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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  June 27, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's 11 am and these are the main stories this morning... scientists say they're hopeful cervical cancer could eventually be eliminated, thanks to a vaccination programme targeting the hpv virus. new campaign pledges from the conservative leadership candidates. borisjohnson wants a points system for immigration and jeremy hunt would scrap tuition fee debts for some young entrepreneurs. europe is in the grip of a heatwave. the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy. laterjen here in rome is not meant to be this hard. —— late june. the real heat tends to come in
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july and august, so there is a early heatwave has taken these tourists here at the trendy by surprise. the metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, says too many crimes are being left unsolved and that national detection rates for some offences are "woeful". fitness fears for england, with both first choice centre backs a doubt for tonight's women's world cup quarter final against norway. pop princess, kylie, tells the bbc that playing the famous legends slot at glastonbury this weekend will be very emotional. by the time i am standing on that stage doing my own show, it will all hit me.
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good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm anita mcveigh. scientists say cervical cancer could eventually be eliminated, thanks to a vaccination programme targeting the hpv virus. it's one of the main causes of the disease, and a new study has examined the impact of the vaccine on 60 millon people in 14 different countries. lauren moss reports. every year, cervical cancer claims the lives of more than 300,000 women worldwide. 850 of those deaths are in the uk. it is most commonly caused by the human papillomavirus. a decade since the hpv vaccine was rolled out to girls aged 12 and 13, scientists have found there has been a decline in types of the virus which can lead to cancer. the study looked at data from 60 million people in 14 high—income countries. it has found that, 5—8 years after vaccination, among women aged 20 to 2a, there was a 66% reduction in high—risk strains of hpv.
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cases of genital warts were also down 5a%, and there was a 31% decline in precancerous lesions. the vaccine's really successful at reducing hpv infections, and there are five hpv types which we've seen really substantial declines of in the uk, and they cause about 90% of cervical disease and cervical cancer. so what we'll expect to see in the near future is that we're seeing really substantial declines in cervical cancers. it is estimated around 80% of girls in the uk receive the hpv vaccine. from september, it will also be given to boys aged 12 and i3. the study didn't analyse data from low—income countries. charities say it shows there is an urgent need for a wider roll—out of vaccination programmes, to get closer to a world where cervical cancer is a thing of the past. i'm joined now by karen hobbs, cancer information officer at the eve appeal, a charity dedicated to the five gynaecological cancers.
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very good to have you with us. this is incredible news, actually. the developments with this hpv vaccine. of course, this is very personal to you as you want to tell our audience. yes, i was 24 when i was diagnosed with cervical cancer and i find it at 99.8% of cervical cancers we re find it at 99.8% of cervical cancers were caused by hpv —— hpv, but it was brought in after i was too old to have the vaccine. i was caught in the middle. when i was diagnosed, it was told it was due to the spiders, prior to being told i had it, i had —— due to this virus. prior to being told i had it, knew nothing about it. it is important that this vaccination is out there. looking at 65 studies of how accept —— effect the vaccine is, it means that the younger generation, hopefully the
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u pta ke younger generation, hopefully the uptake is going to increase with the vaccine and they will know what is going on with their bodies and what to look out for. it is about communicating what hpv is. to look out for. it is about communicating what hpv ism to look out for. it is about communicating what hpv is. it is a huge study. we are talking about 60 million people. doctors, scientists and related charities saying there isa and related charities saying there is a optimism that this disease can eventually be eliminated because the evidence base is so strong. of course. i run with our cancer nurse at ask either and there are five gynaecological cancers that we sort of look after. a disproportionate number of the questions that come in are about hpv, people do not know what it is and they wear the habit. they are not understanding it. —— the body they have it. but esther cannot, it is amazing for us and is great evidence. —— the body they have it. for the city, it has amazing price. at least 50% of the hpv questions we get our about the vaccination. of the letters from
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pa rents vaccination. of the letters from parents who get the letter. it briefly describes what the were underpaid and parents worry that it is harmful. there is no evidence to suggest it as anything other than reduce the of hpv. they buy it will promote promiscuity because hpv has passed through any type of sexual contact and they worry that children will engage in any sexual activity ata will engage in any sexual activity at a younger age, but there is no evidence of this. parents are worried about getting the vaccination to their child, so this type of news piece is a joy. there isa type of news piece is a joy. there is a very sound medical basis for getting the vaccine at this age, before people become sexually active. that is the whole point, isn't it? exactly. the younger you are, the stronger your immune system is. and if you have not been exposed to what you are being immunised against, you're more likely to fight it and not even get the virus in the
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first place. it is important to say that there are four strands any current hpv vaccine that are vaccinated against. 0nly current hpv vaccine that are vaccinated against. only two are related to cervical cancer. so there are other types of hpv as well? there over 100 different strands. lot. so that is why you say it is very important that alongside the vaccine, people are still going for screening as well? yes, it is very important. it is amazing people think, great, i have had the vaccination and i'm going to be protected against the vaccination strands, but there is not it will stop. there are about another 11 types of this particular standard hpv that are not vaccinated against. and vaccination for boys? yes, because it does not only because cervical cancer but penile cancer as well and it is notjust a women problem, but everybody‘s problem.
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thank you very much. the final two candidates in the race to become the next conservative leader have announced new campaign pledges if they become prime minister. the frontrunner, boris johnson has promised to deliver a new australian—point—based immigration system, while the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt says he will wipe the student debt of some entrepreneurs who start up their own business and employ people. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is at westminster. what kind of insight does this give us what kind of insight does this give us into what kind of prime minister either of these men could be and either of these men could be and either giving a lot of detail with his policy pledges? not getting a lot of detail, no. we are getting broad brush strokes. of what kind of prime minister they will be. boris johnson is trying to underscore the pitch that he is making that he would be a prime minister that led from the centre ground, a socially liberal tory. he would be a similar sort of political approach to that
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which he adopted as london mayor. so, for example, he has floated the idea of possibly providing a state aid to the steel industry, not something you would associate with the conservatives. something you would more likely associate with jeremy corbyn. similarly, he has talked about a huge increase in infrastructure spending, transport spending, outside of london to try to sort of level up regions outside of the capital. i suppose the most headline grabbing thing that he has suggested is moving to a very different sort of immigration system, and the stream points based system, and the stream points based system, which many regard as a more liberal system —— australia style points based system. differences that were played down this morning we already have a points—based system, but how can we better inform
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and improve further from the migration council who are experts. currently they are looking at things that are they are looking at things that are the threshold for salaries and other other things that we can build on to this, and qualifications and on language and on each learning from experience elsewhere to simplify the syste m experience elsewhere to simplify the system and ensure we have those controls, but ensuring it is best focused on the skills and job needs that we have for the economy. as forjeremy hunt, he has been setting at the proposals for graduate, if they set up a company that employs ten people, so we would then write off their tuition fees here sing. moving from the conservatives, let's talk about labour as the decision to reinstate chris williams after —— chris
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williamson after his comments on anti—semitism has created on settle m e nt anti—semitism has created on settlement in the party. a lot of anger over the chris williamson decision and privately suggestions that he was only given a rap on the knuckles, a formal warning because he isa knuckles, a formal warning because he is a supporter of mr corbin and because the party wants to make sure he is in place for a possible general election. —— mr corbyn. mr williamson himself this morning has been speaking about the decision and he has hit back at margaret hodge, amongst others, who suggested he has got form when it comes to anti—semitic remarks. this is what he said. it was a grotesque slur, what she said. i've fought racism and bigotry all my life. i'm frankly astonished that she could say such an outrageous thing she did. anybody who knows me, knows my record, knows that i am someone who, as i say, has stood up against bigotry throughout my political life and, indeed, beforehand. my record stands examination by anybody and,
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frankly, some of these assertions that some people are indulging in are really quite offensive and incredibly hurtful. we know the whole anti—semitism row is one of the motivations behind those labour mps who left the party to set up this new party, change uk. and faulkner was asked to take up a role to have a look into these allegations, but he has a role he has now declined —— falconer. he had this to say... do not leave the party, keep fighting, keep making it clear that it is time for the labour party to improve its position. if we leave then you end up in a position where the major opposition party will not change in this critical respect. so i repudiate the suggestion that you're making, but i completely
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agree that something needs to be done. and done, notjust talked about. well, that is something. some labour mps say there should be an independent complaints procedure at with the party, but the prospect of that happening anytime soon it seems pretty remote because we have had that investigation by the equalities and human rights commission going on and human rights commission going on and that, frankly, is likely to take quite a long time, may be more than six months. the idea that anything is going to be done or changed in the near future seems pretty remote. thank you, norman. an air india plane has landed at stansted airport due to a bomb threat. raf typhoon jets escorted the plane — which was due to fly from mumbai to newark — to the london airport so it could land as a precautionary measure. an raf spokesman said the typhoons were authorised to fly at supersonic speed.
