner. i think he's someone who can bring the country and the party back together and take us forward in a positive way. former uefa president michel platini is detained by french anti—corru ption police over the awarding of the 2022 world cup to qatar. two teenage neo—nazis who encouraged an attack
12:01 pm
on prince harry for marrying a woman of mixed race are jailed for encouraging terrorism. plans to clean up the environmental impact of fast fashion are rejected by the government. "we can't stop people from saying nasty things" — the boss of instagram says it cannot tackle cyberbullying alone. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. heathrow — one of the world's busiest airports — has revealed its expansion masterplan. the project to build a third runway is expected to cost £14 billion, but is facing fierce opposition from environmental campaigners. the public will have 12 weeks to comment on the plans. the new runway will be situated over a new section of the busy m25,
12:02 pm
to be completed by 2026. 761 homes will be moved, with their owners compensated. local roads will also be moved, and rivers. a new low emissions zone around heathrow could mean additional charges for many vehicles, and the airport hopes it will be linked up to great western and southern rail. what will be the impact of the new ru nway what will be the impact of the new runway on the environment? magill thought is the executive director for expansion at heathrow. 0ne one of the things we will produce is our preliminary environmental impact assessment which sets out the implications from an air quality, noise the macro noise and quality perspective. they are really important factors and we have worked ha rd to important factors and we have worked hard to make sure that we mitigate those, and clearly we won't be able to expand unless we deliver on those environmental limits. and we do that
12:03 pm
by investing in things like the heathrow ultra low emission zone to make sure that we nudge people who use their cars in the local area onto public transport. and this terminal we are standing in is entirely powered by renewable energy, both gas and electricity, so we are working really hard to make sure that we minimise the environmental impact of expansion on our local communities and nationally. the co—leader of the green party sian berryjoins me now from westmister. are you reassured by these promises about environmental responsibility? no. in terms of its effect on london, londoners and our environment here, it is complete green wash. having this ultra low emission zone, which will maybe reduce a bit of the extra traffic, but we will still see increases in pollution. we will be delaying our compliance with legal limits on their pollution and 300,000 londoners will be affected by
12:04 pm
concentrated flight pass over 700 new flights a day and noise. it has been shown to be terrible for people's mental health and general enjoyment of life in the city. these are enormous impact locally, but think about climate change, as well. the act that was drawn up that passed through parliament allowing this to go through, and shame on all the mps who voted for this when it came to parliament. that was based on the old climate targets of reducing our emissions by 80%. now that the prime minister has signed up that the prime minister has signed up to that the prime minister has signed uptoa that the prime minister has signed up to a new net zero target, now that parliament has voted for a climate emergency, these expansion plans, these extra flights, they are in no way compatible with that, either. it should never have got to this stage but at this stage we need eve ryo ne this stage but at this stage we need everyone in the country, every londoner to say no to these ideas stop it is a shame on mps but don't you mean shame on air passengers? because the demand is there. no, the demand for business travel isn't going up. what this is is a business. we have heathrow wanting
12:05 pm
to increase the number of flights it can offer people and wants to attract more people to fly when there are good alternatives. it wa nts there are good alternatives. it wants people to fly when there is no good reason to fly. if we are going to avert a climate emergency, if we are going to stop runaway climate change, we need to be substituting every single alternative we can for flying and trying our hardest not to flying and trying our hardest not to fly when we don't need to. heathrow‘s entire business model is based on encouraging people to fly more. it wants to expand in order to do that, in order to make my money. we are standing up against that and saying no, in the interests of planning for a country for the future, we need to invest in railways, we need to invest in ways to stay in the uk and have great holidays and all of those things they are trying to get us not to do. 0bviously they are trying to get us not to do. obviously it is a moving target. we have had from heathrow that their master plan is to reduce emissions both in the terminals and the vehicles bringing passengers to and from heathrow and in the flights. what would convince you, if you are
12:06 pm
not convinced by today's argument, what would convince you that they are going to be net zero? nothing will convince me that this massive expansion in flights, and we are talking about 60% more flights out of this airport, that that can be compatible with our climate goals and the needs of people in london to live in a livable local environment. they need to give up on the expansion plans, they need to be doing those measures on the flights they already have. they need to be reducing the impact of people driving to the airport now. if they we re driving to the airport now. if they were doing all of that is now in good faith and not asking for expansion, i think a lot better of them. at the moment it seems driven by greed and this one a business wanting to make more money whilst trashing west london and potentially the plans for the future. so there is arguments you made already. do you then support the proposals currently suspended by extinction rebellion, a climate crisis group, to disrupt the operation of heathrow? i have to say, the use of
12:07 pm
drones around airports is horribly dangerous and i am glad they discussed those plans and dropped them. i think the extinction rebellion campaign, the disruption that has taken place around london, the fact that children have been going on strike from school to draw attention to the urgency of the climate crisis is a really, really good thing because it is very urgent. we do need to be looking at every aspect of our lives. how much we encourage the aviation industry, but also how much we invest in the green new deal the country really needs and those campaigners out on the streets are pushing us in the right direction. thank you very much. former conservative leadership hopeful andrea leadsom has confirmed she's backing the frontrunner, boris johnson, for the leadership of the conservative party. mrs leadsom failed to make it through the first round of voting for the job. the second round will take place later today, with six candidates competing. whoever finishes last — or fails to secure at least 33 votes — will be eliminated.
