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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  June 21, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me annita mcveigh. the headlines. foreign office minister mark field faces calls to resign after his treatment of a woman who disrupted a dinner in london. the conservative leadership race enters its final stage, with borisjohnson and jeremy hunt competing to be our next prime minister. us media reports that president trump approved retaliatory military strikes against iran yesterday before changing his mind. the first patients benefit from a pioneering new treatment for blood cancer now available on the nhs. it's a very exciting new development and it gives new hope to a lot of oui’ and it gives new hope to a lot of
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our patients. commemorations at scapa flow in orkney to mark 100 years since germany sank its own first world war fleet. and in sport. it's like he's never been away. andy murray is impressive, on his return to the court, five months after surgery. good morning. greenpeace has accused the conservative minister mark field of assault after he pushed a female activist out of a black—tie city event. dozens of climate activists interrupted a speech by the chancellor philip hammond last night and you can see mark field forcibly
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removing one of the protest is. greenpeace said it was shocked by mr field's actions and he has apologised. in a statement given to itv news, mr field said, in the confusion many guests understandably felt threatened and when one protester rushed past me towards the top table i instinctively reacted... he went on to say he deeply regretted the episode. ben wright is at westminster this morning. good morning to you. there is clearly a discussion to be had about how protesters were able to get access to senior politicians, but for now the discussion this morning seems to be focused on mark field and his reactions. it is, and you are right, this is an annual event that the chancellor talks at, setting out his views on the economy and the
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security is heavy and yet it fell to bits in this instance and this protest occurred and there are questions there, but i think it is mark field clearly under uncomfortable scrutiny this morning andi uncomfortable scrutiny this morning and i think it was the force with which he pushed the woman against a pillar and then escorted her out that shocked a number of mps yesterday evening and i thought it was horrific and uncomfortable and brandon lewis the tory party chairman added his voice to the criticism saying that this was something the tory party would investigate. greenpeace have said that this is an assault and should be investigated and this is what hannah martin from greenpeace said. what was clear is that she had leaflets in her hand and was aiming to hand out copies of the speech and peacefully make our presence felt. there were 350 other guests at the
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dinnerand none of there were 350 other guests at the dinner and none of them felt the need to assault any of the other protesters in the way mark field did and what he did, as anybody can see from the video was completely disproportionate and unacceptable, particular for a sitting member of parliament. is anyone defending mark field? yes, tory mp peter bottomley, for instance said this morning that people should wait to really understand the circumstances that mr field was acting under. in his statement read out earlier, mr field said that he was concerned that the woman in question might have been armed and could have posed a threat and he acted instinctively a mr bottomley said that people should just wait before rushing to judgment. if each of us can take other peoples microphones, we end up with anarchy and lastly, she makes a point about the woman being a woman andl point about the woman being a woman and i don't normally talk about this, but the person who violently
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assaulted my wife was a woman when she was secretary of state and i think the time to intervene is in advance. most common sense people will think that is the right thing to do. and i guess this is overshadowing the first day of this final phase of the conservative leadership campaign which you might have not expected otherwise. yes, and a tricky position forjeremy hunt because he is the foreign secretary and mark field is a foreign office minister so as soon we hear from foreign office minister so as soon we hearfrom jeremy foreign office minister so as soon we hear from jeremy hunt on day one iam sure we hear from jeremy hunt on day one i am sure he will be asked about this and will be invited to condemn the actions taken by mark field, but it is overshadowing what will now be a four—week process as the two final candidates, boris johnson and jeremy hunt take their pitch to the party membership, i'll hundred and 60,000 tory party members who will determine who the next prime minister will be. there will be 16 hustings around the country and
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postal ballots go out at the beginning of next month and then we get a new prime minister in place and the week ofjuly the 22nd is when that will happen. forest johnson goes in as the clear front runner and he seems to be romping ahead, so jeremy hunt runner and he seems to be romping ahead, sojeremy hunt is the self—declared underdog ahead, sojeremy hunt is the self—decla red underdog here ahead, sojeremy hunt is the self—declared underdog here and has a lot of work to do, but boris johnson, people say he is his own worst enemy and he could trip up and derail his own campaign and there are huge questions to ask, particularly about how both candidates will approach brexit over the next few months were one of them to win because the uk is set to leave on october the 31st and there are massive questions about how they intend to do that. we can discuss some of the questions with the political editor at the spectator and the brexit commissioning editor at the telegraph, a warm welcome to both of you. before we get to the
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leadership contest, let's have a word from both of you on mark field. do you think this is a resignation issue? what do you think about what he said in response, katie? we know there will be an investigation on mark field has put himself forward and certainly from the video it looks very heavy—handed and i think there are lots of questions but as touched on just then, there are lots of questions but as touched onjust then, how there are lots of questions but as touched on just then, how the leadership candidates will respond to this? mark veal said he doesn't know if the person was armed and he made a split—second decision and it sounds like he regrets making the decision but he has worked for jeremy hunt in the foreign office so there is a sense of which side do mps fall on because i've seen a few conservative mps come out in his defence this morning and say that this action could have been the right one had the person been armed, and how would you know? it would be interesting. in another set of circumstances he would be hailed a