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the plane is now in an isolated part of stansted airport, with the main terminal unaffected. the metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, has said too many crimes in the uk are being left unsolved.during during a major speech about the future of policing in england and wales, she admitted national detection rates for some offences were "woeful". home office figures reveal that in england and wales last year only 8.2% of crimes recorded by police resulted in a suspect being charged or summonsed to appear in court. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw told me more about the commissioner's comments. if you look down the list of detection rates, right down the bottom you have sexual offences rates of less than 4% of those cases leading to a suspect being charged or summoned to court. for rape in particular it is less than 2% of allegations that ended someone than 2% of allegations that ended someone going to court. 0ther
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offences, such as criminal damage, the detection is about 5%, theft is around 6%. these are the kind of categories of time, energy, she was thinking of. —— categories of crime. hit cases of manslaughter and murder debate has been around 90%, but in london it has been falling. she was saying that we should be able to bring detection rates up to similar levels like that. is it surprising in some ways to say that a police commissioner is not doing as well at solving crimes as they should be?|j would solving crimes as they should be?” would think a lot of police officers will express concern about this, but for such a senior police officer —— law enforcement figure to say this, that it law enforcement figure to say this, thatitis law enforcement figure to say this, that it is not someone else's fault in something we have to take responsible depart. she says, i'm not proud of this, that detection rates are so woefully low, i think
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it is an important moment and will drive those rates up. what a sheathing that needs to be done to turnit sheathing that needs to be done to turn it around? she was talking a lot about the use of data, computer and phone data. which can be used in criminal investigations, and effectively cctv footage and so on, which is used in homicide enquiries. and managing time is that data effectively to solve more types of other crime. to do that, you need an increase in resources, notjust a lot about the use of data, computer and phone data. which can be used in criminal investigations, and effectively cctv footage and so on, which is used in homicide enquiries. and managing times that data effectively to solve more types of other crime. to do that, you need an increase in resources, notjust staffing, but an increase in the use of technology and better technology, more up—to—date technology. those are the particular things, as well as better skills and expertise in the police service. you need people who really understand technology and how it works and can use that data to solve crimes in the way that is being done in the most serious types of offences. the headlines on bbc news... scientists say they're hopeful cervical cancer could eventually be eliminated, thanks to a vaccination programme
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targeting the hpv virus. new campaign pledges from the conservative leadership candidates— borisjohnson wants a points system for immigration and jeremy hunt would scrap tuition fee debts for some young entrepreneurs. europe is in the grip of a heatwave ...the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy. and in sport: history beckons for england's women — the lionesses will try to become the first england team to reach three successive major tournament semi—finals tonight, when they take on norway, hoping to repeat the form they showed against cameroon. the only unbeaten side at the cricket world cup, india, have lost an early wicket, at old trafford after a review, as they look to snuff out any lingering hopes west indies, had of making the semi—finals. and they maybe under a transfer ban, but chelsea are expecting to turn last season's loan signing, mateo kovachich, into a permanent deal worth £40 million. i'll be back with more on those
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stories just after half past. police on the isle of wight say they are searching for a 22—year—old women who's gone missing from an adventure holiday centre. rosie johnson from glasgow was last seen on sunday evening at pgl little canada in wootton, where she's been working. she is described as having brown hair, of slim build and was last seen wearing a dark blue puffa jacket and trousers. police say they have serious concern for herwelfare and appealed for anyone with information about her whereabouts to contact them. a teenager has been stabbed to death ina a teenager has been stabbed to death in a west london. the victim who is thought to be 18 years old died at the scene in a shepherd's's fish. the place had been given special
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powers to stop and search people in the area —— in shepherd's bush. the two contenders for the leadership of the liberal democrats have clashed in a bbc debate. speaking in front of an audience made up of current and potential liberal democrat voters, jo swinson and ed davey set out their plan, describing how they would ‘stop brexit‘ , and discussing whether they would enter a coalition with other parties in the future. this was how the two candidates set out their vision for leaderhship of the liberal democrats, at the start of today's debate. usually i run marathons, but now i am running to become the leader of the liberal democrats because i think our country is crying out for a liberal movement to stand up and be an alternative to the narrow nationalism of boris johnson be an alternative to the narrow nationalism of borisjohnson and nigel farage. 0ur nationalism of borisjohnson and nigel farage. our country deserves better than boris's brexit britain. and we cannot paint a better vision for the future, one of hope, where
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we transform our economy so it works for people and our planet. as leader i would want to end brexit quickly. given mps are making a mess, the quickest way is to take it back to the people. i hope we then vote to stay and then we can have a lot more money to fix the problems that led to brexit. i want to tackle inequality, help communities left behind and invest heavily in the nhs and schools. i would also make climate emergency priority, as of the climate change cabinet minister, i nearly quadrupled britain's renewable power and have a plan to greener economy. with me to discuss the debate is liberal democrat mp tom brake — who supports jo swinson. and also i'm joined from totnes in devon by caroline voaden mep, who is backing ed davey.