12:08 pm
the successful contenders will go on to appear on a debate on bbc tv this evening. 0ur assistant political editor norman smithjoins us now from westminster. iam sure i am sure you have the right simile, metaphor, musical chairs and statues, hunger chemical games i suggested earlier, you didn't like that. we are getting to showtime, the sharp end of this parliamentary end of the contest because i think by close of play today we will begin to see who is going to emerge as the real challenger to borisjohnson. to see who is going to emerge as the real challenger to boris johnson. by close of play we may have a clearer understanding of what boris johnson's thinking is on terms of how he might get us out of the eu, whether he will stick to, on october 31, the deadline, and i expect we will learn whether rory stewart is a real contender or it's alljust a bit of media froth. emerging from cabinet this morning, though, he was sounding pretty upbeat, i thought. how are you feeling about tonight? we'll see.
12:09 pm
i'm feeling energised but it's all down to how the mp5 vote on the ballot. i've got to convince those last few mps to get a across the line and really my pitch would be, let's make it an open debate. let's get as many people through so we can have a chance to discuss the ideas and principles, the foundation on which our party will be built. now, mr stewart has obviously come from a long way back in this field, but interestingly some of his rivals are beginning to sound a little edgy about him. sajid javid this morning saying that the party really didn't need another contest which looked like some sort of oxford union debate and questioning mr stewart's background and what sort of message that would send out about the tory party. if we end up in a situation where the final two, three, four even are sort of people from similar backgrounds with... somebody that used to go to 0xbridge, all that. and... yeah. it'll look like a debate at the oxford union. ijust don't think that's healthy for the tory party,
12:10 pm
and what we need is notjust to look like we represent modern britain. i think when we get to that final two, whoever emerges — and some of my colleagues say, "listen, saj, it's going to be boris anyway," — they may well be right. and if it is boris, i'm happy to work with boris. i don't have a problem with that. it'll be fair and square. but even if it is boris, he needs to be properly tested. there cannot be a coronation. now, as we go into the ballot tonight, best placed at the moment tonight, best placed at the moment to be the man to challenge boris johnson isjeremy to be the man to challenge boris johnson is jeremy hunt, to be the man to challenge boris johnson isjeremy hunt, and one of his supporters is alistair burt. the difficulty with mr hunt's a campaign is it is losing momentum.” difficulty with mr hunt's a campaign is it is losing momentum. i don't think it is. i think it's a question of notjust think it is. i think it's a question of not just holding think it is. i think it's a question of notjust holding steady think it is. i think it's a question of not just holding steady in the position of being second, but growing that, which i think we will see this afternoon. i think it's notable that apart from penny and amberas notable that apart from penny and amber as cabinet colleagues, the colleague that are backing jeremy tend to be colleagues who are in
12:11 pm
government, who have experience of government, who have experience of government, and who know how important it is to have an experience and serious competition particularly at the moment at the helm of the party. we see this who heart around rory stewart. isn't one of the reasons we see it because the other rivals to him i frankly seen as just other rivals to him i frankly seen asjust a bit other rivals to him i frankly seen as just a bit dull? other rivals to him i frankly seen asjust a bit dull? i think rory's campaign has been great but part of the interest from you guys is, as you say, he is coming from a long way behind. he's had a very different sort of campaign. but because of the determination to try to provide interest in it, a serious campaign like jeremy's at may be more under your radar but it is certainly more alive amongst colleagues who are the electorate. i think what all the colleagues have demonstrated is it's not they individually who are the conservative party. it's all of us. where you went to school, what your background was, we've got them all in the leadership of the
12:12 pm
conservative party. what they have to be well aware of is we are projecting out to the public a sense of us asa projecting out to the public a sense of us as a team, so it contains all the spread of those candidates you see looking for the leadership. they are the conservative party. not one individual. boris johnson is clearly the favourite amongst mps. is he stoppable? i think it seems certainly likely he end up as one of the candidates from mps and after that, who knows? i think certainly he is because i think whenjeremy hunt emerges as the candidate to ta ke hunt emerges as the candidate to take him on in terms of the country, i think over take him on in terms of the country, ithink overa take him on in terms of the country, i think over a period of time, as our electorate look at the respective qualities and skills needed, jeremy has an extremely good chance of overhauling him. isn't the problem your party seems overwhelmingly eight brexit party he was a brexiteer but is now a remain and will never be trusted as much as borisjohnson. and will never be trusted as much as boris johnson. jeremy has made it clear he has accepted the mandate of
12:13 pm
the referendum. as someone who voted to stay in the eu, like me, he has recognised we too have to deliver on the referendum and i think that carries validity that all consider if voters, whether they voted to stay or not. the important thing is who is the best person to get it done quiz and if you approach a hard—line attitude, represented by boris and some of those who support him, will you be able to get the deal? for most conservative member is what they want to see is us delivering well for the united kingdom and i think they will see jeremy is the best place to do that. thank you for your time. today we have the ballot, tomorrow another ballot and on thursday we may have to balance. brace yourself. brace yourself, more like. thank you. we will keep you across all developments in the leadership race
12:14 pm
on the channel. the big debate coming up tonight. lots of politics coming up tonight. lots of politics coming up tonight. lots of politics coming up but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. the former head of european football — michel platini — has been arrested in paris as part of inquiries into the bidding process for the 2022 world cup — which was won by qatar. it's reported that french prosecutors are investigating allegations of corruption and bribery. mr platini led uefa until he was banned four years ago for separate ethics breaches. alex capstick explained why the award of the world cup to qatar was so controversial. i was in the room went sepp blatter, the former president of fifa, now banned from football, made the announcement that qatar would host the 2022 world cup. everybody was surprised, shocked.
