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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 24, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and louise minchin. our headlines today: "man up". jeremy hunt accuses borisjohnson of being a coward and of ducking important questions as they fight it out to become our next prime minister. we'll speak to jeremy huntjust after 8:00. thousands of people with autism and learning disabilities are still being held in secure hospitals in england despite a promise of action by the government. we hearfrom one mum who faces a 300 mile round trip to visit her son. more drama at the women's world cup, as england make it through to the quarter—finals. they beat cameroon 3—0 — but manager phil neville is furious
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about their opponents‘ behaviour. and, triumph for andy murray in the doubles at queen's — his first tournament since the operation that saved his career. cut—price cars. sales of new vehicles have fallen again despite dealers knocking 8% off the average price. plus, life as a dad of four in london. liam gallagher tells us about his fears for the safety of his children. people are dying and stuff but when you wake up in the morning, a 16—year—old kid are being knifed to death and i have kids of that age, do you know what i mean? good morning. from hms enterprise. the weather this week, there is the risk of severe thunderstorms, localised flooding from those and as we had with the rest of the week, the weather will turn hotter and more humid. i will have more details inis more humid. i will have more details in 15 minutes.
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good morning. it's monday the 24th ofjune. our top story: jeremy hunt has attacked his rival for the conservative leadership, borisjohnson — accusing him of cowardice for trying to avoid a live television debate this week. in a newspaper article, mr hunt tells the former mayor of london to "man up" and subject himself to greater scrutiny. after three days of headlines about a heated row with his girlfriend, mrjohnson is trying to refocus attention on his policies. let's get more from our political correspondent nick eardley, who is in westminster. nick, we've been hearing some strong language from mr hunt this morning? is pretty personal, isn't it? absolutely. it is definitely gloves off today. jeremy hunt's most personal attack on borisjohnson so far. he is writing in the times this morning saying that mrjohnson is trying to slink through the back door of number ten stop we have seen loads of headlines over the weekend about borrowed johnson's personal
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life — make borisjohnson‘s personal life — make borisjohnson‘s personal life after the lease were called to the flat after they had a row. jeremy hunt is saying that is not what this is about. not interested in debating boris johnson's what this is about. not interested in debating borisjohnson‘s personal life that he wants to quiz him on how we will leave the eu by the due date. this is all about policy, not just about brexit but also what he wa nts to just about brexit but also what he wants to do with hs2, what he wants to do with big infrastructure policies but he doesn't stick the bootinin policies but he doesn't stick the boot in in this article, saying, "don't be a coward, boris, man up and show the nation you can cope with the intense scrutiny the most difficultjob in the country will involve". why is this happening? we know the answer. we have seen a lot on mr hunt on the airwaves but mr johnson, we have seen far less of. and there's been lots of talk
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around a no deal brexit from both jeremy hunt and boris johnson. is this looking ever more likely? yeah, absolutely. borisjohnson, one of the few places you can hear about his policy is in his column in the daily telegraph. he is repeating in that this morning he is adamant that the uk must come out of the european union by the next deadline, the 31st of october. it is his leg selling point. he is a brexiteer and he is adamant it will happen. jeremy hunt is saying that we can't leave if we don't get a new deal from parliament —— from the eu if we don't get it through parliament. how many times have we sat here instead europe don't want to do it? they are not interested in renegotiating so yes, both men outlining their policies again but still really hard to see them getting to a point where they get to the deal they want. so many
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questions we might be able to ask jeremy huntjust questions we might be able to ask jeremy hunt just after eight questions we might be able to ask jeremy huntjust after eight o'clock on this programme this morning. nhs england is going to open its first gambling addiction clinic for children and young adults. the service will support people aged 13 to 25 years old. it comes after research by the gambling commission found more than 50 thousand children have a gambling problem. lauren moss has more. hgppy happy family memories captured on camera. dancing with his mother, liz. 18 months ago, whenjack was 2a, he took his own life while on a gap year in vietnam, after losing money on a bet. he started gambling in sheffield with his friends when he was 17 but it was a habit that spiralled into addiction. they didn't think it was unsafe. he didn't think it was unsafe. and i think he felt, in the end, that it controlled him
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and that is why he died, really, because he felt he would never be free of it. jack's parents now run a charity to support other families. they're welcoming the news that a clinic for teenagers and young people with gambling problems will open in london, later last year, —— later this year, in what has, until now, been an adult—only service. it is estimated 450,000 children are regularly betting, more than those who drink alcohol, smoke or take drugs, and many have a gambling problem. i've dedicated my life to treating adult problem gamblers, and that has been sad enough, seeing the destruction that these people have incurred. having said this, many of my adult patients were already children with problem gambling issues. from september, treatment sessions will be offered to children alongside their parents, and also focus on mental health difficulties related to gambling. another adult clinical will open in leeds later this year,
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and others are planned for manchester and sunderland. it's hoped they'll offer support to those who need it the most, before what nhs bosses have described as the "scourge of problem gambling" ruins more lives. lauren moss, bbc news. the uk foreign office minister andrew murrison has warned iran that it "needs to stop" attacks in the gulf of oman. his visit to tehran comes after the us accused iran of attacking oil tankers earlier this month, which iran denies. dr murrison said the uk believes iran "almost certainly bears responsibility". 0ur middle east correspondent tom bateman is in fujairah, and can tell us more. this row is not going away, is it? allan absolutely not. it was a pretty firm message from the british on that visit to tehran, as you are saying there. things remain volatile here where just a few days ago, the
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iranians shot down an american drone in disputed circumstances and we heard how ronald trump was moments away from a retaliatory response but said he would step back from the drink —— brink. he feared any uranian loss of life and said that would not be proportionate. ———— iranian. they are visiting key allies, in this case, the uae, to push a message, they want to build a coalition to push back against the iranians. will the british be part of it? in one sense they will but in another sense they won't because unlike america, they are members of the 2015 nuclear deal with the iranians. that was part of the discussions yesterday and the iranians want the british to help them bypass american sanctions that we re them bypass american sanctions that were introduced when the americans pulled out of that deal. so on the one hand you have ominous warnings and on the other hand, the europeans are desperately wanting to breathe
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life into this nuclear deal but at the moment, it looks like that is not succeeding. a crowdfunding website has closed down an account raising money for the disgraced australian rugby player, israel folau, who was sacked for posting homophobic messages on social media. gofundme said it had decided the campaign violated its terms and conditions. let's get more on this from our sydney correspondent hywel griffith. israel folau is one of global rugby's biggest stars and many expected to see him at the world cup later this year but off the pitch, he has been a constant —— constant source of controversy, using the social media following that he has with hundreds of thousands of followers, to share religious messages. he is a devout christian. however, he has got into hot water because of the homophobic content of some of those messages. arc in april, he equated being homosexual with being an thief or an adulterer. that was the final straw for rugby
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australia who sacked him but he wa nted australia who sacked him but he wanted to take that fight to the court is saying that he was the victim of discrimination for his religious beliefs. injust four days, he had managed to raise nearly half a million us dollars worth of funding from followers and fans, using that gofundme website. today, finally, after a fair deal of pressure here in australia, the website has turned around and said that it violates the terms and conditions. they support equality for gay, lesbian and transgender people. no response yet from israel folau or his backers. he is a multimillionaire, by all accounts, having had a very successful career. it may be that he can still take this legal battle forward. it is a battle that many here in australia and further afield see is a real test as to whether law stands over a person's right to hold religious beliefs, them and their responsibility towards other people, not to discriminate and not to share hate speech.
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what a start to the week it has been in the football. it was really unpleasant. england beat cameroon yesterday in the women's world cup. but how? it was so difficult to watch at times. var has produced some amazing moments, it has also slowed the game down and it has made some very, very firm decisions. they are interpreting the law to the very, very letter and at times it is brilliant, at times it is not big yesterday, cameroon, so many players, they just yesterday, cameroon, so many players, theyjust looked confused, they were in tears on the pitch and certainly not as disciplined. the england boss phil neville said he was ashamed for football after england's bruising win over cameroon in valenciennes. they won 3—0, so they'll face norway in the quarter—finals on thursday — but the behaviour of the cameroon players left a really sour taste. and hosts france are also through —
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they needed extra time to beat brazil 2—1. amandine henry with the winner in the 106th minute. they will face either spain or the reigning champions the us on friday. andy murray completed the dream comeback from hip surgery by winning the doubles at queen's with feliciano lopez. they beatjoe salisbury and rajeev ram on a championship tiebreak. lopez had already won the singles title earlier in the day. lewis hamilton strengthened his grip on the formula one world title after yet another dominant display. he finished well ahead of his mercedez teammate valterri bottas to win the french grand prix, making it six wins in eight races. pretty good car. pretty good driver. and we will see more from that england game a bit later. and i would love to hear what people at home thought about it. watching it
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was really, i think not the best moment for this world cup. after so many great moments. yeah. thank you very much. we will look at the front pages. the front pages are dominated by borisjohnson again. the times headline is "johnson is a coward, says hunt". mr hunt is urging his opponent to stop "avoiding public scrutiny" and address the incident which led to police turning up at his door. a picture of a jubilant andy murray there too after his victory at queen's. the express talks about pressure on boris to come clean. it says senior tories are urging him to explain the incident with his partner. the daily mail claims mrjohnson and his partner have been driven out of their home because of protestors camped outside the flat. and the telegraph is the only paper which doesn't focus on borisjohnson‘s domestic situation. instead it says he has
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"renewed his commitment" to leaving the european union on the 31st of october, insisting he would not "bottle" brexit. let's take a look at the inside pages. good morning, steph. it still feels the same. you know what? it does. nice to have you back. like a comfy pairof nice to have you back. like a comfy pair of slippers. the ft is leading ona pair of slippers. the ft is leading on a story to do with lloyds who are trying to crack down on money laundering. they found out —— 8000 offshore accounts and have given the people that own them three years to prove their identity and they haven't been able to so now they are saying they will freeze those accounts. anyone who has ever had a fraud incident where money has been taken from the account will it cruciate that tanks are now trying to crack down and stop that from happening. —— banks. they haven't
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been able to verify who they are. in construction, the average pay has gone up by about two g per year. the average salary isjust gone up by about two g per year. the average salary is just under 116,000 pounds per year. more people are leaving the uk and coming back to the eu. can i show this one of a thing? have you seen this story about the dame who really wanted to dress with hydrangeas on. she bought the bedsheet and got it made into a skirt. dame kiri te kanawa. she was here recently. 1999, everyone was thinking is it will change urbana? it was a bedsheet. i want one of
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those. all of the papers this morning, pictures from yesterday's game. there was a moment where steph horton went clattering. a couple of moments where you were seriously worried about whether or not she had been badly hurt. she went into the quarterfinals on thursday. will that change anything for the rest of the competition? i don't think it will. we saw phil neville's interview. he basically went, that's the rules. we know this, we've been briefed. we know this, we've been briefed. we know what it is going to do. basically, it's tough. vai was the referee. it's like american
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football. start, stop, start.|j referee. it's like american football. start, stop, start. iwant to show you this. top corner story. it's about tennis. and what is happening at queens in the moment. i was there last week with carol, fantastic tennis tournament. animism are there, amazon on line, broadcasting the tennis. —— amazon. the mail have picked up how amazon studio was significantly bigger than the bbci. they paid extra to have a very fancy studio. they are saying amazon up parking their tanks on the bbc's lawn. it all depends on your wi-fi bbc's lawn. it all depends on your wi—fi and whether or not you're going to get the live pictures. very interesting. we were talking about wi—fi. superfast 5g broadband is
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doing amazing things. somebody can be in an ambulance and one the paramedics can wear a special glove to ta ke paramedics can wear a special glove to take an ultrasound while doctors who are at the hospital can kind of instruct them, see it live, so it means they can get treatment much more quickly. the symptoms of a baby that has been diagnosed so clinicians know whether it has a hole in its heart and need surgery 01’ hole in its heart and need surgery or something else like sepsis, it can go to a children's hospital. it can go to a children's hospital. it can really change things. amazing. it is glastonbury week. they are trying to be the most eco— friendly. they have always been environmentally minded but they said the advice to people turning up is don't bring plastic water bottles, plastic, wipes that you can dispose
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of because it's flannel and soap. where do you clean your flannel? it's hard to keep your flannel clean. isn't wipe number one on the festival essentials? not anymore. you can't fly in helicopters anymore. back here, with accurate news. the number of people who were arriving to and from glastonbury by helicopter has gone up. it's very showbiz. notjust showbiz helicopter has gone up. it's very showbiz. not just showbiz people, because you can get a helicopter for 500 quid. which i still think is a lot of money. with your panel. and they are worried about the environment with some wipes. we talked to liam gallagher later, he is performing at glastonbury. talked to liam gallagher later, he is performing at glastonburylj talked to liam gallagher later, he is performing at glastonbury. i bet he doesn't use a flannel. he doesn't look like he does. we can get the
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weather for glastonbury and the rest of the country. she is on board hms enterprise on the thames. good morning, everyone, a lovely start to the day, a wee bit humid in london. the temperature in parts of kent is just over 20 celsius. inverness, just over 20 celsius. inverness, just over 20 celsius. inverness, just over nine. just look at the bridge. what a beautiful warship she is. she was launched in 2003. she is usually based in plymouth. her primary role is to carry out oceanographic work. she is here until wednesday and is going to be taking part in some ceremonial roles. but the weather forecast for the next few days, looking at a severe thunderstorm. there is risk
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of localised flooding and it will feel humid. if you think it is humid at the moment, even more humid. 0n the satellite picture you can see there is a fair bit of cloud around. some of this has carried. moving steadily northwards as well as thunderstorms. if we started nine o'clock in scotland, the north is dry. we have heavy rain across the central belt. it's moving north through the day and again there is the risk of some disruption and localised flooding. we've had thunderstorms and still do across parts of northern england. 0r northern ireland, drier and brighter. as we come south, some fog across devon and cornwall. right skies as well. we are ready have rain across the channel islands.