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let's begin with brexit. the biggest challenge that for any of these candidates is how they will do in the short term with brexit. tom, to first of all, do you think thatjo swinson give a convincing detailed plan of how she would stop exit? because that is what liberal democrat supporters want, isn't it? absolutely. what was refreshing about this is that both candidates who are willing to appear together and answer questions together. it is clear thatjo swinson and answer questions together. it is clear that jo swinson and and answer questions together. it is clear thatjo swinson and ed do not have much difference in policy about brexit. we want to stop brexit and we wa nt brexit. we want to stop brexit and we want to do that by securing a people's vote. the advantage that she would have over him is that the advantage that she would have over him she has experience working cross party and that is a very significant aspect and it will require the support of nearly all of the parties
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in parliament to have that achieved. cattle and why do you think that aid should be the person to lead rather thanjoe should be the person to lead rather than joe swinson? i think that his 20 years experience in the parliament and cabinet and the negotiating table of the eu —— jo and swenson. we are not only facing brexit, but we are facing the climate emergency as well and we had need somebody who has got the ability and strength and gravitas to going into serious negotiations and i believe, as tom said, there is not much between them on the brexit issue,. on the brexit issue, it is very willing and keen to work with people on any party who want to help stop brexit, sol people on any party who want to help stop brexit, so i don't really think there's much between them on that issue as far as policy goes. keen to work with anyone from any party on the brexit issue, but both are saying they would not enter a coalition with the brexiteer prime minister? in terms of using the
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number of liberal democrat mps to try to exert influence, potentially hold the balance of power, tom, what did you hearfrom hold the balance of power, tom, what did you hear from jo swinson that sounded like a clear plan?” did you hear from jo swinson that sounded like a clear plan? i think that one thing thatjo said that is releva nt that one thing thatjo said that is relevant is that we were involved in a coalition and it was important to recognise both the achievement of that collection and also the —— some of the killings. the reality is that the liberal democrats, there is probably little enthusiasm —— some of the failings. 0rganisations like the peoples vote campaign that joe has led —— thatjo has led as work together with other parties, and what we want to do is secure in the long term the best interest by the long term the best interest by the united kingdom, which is at the brexit mess we are in can play through delivering a people's vote. that is what she is very much focused on. caroline, did you hear
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anything significantly different from ed davey on that?” anything significantly different from ed davey on that? i think his position is that we are looking at either the conservative party or labour party or both might be facing a split in the future and any correlation where it is always used in context of the liberal democrats being a minor party who might help prop up being a minor party who might help prop up a being a minor party who might help prop up a major party, but i think we are seeing a tectonic shift in british politics we have never seen anything like it and we have seen pulse coming out of the last few weeks where the liberal democrats have been in the lead. -- polls. ed davey was talking about a government of national unity as well. how would that he envisaged the liberal democrats in that? absolutely. i think we have shown inner results in the local elections and the elections, that we are the mirror and party —— the main party of remain. we want people to come and join us under the leading liberal party of the uk banner. if we did have a commit of national unity deserted brexit, we would hope
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together people from moderates from both side. tojoin is under that banner. tom, you're shaking your head. i think the difficulty with a government of national unity is that if it is proposing, for instance, that yvette cooper should be at the head of it, i am not entirely clear where yvette cooper stands on the issue of the people's vote because, clearly, a government of national unity in my view, has to be there to give people a chance for a people's foot to get out of the huge brexit mess that we are submerged in —— people's vote. i would argue that we need someone who is committed to head... . it is absolutely committed toa head... . it is absolutely committed to a people's vote and has been campaigning for it for years. i do not think there is a great deal of difference there. i think his idea ofa difference there. i think his idea of a government of national unity is that we need to move this process forward. we need to get out of the mess and we need to move it forward quickly. so that whoever is in the
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government can get on with governing the country and talk about other issues, not brexit. good to get both of your reactions to that debate. thank you both very much. the go—ahead's been given for a parliamentary by—election in the mid—wales constituency of brecon and radnorshire. the seat is vacant after its conservative mp chris davies was removed by voters in a "re—call petition" following his conviction for making false expenses. the "writ" for the contest — expected to be held five weeks today august the 1st — was moved by the government's chief whip julian smith. the heatwave spreading across europe is expected to get worse, as germany, poland and the czech republic recorded their highest—everjune temperature yesterday. schools in parts of france will be closed today as temperatures are expected to reach the mid 40s, as officials there issue stark warnings about the risk to life.
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and the uk won't escape — over the next few days there could be highs of 34 degrees, with parts of spain reaching a sweltering 45. 0ur correspondent james reynolds has been chatting to tourists in rome. the journey here in thejourney here in rome is —— later gym here in rome is not meant to be less hot. this early heatwave has taken on these tours and a trevi fountain by surprise as it usually comes in a july or august. a fantastic visit to a beautiful city, but a bit hotter than expected. yes, la st but a bit hotter than expected. yes, last night at the spanish that it was 41 degrees. that is way more than you wanted. yes, it is exhausting when you're trying to see all the sites. it was 37 at etienne when we were driving. you're not stopping, you're carrying on seeing the sites? -- at 8am. trying to
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stay: drinking lots of water. it is very stay: drinking lots of water. it is very warm. stay: drinking lots of water. it is very warm. you did not expect this? no, not at all. it is beautiful though, we will put up with whatever. to escape the heat, some tourist might be tempted to think about it jumping into tourist might be tempted to think about itjumping into the fountain. but, no matter how hot it gets here, run's normal rules still apply. anyone who jumps in, run's normal rules still apply. anyone whojumps in, will be fined. our environment correpsondent matt mcgrath is in bonn in germany for a climate change conference. 0bviously obviously this is raising questions about global warming. yes, obviously this is raising questions about globalwarming. yes, no obviously this is raising questions about global warming. yes, no one is jumping on the web are right behind me yet, but there has certainly been
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questions about how close —— jumping in the river rhine. atomic scientists will say that obviously you cannot a tribute to a single event to climate change. —— obviously scientists will say. looking at the records from last year, the summer heat wave last year across europe has made five times more likely, essentially, by the increased warming that has incurred in the world over the last century. the uk heatwave that was recorded was 30 times more likely. there is growing acceptance that these heatwaves may become the norm by the middle of the century and are connected to climate change, say scientists. yet, we have also heard from the un that there is a triple whammy of the actors efforts to reduce climate change. what are the key thing is the un is worried about
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in terms of the global response to this? last october there was quite a claim when this particular report was published by the ipcc on a 1.5 degrees are saying that you could contain global temperatures to 1.5 degrees a century, but it would take a lot of effort. there has been a big bangle at the end of that wrangle has continued her in bonn with oil countries —— a big wrangle. with oil producer saying there is a lot of uncertainty about this and we do not want to welcome that report on. small island states think that that these might that 1.5 degrees might sink them. this is one of the things that is worrying people here. the other thing is that the european union is trying to get to net a zero by 2050, the uk has signed a law this morning to do that. the eu is trying to get —— are struggling to get everyone on board. we have the 620 get everyone on board. we have the g20 going on and the japanese are seeming to be trying to carry paper
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whether you united states by trying to downplay questions of climate change. so you have these three different things going on that make many delegates here rather grumpy and rather pessimistic about options for tackling climate change. news coming in from tunis, the tunisian capital. we are hearing there has been a bomb attack targeting a police car in downtown tunis according to reports. witnesses heard a loud explosion in this neighbourhood of tunis following the incident another report has witnesses saying that a suicide bomber blew himself up in front of the police car in the tunisian capital. no more details at the moment on that. that is just coming in. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king.