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hero if someone entered the room with some sort of criminal intent. indeed and it's not the first time a politician in the heat of the moment has made a decision that didn't quite come off in that way because in this climate, and let's step back, politicians operate in a climate where they are subject to umpteen threats and security problems and what is meant to be a secure problems and what is meant to be a secure dinner, where there is a top table with the governor of the bank of england, the chancellor of the exchequer, the great and good of the city and when you have a protest or breaking in and disrupting, mark field may have thought at the time that this person had a bag, where they carrying a knife, a milkshake, battery acid, who knows? wasn't taking chances and i understand his intend for the way he went about it the security element, i think it was too heavy— handed. the security element, i think it was too heavy-handed. let's move on to the leadership campaign entering its final phase when members decide who
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will become the next leader and prime minister. not the most edifying start with all of these accusations of threats to vote one way or another and people supporting rory stewart originally and talking about the unpleasant messages she received from a fellow mp, so does this set the tone for how it will be over the next few weeks? we hope it will improve but it is the case that going into the grassroots stage the membership from the parliamentary stage is that there are accusations of dirty tricks and there is a sense that with particular conservative mps, boris johnson's team that with particular conservative mps, borisjohnson‘s team described it as playing a blinder and i don't think everyone agrees and it depends which side you are on but if you look at the final two, boris johnson is against the candidate that his campaign most want him to be against, jeremy hunt. they think he is not really a threat to him and if you look at the numbers it doesn't quite add up. in terms of yesterday,
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sajid javid was knocked out in the morning round and ahead of the second round we had at least four sajid javid supporters say they would move to borisjohnson yet he only went up by three votes but there is a strong sense there is tactical voting that the question is was it sanctioned by the boris johnson campaign or was it boris johnson campaign or was it boris johnson supporters freelancing and being clever. they are trying to point to the latter. given that these are secret ballots, will we find out any more about the aspect of the voting so far. we will never find out that we can speculate endlessly. take for example the two spoiled ballots that meant michael gove briefly was ahead ofjeremy hunt. we will never know who they were. it might have been theresa may protesting the whole thing. rory stewart denies it and we could go on and on, but this is thejoy stewart denies it and we could go on and on, but this is the joy of these things. let's get beyond the speculation into substance and policy. how do you think the remaining weeks of the campaign will
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unfold? remaining weeks of the campaign will unfold ? i remaining weeks of the campaign will unfold? i suspect remaining weeks of the campaign will unfold ? i suspect jeremy remaining weeks of the campaign will unfold? i suspectjeremy hunt's team will say he is going to be more detailed than boris johnson will say he is going to be more detailed than borisjohnson has been so detailed than borisjohnson has been so far in talking about everything from how he will handle brexit to taxation, etc. i think from how he will handle brexit to taxation, etc. ithinkjeremy hunt will be keen to move the conversation away from brexit. because otherwise he willjust lose. an out and out fight, we must rememberthe an out and out fight, we must remember the polls show that boris johnson would win by 77% of the vote, an almost embarrassingly big majority so that is why he will want to emphasises other policies like the corporation tax and it's the lowest rate in the world. some very competitive things like that. they will try and challenge boris on other things, so it's notjust a no—deal brexit auction off who can sound toughest. do you thinkjeremy hunt can make those inroads with the electorate. we know what the polls have suggested but i was chatting to conservative members in sale and we
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watched the bbc debate and although there were certainly boro supporters in the room, many of them at the end of the debate said they were most impressed byjeremy hunt. of the debate said they were most impressed by jeremy hunt.“ of the debate said they were most impressed by jeremy hunt. if you speak to boris johnson impressed by jeremy hunt. if you speak to borisjohnson allies they say that they don't think this is a done deal. it is very hard to see howjeremy hunt would overtake him amongst the grassroots. the best way forjeremy hunt to get a lead over borisjohnson would be forjeremy hunt not to do anything specific but for borisjohnson to suffer a catastrophe. we've had so many things in the past that have been weaponised against him but he has got through it pretty unscathed and i'm not sure exactly what it could be but i think boris's worst enemies boris, so will that derail the campaign. thank you both very much. the white house has declined to
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comment on us media reports that president trump approved air strikes against iran yesterday but later decided not to launch them. the new york times quoted unnamed sources as saying that radar and miss all systems were amongst possible targets. a senior democrat warned mr trump against bumbling into war after iran shot down a us surveillance drone. speaking yesterday, president trump said iran had made a big mistake. this drone was his international waters and we haveit was his international waters and we have it documented, documented scientifically, notjust words and they made a very bad mistake. i have a feeling that it was a mistake made by somebody that shouldn't have been doing what they did. i think they made a mistake and i'm notjust talking about the country making a mistake, i think somebody under the command of the country made a big mistake. joining me from new york is cbs news correspondent mark lieberman. hello to you. how close, according to the reports and what you have been able to garner from
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looking at the information out there, how close did we come to see aus there, how close did we come to see a us strike on iranian targets. very close. cbs news confirmed that the action was and a change of heart because the operation and the order came down after preparations for the attack were under way. the big question is why the president decided to reverse the decision. what reaction has there been in the us to this? give us the spectrum of reaction to it. there has been mixed reaction. a lot of democrat saying that this is not the way to go and they are concerned about the continuing escalation, a couple of them, chuck schumer, saying it is bumbling its way into orbit on the other side, on the side, lindsay