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through the english channel, into hampshire and blossom ——or something across parts of the midlands. in any sunshine, we could hit 27 in the south—east. but another side of the plume, we're looking at the risk of and showers. 0vernight tonight, that and showers. 0vernight tonight, that and a brain continues to migrate northwards. the potential to be heavy and thundery. 0vernight lows falling to about 18 degrees. tomorrow we see that rain continued to edge northwards. in the west, the potential for some thunderstorms in wales and a muggy feel to the weather. then as we had to later on
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in the week, you can see how the temperatures rise. across parts of western scotland, we are looking at possibly 25, maybe a little bit more. temperatures of 30 potentially, a little bit more as well. at humid feel will prevail. in 2015, the nhs pledged to get more people with learning disabilities and autism moved out of secure hospitals — and into more appropriate accommodation within the community. but four years later, the charity mencap says it's still not delivering on its promise. it says the lack of urgency to move patients, sometimes kept hours away from family, is unforgivable. jayne mccubbinjoined one mother on a 360 mile round trip to visit her son. last week, we had a distressing phone call. get me out, get me out, ijust want
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phone call. get me out, get me out, i just want to come home, phone call. get me out, get me out, ijust want to come home, i want my mum,i ijust want to come home, i want my mum, iwant ijust want to come home, i want my mum, i want my mom. i can't take that call. adele's son eddie has learning disabilities. 0n that call. adele's son eddie has learning disabilities. on christmas day when he was 13 he was sectioned ina day when he was 13 he was sectioned in a crisis. nine months, that's how long you were told? i will be going to be about nine months. it's 6.5 yea rs to be about nine months. it's 6.5 years later. any messages for him? we love you, miss you lots and thinking of you. today we are joining adele on her once a month 360- joining adele on her once a month 360— mile round trip to visit her son. previously we have had to go 600- son. previously we have had to go 600— mile round trips. we've travelled over 26,000 miles in the uk. in 2015, nhs england promised people with learning disabilities homes, not hospitals but numbers inside have increased slightly on last month to 2250. one in four are more than 100 kilometres from home
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and they faced a record number of restrictive interventions like restraint and seclusion. over the yea rs, restraint and seclusion. over the years, eddie has had periods of months in seclusion, in some hospitals he's had time when he's not seen outside for months. this is the lane where i'll have to stop. we don't have permission to film inside. 1.5 hours later, adele is out from an environment she says will hinder not help any‘s chances for following her home anytime soon. you can hear the alarm is going, doorslamming, you can hear the alarm is going, door slamming, phones ringing, beepers. you can hear really distressed people. i'm driving home ona minute, distressed people. i'm driving home on a minute, he's not. he's got a stay in that environment. i struggled for an hour. he is desperate to come home. this is an exhausting 10— hour round trip for adele. right, going back, ijust
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wa nt to adele. right, going back, ijust want to show you this place first. this... this is any‘s house. just over a year ago, house accounting was found for eddie so he could move back to his own community but being so far away, there was no smooth transition into new surrounds. eddie was back in hospital within three weeks. for him to be back in home with his own care and support would be cheaper. even if it's more expensive, he should still be entitled to it because it's a human right not to be locked away. local commissioners say they are working ona commissioners say they are working on a special care package. you shouldn't be locked away for a disability. nhs england say they have invested 75 million to smooth the community but the reality for some like eddie is the door out of hospital is a revolving one. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. hello, i'm asad ahmad. the first nhs gambling clinic for children will open in london this year. it's being set up amid growing concern that problem gambling lis being fuelled by online gaming sites and targetted adverts.the it will offer specialist help to those as young as 13. tens of thousands are classed as having a problem. the leading academic investigating the windrush scandal says some of our most famous wartime politicians including sir winston churchill had racist and anti—semitic views. in a bbc documentary, its claim secret government files show politicians including churchill and clement attlee took steps to create an
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environment hostile to black british citizens. i am really glad churchill one in that struggle against halifax in 1940 one in that struggle against halifax in 191i0 but again the this was a man who expressed a lot of racist and anti—semitic views through his career. that is true. you see the heroic actions but also the lamentable attitudes. you can see more on that on bbc two at nine o'clock. the original letters from the top of the centrepoint building are upfor the top of the centrepoint building are up for auction. the neon sign was moved in the building in 2015 and have been reinvented by artists, expecting to self thousands of pounds. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are severe delays on the overground. due to a faulty truck at
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the final green. elsewhere good. disruption on trains from victoria to denmark hill due to a signalling fault. the roads, the 813 as usual is slow but still moving very slowly through dagenham. if it's warmer temperatures you've been looking for, this week it is your week as they are set to climb. today, it's already feeling warm and humid. we had a chance of some showers. the met office has yellow weather warning in place for thunderstorms morning. as looking dry with some sunny spells but these storm is coming out from the south, rumbles of thunder potentially, still some bright spells and sunny spells to enter the afternoon and temperatures heading up to all warm and sticky 25 celsius. 0vernight, another metal office yellow warning in place for under storms. you will notice the bride, the colour, the heavy rain, potential downpours tonight, flashes of lightning and
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look at those temperatures, not dropping much below 18 celsius so quite uncomfortable for sleeping, another hot and humid night in a hot and humid day tomorrow. temperatures similar. a dry day, less showers around but largely dry, 20 of sunshine in the forecast and temperatures getting warmer as we head into the weekend. a lot of rain over the next lili hours. more than half—an—hour. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and jon kay. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: andy murray has proved he still has what it takes to win, even after major surgery. we'll discuss his victory in the doubles at queens in 10 minutes. you wake up in the morning and think didi
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you wake up in the morning and think did i watch love island, did i? no, you were asleep when it was on, sweet as. also this morning, in the week leading up to his glastonbury performance, we've been speaking to liam gallagher about politics, love island and his difficult relationship with his brother. and after 9:00, we'll be joined by naturalist and broadcaster george mcgavin, who has been documenting his life as he goes through treatment for skin cancer. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: jeremy hunt has intensified his attack on his rivalfor the conservative leadership boris johnson. accusing him of cowardice we re johnson. accusing him of cowardice were trying to avoid a live television debate this week. in a newspaper article this morning, mr hunt tells the former mayor of london to" man up" and subject himself to scrutiny. after days of headlines over a row with his girlfriend, mrjohnson is trying to
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refocus attention on his policies by underlining his intention to deliver brexit by the end of october. the uk has opened a first handling that's first gambling clinic for children is to be open soon. it will support people aged 13—25 and comes after the research by the gambling my commission found that 30,000 children have a gambling problem. the uk has warned iran it needs to stop in the gulf of demand. iranians have denied any involvement but andrew morrison has said the british government iran is almost leaves certainly wearing some response ability. west midlands police say it plans to spend £7 million on tackling youth violence after declaring knife crime a national emergency. most of the money will go towards preventing stabbings by focusing resources on birmingham's night—time economy and mediation
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services for young people. critics say the funding is not enough as the plan relies too heavily on police officers working overtime. how is this for the stuff of nightmares? air canada are investigating after passenger fell asleep on the flight. air canada is investigating after a passenger was left alone on a plane after it landed. tiffani adams fell asleep while flying from quebec to toronto and when she woke up, the plane was empty and in darkness. this really happened. she says when she first realised what had happened, she called herfriend and then her phone died was up she managed to fight that might attract attention after finding a torch in the cockpit and shone a light through the window. air canada is saying it is investigating. i bet it is investigating! will you saying something happened to you on the train similarly? i was going south on the northern line and i was so engrossed in the book and i didn't
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get off the train and change and i suddenly looked up and i was the only person on the tube hurtling to i don't know where. i was in such a panic. i was running through the corridors. i eventually knocked on the drivers door going, "where are you going?" he was holding ——he told mei you going?" he was holding ——he told me i was supposed to get off. the whole train was of the whole trade was not what was the book? it sounds great. i can't remember. it wasn't that good. it sounds like all of my anxiety dreams rolled into one. i have had my anxiety happened to me in real life. he did keep the lights on for me which was good. how are you? stressed. a stressful night, wasn't it? it was just unpleasant to watch. the positive news. look, a football is behind me and everything. ralph
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was a very is behind me and everything. ralph was a very glamorous. england are through to the quarter finals after beating cameroon 3—0, but manager phil neville said he was "ashamed" by the behaviour of the opposition, as katie gornall reports. it all started to unravel when cameroon's goal keeper appeared to spit on her. steph houghton stepped up. england a place at —— placed that it replaces above cameroon and soon ellen white pressed on. a goal confirmed by var but still cameroon public players not hard done by. va
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ar stole the spotlight again when cameroon appeared to have shoot and now the drama and anger reached new heights. england were rattled but when it mattered they found a way through as alex greenwood settled the nurse. even the referee was in the nurse. even the referee was in the firing line and the match would have a painful and for england's captain as this cameroon player escaped red for this. that wasn't foot all the measles. that wasn't a world cup last 16 in terms of the behaviour i want to see from the footballers. this is going out worldwide. we always knew cameroon would be an unpredictable side and nobody foresaw gamepad with so much incident and emotion as this was a bit would have been stressful for england, they will have been relieved to come through it relatively unscathed and now they face an entirely different prospect in norway. 18 they will have to be at the best to beat. hosts france are also
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through to the quarter—finals. they needed extra time to beat brazil 2—1 — captain amandine henry with the winner in the 106th minute. they'll face either spain or the reigning champions the usa, who play today. andy murray's comeback from career saving hip surgery ended with a fairytale win in the final of the men's doubles at queen's. he and his partner feliciano lopez beat britain'sjoe salisbury and american rajeev ram. with both pairs winning a set each. the final went to a championship tie—break, with murray and lopez winning it 10 points to 5. it's just six months since murray had the hip resurfacing surgery but already he says he's playing without pain. its been brilliant. i really enjoyed it. i felt very relaxed at the beginning of the week and then as it went on, i was getting more and more nervous and i think my competitive instincts were kicking in at the end of each match. look, it was brilliant. my hip felt great, no pain. and it was a busy day for murray's partner feliciano lopez. the paniard became the first wildcard to win the queen's club
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title since pete sampras twenty years ago. —— spaniard. the 37 year old beat gilles simon in three sets and is now the oldest singles champion in the history of the event. the sheer fact that andy murray is playing tennis like this at all after the state he was in in australia. we all thought his career was at an end. he could ——he was trying to see if you could scrape his body into wimbledon just for a sort of swansong and here he is with his hip resurfacing, having had the desired effect, and no pain. i think that has been a life changing experience for him. he looks like a proper tennis player yesterday,
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winning that title and the guy alongside him and played the last five matches. he played everything. at 37 years of age, that is astonishing. we talked a lot about andy murray's hip over the last few months and just to make that clear to everybody, he actually does have metal in his hip now. he hasn'tjust had it slightly cleaned up in surgery. he has a metal component in his hip. with this, with what happened yesterday, how much further can he go, what more can he achieve? well, it is going to be interesting to see what the next steps are. he is just to see what the next steps are. he isjust finding to see what the next steps are. he is just finding out as he goes along his sort of idol in this sense is bob bryan, the doubles player who had his own hip resurfacing done but it has never been done for a singles player so andy murray will go on for this now, he will play in eastbourne this now, he will play in eastbourne this week. as well play doubles and play at wimbledon. he will play
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doubles and mixed doubles. then its a question of seeing whether he can actually transfer all of these to the single squad as well. i think he is into mines. does hejust go through the us open, enjoy this period of being able to play on half the court, he knows he can do that now, play the us open and then maybe turn his attention to singles after that, what is he look at the us 0pen, that, what is he look at the us open, the tournament he won his first grand slam at seven years ago and think, well, maybe i should try and think, well, maybe i should try and play singles there. it is a big carrot. it must be very tempting. at the same time, he wants to be able to do it gradually. i think a weight has lifted off him because he is walking around with no pain, playing with no pain and enjoying his life again. meanwhile, 2019 just keeps getting better for ashleigh barty. less than a month after wining her first grand slam at rolland garros, the australian has now become