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hello. it's certainly hotting up across the uk, not the same as mainland europe but still temperatures will be way above average for the time of year. this is the satellite imagery. we started with cloud across eastern areas and some of it is still lingering along the north sea coast but for most under those blue skies, will continue with that through the afternoon. cloud across the far northwest of scotland and around the coasts of lincolnshire, norfolk and suffolk. quite breezy, particularly in the south, the southwest particularly high and in the south and west we will see the highest temperatures, up to the mid to high 20s in western parts of scotland. eastern scotland and eastern england, along the coasts, 17 or 18 celsius. cloud in the north sea will move further westwards overnight tonight so first thing tomorrow morning it could be rather cloudy but it will burn back towards the coast and it will be a mainly sunny
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day, maximum temperatures a bit higher, 27 perhaps up to 28 celsius. hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: scientists say they're hopeful cervical cancer could eventually be eliminated, thanks to a vaccination programme targeting the hpv virus. new campaign pledges from the conservative leadership candidates — borisjohnson wants a points system for immigration and jeremy hunt would scrap tuition fee debts for some young entrepreneurs. europe is in the grip of a heatwave — the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy. late june here in latejune here in rome is not meant to be this hot. the real heat tends
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to be this hot. the real heat tends to come in july to be this hot. the real heat tends to come injuly or august. this early heatwave has taken these tourists here at the trevi fountain by surprise. the metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, says too many crimes are being left unsolved and that national detection rates for some offences are "woeful". the german chancellor angela merkel is seen trembling at an official event, bringing her health into focus for the second time in as many weeks. sport now, here's mike bushell. the lionesses will try to become the first england team to reach three successive major tournament semi—finals tonight,
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and the teams will have to deal with the heatwave. head coach phil neville is full of praise for ellen white. we want to possess the ball and keep growing in this tournament and keep growing in this tournament and that is our priority so we will be analysing norway the best way we can, knowing their strengths and wea knesses can, knowing their strengths and weaknesses and how we can exploit them and focusing on what we can do and our priority is 100% on norway that damn and getting the result that damn and getting the result thatis that damn and getting the result that is the best for us. you can see that is the best for us. you can see that tonight from 7:30pm. on to cricket and today's match, in the cricket world cup is at old trafford where india are taking on the west indies. and taking in the sunshine down the road, is our
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reporter patrick gearey. patrick, we've been hearing lots about england's wobbles over the past few days, but how important is today's game, in the scheme of things? india are now officially the world's best one—day team. they have gone up in the rankings and got off to a steady start here at old trafford. the west indies reviewed a controversial decision. tempt rowett was not happy about that. they started the tournament late and have only played five games and are now nine points and a win here would ta ke nine points and a win here would take them to the brink of the semifinals. for the west indies, it's not gone as well, only one win for them. they would need to win the last three matches to have any chance of reaching the semifinals. that looks quite unlikely. i'm guessing there's a lively atmosphere there, patrick. what's it like?
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it's a beautiful day here in manchester, wonderful atmosphere. quite a contrast to the rain earlier in the tournament. there wasn't so much noise and so much colour and confidence in this india team, there we re confidence in this india team, there were people dancing around, people playing the drums, face painting, everything going off on these india fa ns everything going off on these india fans really think that their team can win the tournament and they will ta ke can win the tournament and they will take that belief to edgbaston where they play england this weekend. we are expecting a lot of indian fans and a turning pitch for that game. it's going to be a tough one. now, chelsea are expected, to complete the signing of real madrid midfielder, mateo kovacic, for £40 million despite being under, a transfer ban. they can get around that, because the croatian star spent last season on loan at stamford bridge, playing 32 games, so chelsea have already registered him. that means, providing the deal is done before the loan expires on the 30thjune, it would not contravene
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fifa's transfer ban, which runs until the end of january transfer window. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the german chancellor angela merkel‘s health has been brought into focus for the second time in as many weeks after she was again seen shaking at an official event. concerns were initially raised nine days ago when she was seen shaking alongside the new ukrainian president. she explained then that she was dehydrated. here, as she listened to a speech in berlin, she appears uncomfortable, folding her arms and trembling. berlin is still in the grip of an historic heatwave in place across europe. 0ur correspondent jenny hill is in berlin. has there been any comment from angular angela merkel‘s team?
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has there been any comment from angular angela merkel's team? her spokesman has said she is absolutely fine and will continue to travel to the summit injapan later but at home there are growing concerns about her health and that is really because most people accepted the chancellor's own explanation about her shaking episode last week. she was astute in the direct sunshine, it was very, very hot and she said that she had drunk enough water and had simply been dehydrated. it seemed a very reasonable explanation and you mentioned the heatwave, it has been very, very hot here in berlin but today we are having a bit ofa berlin but today we are having a bit of a respite from that, temperatures are much, much cooler than yesterday andi are much, much cooler than yesterday and i don't think you can point to dehydrated dummy dehydration for today's we don't have an official explanation as yet. it could be
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anything ranging from the mundane to the very, very serious. my suspicion will be that we probably won't hear anything official where it is something serious because we are edging towards the summer break, at the end of this week politicians disappear on a parliamentary recess and this comes at a time when german politics are rather difficult. angela merkel has a successor waiting in the wings, her anointed heir who took over recently as the head of the party and is seen as very much the candidate to be the next chancellor but she herself has waded into all sorts of controversy recently with a series of comments that have got into a lot of trouble publicly and there are big question marks in the party as to who would ta ke marks in the party as to who would take over if the chancellor was to decide to step down before the end of her term in 2021 so angela merkel
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and herself would want to be adding to any kind of uncertainty any sooner to any kind of uncertainty any sooner than they have to show my suspicion would be that perhaps we won't hear very much in the coming days unless angela merkel herself decides to come out and give the explanation. if it is the case that she felt rather under the weather because it was warm. as i say, i'm not sure that would be as easily accepted this time. the un's special rapporteur on poverty, philip alston, will be presenting his report on poverty in the uk at the un in geneva tomorrow. professor alston visited british towns and cities and made preliminary findings last november. his findings will be presented to the human rights council. philip alstonjoins me now from the un. you spent some time here in the uk in november and commented that the uk is the world's fifth largest
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economy yet an estimated 14 million people live in poverty. remind our audience what your definition of living in poverty is. well, the united kingdom has a number of different measures but this measure relates to relative as opposed to absolute poverty but it's one of the measures that the government itself uses. yet the government itself and the chancellor philip hammond was among the members of the government to respond to your report saying he rejected the idea that there are vast numbers of people in the uk living in poverty. 0thers vast numbers of people in the uk living in poverty. others have described this as barely believable, your report. what's your response to the reaction to it? to say that my report was barely believable is to say that all of the official and unofficial organisations that are
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monitoring poverty in the uk have got it wrong so whether it's the national audit office or the equalities and human rights commission, whether it's the rowntree trust, the institute for fiscal studies, all of these groups have documented the extent of poverty that i'm focusing on. this isa poverty that i'm focusing on. this is a very real phenomenon on. anyone who goes out on the streets will see the homeless people, anyone who goes to the outer suburbs will see all the foodbanks, people lining up for food. they will hear stories about people on universal credit to have been sanctioned, who are getting benefits that they can't possibly live on. poverty is very, very real to the point where the rowntree trust claims there are 1.5 million people who are destitute. in other words, have absolutely no resources. so the problem is real and politicians can't just wish so the problem is real and politicians can'tjust wish it so the problem is real and politicians can't just wish it away and say that these sorts of reports
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are "unbelievable". one of the criticisms was that you had spent two weeks, and some people describe that as only two weeks, travelling in britain and northern ireland but your response to that is you spent two weeks travelling but you've also combined what you found on those travels with this official record from various bodies which you have just been quoting. i got 300 submissions from all sorts of groups in advance of the visit. i did hundreds of interviews in advance with experts and all sorts of others. i have a team of people who worked on the issues and analysis, it's very thorough, very detailed and matches with all of the official statistics. it's exactly what the house of commons' various committees are focusing on. the statistics and the information in the report were deemed by a very, very senior dwp official a couple of weeks ago to be
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com pletely official a couple of weeks ago to be completely accurate. of course, the argument around poverty and its causes is very much, as you will be aware, a politicised one heat in the uk, as in other countries —— here in the uk. in that sense your report has continued that political argument here. what difference do you hope that this report will make? i think the fact that the report has got huge publicity in the press that a lot of civil society groups are talking about it, that i get letters even from ministers in the scottish government that there have been separate debates in the lords and the comments in the scottish parliament, the welsh parliament, means that people are really moved by this. the report has resonated. the accepted poverty is at levels that are unconscionable in the united kingdom, that this could be changed through government policies that would not cost a lot of money and that it really does come down to
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and that it really does come down to a political choice, the choice to let people continue living in poverty rather than trying to eliminate it. philip alston, thank you very much for your time today. my you very much for your time today. my pleasure. the japanese foreign minister has called on the british government not to allow a no—deal brexit. taro kono says failure to reach an agreement would bring very negative consequences for japanese companies operating in britain. he also said talks on a trade deal betweenjapan and britain would have to wait until after britain had left the eu. there are a few japanese auto manufacturers operations in the united kingdom and some parts are coming from the continent, from europe. and right now, they have very smooth operations.