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graham indicated that he felt that the uk -- graham indicated that he felt that the uk —— the graham indicated that he felt that the uk -- the usa graham indicated that he felt that the uk —— the usa might need to remind that it is willing to use military action if needed. mark, in new york, from cbs news, thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news: foreign office minister mark field faces calls to resign for his treatment of an activist who disrupted a dinner in the city of london. the conservative leadership race london. the conservative leadership ra ce e nte rs london. the conservative leadership race enters its final stage with borisjohnson race enters its final stage with boris johnson and jeremy hunt competing to be our next try minister. as you've just been hearing, us media reports that president trump approved retaliatory military strikes against iran yesterday before changing his mind. here are your sport headline so far. andy murray made a winning return to the tennis court five months after having a career saving hip operation. he and feliciano lopez are through to the quarterfinals of the doubles at queens. england have discovered are who they will play in
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the last 16 of the women's world cup. it's cameroon after they scored a brilliant winner to beat new zealand. and england are in good spirits going into their latest match on the cricket world cup. they should —— play sri lanka at headingley and victory would almost certainly put them through to the semifinals. and i will have more on those stories at about 940. thank you, mike. see you soon. the battle to bag some of the top eu jobs is continuing as european leaders gatherfor continuing as european leaders gather for a second day. continuing as european leaders gatherfor a second day. all of continuing as european leaders gather for a second day. all of the leading jobs are changing hands this year following european wide elections. but tense differences are said to have emerged over who should get them. the talks wrapped up in the early hours of the morning without agreement. let's talk to adam fleming who is in brussels. it almost feels like shades of brexit with apparently no one able to come to a decision or consensus.
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yes, unlike brexit there were waves of optimism and pessimism and a late night that ended in a slightly inconclusive way and everyone will have to come back and have another go because there's going to be another extraordinary european council, as they call it in the jargon and it will be a dinner on the evening of the 30th ofjune well oi’ the evening of the 30th ofjune well or of the leaders will have to come back and thrash out the top jobs again sojust a back and thrash out the top jobs again so just a reminder that there will be a new president of the european commission and president of the european central bank, president of the european parliament, although to that is exclusively elected by meps and there will be a new high representative which is the foreign policy chief and they are trying to balance out a load of factors and criteria. geographical, north, south, east and west, big member states and small member states, men and women, the centre—right, the ce ntre—left, and women, the centre—right, the centre—left, the liberals and the greens and also keeping the european parliament happy because they want to have a say that even the european parliament is divided on how to handle this so it is a game of 17 dimensional chess with a load of
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politics wrapped around it and lots of names coming and going, favourites rising and falling and people being ruled in and out simultaneously and it's incredibly confusing but it is quite fun to watch. i know you love all of that. will it have to be another summit? we were discussing yesterday that although we out —— billed it as theresa may's la summit, another one might be squeezed in before she steps down as prime minister. there will definitely be another one, the 30th ofjune, will definitely be another one, the 30th of june, sunday, will definitely be another one, the 30th ofjune, sunday, lots of the leaders will have flown back after attending the g20. another meeting where you have to play the game of i7 dimensional chess. the reason we pick the 30th ofjune is because we wa nt to pick the 30th ofjune is because we want to make progress before the new european parliament convenes on the 2nd ofjuly. one reason they want to
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get some progress in before then is they want to steal a march on the european parliament and they don't wa nt european parliament and they don't want the parliament seizing the initiative from then. it's a bit of a power play and one of the first thing the parliament will do on the 2nd ofjuly is elect a new president and that might seem sensible, getting one of the jobs out of the way but that if you allocate one of thejobs it way but that if you allocate one of the jobs it leaves you less room for manoeuvre and one less job to give to somebody when playing the chess game and in terms of theresa may, she isn't here for the last day of the summit visits for countries that use the euro zone and one to have a discussion about the future of the eurozone, so it is the 27 but theresa may had a one—on—one meeting with angela merkel and she popped into the office known as the uk permanent representation to the eu, which is the british diplomats who represent the uk position in brussels and then the 27 leaders are talking about the future of the
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eurozone and will have a five minute discussion about brexit at the very end at lunchtime and we think it will be a generic statement from donald tusk and jean—claude juncker about preparing for an od or brexit, sticking to the eu red lines and the fa ct sticking to the eu red lines and the fact that withdrawal agreement cannot be reopened but we will also see a nod to the hand of friendship being extended to the new british prime minister. i suspect the eu will want to avoid getting involved in the tory leadership race. that is not really their style but one of the things they will be looking for is, do any of the leaders intervene in that quite short discussion and what do the interventions actually mean and reveal about how they think things are heading. adam, thank you very much. a chess game indeed. a pioneering new treatment for blood cancer has been made available on the nhs for the first time. car t therapy works by genetically modifying a patient‘s white blood cells so that their immune system can fight the cancer. doctors at king's college hospital in london say it does not work
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for everyone, but can cure some terminally ill patients. here's our health and science correspondent james gallagher. mike simpson from durham developed a type of blood cancer called lymphoma. two attempts at chemotherapy failed to control his disease, and mike was given around a year to live. but he became one of the first nhs patients to benefit from car t therapy, a living drug tailor—made for each patient. i feel that the treatment really is being effective, that we've got the cancer pretty much on the run, and obviously i'm really happy about that. i'm optimistic for the future, and glad that i committed to the treatment. this is how it works. white blood cells, a part of the immune system, are removed from the bloodstream. they are sent to the united states, where they are genetically modified to seek out and destroy cancer. millions of the modified cells are grown and are then flown back and infused into the patient‘s body.