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the new world number one. she moved above naomi 0saka in the rankings after winning the nature valley classic in birmingham. she beatjulia goerges in straight sets to become the first australian women in 43 years to be at the top of the rankings. roger federer‘s preparations are going very well. the 20 time grand slam champion beat david goffin in straight sets — to become just the second man in the open era to win the same atp event 10 times. he certainly looks in ominous form ahead of wimbledon. every time i go well on this tour, i play well at wimbledon. i know that is not a guarantee that i know i am injury free and i will have a couple of days off. and then i will get ready. world champion lewis hamilton won the french grand prix to continue his best ever start to a formula one season. he crossed the line 18 seconds clear of team mate valterri bottas who was second with charles leclerc third. mercedes have won every race this season, as their domination continues. it was hamilton's sixth win of the season.. south africa have been knocked out of the cricket world cup after they lost to pakistan by 49 runs at lords yesterday —
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their fifth defeat of the tournament. despite a 63 from captain faf du plessis, south africa never got close to pakistan's first innings total of 308 and finished on just 259—9 from their 50 overs. pakistan still have a slim chance of making the semi—finals. australian hannah green won the women's pga championship in minnesota — the third major of the season. the 22—year—old made this putt on the final hole to win by one shot from world number three sung hyun park. she led through out the final round to claim her first lpga title. she looks quite pleased with that. just like us on a monday morning when we arrive. like steph when she arrived. it is good to have her back. she is making me laugh far too
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much. carol is aboard the hms enterprise. i am joined enterprise. i amjoined by lieutenant darren petty. why is hms enterprise here in london? we are here in —— forthe enterprise here in london? we are here in —— for the launch of sea week as well as the ceremony of the jews. it was either a barrel of rum ora jews. it was either a barrel of rum or a barrel of wine to pay tax. we are doing that in the tower of london later. so the hms enterprise does a lot. tell us about it. it is hydrographic and oceanographic little of everything from mapping the sea floor to taking sea samples. what happens to that? it goes into
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charts ready for the safety navigation at sea. speaking of charts. tell us about this fabulous machine. there this is our electronic charting device. just the same as paper charts but they are displayed on computer. this is the route we took in. you can see clearly the river thames. that was narrow. we only had four metres clearance as we were narrow. we only had four metres clearance as we were coming through the lock. — — clearance as we were coming through the lock. —— loc. 0n clearance as we were coming through the lock. —— loc. on saturday, we had 2000 people come on over a period of four hours. it has been a pleasure talking to you, darren. now, the forecast today is very mixed. for the next few days, we are looking at the risk of thunderstorms. some of them will be severe. not all of us will catch one. there is the risk of localised
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flooding as well and it will be humid. it is human this morning, temperatures above 20 degrees. temperatures are just over nine degrees in inverness. a fair bit of cloud around. some breaks in the south are likely to fill in as we go through the course of the day and that cloud has been bearing heavy rain through the night. it is now just around the central belt of scotland. to the north of that, it is dry at the moment, but you have heavy rain coming your way, as much as a0 millimetres so the risk of disruption from that. across northern ireland, some cloud, bright spells, thunderstorms across parts of northern england and generally for the rest of england and for wales, it is a dry start with low cloud and fog in devon and commonwealth and it is a mild start but already we have rain in the channel islands and through the day
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it will push into hampshire and the midlands and that could be heavy and also under e. as a band of rain in scotla nd also under e. as a band of rain in scotland continues to migrate northwards. —— also thundery. it will feel muggy and to the east of the band of rain, risk of sunshine and showers at the same in the west. 0vernight, our band continues to push north, getting up into the north—east of england and in three parts of scotland and behind it, another band of heavy, thundery rain comes our way from the south. muggy night in the south with overnight lows 17 18 and a little bit fresher as we push further north. tomorrow, we have a band of rain continuing to push up the east before clearing off into the north sea, leaving us with a largely dry day. variable amounts of cloud, a few sunny spells but still the risk of an isolated thunderstorm across parts of wales and western england. temperatures again in the muggy side as we look
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down again to the south—east. as we push further northwards not as. later on in the week, things really heat up. across parts of northern scotland, we could see 26 degrees and possibly more than that and across the southern counties of england, we could see 31 degrees, possibly more than that. later in the week, the thunderstorm risk diminishes. heating up for us all. that such a change from last week as well. will like car sales fell again last month and apparently dealers are willing to knock a lot off the asking price. steph's looking into this for us thismorning. what's going on, steph? it's a tough time for the car industry at the moment at the latest figures show things still aren't getting better. sales of new cars fell by nearly 5% last month — diesel sales slumped by 20%. the people that put those numbers together are blaming consumer confidence. new car registrations were down nearly 5% in may. sales of diesel cars were down nearly 20pc. it's bad for those who work in the car industry but it means car dealers are desperate to shift stock
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and that's good news for car buyers. according to one estimate the average potential discount on a new car at the end of may was around £2,500 — or 8% off the average list price. but you may not get that unless you're prepared to haggle. darren moss is deputy editor of what car magazine. is ita is it a good time to buy a car? labour absolutely. 0ur is it a good time to buy a car? labour absolutely. our research shows its never been better. £2500 of the price of a new car. we know that dealers are offering that price and it's up to consumers to go in and it's up to consumers to go in and ask for it. is it a case of haggling. do you need to do that? absolutely. new cars are priced with a margin in mind. you could end up paying over the odds but it's important to remember you can'tjust haggle on price. there are also the other extras. a choice of grade and an option like sat nav i always think i'm not good
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at haggling. any advice? no the target price for that car. the price the dealer is willing to play. that gives you power as the buyer but the most important thing is be confident. do your research, know the kind of car you are interested in know that ultimately, if you don't like deal, you can walk away. how do you know what their target prices? we have people on the phone every day haggling on your behalf, finding out how low they will go. you can go and armed with a number that you know the dealer is prepared to play. talking of the dealers in the industry itself, are they still making money on the cars? what are we talking about? margins vary on a number of the is. it depends on what you are buying, when and how and where. we see margins on pop villa segments on anything from 2—5% was
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also 12— 15% cinematic what segment you are buying, all those factors, go in and try and haggle because chances are you can get a good saving. and they are still making money. selling you the car is not whether dealer the most money. it's actually on the bolt on extra. the kind of things you might think, do i really need that and it's up to you asa really need that and it's up to you as a consumer. that is where the dealer is going to make their real money. is there a particular kind of car where you're going to get the sales are slumping. what do you think on that front? diesel cars make a lot of sense. the latest diesels in some cases can be cleaner than their petrol engine alternatives. a car like an suv, you might not get a lot of saving. those
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two segments have a lot of savings. a diesel car could be a great deal even though there are a lot of levies. if i biodiesel car, even though there are a lot of levies. ifi biodiesel car, with the worthless ? levies. ifi biodiesel car, with the worthless? 90% of us buy on finance whether it be leasing or a pcp deal. the manufacturer takes the risk. interesting. that is it from me for now. i thought you would be a haggle of. i think i get now. i thought you would be a haggle of. i think! get too nice about it. everybody should haggle and die rubbish at it. excellent, that's funny. shopkeepers across britain, don't worry. the pyramid stage at glastonbury is one of the most instantly recognisable festival
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stages in the world — hosting crowds of up to $100,000 people. it's been 15 years since former 0asis frontman liam gallagher stepped foot on it, but on saturday that will all change. with his second solo album on the way, he took a break from rehearsals to speak exclusively to colin paterson about politics, love island and that famous feud with his brother noel. liam gallagher, welcome to bbc brick list. you are quite a warm —— morning guy. when your alarm clock off? this morning it was four o'clock i couldn't sleep, i had news on that. how far do you go for the running? just about an hour. i don't do any of that fit nonsense. can you see yourself doing a marathon? no, no. it's just legs and see yourself doing a marathon? no, no. it'sjust legs and pot see yourself doing a marathon? no, no. it's just legs and pot noodles, not for me, man. a busy time at the moment. shockwave, the single.
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not for me, man. a busy time at the moment. shockwave, the singlem sounds like you are quite angry. you saw me ride up the river. you had to hold me back. i saw a lot of people be lazy and go, it's about your brother. it could be aimed at a lot of people. that's up to you to find out. coming out like a shock wild. it's coming round like a shockwave. a lot of protests going on. what do you protest about? i'm not into politics and all that but i do keep an eye on it. i do not bit about brexit. he seems to not be doing a good job. all those kids getting knifed. all that he says is open. what, open for dying? you see 16—year—old kids getting knifed death. i've got kids that age out and about, living, being young and all that. that freaks me right out. we're going to have new prime minister soon. i don't think we
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should have done that. we've had to. three strikes, you get out, you know what i mean? the green party. that must be one of the strange things. suddenly all these politicians are coming out and saying they have been taking drugs in the past. have you seen a take drugs? i don't hang out with politicians and celebrities. politicians or rock ‘n' roll stars. ijust hang politicians or rock ‘n' roll stars. i just hang out politicians or rock ‘n' roll stars. ijust hang out with my mrs and my kids and my mates in a knockabout vibe. if i did see a politician taking drugs, they would get a crack around ahead. what are you doing, you do not? they are meant to be running the country, aren't they? tonight, i'm a rock 'n' roll star. glastonbury, playing the pyramid stage on saturday. you are on the main stage immediately afterjanet jackson. what have you done for me
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lately? i think she is mega, janet jackson. i'm looking forward to seeing her. seeing her crew and all that because you know it's a like with the americans, they go a bit overboard, it's funny. love island, how do you feel if one of your kids wa nted how do you feel if one of your kids wanted to go on that? it ain't happening. why not? it ain't happening. why not? it ain't happening. i sort of that into it last year but haven't watched a bit this year, which is good. it's like not doing drugs. you wake up in the morning and go, did i watch love island? morning and go, did i watch love island ? you wake morning and go, did i watch love island? you wake up and go no, no, no, i was asleep when it was on. sweet as. thank you very much, that was great. you're welcome, will be. i love that he was asleep when it was on. it's on at nine o'clock at night. if you get up at four o'clock in the morning. how many hours is that? we will hear a bit more from that interview later. good fun and full coverage of
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glastonbury at the end of the week. all the headlines at the top of the hour. news, travel and whether you are watching breakfast this morning. hello, i'm asad ahmad. the nhs is to open a gambling clinic in london for children. it's to address children's addiction is being fuelled by on line gambling sites and targeted adverts. the national problem gambling clinic near earls court will open later this year in office specialist help those as young as 13. the number of children classed as having a problem is and it's tens of thousands. a leading academic investigating the windrush scandal which led to thousands of migrants from the carribean being denied legal rights, says some of our famous wartime politicans, including sir winston churchill —
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had racist and anti—semitic views. in a bbc documentary tonight, professor david 0lusoga says secret government files shows politica ns including churchill and clement atlee took steps to create an environment which was hostile towards black british citizens. it included drawing up secret plans for laws which would discriminate against black people. i'm really glad churchill won in that struggle against halifax in 19a0 but at the same time, this is a man who expressed an awful lot of racist views, anti—semitic views throughout his career. both of those figures are true, both of those churchills are real. a mature approach is to see the the heroic actions but also the lamentable attitudes. the original letters from the top of the original letters from the top of the centrepoint building in london are upfor the centrepoint building in london are up for auction. taken from a neon sign removed from the building in 2015, they been reinvented by artists and are expected to sell for thousands of pounds. the money will
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go to centrepoint homeless charity. 0n the trains, disruption on south—eastern services from victoria to denmark hill due to a signalling fault. 0n the roads, traffic is building up in both directions across putney bridge but still moving quite well. good morning. if it's warmer temperatures you've been looking for, this week it is your week as they are set to climb. today, it's already feeling warm and humid. we have a chance of some showers. the met office has yellow weather warning in place for thunderstorms morning. this morning it's looking dry with some sunny spells but these storms coming out from the south, rumbles of thunder potentially, still some bright spells and sunny spells to enter the afternoon and temperatures getting up to a warm and sticky 25 celsius. 0vernight, another met 0ffice yellow warning in place for thunder storms.