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their stock for each part is only for a few hours, but if there is no—deal brexit and if they have to go through actual custom inspection physically, those operations may not be able to continue. and many companies worried about implications because they don't know what is going to happen. they don't know what happens legal or physically, so some companies already start moving their operation to other places in europe. so we do not want to disrupt economic relationships with the uk. we have been asking the uk government, let the japanese company know what they can expect and think should happen smoothly without any disruption.
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white more on the breaking news about an explosion in the tunisian capital tunis. about an explosion in the tunisian capitaltunis. a about an explosion in the tunisian capital tunis. a local radio station and a news agency in turkey are now reporting two attacks in tunis. the first is reported as being against a police patrol near the embassy. witnesses talk of a suicide bomber blowing himself up in front of a police car and the second is being reported at a parking lot at the headquarters of the anti—terrorism directorate in tunis. we are now hearing from a number of sources that two bomb attacks are being reported, one close to the french embassy in tunis, the second at the parking lot of the headquarters of the anti—terrorism directorate in
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the anti—terrorism directorate in the city. any more information on that, we will bring that to you. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. scientists say they're hopeful cervical cancer could eventually be eliminated, thanks to a vaccination programme targeting the hpv virus. new campaign pledges from the conservative leadership candidates — borisjohnson wants a points system for immigration and jeremy hunt would scrap tuition fee debts for some young entrepreneurs. europe is in the grip of a heatwave — the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy. i'm victoria fritz. in the business news: us regulators have uncovered a possible new flaw in boeing's troubled 737 max aircraft that is likely to push back test flights. sales of houses worth £1 million
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have risen in the uk, but have fallen in london. more high—end homes were sold in scotland, wales, the midlands and in the north of england, but london saw a fall. 80% of homes trading hands for more than 1 million are in the capital and the southeast. and the environment secretary michael gove has ordered a review of the uk's entire food system to make sure it delivers healthy and affordable food "regardless of where people live or how much they earn". the study will be led by leon restaurant co—founder henry dimbleby. his recommendations will form the basis of a new national food strategy to be published in 2020. people running the railways in britain must be breathing a sigh of relief today because it appears that more reliable and newer trains are improving overall satisfaction with train travel. this is according to the national rail passenger survey. transport focus consults more than 50,000 passengers a year to produce a network—wide picture
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of passengers' satisfaction. let's speak to anthony smith is chief executive at transport focus. people are delighted to find a plug socket for their phone or tablet and to find a train that arrives at the right time at the right destination. yes and over 30,000 passengers have had a say about your last journey and what we are seeing in particular in the southeast is the improved reliability which has been long coming and painful has started to push up passenger satisfaction and what is reinforcing that is there are what is reinforcing that is there a re lots of what is reinforcing that is there are lots of new trains in service, they tend to be longer and have more seats, they are better equipped, they have wi—fi that works, they have power sockets and that's hoping
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to push passenger satisfaction in the right direction. it's not where everybody would like it to be and it's got to be consistent and maintained but it's a very welcome move in the right direction. all of this comes down to value for money. train travel is very expensive, or can be, compared to the same number of miles by car. train travel can be very poor value for money. if you getan very poor value for money. if you get an advance ticket it can be good value for money but one thing that still needs to cracking is reform with the fair system. we have an antiquated fare system that doesn't suit the way that we live and travel. we need reform and the government and rail industry need to continue to push that through and passengers can start to feel better value for money. let's hope so. thanks, anthony. let's take a look at some other business stories. bayer is taking further measures
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to tackle huge lawsuits facing the company over glyphosate. in march a us jury has found that one of the world's most widely—used weedkillers — was a "substa ntial factor" in causing a man's cancer. bayer has strongly rejected those claims. the company has now hired an external lawyer to advise its board on the issue and is setting up a committee to resolve the litigation. shares in the german company have jumped more than 7% today, making them the biggest winner among frankfurt's leading shares. the chief executive of nation's biggest car dealer pendragon is leaving the business less than three months afterjoining. this is following a fallout over the compa ny‘s strategy of focusing on used cars. another big faller in the markets — the fashion house h&m.
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profits came in under expectations and a key meausre of how much stock was left unsold is rising. the company is under pressure to address widespread concerns about the impact of fast fashion on the environment. stock markets generally rising as investors remain hopeful for a breakthrough in the trade dispute at the meeting this weekend xijinping. some shockers though. more business news throughout the rest of the day, after the lunchtime news. ebay revealed this morning that the number of new, self—made millionaires on the internet marketplace has increased by 18% in the past 12 months. in the last year there were almost 1,300 new ebay millionaires defined as businesses trading on the website with revenues of £1 million or more. let's speak to ed snelson, who was able to quit his job when his company selling printed gifts and clothing on ebay took off. great to have you join us. how did you do it, how did you become a self—made millionaire? you do it, how did you become a self-made millionaire? the story started about six years ago, just as
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a small bedroom project selling personalised t—shirts and genetic items and over the past six years we have just developed into a whole host of products —— generic items. we have to hundred and 75,000 different items so it has grown a lot. and you do this with your partner hana, you have been friends since school. when you are at school, was this kind of entrepreneurship encouraged there was this a self starting enterprise? the school was encouraging and i was involved in a young enterprise project so that was kind of my initiating factor into doing this. that went quite well and i thought, this is the kind of thing i'd really like to do, get into business. you are working in anotherjob when you started this business and you were able to eventually give that up. yes, that's right, i worked in a com pletely yes, that's right, i worked in a completely different job, yes, that's right, i worked in a
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completely differentjob, i worked on aircraft manufacture. i worked there for three years and run the business as a side hustle whilst doing the mainjob and ifound myself working till midnight, 1am every single day, and it came to a point where i wanted to leave behind thejob i do this point where i wanted to leave behind the job i do this full—time and now i've been doing that for over five yea rs. i've been doing that for over five years. that's pretty successful site hustle! was the driving force behind this an idea to create the kind of work and lifestyle where you could dictate your own hours and be your own boss? yes, exactly, i've always wa nted own boss? yes, exactly, i've always wanted that freedom of being your own boss and it also brings an enormous amount of responsibility but you still get to choose what you're doing and you have an enormous input over what your company does so yes, we started this on ebay and had this great platform for growth from day one and it has really spiralled from there. thank you very much for to us. we wish you
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continued success. in a career spanning more than 30 years, kylie minogue has achieved most things in music, but there's one ambition she's yet to fulfill. until this weekend that is. the princess of pop will step on stage at the glastonbury festival, 14 years after breast cancer forced her to cancel a headline slot. to warm up she performed in the grand surroundings of kensington palace where my colleague naga munchetty managed to get an exclusive chat. i got you a palace, i got you a throne. we have two micro thrones. what else would i get for the princess of pop? all of this, really, is a bit of a warm up for glastonbury, isn't it? yeah. was that the goal? yeah, i'm a bit nervous. really, after all this time? it's a big dealfor me. why? tell me. there is history with this, isn't there? yeah, it's the legends slot, i keep calling it the afternoon slot to take the pressure off,
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but i think most people know i was meant to headline in 2005 and i had my breast cancer diagnosis so i couldn't do that, so by the time i am standing on that stage doing my show it will all hit me. you know those things, you have to just put them aside and get on with life, but it will all come to me. kylie performs at glastonbury on sunday and her album step back in time is out tomorrow. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. we got lots of sunshine which we haven't seen for a while across many areas. the cloud is burning away and fog the vast majority of us across not only the uk but towards europe, lots of sunshine. we could still see a bit of cloud around the coast of lincolnshire, norfolk and suffolk into the afternoon, a bit of cloud