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i think the most exciting part is that it offers people therapy for many patients where adequate therapy doesn't exist. so it's a very exciting new development, and it gives new hope to a lot of our patients. clinical trials of car t in the us showed 40% of patients had all signs of their otherwise untreatable lymphoma eliminated from their body. mike is still recovering from the side effects of his treatment, and it is too soon to know what will happen to his cancer in the long term. but, for now, he says he has hope. joining me now is phil reynolds, policy manager at bloodline. that is a blood cancer research charity, and phil, you are very welcome. the very idea that a patient who has been told that their cancer is terminal is being told that effectively they have been cured is quite astonishing. its remarkable and we are delighted that
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the ground—breaking treatment is available to small numbers of people on the nhs. it's really good many people that have this type of blood cancer. they are well treated by chemotherapy but this is another option for those members who relapse and would have had no other choice. it's not for every patient, not for every type of cancer, clearly. that's right. car—t has been approved on the nhs for people with approved on the nhs for people with a rare type of lymphoma that affects thousands of people year. it's only going to benefit about 200 people per year. i suppose the hope would be that the research that has gone into the techniques being used now could expand to treat other types of cancer but it is unclear at this stage. yes. we know there are 20 other trials for blood cancer types and we hope that in years to come we will see more car—t therapy for
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people with blood cancer but we need to know more about how car—t works for solitary cancers. what we are seeing more and more in this area of research is using the person's own immune system to try to get it working against the cancer cells and a range of cancers. it's a really exciting area of therapy and car—t is just exciting area of therapy and car—t isjust a drop in exciting area of therapy and car—t is just a drop in the exciting area of therapy and car—t isjust a drop in the ocean. the costis isjust a drop in the ocean. the cost is about £280,000 per patient, clearly a lot of money and i think there are discussions going on between the nhs and drugs companies and how they might bring down the cost but is there any possibility this will become less expensive? it's partly a question for the manufacturers. as the manufacturing advances that's one way could be brought down but we need to make sure that the nice approval process
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assesses medicines before they widen it to the wider patient population. phil, thanks for talking about this really interesting story today. the shetland islands are closer to the arctic circle than london but they are warming up arctic circle than london but they are warming up as a arctic circle than london but they are warming up as a result of climate change. that is making a big difference to the fishermen who have worked the seas for generations and to the wildlife that has been there even longer. we can go to shetland andjoin even longer. we can go to shetland and join matt taylor who is there. matt, it looks absolutely stunning behind you. obviously big concerns about the impact on the impact of climate change on this beautiful environment. you cannot deny the beauty of shetland and part of the beauty of shetland and part of the beauty comes in its remoteness. the atla ntic beauty comes in its remoteness. the atlantic one side, the north sea the other side on the fishing impact as a big impact on the economy but the lifting of temperatures through climate change in the seas around me are having a big impact on not only the fish life but the bird life in
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and around shetland. as i have been finding out. we are out on the voy fraserjust off the coast of shetland. alan has been fishing these waters for 38 years and in that time, he's noticed a lot of changes. there have been a lot more cod, which you would never have seen. so you've seen big changes in varieties? we're trying for velvet crab. there are a lot less of those around now, and more lobsters. one moves in and another moves out. certainly the climate and everything in this is a massive thing to do with it. a lot of people blame overfishing but one of the biggest things is natural causes. research from the university of aberdeen says climate change has caused temperatures across the north sea to rise by up to 1.5 degrees in the last 40 years. during this time, fish that have been traditionally caught in these waters for generations are moving towards colder seas further north.