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you will notice the bright, the colour, the heavy rain, potential downpours tonight, flashes of lightning and look at those temperatures, not dropping much below 18 celsius so quite uncomfortable for sleeping, another hot and humid night and a hot and humid day tomorrow. temperatures similar. a drier day, less showers around but largely dry, plenty of sunshine in the forecast and temperatures getting warmer as we head into the weekend. goodbye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay
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and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: "man up". jeremy hunt accuses borisjohnson of being a coward and of ducking important questions as they fight it out to become our next prime minister. we'll speak to jeremy huntjust after 8:00. thousands of people with autism and learning disabilities are still being held in secure hospitals in england despite a promise of action by the government. we hearfrom one mum who faces a 300 mile round trip to visit her son. more drama at the women's world cup, as england make it through to the quarter—finals. they beat cameroon 3—0 — but manager phil neville is furious about their opponents' behaviour. and, triumph for andy murray in the doubles at queen's — his first tournament since the operation that saved his career. is yourjob at risk from the rise of the robots? a report says technology could make thousands of positions redundant in the next 5 years.
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plus, life is a debt of four in london. liam gallagher tells us about his fears for the safety of his children. london is open. what, open for knife crime and dying and stuff, but every time you wake up in the morning, there's some 16—year—old kid being knifed to death and i've got kids of that age, you know what i mean? good morning. from hms enterprise. iam i am next to canary wharf in london. the weather this week, there is the risk of severe thunderstorms, localised flooding from those and as we had with the rest of the week, the weather will turn hotter and more humid. i will have more details in 15 minutes. it's 2ath of june. our top story: jeremy hunt has attacked his rival
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for the conservative leadership, borisjohnson, accusing for the conservative leadership, boris johnson, accusing him for the conservative leadership, borisjohnson, accusing him of cowardice for trying to avoid a live television debate this week. in a newspaper article, jeremy hunt tells borisjohnson to, newspaper article, jeremy hunt tells boris johnson to, "man newspaper article, jeremy hunt tells borisjohnson to, "man up". what is striking about this is the kind of language that he is using. believe it or not, we are only four days into this contest proper and we got down to the last two candidates. definitely gloves off from jeremy hunt this morning. lots of stories over the weekend about borisjohnson because my personal life. jeremy hunt says this isn't about that. let mejust hunt says this isn't about that. let me just tell you exactly what was in the times this morning. tea m team hunt say this is all about policy, all about scrutinising what borisjohnson policy, all about scrutinising what boris johnson wants to policy, all about scrutinising what borisjohnson wants to do with the keys for number ten. they are
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actually suggesting at the moment it looked more like he was willing to see ——'s link through the of number ten. the language is not the kind of language you get between two friends that are part of the same political party. -- "slink in —— "slink in through the back door" because of this is part ofjeremy hunt's trying to chip away at boris johnson. we know you guys are speaking to him this morning. let's talk about brexit. both of them have been talking about that date. boris johnson repeating this morning in his telegraph column one of the places we find out exactly where he thinks, repeating that under him we
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will definitely leave on the 31st of 0ctober saying it is infuriating to the british public who haven't left already. he is determined to do so. this still questions about how he will do it because there are some in the conservative party warning today that if borisjohnson tried to leave without a deal, there's enough tories to stop him doing that, potentially bringing down the government in the process. jeremy hunt's policies to get a new brexit deal but the questions about that as well. how will he do that, something that theresa may tried to do, and absolutely failed to do, get a deal they can please the eu and get it through parliament. we will be able to put those questions tojeremy hunt. we are speaking to him just after eight o'clock this morning on brea kfast. nhs england is going to open its first gambling addiction clinic for children and young adults. the service will support people aged 13 to 25 years old. it comes after research by the gambling commission found more than 50 thousand children
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have a gambling problem. lauren moss has more. happy family memories captured on camera. jack ritchie dancing with his mother, liz. 18 months ago, whenjack was 2a, he took his own life while on a gap year in vietnam, after losing money on a bet. he started gambling in sheffield with his friends when he was 17 but it was a habit that spiralled into addiction. they didn't think it was unsafe. he didn't think it was unsafe. and i think he felt, in the end, that it controlled him and that is why he died, really, because he felt he would never be free of it. jack's parents now run a charity to support other families. they're welcoming the news that a clinic for teenagers and young people with gambling problems will open in london, later this year, in what has, until now, been an adult—only service.
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it is estimated a50,000 children are regularly betting, more than those who drink alcohol, smoke or take drugs, and many have a gambling problem. i've dedicated my life to treating adult problem gamblers and that has been sad enough, seeing the destruction that these people have incurred. having said this, many of my adult patients were already children with problem gambling issues. from september, treatment sessions will be offered to children alongside their parents, and also focus on mental health difficulties related to gambling. another adult clinical will open in leeds later this year, and others are planned for manchester and sunderland. it's hoped they'll offer support to those who need it the most, before what nhs bosses have described as the "scourge of problem gambling" ruins more lives. lauren moss, bbc news. a crowdfunding website has closed down an account raising money for the disgraced australian rugby player, israel folau, who was sacked for posting homophobic messages on social media. gofundme said it had
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decided the campaign violated its terms and conditions. let's get more on this from our sydney correspondent hywel griffith. this has been rumbling on for a few weeks now but it seems to be getting very intense all over again forced up very intense all over again forced up absolutely. for those who don't follow rugby, israel folau is a superstar in the game, he had expected to start in the world cup later this year but off the field, he has been controversial because of his homophobic tweets and instagram posts, all based on his devout related —— religious faith. back in april, he posted a message which compared gay people to thieves and adulterers saying they will all go to hell. that was the last straw for his supporters, rugby australia, who sacked him. but he was to take that fight for his job back and the place in his team on the way to the courts. last week, he let launched a big funding exercise on a website
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gofundme and within a few days, he had more than £a000 worth of donationsjust make had more than £a000 worth of donations just make a00,000. had more than £a000 worth of donationsjust make a00,000. in had more than £a000 worth of donations just make a00,000. in the latest twist, the website has said that breaches the terms and conditions and they want equality for gay, lesbian and transgender people. we israel folau hasn't responded today. we know that he has been determined to take this to the courts because it is seen as a bit ofa courts because it is seen as a bit of a text —— test case for employees' rights. if they are allowed to use their workspace to extol their private views. some of his teammates haven't been too impressed that he will be fighting to his place in that team. we will wait to see what he has to say next. the uk has wandered around it needs to stop attacks on oil tankers in the gulf of demand — make the golf of oman was
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west midlands police says it plans to spend seven million pounds on tackling youth violence after declaring knife crime a "national emergency". the force said most of the money will go towards preventing stabbings, by focussing resources on birmingham's night time economy and mediation services for young people. critics say the funding is not enough and the plan relies too heavily on police officers working overtime. let's return to our top story now. borisjohnson is facing pressure to answer questions about a row he had with his girlfriend which led to police being called to their address over the weekend. health secretary matt hancock, who withdrew from the race to be the next conservative party leader, has backed borisjohnson's bid to become prime minister. hejoins us now from central london.