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for the far north of scotland. for most it is sunny. quite breezy conditions, especially in the south and southwest. temperatures will be widely up into the ‘20s, the highest temperature is likely to be across western scotland, wales and the southwest of england, temperatures getting up to around 27 celsius. we will see this cloud drifting further westwards so for many of us on friday morning, it will start off cloudy but stick with it because it will burn back to the coast again, more sunshine expected, temperatures up more sunshine expected, temperatures up to 27 or 29 celsius in western parts.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live — these are today's main stories... scientists say they're hopeful cervical cancer could eventually be eliminated, thanks to a vaccination programme targeting the hpv virus. report of a suicide bomb attacks in the heart of the tunisian capital. europe is in the grip of a heatwave. .. the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy. latejune here in rome is not meant to be this hot. the real heat tends to come injuly and august, so this early heatwave has taken these tourists here at the trevi fountain by surprise. food delivery company uber eats tightens up the way
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restaurants join the platform, after bbc news successfully registered a fake takeaway on the site and was able to process orders. new campaign pledges from the conservative leadership candidates. borisjohnson wants a points system for immigration and jeremy hunt would scrap tuition fee debts for some young entrepreneurs. the german chancellor angela merkel is seen trembling at an official event, bringing her health into focus for the second time in as many weeks. and history beckons for england's women — the lionesses will try to become the first ever england team to reach three successive major tournament semi finals when they take on norway tonight. good afternoon, welcome to bbc newsroom live.
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i'm annita mcveigh. scientists say cervical cancer could eventually be eliminated, thanks to a vaccination programme targeting the hpv virus. it's one of the main causes of the disease, and a new study has examined the impact of the vaccine on 60 millon people in 14 different countries. lauren moss reports. every year, cervical cancer claims the lives of more than 300,000 women worldwide. 850 of those deaths are in the uk. it is most commonly caused by the human papillomavirus. a decade since the hpv vaccine was rolled out to girls aged 12 and 13, scientists have found there has been a decline in types of the virus which can lead to cancer. the study looked at data from 60 million people in 14 high—income countries. it has found that, 5—8 years after vaccination, among women aged 20 to 24, there was a 66% reduction in high—risk strains of hpv. cases of genital warts were also down 54%, and there was a 31%
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decline in precancerous lesions. the vaccine's really successful at reducing hpv infections, and there are five hpv types which we've seen really substantial declines of in the uk, and they cause about 90% of cervical disease and cervical cancer. so what we'll expect to see in the near future is that we're seeing really substantial declines in cervical cancers. it is estimated around 80% of girls in the uk receive the hpv vaccine. from september, it will also be given to boys aged 12 and 13. the study didn't analyse data from low—income countries. charities say it shows there is an urgent need for a wider roll—out of vaccination programmes, to get closer to a world where cervical cancer is a thing of the past. i'm joined now by kate sanger, from jo's cervical cancer trust. thank you for coming along. we
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sometimes talk about vaccines or scientific development as being really promising. there is absolutely is, is? absolutely. the hpv vaccine is really effective at reducing hpv infection and this is high risk hpv infection which can affect sales, especially in the case of cervical cancer. the sales in the cervix, if not treated, could develop into cervical cancer and the vaccine has reduced the number. —— the cells in the cervix. this is why doctors, medical professionals and other charities are saying that they hope there is, eventually, as to eliminate cervical cancer entirely? that is the holy grail, is it not? that is the holy grail, is it not? that is the holy grail, is it not? that is our vision. we know it as a possible reality and that is largely asa possible reality and that is largely as a result of the vaccination. with the vaccination and the cervical screening programme,
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the vaccination and the cervical screening programme, we the vaccination and the cervical screening programme, we know in young women that we have already seen young women that we have already seen that the number of precancerous cell changes have decreased and we hope that over the next few years we are going to see the incidence of cervical cancer decreased. one of the ambassadors that i spoke to earlier today forjoe's trust, has said the uptake is to 80%. what about that 20% who are eligible for the vaccine but are not taking it? think these headlines were rich people. we hope the study will demonstrate the effectiveness —— you think these headlines will reach people? we hope it will make them think, this is a really possible thing, this vaccination and it can bejust, hope thing, this vaccination and it can be just, hope labour just thing, this vaccination and it can bejust, hope labourjust cervical cancer and religious other cancers in my children. —— hopefully reaches cervical cancer and reduce other
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cancers in my children. working with skills to increase awareness of what this vaccination is for is so important. we have had from other guests that it is important that girls and, later this year it is due to be young boys as well, i this age of 12 or 13 get this vaccination. well before they become sexually active. but it is that issue, that connotation of having this vaccine and the idea of, you know, young children who will eventually go on to become young adults who will become sexually active that has put some parents of allowing their children to have it. yes, so the vaccination is getting around puberty and it is a fact that hpv, especially genital hpv is transmitted through gentle, skin to skin contact of the genital area. so there are some connotations and are some thoughts on some groups around that it some thoughts on some groups around thatitis some thoughts on some groups around that it is allowing... saying that
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you're allowing your children to go and have sex, which is not true at all. it is given at the time because thatis all. it is given at the time because that is when it is most effective. and it can provide the greatest protection against hpv and the diseases that hpv can cause. thank you. a really good to hearfrom diseases that hpv can cause. thank you. a really good to hear from you. more on the breaking news of two suicide bomb attacks in tunis, the capital of tunisia. the bomber is believed to have targeted a police car on one of tunis's main avenues. several people have been injured, including 2 police officers according to reports. witnesses say that a suicide bomber blew themselves up in front of a police car. security forces have imposed a cordon and suspended traffic in nearby areas. local reports are now saying that a second suicide bomber blew himself up second suicide bomber blew himself up near second suicide bomber blew himself up near a second suicide bomber blew himself up near a police station elsewhere
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in the city, winding a further four people. in recent years, tunisia has suffered attacks by islamist, in recent years tunisia has suffered attacks by islamists, including the sousse attacks in 2015. these are live pictures from nature and is in capital, security forces there on the streets. undoubtedly a lot of confusion after these two attacks. —— these are live pictures from tunisia. we are hearing some reports, as i talk to you, that one police officer has in fact died after one of the suicide bomb explosions. in nature netting capital, that is a quote from —— in the tunisian capital. the interior
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ministry is now saying that one police officer has been killed. we are hoping to talk to correspond it for the latest on the the next few minutes. the time is eight minutes past 12 p m. the heatwave spreading across europe is expected to get worse, as germany, poland and the czech republic recorded their highest—everjune temperature yesterday. schools in parts of france will be closed today, and exams delayed, as temperatures are expected to reach the mid 40s. 0fficials there have issued stark warnings about the risk to life as a result of the hot air from northern africa that meteorologists say is behind the heatwave. and the uk won't escape — over the next few days there could be highs of 34 degrees. but it's not quite as bad as parts of spain though, where temperatures will reach a sweltering 45 amid warnings of ‘significant risks' of forest fires. 0ur correspondent james reynolds has
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been chatting to tourists in rome. latejune here in rome is not meant to be this hot. the real heat tends to come injuly or august and so, this early heatwave has taken these tourists here at the trevi fountain by surprise. absolutely fantastic to visit such a beautiful city, but a bit hotter than we expected. yes, last night at the spanish that it was 41. —— at the spanish steps it was a 41. 41? yeah. that's way more than you'd want it. yes, it is exhausting when you're trying to do all the sites. when we drove here it was 37 at 8am. but you're not stopping, you're carrying on seeing the sites? that's pretty impressive. oh, yes. lot of water, lot of gelato. just trying to stay cool. is it too hot? it's pretty warm. did you expect this? no, not at all. you can't get your money back. it is ok, it's beautiful. we love being here in rome so we will put up with whatever. to escape the heat, some tourists might be tempted to think