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meanwhile, fish preferring warmer waters are starting to thrive around shetland. are you worried about the future of the fishing industry in the way that climate is changing? it's probably a thing you have to think about. fishing, it's a main thing in shetland. probably a lot of people in shetland doesn't realise how important it is. cod and haddock may be thriving in the waters around shetland at the moment but studies suggest that yet more warming could send them further north. could we be swapping, in the decades ahead, my favourite fish, for something a bit more exotic? changes in the seas around shetland are also making it tougher for some of the island's most popular sea birds. hello, helen. how are you doing? i'm good, welcome. the rspb there's been a sharp decline in the number of puffins and kittiwa kes due to the warming waters. since 1981, has been a 90% decrease
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in the number of kittiwakes along what do you think are the main factors behind the drop in those numbers? the food availability is the big one. so the sea temperature is going up a little bit and just a small change in temperature has big impacts on the food web. sandeals, which is the best fish were sea birds, are not enough around. just to find them. gillimots and razor bills, down to the moray firth to feed and even further south to montrose so that's hundreds and hundreds of miles and it would be like me going to glasgow to get my tea. is there anything that we can do to try and help protect bird numbers? so everybody can do something to tackle climate change. so switching your lights off, choosing what you buy, using less energy, can save puffins. the scottish government says it's hard to pin all of these shifts on climate change as there could be other factors
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involved such as overfishing and changes of the food chains, but the warming of sea temperature is likely to pay part in these trends as folk here in shetland are already seeing. as we saw, the bird populations are really struggling in shetland. what is happening out there in the sea, to discuss that more, i have paul harvey. thanks for joining to discuss that more, i have paul harvey. thanks forjoining us. should we be worried? it is worrying. shetland is incredibly important to see bird so we have a 10% of the sea birds bred in britain are breathing in shetland and internationally those are important numbers. sea birds sit at the food web. so it is a measure of how healthy the sea is and if something is going wrong there is something going wrong with the sea. and a lot of tourists come to shetland to shetland to see sea birds and it's bad from that perspective. having said that, as you are aware, still lots of sea birds to see and it's quite encouraging because we see a lot of puffins coming backs with
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beaks full of sand is so it might be a good breezing season. —— breeding season. it sound small, three degrees rise, but it has an out of sync effect on the food chain. degrees rise, but it has an out of sync effect on the food chainm degrees rise, but it has an out of sync effect on the food chain. it is just a 1 degrees rise in sea temperature during the winter months, but the zoo plankton mature more quickly and the sand eels are hatching later, so when they need the plankton it's not there which means the sanders are failing to recruit the population and the sea birds cannot find the sand eels. they are trying to travel further to get their food and that takes a lot of energy. absolutely and some of these birds fly off the north—east of scotla nd these birds fly off the north—east of scotland which is a long way to go for a meal. certainly is. thanks for joining go for a meal. certainly is. thanks forjoining us, paul. more fish are
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landed here in shetland than england, wales and northern ireland combined. but the crucial thing is what the impact further down the line will be as those sea temperatures continue to rise. back to you. have you been to shetland before, matt? it's my first time here and it has been stunning. the people have been wonderful and who can argue with surroundings like this? wonderful. thank you very much. in a moment the weather. first more weather and what we have coming up more weather and what we have coming up on the victoria derbyshire programme. today, the foreign office minister mark field says is sorry as he is accused of assault after he pushed a female climate change activists out of an event in london. greenpeace protesters interrupted a
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speech by the chancellor. join us at ten on bbc two, the news channel and online. now the weather. we have some summery weather to talk about. for many today dry with sunshine. high pressure moving up. that will move to the east and for the second half of weekend the systems will allow themselves to come in across areas. before that, plenty of fine weather. a lot of sunshine around today. some showers in the far north of slapped scotland and northern ireland. for most of us dry with sunshine. temperatures 13 to 17 in the north. up to 20 in the south—east. tonight not a great deal going on. it could turn chilly into the early part of saturday morning.
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throughout saturday a lot of dry weather and sunshine and warming up, particularly by sunday. that brings storms into monday. the headlines: foreign office minister mark field faces calling to resign after his treatment of an activist. the conservative leadership race enters its final straight. trump approved strikes against iran yesterday before changing his mind. the first patients benefit from a pioneering new treatment for blood cancer now available on the nhs. commemorations
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at scapa flow in orkney to mark 100 yea rs at scapa flow in orkney to mark 100 years since germany sank its own first world war fleet. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. let's return to the disturbance last night at a black tie city event and as we've been hearing, greenpeace has accused foreign office minister mark field of assault, after he pushed a female activist out of that event. the police in the city of london say they are looking into the incident, which took place at the start of a speech by the chancellor philip hammond. hannah martin from greenpeace was at the protest she told justin webb on the bbc‘s radio 4 today programme, that mr field's actions were, in her words, "disproportionate and unacceptable". yesterday we were peacefully protesting, we were trying to draw attention to the climate crisis. the treasury have proven to be a key
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blocker. weeks arpg it was reported that hammond thought it would cost too much. i what were you going to do. we were going to deliver the mansion house speech that should have been delivered. the woman walking towards him, was going to stand nexted to him and say something? she had leaflets, she was aiming to hand out copies of speech and peacefully make her presence felt. there were 350 guests, none felt. there were 350 guests, none felt the need to assault protesters as mark field did. what he did was disproportionate and unacceptable. particularly for a sitting member of parliament. well sir peter bottomley, the conservative mp, disagrees with that view we heard there from hannah martin. he told the today programme that he thinks mr field did the right thing.