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good morning. boris johnson good morning. borisjohnson setting you out as a sort of stunt double. you are taking the blows while he hides backstage? element no blows at all. there is only one person who can unite the conservative party and bring people together. ---- no blows at all. they haven't optimistic views of this country. he has support from right across the party andi support from right across the party and i think that's why he's the right man for the job. that support, according to recent polls, seems to be getting a bit of a knock over the last few days. away from his private life, whatever happened behind closed doors, is this issue of not wanting to face questions, not being open to scrutiny. that could be more damaging than anything. being described as a coward this morning. that is total nonsense. there is
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about 18 different leadership hustings over the next few weeks. we all saw the debate on the bbc that was last week. endless and constant scrutiny in this contest and rightly so. i called for the tv debates and i'm glad that what happened with all the main candidates, i might say it was quite scrappy, but it meant that all of the questions could be asked and in fact, all of the questions could be asked and infact, if all of the questions could be asked and in fact, if you listened to some of the experience journalists who we re of the experience journalists who were at that on saturday, they thought that it was a pretty rigourous exercise and were surprised how good it was in terms of the level of scrutiny that when you look at the response from the conservative party members, they we re conservative party members, they were also does make very supportive of boris' message and his optimism. he is up eight and can share the country up. the conservative party members, paid—up members of your
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party. yes, some of the questions they asked were tough but its not they asked were tough but its not the same as being scrutinised with your final the same as being scrutinised with yourfinal rival, the same as being scrutinised with your final rival, the final two, the same as being scrutinised with yourfinal rival, the final two, up there in front of a tv audience of millions, ashley getting proper interrogation. you have got to admit thatis interrogation. you have got to admit that is not the same. why won't he do any of these live debate until after voting has begun? he is doing them. he is doing one on itv and on saturday and all of these hustings i was talking about, they are being invigilator by professional journalists. i thought that ian dale who did the one on saturday, i thought he was excellent. he is a broadcaster with huge amounts of experience and so this, the scrutiny that make the scrutiny is happening for both of the candidates and people want to hear about boris's plans for the country higher pay for the conservative 's and he has a series of areas where he wants to
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make progress for people to have more money in their pockets and more money in their pockets. he might be talking about it but he won't talk to us about it. he won't talk to the public about it will he? he can write an article that people have to buy ina write an article that people have to buy in a newspaper to read his views but it is not the same as actually going out there are answering questions from members of the public from independentjournalists. you talk about ian dale, chairing the debate and talking —— asking excellent questions but boris johnson wouldn't answer them. when you are saying that there is no scrutiny, you're obviously not watching these debates. they are incredibly good! lots of questions, rightly, to both candidates and the question of whether boris' private life is private is reasonably up to him. i don't think anybody would like their conversations late at
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night to be listened in to snooped on bya night to be listened in to snooped on by a neighbour but the amount of scrutiny is very significant which is quite right. they have been tv debates already, tv debates around the country, televised, and the truth is boris' message of bringing the party together and of having support from right across the party and therefore being able to bring the country together, absolute clarity on delivering brexit and then a positive, optimistic vision for britain in the future, that's the message that is attractive, not just to the tory party members, although it is, but also to the country that we govern and that we serve. jeremy hunt is a saying in the newspapers this morning is not his private life that is interesting, he wants to talk policy, for example, the issue
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yesterday about tariffs on how mr johnson would leave the eu by the end of october. claims by which the international trade secretary were just not true. it is that kind of thing, isn't it, thatjeremy hunt wa nts to thing, isn't it, thatjeremy hunt wants to open up and have in public? well, clearly, leaving the eu by the end of october is one of boris' commitments and he wants to do that with a deal. i want to see that done with a deal. i want to see that done with a deal because boris has the best chance of doing that with the deal. that is why i backed him. yes, let's have a debate about how we leave the eu and deliver on the referendum result and preferably do it. that debate is happening. they will be debates on tv, what you would classify as a tv debate on the channel and all of these hustings
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all around the country. endless hustings. we have a ready had the bbc debate. now it is down to the final two and giving them head—to—head clarity... crosstalk mac. a lot of debates happen on the bbc. it is understandable that itv would wa nt to it is understandable that itv would want to have a go. as far as the future of this contest, a lot of people were very surprised when you chose boris johnson people were very surprised when you chose borisjohnson and backed him. when you look at the soap opera headlines across the papers this morning, do you think maybe you back to the wrong horse? certainly not because i care about the future of the country and i care about having a prime minister who can bring people together from right across the party, can bring unity instead of sowing division, as clarity on being able to deliver brexit and then has an exciting domestic
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agenda. you know, are driving higher pay, having better jobs, agenda. you know, are driving higher pay, having betterjobs, attracting betterjobs, pay, having betterjobs, attracting better jobs, lower pay, having betterjobs, attracting betterjobs, lower taxes, that's the sort of agenda that we should be fighting for because it is good, it is good for the citizens we serve and it is also the best way to meet jeremy corbyn and a general election because, because, you know, because he would be a total disaster for the country. i think its a great agenda. she does i'd like to talk to you about this story where people are hundreds of miles from their homes. the charity mencap saying it's unforgivable that the government has not missed to sort this out.|j totally understand where people are so concerned about this area. a huge
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amount of ever to bring the numbers of people who are having to travel for this treatment down on the numbers are lower than they were. also the number of people overall we re also the number of people overall were held in secure units is down. that's important. we've got further to go in both areas. we put extra money in. extra money going into the nhs and some of that is going to making sure we can get people on the right treatment, in the right place, in the right setting because after all, this is about supporting some of the most vulnerable people in society. do except it's not having —— happening soon enough? society. do except it's not having -- happening soon enough? unlikely to happen as fast as possible. these are complicated and difficult cases. the care is extremely specialised. absolutely, this is something i'm putting a lot of attention into. address the problem. thank you very
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much forjoining us this morning. we are due to be speaking tojeremy hunt. if you want to read the articles, one byjeremy hunt in the papers this morning, in the times, will have full coverage here. you will have full coverage here. you will not miss out. four days into the official leadership campaign. carol this morning is out on board the starship enterprise. no, hms enterprise! wouldn't that be great? i'm going to show you the view from the deck of the hms enterprise across london. you can see the 02 there and as we sweep across some fab buildings, it almost looks like new york. hms enterprise is in london for the launch of
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international see week and the crew will be involved in the ceremony of the constable dues and the tower of london. today also, you can get a good view of the sky. it is lovely and blue but don't expected stay like that because the forecast is changing. we're looking at more cloud coming in thunderstorms developing. it's worth mentioning if you have an allergy to pollen, the levels are low to moderate. across england and wales. moderate, high or very high. they will come down in the rain. it's the grass pollen season. the forecast for the next few days is one of severe thunderstorms. not all of us will see this. you can see the amount of cloud in the satellite picture. that's been bringing ray northwards through the course of the night and it's ensconced across parts of
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central scotland. continuing its journey northwards, a0 millimetres of rain so it could lead to some disruption. for northern ireland, a mixture of cloud and brighter spells this morning. 0r northern england, still some thunderstorms and for the rest of england and wales this morning, variable amounts of cloud, mrau in morning, variable amounts of cloud, mr au in cornwall and also a bit of sunshine but already, the rain across the channel islands is going to be coming across the english channel, into hampshire, getting into the midlands and also northern england and some that will be heavy and sundry. either side of it, the risk of sunshine and showers. temperatures in the sunshine getting up temperatures in the sunshine getting up to about 26 or 27 in the south—east. not as high as that as we push further north and coming down in the rain. the band of rain continues to migrate only to be followed in hot pursuit by another one coming up from the english channel. again, heavy and thundery rain. humoured in the south—east.
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not as humoured the further north you do trouble. into tomorrow, the band of rain continues east of the country. then clears off into the north sea. we are left with again variable amounts of cloud, brighter, sunny skies but the risk of an isolated under storm in wales and western parts of england. temperatures climbing up into the 20s. then as we head into the latter pa rt 20s. then as we head into the latter part of this week, that's when we really notice the temperatures rise. across parts of western scotland, temperatures at least 26 celsius and in the south of england, at least 31 celsius. glastonbury takes place this week. on wednesday, when the gates open, some early showers and it's going to be driver there will bea it's going to be driver there will be a risk easterly wind. 0n thursday, a brisk wind but fine. temperatures about 26 on friday, saturday and sunday, mostly dry and fine in those temperatures creeping up. the warmest day we think is
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going to be friday, just the risk of a shower on saturday. quite humid, especially on friday night. something to bear in mind. it will be wet after the next few days. such a big change from last week. we have a big change from last week. we have a spanish plume this week. a big change from last week. we have a spanish plume this weekm a big change from last week. we have a spanish plume this week. it sounds like a dance, doesn't it? in 2015 the nhs pledged to get more people with learning disabilities and autism moved out of secure hospitals — and into more appropriate accommodation within the community. but four years later, the charity mencap says it's still not delivering on its promise. it says the lack of urgency to move patients, sometimes kept hours away from family, is unforgivable. jayne mccubbinjoined one mother on a 360 mile round trip to visit her son. last week, we had a distressing phone call. "get me out, get me out, i just want to come home, "i want my mum, i want my mum." i can't take that call.
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i can't take that call out of my head. adele's son eddie has learning disabilities. on christmas day, when he was 13, he was sectioned in a crisis. nine months, that's how long you were told? it is probably going to be about nine months. and its 6.5 years later. any messages for him? we love you, missing you lots, alfie and reddy. today we're joining adele on her once—a—month, 360—mile round trip to visit her son. are you going to come and wave bye—bye? previously we've had to go 600—mile round trips. we've travelled over 26,000 miles within the uk. that's crazy. in 2015, nhs england promised people with learning disabilities homes, not hospitals, but numbers inside have increased slightly on last month to 2,250. 1 in a are more than 100km from home and they faced a record number of restrictive interventions
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like restraint and seclusion. over the years, eddie has had periods of months in seclusion. in some hospitals he's had time when he's not even seen outside for months. this is the lane where we'll have to stop filming. we don't have permission to film inside. 1.5 hours later, adele is out from an environment she says will hinder, not help, eddie's chances for following her home anytime soon. you can hear alarms going, you hear door slamming, phones ringing, bleepers. you can hear really distressed people. i'm driving home in a minute, he's not. he's got a stay in that environment. i struggled for an hour. he's desperate to come home. this is an exhausting 10—hour round trip for adele. right, we're nearly back, but i just want to show you this place first. this... this is eddie's house.
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just over a year ago, a house and a care team was found for eddie so he could move back to his own community. it's exactly as it was... but being so far away, there was no smooth transition into new surrounds. eddie was back in hospital within three weeks. for him to be back in home with his own care and support for him to be back in his home with the right care and support would be cheaper. even if it was more expensive, he should still be entitled to it because it's a human right not to be locked away. local commissioners told us they're still working on a new specialist care package. you shouldn't be locked away for a disability. nhs england say they're invested £75 million to improve support in the community but the reality in the community and numbers of people travelling for car are down but the reality for some like eddie is the door out of hospital is a revolving one. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. jane will be hearing about a0
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minutes to talk through the implications of that story and across the country. and the health secretary told us in the last few minutes that he wants more to be done more quickly to try to make changes. you are watching activist. the news, travel, and weather wherever you are. hello, i'm asad ahmed. a crowdfunding page set up to help a cyclist who was sued after he pedestrian near london bridge is raised over double the amount it was hoping to raise. robert haseltine crashed into gemma brush it. ms brush it sued, although the judge found her equally at fault. mr haseltine says he is moved by the donations and any extra money will be donated to charity. a leading academic investigating the windrush scandal which led to thousands of migrants from the carribean being denied legal rights, says some of our famous wartime politicans,
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including sir winston churchill — had racist and anti—semitic views. in a bbc documentary tonight, professor david 0lusoga says secret government files shows politica ns including churchill and clement atlee took steps to create an environment which was hostile towards black british citizens. it included drawing up secret plans for laws which would discriminate against black people. i'm really glad churchill won in that struggle against halifax in 19a0 but at the same time, this is a man who expressed an awful lot of racist views, anti—semitic views throughout his career. both of those figures are true, both of those churchills are real. a mature approach is to see the the heroic actions but also the lamentable attitudes. the original letters from the top of the centrepoint building in central london are up for auction.
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taken from a 2m—high neon sign, and removed from the building in 2015, they been reinvented by artists and are expected to sell for thousands of pounds. the money will go to centrepoint homeless charity. 0n the tube board, the overground remains suspended between liverpool and hackney downs due to a faulty track and there are severe delays on the piccadilly line due to an electrical fault. slower than usual towards the blackwall tunnel from greenwich due to a collision but it's always slow at this time of morning. now the weather with kate. good morning. if it's warmer temperatures you've been looking for, this week is your week as they are set to climb. for today, it's already feeling warm and humid. we've got the chance of some showers. the met office has a yellow weather warning in place for thunderstorms morning. this morning it's looking dry with some sunny spells but these storms coming out from the south, rumbles of thunder potentially, still some bright spells and sunny spells to enter the afternoon still some bright spells and sunny spells to end the afternoon and temperatures getting up
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to a warm and sticky 25 celsius. 0vernight, another met office yellow warning in place for thunder storms. for further thunderstorms. you will notice the brighter the colour, the heavier rain, potential downpours tonight, flashes of lightning and look at those temperatures, not dropping much below 18 celsius so quite uncomfortable for sleeping, another hot and humid night and a hot and humid day tomorrow. temperatures similar. a drier day, less showers around but there's still a risk, largely dry, plenty of sunshine in the forecast and temperatures getting warmer as we head into the weekend. more on windrush on bbc radio london. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. jeremy hunt has intensified his attack on his rivalfor the
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conservative leadership, boris johnson, accusing him of cowardice for trying to avoid a live television debate this week. in a newspaper article, mr hunt tells the former mayor of london to man up and subject himself to greater scrutiny. after a heated row with his girlfriend, mrjohnson is trying to refocus attention on his policies. earlier, we spoke to some of his supporters. does make one of his supporters, matt hancock. when you say there is no scrutiny, you are obviously not watching these debates. they are incredibly good and lots of difficult questions, as you say, rightly, to both candidates. of course, the question of whether boris' private life is private is perfectly, reasonably, up to him. i don't think anybody would like their conversations late at night to be listened into and snooped on by a neighbour. the uk's first gambling addiction clinic for children and young adults is to be
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opened by nhs england. the service will start in london later this year and will support people aged from 13 to 25. it comes after research by the gambling commission found than 50,000 children have a gambling problem. the uk has wander around that it has to stop attacks of oil to help — make oil tankers in the gulf of oman, a visit to tehran, the foreign office minister andrew morrison said the british thinks iran bears almost certain that responsibility. a 1a—year—old has been charged with murder after a man was stabbed in bristol. police were called to support in this of paul's area of the city where a man was announced dead at the scene in the early hours of friday. the teenager who was also charged with possession ofa who was also charged with possession of a knife will appear in court tomorrow morning. this is a story that has got us all thinking this morning, imagining. air canada is investigating after a passenger fell asleep on a flight and eventually woke up alone in the dark, locked in
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the empty plane, which was parked on the empty plane, which was parked on the tarmac at an airport. her name is tiffany adams and nodded off flying from quebec to toronto and when she realised what had happened, she fault —— called afraid that her ran out of battery and she found an emergency torch in the cockpit, shone it through the light... through the window. shot it through the window and air canada said it is investigating. it is the stuff of nightmares, sally, isn't it? happen to you, didn't it? i was reading a book on the tube and suddenly i was all alone and we were driving to who knows where. but you are safe now. we have got her back! horrific. a little bit like england pot — make
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england's football match yesterday in valenciennes. a great result but cameroon and their players, who lost control of that game? i think you would have to say it was the referee. a lot of the time, cameroon's discipline was lacking, you would have to say. hugely emotional. england are through to the quarter finals of the women's world cup after a 3—0 win over cameroon. manager phil neville said he was ashamed by the behaviour of the opposition following a string of incidents in the match. as katie gornall reports. this was a match that had everything but only one thing really matters to england, they're still standing. from the start, cameroon tried to throw them off course, but it all started to unravel when cameroon's goalkeeper picked up a backpass and in the melee, england's toni duggan appeared to be spat on. what they needed was a cool head in the cauldron. step forward, steph houghton. commentator: houghton, 1-0! cheering. england are ranked a3 places above cameroon and soon ellen white pressed home their advantage.