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aboutjumping into the fountain. but, no matter how hot it gets here, rome's normal rules still apply. anyone whojumps in, will be fined. earlier i spoke to our environment correspondent matt mcgrath from a climate change conference in bonn — he said the current heatwave was focusing the minds of delegates attending. the summer heatwave at last year across europe was made a five times more likely, essentially, by the increased warming that has occurred in the world over the last century. in the uk the heatwave was, according to the met office, 30 times more likely. there is a growing consensus among scientists that the heatwave is like we are seeing might be the norm by the middle of the century and is the result of climate change. we have also heard from the un something else to focus the minds of the
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delegates there, that there is a triple whammy effect as threatening effo rts triple whammy effect as threatening efforts to be just climate change. so what are the key thing is that the un is worried about now. last 0ctober there was quite a claim when this report was published by the ipcc on1.5 this report was published by the ipcc on 1.5 degrees are saying that you could have global temperatures at 1.5 you could have global temperatures at1.5a century you could have global temperatures at 1.5 a century and that wrangle has continued in bonn with oil—producing countries like audi —— like saudi arabia and the united states not wanting to welcome that report in. small islands thinking that 1.5% report in. small islands thinking that1.5% -- report in. small islands thinking that1.5% —— one report in. small islands thinking that 1.5% —— one .5 degrees above the sink them desperately want to keep that... the eu which is trying to get in at zero by 2050, the uk has signed a lawjust to do that, the eu are struggling to get
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everybody on board, particularly those for the eastern parts of the continent. the g20's getting on and the japanese are being seen to be carrying paper with the united states by playing down climate change. so many things going on which make lots of delegates here grumpy and pessimistic about tackling climate change. police on the isle of wight say they are searching for a 22—year—old women who's gone missing from an adventure holiday centre. rosie johnson from glasgow was last seen on sunday evening at pgl little canada in wootton, where she's been working. she is described as having brown hair, of slim build and was last seen wearing a dark blue puffa jacket and trousers. police say they have serious concern for herwelfare and appealed for anyone with information about her whereabouts to contact them. an air india plane has landed at stansted airport after a bomb threat — which turned out to be a hoax, according to an official at the state—run airline. the plane is back in the air after a call was received
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at mumbai airport. air india said earlier that flight a! 191 from mumbai to newark had made a precautionary landing at london stansted airport adding that there is no security threat. more on today's main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. to the conservative leadership contest. theresa may has refused to give unconditional support to her successor‘s brexit plan when she leaves downing street at the end of next month. the prime minister made the comments as she arrived injapan, ahead of herfinal g20 summit. this meanwhile, the two candidates in the race to suceed her as the next conservative leader have announced new campaign pledges. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is at westminster. numbing, and interesting intervention from the prime minister, the current one. it is a
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mrs may about to put a spoke in the wheel of the boris johnson mrs may about to put a spoke in the wheel of the borisjohnson bandwagon by, not necessarily backing any brexiteer he does, he becomes prime minister. that is mooted as a prime minister. that is mooted as a prime minister —— mooted. she refused to give an unconditional guarantee that she would back whatever deal the next prime minister comes up with, saying she was only pack a deal if it was a good deal and it could command a majority in parliament, sort of suggesting that maybe she would not support no deal. this of course boris johnson would not support no deal. this of course borisjohnson has been talking about something other than brexit, setting out his plans for immigration. floating the idea of having an australian style points system if he were chosen as prime minister. i am joined system if he were chosen as prime minister. iamjoined by system if he were chosen as prime minister. i am joined by ritchie, system if he were chosen as prime minister. iam joined by ritchie, a backer of the boris johnson campaign. as there do you take the possibility that the prime minister, she will not be pamina so then of
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course, might not be prepared to back any deal that borisjohnson does? -- prime minister. the current boom and has not been able to pass parliament three times and boris point smack plan is to renegotiate that with the eu —— renegotiate that deal with the eu. when we do that he will be able to deliver brexit and we can get, talking about everything else that we want to. you do not think there will be a sneaking suspicion and mrs may's mind to cause trouble because of all the difficulties that borisjohnson and brexiteers have cause for her and her deal? i think the prime minister has pretty's best interests at heart and she always has if there is an improved offer —— britain's best interests at heart. i think that there is a good deal on table she will support that. and get we can then move on to talk about the other things we want to talk about. let's look at the idea that mrjohnson's
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idea of an australian point system for the immigration system. i would be different to mrs may's system? mr johnson recognises that the immigration advantages that they bring to our society but we also must have control over who comes to our country. the australian —based point system takes into account your job, your egg skills, your ability to speak english and that will —— your skills, your ability to speak english and that will give us more control. has he said he would have a cap on numbers? it is a broader conversation thanjust cap on numbers? it is a broader conversation than just numbers. cap on numbers? it is a broader conversation thanjust numbers. it will be at the british government thatis will be at the british government that is accountable for the first time, for the immigration that is accountable for the first time, forthe immigration system. that has not been the case for before. when i talk to my constituents as well, what they were interested in is that we have control and then also the type of emigration, the nature of the immigration that we have. but as has been very clear that he is open to
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more high skilled immigration. —— also the type of emigration. equally must have control over the low skill immigration. that will be responsive to the meat that people have been asking for. thank you very much for your time. asking for. thank you very much for yourtime. —— asking for. thank you very much for your time. —— two the needs that people have been asking for. mr hunt has been floating the idea that graduates who leave university might start upa graduates who leave university might start up a business which employs people, then their tuition fees should be the top. —— should be written off. something something that might distract us all from politics this evening as the england's rod captain. sport now, here's mike bushell
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the heat won't be a factor for england women's tonight, phil nevillejust phil neville just wants to make sure that his players do not get ahead of the south and dream of the glory that goes ahead. once you get past that goes ahead. once you get past that have a market, we want to be here for the duration of the tournament, but it is important to look to the next game because your mind can start wondering and you can overthink and i think that is something that this squad has been really good at sticking to the task in hand. it will be a difficult game because they are a physical and technical team and they will want to protest as much as us. it is a real moment of character. —— progress as much as us. just sticking to the plan and! much as us. just sticking to the plan and i think that is what is going to be key. i believe that eve ryo ne going to be key. i believe that everyone of these players are —— i believe in everyone of these players and have been a trust in them and i am excited that we are in a world
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cup quarterfinal. and you can see if england can reach the semi—finals on bbc 1 tonight from 7.30, commentary also on five live now, chelsea, are expected, to complete the signing of real madrid midfielder, mateo kovachic, for 40 million pounds, despite being under, a transfer ban. they can get around that, because the croatian star, spent last season on loan at stamford bridge, playing 32 games, so chelsea have already registered him. that means, providing the deal is done, before the loan expires on the 30thjune, it would not contravene fifa's transfer ban, which runs until the end of january transfer window. 0nto cricket and the latest from today's match at the cricket world cup. it's between india — the only unbeaten team in the tournament — against the west indies at old trafford, the windies needing a win to maintain their already slim chances of reaching the semi—finals. india are batting first and despite the early loss of rohit sharma, they have moved on to 113 — two.