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he was sitting down. she was walk past. somebody needed to intervene. everyone can accept that. why did anyone need to intervene. it was a peaceful protest. shed that right to walk where she was walking. when the person came into the bbc studio, was it 1988, did ask the bbc eight hours ago to find the clip. how was that different to what mark field did? he was more gentle. if each can take other people's microphones, we end up other people's microphones, we end up with anarchy. she made a point about the woman being a point, the person who assaulted my wife was a woman. when she was a secretary of state. i think the time to intervene is in advance. if a police officer had done it, had blocked, had blocked her, same powers as mark field has. well mark field is a popular search on uk google trends with 10,000
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searches this morning. his name also features on twitter with over 36,000 tweets. the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, has rejected boris johnson's assertion that there would not be new tariffs on trade if the uk left the eu without a deal. mrjohnson said this week that a provision of world trade organisation rules known as gatt 24 would allow for current arrangements to persist while a deal was negotiated. mr carney told the bbc‘s radio 4 today programme that such an arrangement was possible only once an agreement had been reached in principle. look, the gatt rules are clear, the minister, secretary of state for international trade, liam fox has testified to this effect in parliament, i have spoke on the the director general owto. gatt 24 applies if you have an agreement, not if you can't come to an
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agreement. if we don't have an agreement, that means there are ta riffs agreement, that means there are tariffs automatically. the europeans have to apply the same rules to us as they apply to everyone else. if they were to decide not to put in place tariffs they have to also lower their tariffs with the united states and canada and the rest of world and the same for us, the uk would have to make a decision about what to do there. we should be clear that no deal means that. that situation and it means a bigger adjustment. which is why it is desirable, it bha the choice that the country takes, it may be the choice that we move to so—called wto standards. whether we move to wto or a so—called canada style agreement or some deeper partnership, it is a lwa ys or some deeper partnership, it is always advisable and indeed always
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the case i'm hard pressed to think ofa the case i'm hard pressed to think of a case, in the last 25 plus years globally, where a new trading arrangement has been struck and it's happened over night. if you lack at the 50 trading agreements that have been struck over the last quarter a century, the average time is at least two years and up to four yea rs. to least two years and up to four years. to do it overnight is a big adjustment. thousands of people have greeted the sun with cheers as it rose over stonehenge for the northern hemisphere summer solstice. on the summer solstice, the sun rises behind the heel stone, the ancient entrance to the stone circle, and rays of sunlight are channelled into the centre of the monument.
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it is believed that solstices have been celebrated at stonehenge for thousands of years. the sun rises behind the heel stone. rays of light are channelled into the monument. there 200,000 searches for summer 2019 and the hashtag summer solstice is popular on twitter. several pictures of dawn are being shared like this one from ross. others say the annual stonehenge ceremony is a reminder of the history and democracy in the united kingdom. nowa the history and democracy in the united kingdom. now a quick look at what you're reading and watch on the bbc news app. if you look at the top ten in the most read, reflecting the stories we have been bringing you today, the incident involving mark field and a greenpeace activist is at no one. no two is the tory leadership campaign. three is that
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decision by the trump administration to pull back from a strike on iran. and no four is the story about that new treatment for a type of blood cancer. looking down to the most watched, let's have a quick look at no six. would you take a job that was bad for the planet is the question? this is part of bbc‘s crossing divides season and it tells you the story of a conversation between two 21—year—old men about a mine, a coal mine, that is re—opening in cumbria, creating 500 jobs, but there is an environmental impact. you have kenny who is thinking of taking a job in the mine and james who is an environmental activist having a discussion about their differencing points of —— differing point of view. that is today's morning briefing. now the sport and here is mike. good to see andy murray back in the headlines for the right reasons? absolutely,
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wasn't it a great come back. a relief that he had zero pain a p pa re ntly relief that he had zero pain apparently in his hip after playing in the doubles at queens. it was at times like he had never been away. he was knocking it around and wing again. —— winning again. he was playing in the doubles with lopez and they beat the top seeds. the world no two turned down the chance to pairup with world no two turned down the chance to pair up with murray.|j world no two turned down the chance to pair up with murray. i asked her during the french open and told her, she said i'm sorry, but i'm already playing singles and doubles. i messaged and said no worry, ijust wanted to find the best partner. she said there is many better out there than me. a few days later she won the french open and sol than me. a few days later she won the french open and so i fired her a message saying, i told you you're the best one. she still rejected me!