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into white...flag stays down, ellen white! it was a goal confirmed by var but still, cameroon's players felt hard done by. in the second half, ajara nchout looked to have caught england cold, only to have var steal the spotlight. now the drama and the anger had reached new heights. england, too, were rattled but when it mattered they found a way through, as alex greenwood settled the nerves. even the referee was in the firing line and the match would have a painful end for england's captain as alexandra takounda escaped red for this. cameroon are out but have left their mark. let's cross live to valenciennes where the match took place and speak to former england goalkeeper rachel brown—finnis, who was part of the 5 live commentary team. good morning to you, rachel. phil neville said he was ashamed of cameroon's behaviour last night. how bad was it for you? it was something
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i'd never seen before and it was very uncomfortable to watch because we are looking at the pinnacle of women's football in the world and we are seeing players out there not act like professional athletes. not like the role models we want to see and certainly how england performed yesterday and how they conducted themselves because for all the antagonising and the poor behaviour of the cameroonian 's, the england players were outstanding, fully professional, fully focused on what they needed to do and ensuring that whatever the ar or the referee, whatever the ar or the referee, whatever decisions they made, they moved on and continued with the game -- var. we had some really lengthy waits for the var decisions, didn't we? should it be used for off side? 0r we? should it be used for off side? or is it slowing down the game too much? well, i think the slowing down of the game is down to the
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application of the var rule and how quickly it is turned around. i feel like in the world cup in russia last year, it was quickly applied and a decision was quickly enforced so i don't think there is a problem with the rule for off side. i think it is as definitive as goal line technology, you are either on or off, there is no emotional decision, there is no to context of it, you arejust on or there is no to context of it, you are just on or not. for there is no to context of it, you arejust on or not. for me, var does work for off side and players just need to get on with it. that's it. it isa need to get on with it. that's it. it is a rule change and i understand the heightened emotions of the world cup. i completely understand that those rules, you might feel the injustice of them, but itjust as as that, it is rule that decides the decision that is an absolutely definitive decision and i have no problem with that. let's look ahead, england play norway next. looking at their performance last night, how do you rate their chances? well,
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finally, we are talking about a 3—0 win for england and but does make flying through to the quarter—finals against norway. we played norway cou ntless against norway. we played norway countless times over the last few yea rs countless times over the last few years and they have always been a top women's side in the world of football. they have young players coming through who could be real threats for england but they were taken to 120 minutes and extra time of energies to get through their round so england will, although they have had 2a hours also less recovery time, should innocence be a little bit fresher from time, should innocence be a little bit fresherfrom their time, should innocence be a little bit fresher from their game. england are ranked higher than going into this quarter—final but i fancy england. england have not hit top gear. they have shown some excellent spells of football, they have shown some brilliant finishes, they have shown solid defending but vulnerabilities as well. but i do feel that there is more to come from england and they are gaining in momentum and they are in the
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ascendancy. the game on thursday against norway, you can watch on bbc or listen to it on five it will be stunning and i see england going through. brilliant to talk to you, rachel. —— five live was up you can keep up to date on the daily pod casts. it is available every day of the world cup. the hosts, france, needed time to beat was ill to happen one. their captain with the winner in the 106th minute. andy murray's comeback from career saving hip surgery ended with a fairytale win in the final of the men's doubles at queen's. he and his partner feliciano lopez beat britain'sjoe salisbury and american rajeev ram. with both pairs winning a set each, the final went to a championship tie—break, with murray and lopez winning it 10 points to 5. it's just six months since murray had the hip resurfacing surgery but already he says he's playing without pain.
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it's been brilliant. i really enjoyed it. i felt very relaxed at the beginning of the week and then as it went on, i was getting more and more nervous and i think my competitive instincts were kicking in at the end of each match. look, it was brilliant. my hip felt great, no pain. and at that point, feliciano lopez had just won the seven —— singles title as well. world champion lewis hamilton won the french grand prix to continue his best ever start to a formula one season. he crossed the line 18 seconds clear of team mate valterri bottas who was second with charles leclerc third. mercedes have won every race this season, as their domination continues. it was hamilton's sixth win of the season. the first lap was very tricky. a couple of mistakes and the first few la ps were couple of mistakes and the first few laps were a little bit hairy. the tires, for some reason, felt odd, they weren't working very well. i got my balance and i was good. great britain's men needed to win and they
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did it, 2—0 at twickenham. the first hockey match played at a uk rugby stadium. it took them through to the last four. great to see it being used for that. thank you very much indeed was tipsy later. —— see you later. people aged between 13 and 25 will be able to get support from the uk's first gambling addiction clinic for children and young adults — when it opens later this year. it comes amid growing concern that the problem is being fuelled by online gaming sites and targeted adverts. charlie and liz ritchie's sonjack took his own life when he was 2a, after struggling with a gambling addiction. they join us now. we're also joined from our westminster studio by claire murdoch, nhs england's national director for mental health. let's talk to you first, claire
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murdoch. this is targeted at young people. what will it essentially be trying to do? yes, so this is the first clinic of its kind and we announced in the nhs long—term plan injanuary announced in the nhs long—term plan in january of this announced in the nhs long—term plan injanuary of this year announced in the nhs long—term plan in january of this year that we wa nted in january of this year that we wanted to establish a network of nhs funded clinics across the country over the next five years. and i'm delighted that we are launching this clinic for younger people today. the idea is that this clinic will deliver evidence—based treatment to those severely affected by gambling addiction. may ijust say, actually, you have liz and charles ritchie with you today. its an absolute privilege to work with liz and charles on the back of their experience with their son, tragic experience, with their sonjack and they have really helped inform the model of care that we will be offering. so, for example, that will be 1—to—1 there appear, group therapy, skype treatments initially, but it is a first step, there is much more to be done. liz and
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charles, let me turn to you. thank you so much for coming in this morning to stop how do you think a centre like this could have made things different for you? well, what we things different for you? well, what we ashley would like to say to claire, i really appreciate what she said. —— actually. these clinics are great and we welcome them but you need to end up getting there. so it needs to be integrated with the rest of the health service and what would have helped jack would have been a proper primary care referral. he did refer himself to his gp so actually, there is a massive training task for gps. we are concerned they should be enough money for that. this first centre is in london and i suppose you would like to see this rolled out across the uk and many more of them. i think it is key that people are close to treatment centres so there is a clinic opening in the north fairly soon for adults and as
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we north fairly soon for adults and as we have said, we would definitely wa nt we have said, we would definitely want that across the whole country. claire murdoch, let me pick up on that question, what about primary care? what about young people? we are talking about children in some cases, getting access to these clinics in the first place and also if they don't live near a centre like this? as i said, the long-term plan would see us opening 1a such centres on a network of clinics across the country and it will be really important, as liz and charles have said, that these clinics integrate into their local areas, primary care being key. and certainly, in the first instance, this new and first clinic will also see children and young people... sorry to interrupt you, what about theissue sorry to interrupt you, what about the issue we were particularly talking about, people who have asked for help and not being sent to the right places. how do you tackle that? it is important we do this
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awareness raising. this is a first step. we know this industry. spend something like £1.5 billion on aggressive advertising and marketing, the gambling industry. the nhs cannot tackle this alone so we are making an important first step. as simon stephens had said, the chief executive of the nhs, we need sustainable funding models and we need to look at a mandatory levy and funding research, prevention and also treat and stop so the nhs is stepping forward but it is a first step. there is much further still to go and raising awareness, making sure that schools, primary care, gps, employers and others, spot signs early, and parents, spot signs early and nowhere to go to help and that we develop the resources to support them. that will be an important part of our work. with
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course the gambling commission estimates 50,000 kids have a bloom with gambling today. how surprised are you that it's taken this long to get to a place where we have one centre opening to start with. it's too little, too late and it's too late for us. i'd like to agree com pletely late for us. i'd like to agree completely with claire. we really appreciate what simon stevenson said. we need a mandatory levy that is going to pay for all this. the gambling companies have offered a volu nta ry level gambling companies have offered a voluntary level phased in over five yea rs. let's voluntary level phased in over five years. let's just not enough. voluntary level phased in over five years. let'sjust not enough. this isa years. let'sjust not enough. this is a difficult question to answer. would early intervention have made a real difference. there is no question he would be alive today if that had happened. we knew he had no idea that this was a serious addiction. a heroin level addiction.
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the whole publicity about this being just about money, we thought it was about money. you say it's only money. it shows the power of the industry that this problem has remained as hidden as it has for so long. actually, the research has been out there for many, many years about the addiction risk of gambling andindeed about the addiction risk of gambling and indeed the suicide risk but the industry has managed to retain control through their voluntary levy so that actually that message is not got out to parents, to the medical profession, to all people who should be there at that first stage of intervention. when jack died, we we re intervention. when jack died, we were stunned by the complacency really. we spoke to other parents who were similarly bereaved. we all decided the most important task was to warn other parents because nobody
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else was doing it. you've certainly done that today. give a coming in to speak to us. and thanks to claire murdoch. from the remote gambling association, they say, we support these new clinics and through continued funding by industry, these charitable services are able to provide free of charge treatments for anyone affected by gambling, the national gambling helpline. at the time, it's nearly ten to eight. after the freezing cold wet weather, carol is on the hms enterprise on the thames. warm weather and sunshine, lovely. that's right, but also going to have a lot of thunderstorms. 0n hms enterprise, you can see behind me some of the equipped and that's used. the first one which looks a bit like a propeller isn't undulating oceanographic recorder and it
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records the saltiness of the water, temperatures and depth. what it does, it's dragged behind and undulate 's from seabed to surface and back again. the other one next with the looks like the breakfast microphone, that is called the sub bottom profiler. it goes down to the seabed and sends an acoustic signal down to the bedrock to measure the make up of the seabed and all the data collected by both of these is used by the royal navy to determine what is going on in the underwater environment. how interesting. the weather is also interesting. there could be record—breaking during temperatures across parts of france and germany. we are looking here this week at temperatures from a1 to about aa degrees. if you often your holidays, do bet that in mind. back at home, the forecast for the next few days is thunderstorms. some of
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those could be severe. not all of us will see one. it's going to feel humid as it is already. 0n the satellite picture, you can see there is quite a bit of cloud around. that been bringing rain northwards and it's moving across parts of the highlands and the grampians and that will deposit quite a lot of rain through today. as much as a0 millimetres. we still do have some thundery showers across parts of southern scotland and northern england but will northern ireland, a drier start. some bright spells. for the rest of england and wales, again, some cloud around, low cloud and fog across devon and cornwall equally some bright spells and sunshine as we have here in london but already, rain coming up from trance, moving across the english channel to hampshire into the midlands and northern england. that could be heavy and also thundery and on either side of that, as well as sunshine, we could see thundery
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showers. temperatures getting up to about 26 or 27 in the south—east. not as warm as that as we push further north. pollen levels across england and wales will be very high. as we head on through the evening and overnight, our first as we head on through the evening and overnight, ourfirst band moves north and a new band comes in from the south. again, the potentialfor that to be heavy and thundery with risk localised flooding. 0vernight lows, 18 degrees, not as muggy as we push further north. tomorrow, we start off with all that rain across eastern parts of england. it will eventually push out into the north sea, leaving variable amounts of cloud, sunny spells and the isolated chance of under storm for wales in western england. temperature—wise, once again, at best in the high teens, mid—20s. some of us getting a bit higher than the mid—20s. again, feeling humid. for the rest of the week, we are looking at western
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scotla nd week, we are looking at western scotland having temperatures at least up to 26 celsius. southern england, at least 31 degrees but feeling humid with it. such a change. thank you very much. back with you later. could a robot sit here and do this? or more of us, jobs are under threat from automation. of course the robot couldn't do yourjob. automation. of course the robot couldn't do yourjoblj automation. of course the robot couldn't do yourjob. i am actually a robot, just a really bad robot. this is new research that is out. the digital revolution what that will mean forjobs in the changing work base. new research from open university has found 37% ofjobs in
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the uk are either going to dramatically change over the next five years or they are going to disappear completely and are saying thatis disappear completely and are saying that is because of things like artificial intelligence and basicallyjust the rise in the use of digital. on top of that, the likes of the bank of england talking about this as well, saying there is going to be a fourth industrial revolution and this will mean that we revolution and this will mean that we need to revamp our skills in order to make sure lots of people don't end up out of work. suddenly, all of the jobs are not going to go, as the workplaces change however, we need to adapt for that. it's a lot ofjobs. what sort ofjobs? need to adapt for that. it's a lot of jobs. what sort of jobs? the accountancy firm pricewaterhousecoopers have talked about financial services. some particular jobs, about financial services. some particularjobs, there is a lot of repetitive calculations. also, with the driverless cars, we perhaps won't need as many drivers and even journalism. the financial journalism
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for bloomberg, they have said they already have a system in place where financial data can be analysed and written up as a story which looks like it's been written by a journalist as well. it's creeping into lots of different areas of our lives. how do you prepare for that and protect yourself? of course, there might be people out there going, oh, no, i'm going to be out ofa going, oh, no, i'm going to be out of a job but it's the fact that we need to reskilling many ways orjust keep up—to—date with what's happened digitally so again, as part of this research that the open university of dunn, they say now there has been an increase in the amount of money companies spend on digital training, that's a lie about 13%. it should be things like that which make a difference. the idea being that we work alongside robots, we other people who develop them, we will need lots of people to do that. it's about making sure people have the skills to do that so they can work
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alongside them rather than completely take over everything. you are safe for now. we are safe for a bit. thank you very much. in a robotic voice. so natural. the pyramid stage at glastonbury is one of the most instantly recognisable festival stages in the world — hosting crowds of up to 100,000 people. it's been 15 years since former oasis frontman liam gallagher stepped foot on it, but on saturday that will all change. with his second solo album on the way, he took a break from rehearsals to speak exclusively to colin paterson. we're going to have a new prime minister soon. yeah, i don't think we should have done that. we've already had two that no—one's really voted for. i think three strikes, you're out, you know what i mean? get the other party in there or whoever‘s next, not just labour or the green party, whoever else. that must be one of the strange things. suddenly all these politicians are coming out and saying they have been taking drugs in the past.