12:15 pm
this country has no history of international football success. it's boiling hot there in the summer. it has been moved to the winter months because of the temperatures. it was a huge, huge surprise, and ever since then, the country's officials have denied all allegations of wrongdoing. there have been plenty of suggestions that that vote was rigged. michel platini at the time was part of the decision—making process. he was a senior member of fifa's executive committee, he was president of uefa, as well as being a former great footballer, one of france's greatest ever footballers. a big figure in football. he was, it was suggested, going to vote for the usa for 2022 and seemed to change his mind shortly before the vote took place and it went to qatar. there have been suggestions he was leaned on by the french president nicolas sarkozy. he has denied all of this, saying that football had to go
12:16 pm
to a new territory and it was right that qatar got it. they were french media reports that there was this critical lunch several days beforehand. yes, with nicolas sarkozy and a senior official from the qatar bid team. the suggestion was that there was a contract up for grabs, that nicolas sarkozy‘s son was involved in that company and the former french president said, look, we would like you to vote for qatar. all of that is being denied by michel platini, although he did not deny the fact that nicolas sarkozy was leaning towards qatar but he denied he was influenced by anything the french president said. lets catch up with all the sport. what is your obsession this morning? that's a bit personal. i will go for the cricket. england won the toss, batting first against afghanistan in the cricket world cup match at old trafford. james vince is the man to replace the injured jason roy. didn't hang around too long. he was the first wicket to fall, but he is
12:17 pm
the first wicket to fall, but he is the only wicket to fall so far. it's been a very productive morning. the captain eoin morgan passed a late fitness test so he will be batting at some point. joe root and jonny ba i rstow at some point. joe root and jonny bairstow are at the crease right now and going along very nicely indeed. england 155—1. you can follow it across the bbc. coverage has lots of video in play clips on the sport website. michel platini has been arrested. he is still serving a football ban after being found guilty of receiving at this royal payment from sepp blatter, the former disgraced president of fifa for about 1.5 million pounds.
12:18 pm
jane dougall is outside the government building where platini is being questioned. you thought you would be reporting on the women's world cup. it also involves the former president nicolas sarkozy. how embarrassing is this that all this has been dragged up this that all this has been dragged up in france forfever and this that all this has been dragged up in france for fever and for the french football authorities? of course, because it is a fifa organised event. we have already seen gianni infantino at some of the matches. and platini is something of a legend in france. he was former captain in his playing days and was instrumental in bringing the world cup in1998 to instrumental in bringing the world cup in 1998 to organising alley —— ring and woke cup to france and organising it. it was considered to bea organising it. it was considered to be a huge success and of course he was made head of uefa in 2007 but then we have already mentioned in 2015 he received a ban following
12:19 pm
charges of corruption along with the former fifa president sepp blatter. this morning it has been reported that michel platini has been brought to this building behind me. this is the anti—corru ption offices to this building behind me. this is the anti—corruption offices of the judicial police and they are based at the ministry of the interior and we understand that this is following the questioning over the awarding of the questioning over the awarding of the 2022 world cup to qatar. when that actually happened in december 2010 there was a lot of shock. you might remember. mostly because of huge temperatures that the players would have to be playing in. temperatures up to 50 degrees. but also because of issues around human rights. many about that. following investigations including by american officials, 16 of the 22 member is of the executive committee of fifa have either been struck off, suspended or remain under investigation. the story broke not that long ago and already a huge amount of french media here on the pavement opposite
12:20 pm
this building waiting for any emergence of michel platini. if and when that happens we will bring you it as soon as possible. many thanks. —— many thanks. newcastle boss rafael benitez has been offered twelve million pounds a year to take over as manager at chinese super league club dalian yifang. benitez is out of contract at the end ofjune and is yet to sign a new deal. the bbc understands it is becoming increasingly likely benitez will leave st james' park. that's all the sport for now. we will have more at around 1:30pm. but techno is british citizens abroad and eu nationals in the uk in the event of no deal. mr buckley says both sides should make sustained efforts to fully consider the proposals put forward two
12:21 pm
separate citizens' rights from the rest of the brexit deal. to conservative mp alberto costa, who has campaigned on this issue. can you explain for us why this issue is so important and urgently needs to be separated from the rest of no deal? never before in peacetime have the rights of millions of innocent people being put on the negotiating table. let me be clear. i've been championing this issue for three yea rs championing this issue for three years in the house of commons. there is unanimity across the floor of the house of commons that those innocent people, that is 1.3 million british citizens in the eu, and 3.6 million eu nationals here in the uk, their rights should never have been put on the negotiating table. the house of commons united in february around my amendment that said whatever the outcome of the brexit negotiations, we must carve out this citizens'