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the return of andy murray is on most of this morning's back pages. some great pictures. the guardian said he is back with a bang. the express says he said i'm lucky. they say manchester city will beat united to sign harry maguire. the mirror features england's world cup team. they are on inflatable unicorns. now world cup, our reporter is in le havre. it is a rest day and a perfect chance to look back on the tournament. back home it has caught the imagination. yeah, absolutely. this has been the world cup that has been billed as the biggest and the best and it has generated the most interest that we have seen. we have seen interest that we have seen. we have seen record viewers around the ward
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—— world. there has been a marked increase in the coverage of the sport and the athletes taking part and we have had some pretty dramatic games. some very competitive games. more teams are really competitive at the top level. and then i don't know ifi the top level. and then i don't know if i should mention it, var, we have had plenty of controversy around that, be it the technology its, new laws, the implementation of it, how rigidly they're sticking to it. so it has had tall. rigidly they're sticking to it. so it has had t all. so many talking points, especially var, don't mention to it the scots. england showed more freedom againstjapan and seem to be growing into the tournament with three wins out of three? absolutely. it couldn't be going much betterfor them. i don't think as one of top ranked teams you wa nt to think as one of top ranked teams you want to show your cards too early. they have had three wins from three and a better performance in the japan game. england are good at
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taking their chances. ellen white has been a great goal scorer for them. and joy di—taylor has —— jodie taylor has scored. so they have flexibility within that team. they will face cameroon in the last 16. cameroon after that last gasp winner yesterday, just 11 seconds from time, putting them through. the first time two african teams are through to the knock out stages. i think england will feel like they can win that next game with cameroon. it is one of ease er opponents. that one is on sunday. what about the united states? can anyone stop them? i know, this is why we are in le havre, they were
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playing sweden last night and it was billed as the first real test and they won 2—0. they did it in easy fashion. there was some var controversy fashion. there was some var co ntrove rsy over fashion. there was some var controversy over their second goal. but sweden offered little up front. the interesting thick for thing is they have so much attacking process, but their defence is shaky. it wasn't tested as much as we would have liked and it may not be tested against spain, but if they get through they come up against teams like france and then it will be tested. thank you. england's cricketers are on the brink of reaching the semi—finals of the cricket world cup. they looked in good spirits in practice at headingley yesterday ahead of their match with sri lanka. victory would
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ta ke match with sri lanka. victory would take them level with australia at the top. the match is part of a commentary double—header on five live sports extra with england's women taking on the west indies. and you can follow both games on the bbc sport web—site. before we go, frank lampard sport web—site. before we go, frank lampa rd celebrated sport web—site. before we go, frank lampard celebrated his 41st birthday yesterday. his wife posted this video and his friends had something toi video and his friends had something to i about his future in management and where it should be. # should i stay or should i go! they sang along to the clash classic, should i stay or should i go? tease, tease, teasing him about speculation that he may leave derby to take over the manager'sjob at he may leave derby to take over the manager's job at chelsea. watch this space. that is all the sport for now. more at 11.15. thank you. the
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headlines: foreign office minister mark field faces call to resign for his treatment of an activist who disrupted a dinner in london. the conservative leadership race enters its final stage with borisjohnson and jeremy hunt competing to be prime minister. the us media reports that president trump approved military strikes against iran yesterday, before changing his mind. the mayor of manchester has warned the government must honour its commitment to the north. nina warhurst reports. the skyline says it all, manchester is booming. in six months here there will be a
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world class hub for developing advanced materials, research that could revolutionise how we live. what is it like to work on this? very exciting. i have been in science for more than 20 years and just being able to be part of this venture and this institute is absolutely amazing. it was the former chancellor who put aside £230 to get this built. how five years have flown since these words. i'm here to talk about what we can do to make the cities of north a power house for our economy again. make the cities of north a power house for our economy againm make the cities of north a power house for our economy again. if the northern power house was an actual house the foundations one looking strong. now almost half of those living int strong. now almost half of those living in t north have a directly elected mayor. there are plans for £70 billion to be spent on transport. but is like getting
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better? there are many more children living in poor households, many more people surviving on low incomes and spend more head on public transport has been less than in london.|j praise george osborne for putting it forward , praise george osborne for putting it forward, but five years on, where is it? that is what people here are saying. we still have austerity and we are being asked to cut services and we have rail having gone in reverse. where is this northern hower house? well not here. in neighbouring lancashire, productivity‘s improving faster than in most parts of north and that is despite rejecting the idea of a mayor and the money that m cos with it. we are proactive in achieving funding. we are not in any financial trouble. everything is going well here. so that sounds a bit i'm all rightjackish. here. so that sounds a bit i'm all right jackish. if it ain't broke don't fix it? quite so, yes. here they're pushing their own luck.