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shame on them. i was just wondering, have you seen a politician take drugs? i don't hang out with politicians and i don't hang out with celebrities that hang out with politicians or these fake rock'n'roll stars that hang out with politicians. ijust hang out with me, my missus and my kids and my mates. i don't knock about in that vibe. if i did see a politician taking drugs, they would get a crack around the head. what are you doing, you donut, you know what i mean? you don't approve? they are meant to be running the country, aren't they? liam gallagher on question time, that would be brilliant. it would. put it out there. headlines for you shortly but first, the news, travel and whether where you are. hello, i'm asad ahmed. a crowdfunding page set up to help a cyclist who was sued after he pedestrian near london bridge is raised over double the amount it
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was hoping to raise. robert hazeldean crashed into gemma brushett. ms brushett sued, although the judge found her equally at fault. mr hazeldean says he is moved by the donations and any extra money will be donated to charity. a leading academic investigating the windrush scandal which led to thousands of migrants from the carribean being denied legal rights, says some of our famous wartime politicans, including sir winston churchill — had racist and anti—semitic views. in a bbc documentary tonight, professor david 0lusoga says secret government files shows politica ns including churchill and clement atlee took steps to create an environment which was hostile towards black british citizens. it included drawing up secret plans for laws which would discriminate against black people. command i'm really glad churchill won in that struggle against halifax in 19a0 but at the same time, this is a man who expressed an awful lot of racist views, anti—semitic views throughout his career. both of those figures are true, both of those churchills are real. a mature approach is to see the heroic actions but also the lamentable attitudes.
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the original letters from the top of the centrepoint building in central london are up for auction. taken from a 2m—high neon sign, and removed from the building in 2015, they been reinvented by artists and are expected to sell for thousands of pounds. the money will go to centrepoint homeless charity. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, the overground remains suspended between liverpool and hackney downs due to a faulty track and there are severe delays on the piccadilly line due to an electrical fault. slower than usual towards the blackwall tunnel from greenwich due to a collision but it's always slow at this time of morning. now the weather with kate. good morning. if it's warmer temperatures you've been looking for,
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this week is your week as they are set to climb. for today, it's already feeling warm and humid. we've got the chance of some showers. the met office has a yellow weather warning in place for thunderstorms morning. this morning it's looking dry with some sunny spells but these storms coming out from the south, rumbles of thunder potentially, still some bright spells and sunny spells to end the afternoon and temperatures getting up to a warm and sticky 25 celsius. overnight, another met office yellow weather warning in place for further thunderstorms. you will notice the brighter the colour, the heavier rain, potential downpours tonight, flashes of lightning and look at those temperatures, not dropping much below 18 celsius so quite uncomfortable for sleeping, another hot and humid night and a hot and humid day tomorrow as well. temperatures similar. a drier day, less showers around but there's still a risk, largely dry, plenty of sunshine in the forecast and temperatures getting warmer as we head into the weekend. more on windrush on bbc radio london. vanessa feltz is
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on bbc radio london. about the boris headlines. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast. our headlines today... man up. jeremy hunt accuses boris johnson of being a coward and decking important questions as they fight it out to become the next prime minister. we will speak live
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tojeremy prime minister. we will speak live to jeremy hunt in prime minister. we will speak live tojeremy hunt in the next few minutes. thousands of people with learning disabilities are still being held in secure hospitals despite promising action from the government. we speak to one man he faces a 100 mile round trip to visit her samples at more drama as england get through to the quarterfinals in the world cup. they beat cameroon 3-0. the world cup. they beat cameroon 3—0. phil neville is furious at the behaviour of the opponents. andy murray in the tournament, the first of his career since his surgery. plus, life as a dad of four in london today. liam gallagher tells us about his fears for the safety of his children. london is open. every time you wake in the morning there is some 16—year—old kid being knifed to death. i had kids that age, do
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you know what i mean? the temperature in canary wharf is already 22 celsius. the forecast for the next few days is heavy, than downpours with the risk of localised flooding. it will get hotter as we head towards the end of the week. more in 15 minutes. good morning. our top story is jeremy hunt has attacked boris johnson, accusing him of cowardice for trying to avoid a live television debate this week. mr hunt tells the former mayor of london to man up and subject himself to greater scrutiny. let's go live to westminster to speak to our political correspondent, he joins us now. jeremy hunt is known as being a mild mannered, gentle politician. strong language from him
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today. it is gloves off. he has a lot of ground to make up on boris johnson and it seems he will do whatever it takes to get there. there has been a lot of discussion about the private life of boris johnson. police were called to the flat he shares with his girlfriend in the early hours of friday morning. jeremy hunt is clear it is not about that. he said i'm not interested in debating the private life of boris but i do want to quiz him on how he can guarantee we will leave the eu on the 31st of october if parliament votes to stop a noo deal brexit. this is also about policies, about finding out what mr johnson wants to do with the keys to number10, johnson wants to do with the keys to number 10, suggesting at the moment he is prepared to slink in the back door when it comes to getting power. he really sticks the boot in nfp is saying, don't be a coward, boris clement man up, ensure the nation
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you can cope with intense scrutiny the most difficultjob in the country will involve. this is about the factjeremy hunt is doing more interviews, he is on your programme in ten minutes tyne and we have seen a lot less of borisjohnson. his supporters had been out sticking up for their man saying he is answering questions. here is one of them. when you are saying there is not scrutiny, you are obviously not watching these debates. they are incredibly good. lots of difficult questions, as you say, rightly, to both candidates. the question of whether the private life of boris his pride it is perfectly reasonably up his pride it is perfectly reasonably up to him. nobody would like conversations late at night to be listened into and snooped on by a neighbour. four weeks to go and jeremy hunt says let's get in the tv studios and get borisjohnson on the airwaves more. whether that happens,
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i wouldn't hold your breath just yet. the campaign feels like it has been going on for ever. jeremy hunt will bea going on for ever. jeremy hunt will be a few minutes to answer some of the questions we had been talking about. the uk has warned iran it is to stop attacks on oil tankers in the gulf of oman. on a visit to tehran the foreign office minister has said the british government believes iran almost certainly bears responsibility. let's speak to our middle east correspondent who is in the united arab emirates. how significant is all of this? tensions remain really high here. just across this water was where a us drone was shot down by the iranians in those disputed circumstances. the us said it was in international airspace and the iranians said it was a bad bad territorial waters. the us secretary
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of state is travelling to the gulf, meeting allies in saudi arabia and the united arab emirates. the crucial background is the 2015 nuclear deal designed to stop iran getting nuclear weapons the us pulled out of last year. the us would be quite happy to see that deal being killed off but there are five other signatories that remaining, including britain and two other european states. the british visit to tehran yesterday saw the iranians calling them to bypass us sanctions which are crippling the economy. what we had from the iranians deputy foreign minister is that he felt britons and europeans lacked the will to keep the agreement alive. this will be a crucial week because the iranians say they are going to breach a technical limit of that. we will see if there are further sanctions and
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further moves against the iranians. the uk's first gambling addiction clinic is to be opened by nhs england. it will support people 13 to 25. it comes after research found more than 50,000 children have a gambling problem. happy family memories captured on camera. jack ritchie dancing with his mother, liz. 18 months ago, whenjack was 2a, he took his own life while on a gap year in vietnam, after losing money on a bet. he started gambling in sheffield with his friends when he was 17 but it was a habit that spiralled into addiction. they didn't think it was unsafe. he didn't think it was unsafe. and i think he felt, in the end, that it controlled him and that is why he died, really, because he felt he would never be free of it. jack's parents now run a charity to support other families.
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they're welcoming the news that a clinic for teenagers and young people with gambling problems will open in london, later this year, in what has, until now, been an adult—only service. it is estimated a50,000 children are regularly betting, more than those who drink alcohol, smoke or take drugs, and many have a gambling problem. i've dedicated my life to treating adult problem gamblers and that has been sad enough, seeing the destruction that these people have incurred. having said this, many of my adult patients were already children with problem gambling issues. from september, treatment sessions will be offered to children alongside their parents, and also focus on mental health difficulties related to gambling. another adult clinic will open in leeds later this year, and others are planned for manchester and sunderland. it's hoped they'll offer support to those who need it the most, before what nhs bosses have described as the "scourge of problem
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gambling" ruins more lives. lauren moss, bbc news. a crowdfunding website has closed on an account raising money for disgraced australian rugby player, israel folau. gelfand me has said it has decided the campaign violate its terms and conditions. —— go fund me. this guy is a megastar, isn't he? israel folau are set to become one of the big names in the rugby world cup. he has had his contracts cancelled because of his controversial messages online. he has been posting quite routinely messages. he claims they are quite often homophobic. he made one
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comparing gay people with thieves and liars and adulterers, saying they would all go to hell. his contract was cancelled and wanted to ta ke contract was cancelled and wanted to take australian rugby to court. their website that hosted the campaign has turned around and said it violates, as you said, terms and conditions. they support equality for gay, lesbian and trans people. since we spoke earlier on, israel folau has issued a statement. he claims the company has buckled under pressure and he and his supporters are the victims of discrimination. he seems determined to carry on with the fight to get his contract renewed and when his place back in the wallabies team. it has been seen in australia and around the world as a test case to balance someone's freedom of speech and religion against the right of people not to be discriminated against. thank you.