12:22 pm
rights element to the withdrawal agreement which was unanimously approved and ensured that the uk and eu agreed to honour that. sorry to interrupt, but you are talking about innocent people and being denied their rights, but what rights are you talking about? pensions? health care? welfare payments? in the event of no deal, let me be very clear. a british citizen working for example in berlin over night without an agreement in place will become an illegal alien in a legal speech. they will lose the right of residency, they will lose the right of pension access, they will lose the right of welfare access. this has never happened before and it is outrageous that we are in this position. i have been saying repeatedly, and the house of commons has also been arguing repeatedly, that the uk government and the eu must now once and for all take the issue of citizens' rights off the table because if we don't do that,
12:23 pm
we are going to have total legal chaos when it comes to citizens' rights on the 1st of november in the event of no deal. my message is simple. my messages both to the uk government and to michel barnier, who i know watching proceedings very closely. my message is this. enough is enough. get the issue of citizens' rights off the negotiating table. we have an agreement on that. it is part three of the withdrawal agreement. take it out of the withdrawal agreement and lets have that underpinned by international law so that 1.3 million british citizens... we have had the numbers, yeah. so you say that mps voted for it in february and obviously you have mentioned the 3.6 million european citizens who would benefit. he on earth could possibly disagree with you? sadly michel barnier has already said no in the space of the last hour. the reason i have raised
12:24 pm
this as a matter of urgency today in the house of commons, in less than half an hour i will raise this matter in the house of commons under what we call an urgent question. my message is this to michel barnier it. enough is enough. yeah, we have had that. next question. we are running out of time. the leadership candidates, are they all lined up behind you, will they push this? this is not about the leadership. this is not about the leadership. this is not about the leadership. this is about the rights of 5 million innocent people.” this is about the rights of 5 million innocent people. i realise that but to the extent they would be the next leader of the conservative party and the government, their view is surely important how much political capital they will put behind getting this done. indeed. on the 27th of february the house of commons unanimously... the 27th of february the house of commons unanimously. . ” the 27th of february the house of commons unanimously... i heard that. whoever becomes prime minister in the next few weeks has to follow the instruction of the house of commons and that is that the house of commons once the issue of citizens' rights off the negotiating table
12:25 pm
once and for all and that's what i'm championing today through my urgent question. mr custer, thank you. two extreme neo—nazi teenagers have been sent to prison after admitting encouraging terrorism on the internet. they had suggested on social media that prince harry should be shot and that white women who mixed with other races should be killed. they were members of an ultra—extreme revolutionary nazi group exposed by bbc news last december. daniel sanford reports now from the old bailey. some of the most violent nazi propaganda to emerge in britain will stop social media posts calling for women who mix with other races to be killed and four attacks on the police. there was even a post which we are not showing, suggesting prince harry should be shot as a race traitor. the group responsible
12:26 pm
was set up last year, but was exposed by bbc news in december. its mission statement encouraged followers to join a violent race war stop right will you rise up? it said, or will you sit back and do nothing, smashing away at keyboards in internet arguments? . they were encouraging others online to commit terrorist attacks and of course it only takes one individual to be encouraged or be inspired by that propaganda to take that further step. today a computer science student from leeds responsible for many of the posts was sentenced to four years three in prison. in a blog he encouraged followers to rape and slaughter women. but when we caught up with him, he seemed less keen to make the same comments on camera. why were you
12:27 pm
running an account saying women and babies should be raped? do you think prince harry should be killed? are you looking forward to going to jail? no comment. anything else? 0scar, seen here in the centre of a neo—nazi march, was jailed for 18 months. he had previously been a member of the banned group national action and did fight training with otherformer members. action and did fight training with other former members. 0n the social media account he wrote... 0scar, why did you think that prince harry was a race traitor? again he seemed less brave when the camera it was running. you are happy to post about nazis on the internets but not admitted on camera? the uk group was
12:28 pm
linked to this ultra—extreme nazi group from the united states, which encourages paramilitary style training and lone wolf attacks and has been linked to five murders in the us. their ideology is viewed as perhaps the most violent revolutionary version of right wing extremism. a man has pleaded guilty to throwing a milkshake over brexit party leader nigel farage last month. gerryjackson party leader nigel farage last month. gerry jackson from party leader nigel farage last month. gerryjackson from newcastle on tyne through the drink during a european election campaign when nigel farage was visiting the city. he also pleaded guilty to causing criminal damage to a microphone one bite nigel farage. billionaire inventor sirjames dyson has gifted almost £19 million to his former school which allowed him to continue his education after the death of his father.