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self—funding a new business district and regenerating. the you need a northern power house? and regenerating. the you need a northern power house ?|j and regenerating. the you need a northern power house? i think we manage nicely on our own, thank you. we are a force to be reckoned with as an enterprise partnership and northern power house if it won'ts wants to assist us we can't say no. perhaps it is too early to judge the architecture of such an ambitious build. we will see if they can build a better north for everyone. the most seniorjudge in england and wales has expressed concern that many cases are not being prosecuted. sir brian leveson said the system could collapse. he has been speaking to our legal correspondent. in the
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wa ke to our legal correspondent. in the wake of phone hacking scandal, sir brian leveson become a national figure. today, he retires as head of criminal justice, with figure. today, he retires as head of criminaljustice, with grave concerns. there is undeniably a reduction in the number of crimes being detected and crimes being prosecuted. it is very concerning that citizens suffer wrong and are not obtaining redress through the criminal courts. he also addressed concerns by compiegners that come —— campaigners that complainants of rape would be discouraged by being force toed hand over their phones. the police are looking for reasonable lines of inquiry. they're not seeking as it were to digitality
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strip search the victim. they're all looking for material that is releva nt. looking for material that is relevant. i can't believe that people who are legitimately concerned would want to undermine the rights of a defendant to a fair trial. his parting message is clear, ourcriminal trial. his parting message is clear, our criminaljustice trial. his parting message is clear, our criminal justice system trial. his parting message is clear, our criminaljustice system creaking under the weight of cuts and digital evidence, needs urgent investment. commemorations are taking part in orkney to mark the 100th an verse of the scuttling —— anniversary of the scuttling of german fleet at scapa flow. the vast natural harbour
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of scapa flow in orkney. the once—mighty german high seas fleet had been interned here, while its fate was decided during the peace negotiations at the end of the first world war. through winter and on into the lighter months, 74 german ships, flags lowered, lay idle in the waters off these northerly isles. the crews reduced to a minimum, demoralised, forbidden to go ashore. but on midsummer‘s day a century ago, the officer in charge, fearing the victorious allies would seize the ships, gave orders that the fleet be scuttled. new research shows that, in the space ofjust over five hours, 50 german ships sunk here in scapa flow. it was the greatest loss of shipping ever to occur in a single day. seven of those ships still remain beneath the waves. through salvage and now diving, they became a source of income for these islands in the decades that followed. people here, though, this week remembering the last german fatalities of the first world war, the german sailors that died here in the chaos and confusion
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that followed the scuttling of their navy. lorna gordon, bbc news, orkney. thousands of protestors have blocked roads in hong kong making fresh calls for the government to scrap its controversial extradition bill. our correspondent nick beake is with some of those protesters outside the police headquarters. hundreds of demonstrators remain in hong kong. you can see the sea of black extends to the end of street, many wearing masks, they don't want their identities to be known, they're worried they may be prosecuted for making their voices heard and the chanting has been very loud today. you will hear the ripples of noise every now and then. they're here ripples of noise every now and then. they‘ re here demanding ripples of noise every now and then. they're here demanding the resignation of police commissioner. they're not resignation of police commissioner. they‘ re not happy resignation of police commissioner. they're not happy about the way protesters were treated in previous demonstrations over the past week. they want all those demonstrators who were arrested to be freed and they want this broader investigation into what the police were doing,
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responding to these allegations of police brutality. what happens next is hard to tell. most of people out today are young and angry and are stu d e nts today are young and angry and are students in the main and it is students in the main and it is student unions who have been organising what has been happened. there is talk they may move to other locations, but this seems to be the lightning rod for the anger. the police force of hong kong. every now and then a message comes through for what they should do. now there is a relative pause. but they have made it clear they will be staying here for as long as it takes. we will have to see whether they keep their word. now time for the weather. some fine weather for the next couple of days. some drier and brighter conditions. high pressure moving up from the south. we have still got a wea k from the south. we have still got a weak front affecting the far north
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of scotland, bringing us some showers. but for most of us it what badry showers. but for most of us it what b a dry start with sunshine for summer solstice. that was in east yorkshire. we will continue with sunshine for most parts through this afternoon. still a few showers in the north of scotland. you could catch the odd shower in northern ireland. but they will be scattered. still fresh, cool in the north—west. temperatures 13 to 16 degrees. up to 21 in the south—east. tonight, the showers will disappear and for most dry with clear spells and it will turn chilly. temperatures for many down into single figures. for the weekend, we keep some sunshine, but things warming up and as we go into next week, getting warmer. so this is saturday. a chilly start, but a lot of sunshine. a bit of cloud
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building up into the afternoon. that won't spoil things too much. temperatures up to about 16 or 17 degrees in the north. widely for england and wales temperatures into the low 20s. high pressure isjust moving closer to scandinavia and that will allow this weather front to move in closer across the uk during sunday. you will notice cloud increasing in the west and some rain moving into south west england and west wales and northern ireland and that will turn thundery, because temperatures are going to build on sunday. mid 20s in the south—east. even 20 in the central belt. the humidity will rise throughout sunday. as we go through sunday night, this will bring the risk of intense thunder storms spreading across england and wales. some uncertainty on the details, but there is a met office warning for a
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lot of rain fall in a short space of time and next week the threat of more storms and temperatures continuing to rise. it will feel very uncomfortable for some of us. stay tuned for the details.
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hello it's, it's ten o'clock, a government minister has been accused of assault after pushing a female activist out of the black—tie event. here is the moment that mark field grabbed the woman and pushed her against a column after she great —— gate—crash the event. he has apologised and referred himself for investigation. the labour spokeswoman on policing told us that was not good enough. as far as i am concerned, and as a former police officer myself, that was assault and it should be investigated by the police. if he is going to be under police. if he is going to be under police investigation, of course he should resign, and jeremy hunt, the foreign secretary and his boss, and running to be prime minister at the moment should be showing leadership
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on this and if he's not

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