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west midlands police says it plans to spend £7 million on tackling youth violence after declaring knife crime a national emergency. the force said most of the money will go to preventing stabbings by focusing resources on banning an's night time economy and mediation services for young people. critics say that is not enough and it relies too heavily on police officers working overtime. nine of the young footballers who we re nine of the young footballers who were trapped in that high k+ to have marked the anniversary of their rescue with a commemorative marathon in northern thailand. a000 people took part in the run to raise funds for the complex where the youngsters we re for the complex where the youngsters were trapped. two acrobatic siblings have become the first people to cross new york's times square on a high wire. they are known as the
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flying wallenders. they walked from opposite ends of times square are now 1300 foot wire, suspended between two towers, crossing each other in the middle where they had to pass. liliana sat on the way and let her brother step over her. would you trust your brother to do that? why would you? no, is the answer. wow! well done. they then continue to the opposite side. makes me feel a little bit ill. let's return to our top story now. we can speak to one of the two remaining candidates, jeremy hunt. thank you forjoining us. i have read your article in the newspaper this morning and i am really interested in the language you use. you call boris johnson interested in the language you use. you call borisjohnson a coward and accuse him of trying to slink
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through the back doors of downing street. why make it so personal? there are only two more weeks before ballot papers will arrive through the letterboxes of conservative party members and boris is refusing to do any head—to—head debates in that period, refusing to do any difficult media interviews. when you are prime minister you will have to make some very big decisions, almost immediately, on brexit. it is very important country knows what decisions he would actually take. we had spoken to matt hancock who says borisjohnson is had spoken to matt hancock who says boris johnson is taking had spoken to matt hancock who says borisjohnson is taking part as you are in whole series of hustings and is answering questions. but he is not answering questions on some of the most important things. for example, the news today that some conservative members of parliament would vote down a borisjohnson government if he tried to walk into no deal. the risk that we have got
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is that he arrives at number 10 with a coalition of people like matt hancock, he says no deal should be taken off the table and people like mark francois, he want no deal. sometimes in politics you can fudge and get away with not answering a question but as prime minister you will have to decide and i have been very clear about what my decisions will be. if parliament takes no deal of the table, with prime minister borisjohnson of the table, with prime minister boris johnson take us of the table, with prime minister borisjohnson take us into a general election? yes or no? i would not. i think we must not have a general election until we have left the european union because otherwise we would be wiped out, it would be very dangerous for us, if you look at peterborough. it would be disrespectful for conservative party members not to allow them the chance to see us debating head—to—head so they can be very clear in their minds as to what either of us would actually do. he is clear in his column today and that is another
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newspaper which talks about brexit on the 31st of october. we can, we must and we will leave then. what would you do about the date if there is no deal on the table?|j would you do about the date if there is no deal on the table? i have been very clear. i would leave the european union if there were no deal on the table and there is no prospect of a better deal to go through parliament. i would do it with a heavy heart because an impact onjobs and with a heavy heart because an impact on jobs and businesses, with a heavy heart because an impact onjobs and businesses, the risks to the union. i was in scotland yesterday where no deal would be very unpopular. i would do it with a heavy heart but in the end we must do what the country voted for because we are a very do what the country voted for because we are a very old, very respected democracy. so yes, i would go. the question that is not being answered, if no deal has been taken off the table, with daikon that would boris can have a general election? i would would boris can have a general election? iwould not. iwould would boris can have a general election? i would not. i would carry on negotiating until we managed to leave. boris needs to answer what he
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would do in that situation. he mentioned jobs and you said over the weekend to 10% tariff on products that wipe out a particular company in kidderminster meaning 350 people lost theirjobs. you must have figures if it were extrapolated out. how many people would lose their jobs? the bank of england has published figures. they think it would be a potential reduction in gdp of 2% to 3%, something like that. significant numbers. in the end, i think if we had to we would get through no deal and find a way to flourish and prosper. it should bea to flourish and prosper. it should be a last resort because of the impact on families up and down the country. i also think that conservative party members want to have this debate and they want to know what choices people would make. i think it isjust know what choices people would make. i think it is just respectful to them that both candidates should subject themselves to the kind of scrutiny that makes them know when this guy becomes prime minister this is what he is going to do and he
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will do it with the authority and the mandate of somebody who has spelt out in advance what is he is going to do. that is so important when have these very important controversial issues. you are talking about the party and all the rest of it. theresa may said people call the party the nasty party. are you not concerned that using this language, coward, man up, plays into that view? i think that i am saying is correct. we have someone who is a frontrunner to be prime minister and who is refusing any media scrutiny, refusing head—to—head debates, and he is hoping to get into number 10 not having to answer questions about exactly how he will get us out of the brexit crisis. i said last week i would give him the fight of his life. i will do that. i think i can win this contest because i am being com pletely win this contest because i am being completely straight with people about the decisions i would take. i
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think that matters. these are very difficult times for the country and are prime minister needs to arrive in downing street with a mandate to do what he has said he will do and to do that you had to spell it out. on another point matt hancock made, he talked about borisjohnson being the one to unite the party. what makes you think you are the one?” ama makes you think you are the one?” am a unifierand makes you think you are the one?” am a unifier and i think i can deliver brexit for the 52%, a clean brexit, leaving the single market, leaving the customs union, but i can also deliver a brexit that works for the a8% he voted to remain, who do not want the fundamental character of the country to be changed by brexit, they do not want us to become a country that pulls up the drawbridge that brings down the shutters and says foreign is not welcome. i think i can deliver that brexit to bring us together and that is why i am standing here. we have
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talked about no deal but how will you deliver brexit? the eu has said repeatedly they will not reopen the withdrawal agreement.” repeatedly they will not reopen the withdrawal agreement. i think there isa withdrawal agreement. i think there is a deal to be done. if we send the right person to brussels, someone who is able to negotiate someone they trust and they will talk to bet someone he does not blink and someone he does not blink and someone he does not blink and someone he will walk away if they do not get what they want. if they do that there is a deal to be done. if we don't know what i am worried about is we will trip into a general election, jeremy corbyn will become prime minister and we will have no brexit at ul. let me ask you this last question. if you do not get your way and do not get the keys to downing street, witty work for boris johnson? absolutely. and i hate he will work for me. we had to come together, unite, deliver brexit and unlock the amazing potential of our country. —— and i hope.
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karen is out and about with the weather for the week ahead. she is on board hms enterprise on the thames in london. look at the sky! i am on the quarterdeck, which isjust below the porch deck and you are having a lovely view of canary wharf, which is where we are in london. the enterprises here for the launch of london international media shipping week. the crew will attend the flag raising ceremony for national armed forces day. worth mentioning there are two warships at the moment on the river thames. hms enterprise and hms belfast. both of those are entitled to call the union jack just that, the those are entitled to call the union jackjust that, the unionjack, rather than the union flag. the sun is beating down. i can tell you to scheme it already. the temperature in lens on his rant about 22
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degrees. as we go through the week the forecast is going to be u nsettled the forecast is going to be unsettled for the first half. —— is a roundabout. we are looking at heavy downpours with the risk of flooding. it will remain humid. the thunderstorm risk diminishes from wednesday really. you can see all the cloud on the satellite picture. that has been producing rain through the course of the night. behind it there are thunderstorms and there is another area coming up across the english channel, just crossing the isle of wight and that will come in across southern counties. for scotla nd across southern counties. for scotland this morning the heaviest rain will be in the north, we could have up to a0 millimetres. there is a risk of disruption from that. still thunderstorms in southern scotla nd still thunderstorms in southern scotland and parts of northern england. as we come south that is where we are looking at variable amounts of cloud and sunshine,
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feeling humid with mist and folk in devon and cornwall. either side of that, in the east of england, the west of england and wales, we could see some thunderstorms were not as prolific as the ones we are expecting in central and northern england. highs up to 26,27, but feeling oppressive. this evening and overnight rain will continue to push northwards and a new band will arrive in the south. still heady with the risk of thunderstorms. a muqqy with the risk of thunderstorms. a muggy night in the savage blows to 18. tomorrow we will start off with rain in the east of england which will clear off into the north sea, leaving a messy friday with variable amounts of cloud and sunny spells. an isolated chance of a thunderstorm in parts of wales and west in england and temperature is continuing to be as high as their
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mid—20s, possibly a little more. as you can see in the chart may not everywhere. later in the week is when the temperatures will climb. they lose their thunderstorm risk and temperatures in the west of scotla nd and temperatures in the west of scotland 26 and in the south of england at least 31. today if you have an allergy to pollen, in the sunshine levels will be very high. if you are off on holiday to parts of france or germany, there is a high chance that thejune temperature records will be broken. we are looking at a1 to aa degrees this week on current thinking. aa degrees! the summer is coming back with a vengeance, isn't it, carol? not necessarily going to last.
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thank you very much indeed. a red day for retailers. how will the struggling high street cope? this is the quarterly rent day for quite a lot of retailers, when they had to pay landlords. it is normally better ina pay landlords. it is normally better in a crunch point for any businesses out there that are struggling because they will owe an awful lot of money to the landlord. we have seenin of money to the landlord. we have seen in the past quite often, businesses like debenhams talking about trying to get rent reductions in order to help them. i want to use is to give us an update on what is going on. monsoon at the moment, the accessory still, trying to get a reduction from their landlords. they are trying get an agreement on that. they are in negotiations to get a reduction on the rent. they are saying there is no risk of anyjob losses are still places at this point but a rent reduction would help them. also bus store, the
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bathroom retail specialist. they are looking at problems they are having with their business and seeing what can be done about the rent. they have 168 stores, which has put 700 jobs at risk at the moment but, with them, it is trying to renegotiate things. also it is the point when other buyers might come in and look at them and say, is it worth as snapping up some of these companies are taking over those retail units? that is going on in over the weekend there were stuff about patisserie valerie, the cake shop for and that five of their management team had been arrested because of allegations around alleged accounting fraud. a lot going on in the high street at the moment. for landlords, you reduce the rent for one company... but it is big pressure. there is a lot of talk about whether the rent system is out of date and the fact
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it isa system is out of date and the fact it is a quarterly system. could there be other ways of doing it? i know a lot of businesses struggle with that when they are having trouble. do you have any life hacks, to make your life easier?” trouble. do you have any life hacks, to make your life easier? i tried one yesterday. they probably did it 50 times. we are talking about life hacks later and andy murray, who is back on court and won his first double match since he has his new hip. metal hips and silverware in his hand. all metal. liam gallagher talking about all sorts of things, including politics and love ireland, and glastonbury. —— island.
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good morning. it is said to be an interesting week of weather but there will be a lot of variation depending where you live. the main theme for the next few days is thunderstorms, where there is the risk of flash flooding and it will feel warm and humid for many. this is the low pressure to the south—west. the weather fronts stretching up from spain into france and the uk. plumes of thundery rain moving north in that. one area in the north of scotland will stick around, and in the north—east later, with this thundery rain coming up
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into the midlands and north—west england and eventually the north—east with those brighter showing intense downpours. some sunshine in the west and east but on the whole quite cloudy, warm and humid with temperatures in the mid 20s in the south—east but only 12—1a further north. we have rain in the north—east of scotland continuing and the next area of thundery rain moves in. look at the intense colours, really intense thunderstorms and flash flooding possible overnight tonight into tomorrow morning with temperatures no lower than 18, warm and humid. elsewhere, quite a warm night. on tuesday, the thunderstorms moved north and eastwards and there will be some lure showers in the north—west living with for a time in the morning with lots of cloud again on tuesday. a few bright spells but because of that it will feel quite lucky again with temperatures in the mid 20s, even 20 south in the central help —— quite muggy. on
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wednesday, a few thunderstorms in the far south but on the whole, it will be drier some cloud and brighter spells with temperatures in the mid 20s again. late in the week, drier with more sunshine but staying hot and drier with more sunshine but staying hotand humid drier with more sunshine but staying hot and humid and muggy by night and temperatures by the we can get into the 30s in the south—east.
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hello, this is business live from the bbc. troubling tariffs, china once they threaten the global economy as world leaders prepare for the g20. we are live in london and thatis the g20. we are live in london and that is our top story this monday the 2ath of june. as some of the world's leaders prepared to meet, beijing is urging washington to find a compromise in the ongoing trade dispute. we look at what is at stake. also, carrefour shuts up shop in china, we will look
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at how it

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