12:29 pm
sirjames was a nine—year—old pupil at gresham's school in norfolk when his father alec dyson, a teacher at the school, died. the independent school supported him financially afterwards, giving him and his brother scholarships to stay on and board. the donation is to fund a new science and technology centre at the school. researchers have found that dogs have evolved muscles around their eyes, which allow them to make expressions that particularly appeal to humans. a small facial muscle allows dog eyes to mimic an "infant—like" expression which prompts a "nurturing response". the study says such "puppydog eyes" helped domesticated dogs to bond with humans. we can cross the newsroom and talk to nick miller. lets see our best puppy to nick miller. lets see our best punpy dog to nick miller. lets see our best puppy dog eyes. i'm looking right at you! a long way away but look at those eyes. all in the eyes. let's look what's going on at the moment. some of us have lovely sunshine across northern england in particular at the moment but there are showers in scotland, mainly
12:30 pm
towards the north—west. if you pushing through northern ireland today but already across parts of southern england you know you have rain. some has been thundery, pushing further northwards into parts of wales through this afternoon. the thundery bursts heading towards east anglia around 17 to 20 degrees. we expect some torrential thunderstorms, particularly across central and eastern england and through the night and into tomorrow morning with the risk of disruption. still some showers overnight in north—west scotland. quite a muggy night to the south—east so a risk of disruption in the morning. the large area of cloud and some outbreaks of rain across parts of england and wales. pushing is, telling thundery into the afternoon across parts of eastern england. showers in scotland and northern ireland, brightening in wales and west in england and temperature is no better than about 20 degrees. most of us falling short of that. they has showers in scotla nd of that. they has showers in scotland and northern ireland. quieter in england and wales and many places dry. dry, i said! friday and saturday.
12:31 pm
hello this is bbc newsroom live with carrie gracie. the headlines: heathrow airport publishes detail of its controverisal plans for a third runway, which includes diverting rivers and rerouting the m25. the proposals are now open for public consultation. ahead of the second round of voting in the conservative leadership race this afternoon, borisjohnson is backed by formal rival andrew leadsom. i do believe he is an election winner, i think he is someone who can bring the country and the party back together and take us forward in a positive way. two extreme neo—nazi teenagers have been jailed after admitting encouraging terrorism on the internet. they suggested that prince harry should be shot, and that white women who mix with other races should be killed. former uefa president michel platini is detained by french anti—corru ption police over the awarding of the 2022
12:32 pm
world cup to qatar. and plans to clean up the environmental impact of fast fashion are rejected by the government. the united states is to send 1,000 extra troops to the middle east, amid rising tensions with iran. the white house said it was in response to what it described as "hostile behaviour " by iranian forces. yesterday iran revealed it was close to breaching a key part of the international agreement to restrict its nuclear acitivities. 0ur north america correspondent, peter bowes, has this report. more evidence that iran is to blame. these are the photographs the pentagon says offer further proof that the attacks on two tankers in the gulf of oman were carried out by iranian forces.
12:33 pm
this image shows what the us military describes as the remnants of the magnetic attachment device of an unexploded limpet mine placed on one of the tankers. the pentagon says it proves that iran has the resources and proficiency needed to quickly remove the unexploded mine. iran continues to deny any involvement in the attacks. announcing a further 1,000 troops to be sent to the middle east, the acting us secretary of defense, patrick shanahan, said the recent iranian attacks validated credible intelligence on hostile behaviour by iranian forces, threatening united states personnel and interests across the region. you have to get to the bottom line of what the us is trying to accomplish. the whole thing about maximum pressure and bringing pressure to bear on the regime and pointing all these fingers when things happen. the fact is, whether iran did this or not, because it is conflicting information, it could have gone either way. but what is clear is that when you put too much pressure on, you can actually cause the very things you are trying to prevent. and the objective should be
12:34 pm
stability in the middle east, not pushing closer towards a war and i think that is what we are getting close towards. the extra troops come on top of 1,500 announced last month. the us military says their role will be defensive, addressing air, naval, and ground—based threats. the us is insisting it does not seek conflict with iran, but with tensions rising, the region is looking increasingly unstable. peter bowes, bbc news. we have to look at this in context. it has an escalation that has been going on and one that has been caused at the very start by the united states violation of the joint comprehensive plan of action with iran. this has led to mounting
12:35 pm
tensions in the gulf. we obviously do not know yet, we do not have definitive proof as to who has committed this. it is reasonable to expect that iran has been involved in the attack on the two oil tankers, but we do not have definitive proof on this. can i check a couple of things, on their nuclear deal, that was violated by the us. meanwhile the iran is about to breach its uranium enrichment limit. is that iran breaking the deal or do you regard the deal as having already been broken?“ deal or do you regard the deal as having already been broken? if you are an international agreement and that agreement has a certain bargain at the heart of it, if there is one side that violates it and as we know the united states has been the party
12:36 pm
violating it, then it is in a sense only reasonable to expect that it gets to a point that the other side sta rts gets to a point that the other side starts in, hang on a second, there is something not quite right here. in my view, obviously and this is what we have been saying to the iranians up until now, not only that we expect them to continue living up to their site of the agreement but that we recognise that they need to have something in return for this. the europeans are trying to make an effort and work on trying to sack then the effect... on the iranians say you are not making enough of an effort. there has been pressure and demanded that other signatories to the deal should step up and help them get around us economic sanctions. but they feel their economy is crippled and europeans are not doing enough on their part. i think it is fair to say, looking
12:37 pm
at it from an era tan —— like uranian vantage point, not enough has been done. looking at it from the european angle —— iranians vantage point. this puts us at loggerheads with our closest partner and ally, the united states. it is complicated technically to do. what we are trying to put in place, there isa we are trying to put in place, there is a very complicated to attack barter system. —— to track. the former egyptian president mohamed morsi has been buried in cairo — hours after he died suddenly following his collapse in court. amnesty international has called on egypt to order an impartial investigation into his death and raised serious questions about his treatment in custody. egyptian state television said he suffered a heart attack. hong kong's leader carrie lam has apologised for an extradition
12:38 pm
bill that sparked mass protests, acknowledging it is now "unlikely" it will pass. millions have taken to the streets against the proposals, which would allow extradition to mainland china. lam offered an apology at a news conference earlier today. i have heard you loud and clear and have reflected deeply on all that has transpired. the concerns over the past few months have been caused by deficiencies in the work of the government over the amendment exercise. i personally have to show them —— right shoulder much of the responsibility. this has led to controversies, this builds anxieties and society. for this, controversies, this builds anxieties and society. forthis, i controversies, this builds anxieties and society. for this, i offer my most sincere apology. so all people of hong kong. the justice secretary, david gauke, says that he wants
12:39 pm
to reduce the number of women who are given short prison sentences for non—violent offences. he was responding to a call by the chair of the house of commons committee on human rights — for a change in the law so that children's welfare is paramount when their mothers are sentenced. 0ur education and family correspondent frankie mccamley has this report. when my mum was punished, ifelt i was punished to because i did not see herfor a long amount of time. katie's mother was sent to prison when she was 11. we are protecting both of their identities.” when she was 11. we are protecting both of their identities. i used to shout at everyone, like just punch everything and hit everything all the time. it is thought around 17,000 children every year in england and wales have their mother go to prison. in the family court system, the child is in the centre of proceedings, that is not the case
12:40 pm
in criminal courts which is the focus of an enquiry on a joint enquiry on human rights. the state is supposed to protect people's human rights but when the state sends a mother to prison then they are actually violating the human rights of their children, their rights of their children, their right to our family life. in a court room that looks like this, the judge could consider a presentence report that can include mitigating factor is like weather the defendant has children. but these reports are not a lwa ys children. but these reports are not always taken into account. it varies from one court room to another. which is what grows, not her real name, experienced in her initial trial thejudge gave her a name, experienced in her initial trial the judge gave her a suspended sentence as a sole care of two children but in the court of appeal thejudge had a very children but in the court of appeal the judge had a very different message. he said although parenthood is important, children cannot be given —— like used as a trump card
12:41 pm
with getting out ofjail. given —— like used as a trump card with getting out of jail. what did you think when he said that? horrible. like many others, rose's pa rents horrible. like many others, rose's parents looked after her children.” think at the moment there are women and mothers who go to prison where if we could have good robust community sentences that would be a better outcome, not just for the woman and not just for the child, but also for society. but with one of the highest rates of female imprisonment in western europe, this systemic shift towards rehabilitation rather than incarceration feels for many a long way off. people in wainfleet in lincolnshire are preparing themselves for more bad weather tonight, after a week of heavy rain left many homes flooded. hundreds have had to find emergency accommodation, after two months of rain fell in just two days. john maguire has been talking to people in wainfleet.
12:42 pm
water is saturating here. it was the river that burst its banks and we saw that breach being built 100 tonnes of ballast was dropped in by the raf to breach that gap. around 35 houses we reckon were flooded over the past couple of days. when you have got that two months of rain falling injust you have got that two months of rain falling in just two days, quite extraordinary. joined this morning byjean and kevin hart and extraordinary. joined this morning byjean and kevin hartand by councillors from lincolnshire county council. you are out of your house, you might not get in for a year, what it is like in your place? horrendous. there is water up to her chest when we last went in. lost everything in the house but i've been able to save my cat, my daughter and my husband. you are affected by that breach of the water. how quickly did the water
12:43 pm
come in? within the hour it literally went from ankle depth to need depth. and the next day it was up need depth. and the next day it was up to need depth. and the next day it was my need depth. and the next day it was up to my waist. and then when we got back again, it was up to the chest. it sounds frightening with the water comes in that quickly. at first you thought you could get away with it. you said you were putting things up on breeze blocks but then it became apparent it would not be enough. five guys came in and they were lifting my furniture up. within an hour it was floating. we had to give up. their pumps could not cope either with the amount of water that was coming in quickly. it was... to cut out at midnight. you are in remarkably good spirits. you are in a caravan in skegness. it'sjust the cat in the cattery. it will take you awhile to get in. into our house?
12:44 pm
probably about a year they think. so we are going to try and buy a ca rava n we are going to try and buy a caravan to go on the property, to stay near it. and you have onlyjust finished renovating? onlyjust finished renovating? onlyjust finished renovating, yes. two extensions that was it. we were just going to sit and relax and potter. and enjoy. famous last words. the community response has been fantastic. everybody is coming together and offering help. we have the team in there, anybody that wants anything as they are for them. and the 24—hour centre is still open as well, for a chat, tea and coffee and services are there. anyone who is struggling around wainfleet, come in and they will help. thank you all very much. between five and 600
12:45 pm
houses were evacuated when the weather got bad last week. fingers crossed in this part of lincolnshire that they might not get the worst of those thunderstorms. you wonder how much more they can take if you look at the scene here. and as i say, this is the best it has looked for the past few days. fingers crossed not the same scenes as last week. the headlines on bbc news... heathrow airport reveals its ‘masterplan' for a third runway, which includes diverting rivers and rerouting the m25 — the proposals are now open for public consultation. borisjohnson is backed by former rival andrea leadsom before tory mps vote again in the conservative leadership contest. former uefa president michel platini is detained by french police over the awarding of the 2022 world cup to qatar.
12:46 pm
a lack of training for doctors on how to treat eating disorders is contributing to avoidable deaths, according to a committee of mps. their report says that medical students may getjust a few hours of training on issues such as bulimia or anorexia, and that the nhs has failed to act on recommendations to improve services. 0ur health correspondent, dominic hughes, reports. for the past decade, hannah has lived with an eating disorder. it's a potentially very serious condition, and yet she struggled to get the help she needed. there was a long wait, actually, when i was 19, to get help. so the wait was about six months for some cbt group therapy, and by that point, that wasn't really sufficient. and also, within six months i was extremely unwell, and by that point i was having, you know, suicide attempts. for those suffering with an eating disorder, getting treatment quickly is vital. but the eating disorder charity beat says, last year, one in five adults in england had to wait longer than 18 weeks, while one in ten had to wait
12:47 pm
longer than 24 weeks. the average waiting time in england was nine weeks, but the charity says patients face a postcode lottery for treatment. what we found was that, for some areas, people are being seen within two weeks. for others, they're waiting almost six months. it's a real variety across the country, and that's having detrimental impacts upon people's health. for those like hannah, who are living with an eating disorder, a clear understanding of their illness is key. but a report from a committee of mps says the training medical students receive can amount to just a few hours. they warn that, without better training and more joined—up services to help people like hannah, the nhs is risking avoidable deaths. dominic hughes, bbc news. the royal college of gps says training in mental health, including eating disorders, makes up a key part of the gp curriculum — but that more resources and funding are needed to deliver the best possible care.
12:48 pm
instagram "can't solve bullying on its own" — that's according to the social media company's boss, adam mosseri. in an inteview with bbc radio 1's newsbeat, mosseri, the head of instagram, says that online bullying needs to be tackled as part of a wider plan, and he welcomed regulation in some areas. bullying has existed for a long time, it has changed and evolved with the internet, some of that manifests on instagram and on other platforms as well. to address that issue, i think there are a lot of interesting things that we could do with instagram and we are really excited to innovate in that space and you will see more coming from as later this year. but instagram alone can't solve the issue of bullying, it has to be a combination of support for children, parents, schools. and bullying, like many other issues, it is broader thanjust instagram and i think that sometimes gets missed.
12:49 pm
the view from the boss of instagram. proposals designed to tackle the environmental impact of the fashion industry, have been rejected by the government. the recommendations put forward by mps on the environmental audit committee, hoped to end the culture of throwaway clothes and poor working conditions. but the government says many of the proposals are already covered by government policy. earlier i wasjoined by earlier i was joined by lynnjames and mp mary kray who chairs the environmental audit committee. mary started by explaining the skill of the problem. the industry's voluntary initiatives have failed. they've got voluntary initiative to tackle carbon, water and waste. and even if they meet those standards, which they haven't, that is far surpassed by the volume of clothing doubling in the last 15 years. so we've got an ever increasing
12:50 pm
mountain of clothes and no action to tackle it. and so really what we're saying is, you know, if you are going to report on your carbon emissions and we get to net zero, you have to report on your water and your way emissions as well. loads of them don't. so is this just a question of the government notjoining up the dots and kind of thinking it all through and getting up to speed? i mean they say they are dealing with this agenda. they have got a waste consultation which has just closed. in that waste consultation they have said that they will consider an extended producer responsibility and they've given a menu of five different things. so textiles are in there, vying for attention with tyres, with furniture, with mattresses and carpets. what we are saying is it is not a choice of one of the other, it is all of them. they are also saying that they will do a couple of them by 2025. we have got scientists saying we've got 11 years to tackle devastating climate change. we need to get on with this. so, lynn, in yourview, what is the thing that shoppers should be doing? we know that a lot of people watching this programme this morning are the people, you know, in the frame, in terms of throwing away clothes. we all occasionally to that. what should we be
12:51 pm
doing that instead? and i'm guilty of having far too many clothes at home. so, firstly, it'sjust don't throw them away. like, recycle them, give them to the local charity shop in your village. we've got a small charity shop where i live and the clothes go there, or to my local school or to people that are... not necessarily the bags that come through your letterbox, because i never trust them. 0r give it to somebody you know. i buy stuff from h&m and i know h&m are working hard to become more environmental. i know they are not perfect yet but they have taken steps. you can take a bag of clothes to h&m and they will give you some money off your shop. so it is a small step but it's on the right direction. so it is looking, mary, do you agree, it is looking like best practice among the fashion retailers? we had a list of leaders and laggards which is on the environmental audit committee's website and you can go
12:52 pm
so is primark actually. so it is asos. and some of those companies have been caught up in big scandals like the rana plaza scandal, so they have had to make those changes. the bangladesh factory. the big factory collapse where 1100 workers were killed making clothes to our high street. so that is the real cost there. but the laggards really are the online brands, the boohoos, tk maxx and amazon. not only does amazon not pay its taxes, the obviously don't have any sort of sustainably
12:53 pm
policies at al. and that is really difficult and damaging for the environment. so go a and demand more from your clothing retailers. what we really feel though is that without the government regulating and saying you have, if you want to pair have permission to operate in this country, got to be tackling these big issues. and if you're not, you cannot really do business in this country. and modern slavery, there are all meant to have a statement on their website saying what they have done to tackle slavery and in the supply chain. we have found big bands like foot locker, geox, valentino luxury brands simply not doing anything about it. it's one of motorsport‘s most prestigious events. winning the le mans 24—hour driving marathon is the ultimate goal for any serious endurace racer. now a team from britain is hoping to become the first ever all—disabled team to compete in the race. tim muffett has been to meet them. team brit is known as the most inspirational team in motorsport. where the only race in the world where a disabled person can come along, get an introduction to motorsport. bedford autodrome. and dan smith is preparing to take to the track. i was involved in a road traffic accident in december 2002. it left me paralysed from the upper chest downwards. team brit was formed in 2015. it now has five specially adapted cars and this specially adapted simulator. we adapted one of our steering
12:54 pm
wheels to fit onto the simulator so whereas before we would have had to have put a driver into a race car, showed them the hand controls and see how they get on. now we can get them on the simulator, teach them to do circuits. it started off as a project to get injured troops into motorsport and we always wanted to inspire other people with disabilities and mental health issues. bobby has autism. he is one of the team's top drivers. autism doesn't affect my driving, in fact in a way it probably helps me because i'm able to focus on more things as the autistic rain on more things as the autistic brain analyses more data are probably better than other people. the team helped billy monger get into racing when he lost his legs in an accident in 2017. track days like this are a chance to start spot new talent like tracy who had her leg amputated in 2010. cancer. yeah. three times. lost my leg. i haven't looked back. it has made me take life one day at a time and enjoy every single day.
12:55 pm
i never thought i would be able to do it. i am i never thought i would be able to do it. iam in my i never thought i would be able to do it. i am in my 50s and this is my third time with them. if they had not have opened up i would not be able to do it. time for dan to take to the circuit. no break and then run the white line. going down the straight and then breaking, and going into a corner. faster than you would ever think you would take the corner and the car sticks to the road and bam you are off again. corner and the car sticks to the road and bam you are off againfl has already achieved its main aim of opening up the sport of motorsport to disabled drivers. the pinnacle of it is the 24—hour lemon. especially asa it is the 24—hour lemon. especially as a british team, we are setting the standard for the rest of the world to follow. -- seb blatter. it
12:56 pm
is not a charity and taking to the track is not a charity. —— le mans. in a moment it's time for the one o'clock news with reeta chakrabarti but first it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. we have already had thundery rain in southern england this morning. as we go into tonight, this weather system pushes into the south and east. another one running through scotland and northern ireland, delivering showers and sunshine here and there. in scotland most of the showers in the north and west. across southern england, parts of south wales, thick cloud and outbreaks of rain, thundery bursts across east anglia. most of north england having a fine afternoon.
12:57 pm
high pollen levels and temperatures around 17, it may be 21 celsius. the area of concern tonight into tomorrow, shaded yellow with the met 0ffice yellow warning for thunderstorm. maybe up to 50 millimetres in the wet spots, these areas have had some flooding and disruption because of recent weather and there is more rain to come. there are a broad area of cloud and areas of rain. torrential thunderstorms will head away from across the continent and these could deliver a lot of rain in a short space of time in parts of east anglia and into eastern england as we go through the night. we could see some disruption from flooding but also hail stones, lightning and gusty winds. as ever some places may not see a huge amount of rain whereas others get an absolute soaking. a broad area of cloud and rain elsewhere across england and wales, showers in scotland. some showers to come across northern
12:58 pm
england and scotland. rain clearing eastwards and as it does so into the afternoon, still the potential for some heavy thundery downpours whereas much of wales and eastern england will brighten up. 20 celsius is about the maximum of it for the next few days. a quieter looking picture for thursday, showers in the north and west of scotland. not too many for england and wales, a westerly breeze feeling fresher and humid into the south east at the moment, high teens to around 20. friday and saturday looking mainly dry as another area of high pressure brings rain as we head through sunday.
12:59 pm
1:00 pm
the next stage in the contest for the tory leadership and downing street — a second secret ballot takes place this afternoon. tory mps choose between six candidates, who have to secure enough supporters and avoid coming last, to get through. those remaining in the race will take part in a live tv debate here on the bbc this evening. also this lunchtime: the teenage neo—nazis, who encouraged an attack on prince harry for marrying a mixed—race woman, jailed for terrorism offences. how a police report identified london bridge as a viable target just weeks before the attack. the former head of uefa, michel platini, is questioned by french police over the awarding of the 2022 world cup to qatar. and the cricket world cup sees england take on afghanistan

37 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on