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the food delivery company uber eats says it has tightened up the way restaurants join the platform, after bbc news successfully registered a fake takeaway on the site and was able to process orders. the company says it's deeply concerned by the incident and is now carrying out an audit of all food outlets on the platform. 0ur correspondent angus crawford has been investigating this story.... he is with me now. how did this come about? we wanted to ask a very simple question which is how safe is that food that your order online and arise at your door by mopeds? we reported quite a lot about the number of high though —— the hygiene ratings at there. we wanted to go one step further and see if we could set up our own takeaway. so, in comes the best burger corporation... the bbc. we register with uber eats
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on and we give my name and home address, real home address and promised to get a hygiene rating by registering with the local authority and all the cat turned up three days later, the tablet that you process your orders on, and we were able to process orders, no proof of id, no hygiene check and no bank details. -- all hygiene check and no bank details. —— all the kids turned up. hygiene check and no bank details. -- all the kids turned up. what had uber eats said about this? they have said they are deeply concerned about the breach of that safety policy and they have taken immediate action to update the safety sign up requirements and began an additional audit of all the restaurants on the app and have said that finally, they are working hard to ensure that this does not happen again. there is the response on the screen in the background. thank you very much.
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migration and what to do about the surge of arrivals on the us mexico borderfeatured heavily in the first televised debate of democratic contenders for the twenty—twenty presidential race. but healthcare, iran and gun control were also discussed with candidates desperate to use this chance to stand out in a very crowded field. gary 0'donoghue has the story from miami. 0ne party, ten candidates all vying for the chance to make a big breakthrough in front of a national tv audience. after a slow start, it was health care that stirred some patterns. candidates asked to raise their hand if they would get rid of private insurance. it is a key policy for one of the front runners, senator elizabeth warren. health care is a basic human right and i will fight for basic human rights. but one candidate, former congressman, beto 0'rourke, who needed a big lift from tonight, clashed with new york mayor bill de blasio when he defended the choice
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of public and private health care. i think the choice is fundamental. private insurance is not working for tens of millions of americans. when you talk about the deductibles, the premiums, the out—of—pocket expenses, it's not working. how can you defend what is not working? immigration was bound to be a central topic given the emergence of a horrifying image of a drowned man and his two—year—old daughter on the banks of the rio grande as they try to enter the united states. senator cory booker spoke for many of the candidates. when people come to this country they do not leave their human rights at the border. but on the question of solutions, there were disagreements. should crossing the border illegally be a crime? you should not prosecute any family who are fleeing the violence and prosecution. —— persecution. generally the candidates
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stayed away from attacking donald trump, but there were some sharp words. i don't think we should conduct foreign policy in a bathrobe at five in the morning. the biggest threat to the security of the united states is donald donald trump. on january the 20th, 2021, we will say adios to donald trump. these ten candidates agreed on quite a lot, not surprising, because they are all from the same party but there were significant clashes on health care and immigration, a sign that there is a real choice on policy as well as personality. later today, we will do it all over again with the next ten democrats who want to be president. gary 0'donoghue, in the spin room, in miami. and we can talk now to gary 0'donoghue in miami. good to have you with us. as you said at the end of the report, we have only seen half of them. ten more are to come. in terms of what happened last night, who at? -- who stood out. elizabeth warren, it is
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better to say, has one of the front runners in the field, she had one of the —— she had apparently staged herself for most of the debate. she was really able to hit her points pretty early on and get them out there. she was very good on timing, etc., very passionate. her camp will be very pleased and they will feel that the state a villa consolidated their position. in terms of the other candidates, there are one or two who, perhaps, stood up from the crowd. mr castro who has been pulling around the 1% or 2% mark, he made some big splashes. and mr 0berg, who ran against ted cruz in texas by the senate seat, he is big hope for the future —— mr over. —— mr0 hope for the future —— mr over. —— mr 0 work. ten people vying for oxygen and vying for donor money in
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the next few months on the same's debate stage. it was interesting that donald trump responded with a 1—word tweet, boring. i wonder how uneasy he will feel about the level of detail that those candidates got into because that is not his style. that's right. if you think about the people who are probably watching, these are democratic party members, activists. some of the more committed and more —— some of them are committed and about than others. they want to get to know those candidates and hear what they have to say. you had last night that there are differences of opinion within the party. they do not want too much, what they call, blue on blue fisticuffs in these debates because that will only help republicans, but he did see some battle lines and divisions are drawn on those key social issues, in particular the economic debate. we will see somewhere that night. perhaps even more sharply tonight because, if elizabeth warren is one
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of the frontrunners, she was the only one of the five frontrunners who was on stage last night. tonight we will get the other four frontrunners. the people who have gone into double digits in the polling. i think you'll see when we getjoe biden on stage, the former vice president, with bernie sanders, the person who ran against hillary clinton for the nomination in you will see the two strains of the two themes within the democratic party, themes within the democratic party, the centrist versus the more left—wing, progressive, more socialist, if you like, themes. those two going head—to—head will be a fascinating competition later on. thank you very much lets get more on the news of those reported blasts in the tunisian capital, tunis. our world service middle east editor, alanjohnstonjoins me now there have been two bomb blasts in
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there have been two bomb blasts in the tunisian capital tunis, one of them on to the main thoroughfares, a tree—lined street cafe is on each side. there would be a particular amount of security at the french embassy which sits at one end of that straight. the suicide bomber appeared in one of —— in front of one of the place because they are. and detonated. the second explosion near a compound linked to an anti—terror police type operation. when reporting a man on a bicycle detonated a device when they get to this compound opened and as a police car was coming out. we are hearing that one policeman is dead in his attacks and several injured and some civilians injured too. possibly too early for any claims of responsibility, alan, but after the audience may remember the attack at
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sousse. the tunisians must be worried about the impact on the country, particularly for tourism ? yes, no indication of who has done this yet, but it is likely suspicion will fall on the islamic state group. going back last year, to 0ctober, group. going back last year, to october, that same street in the main avenue in the capital was targeted by a woman suicide bomber and it was suggested she had been linked to islamic state. going back to 2015 you will remember two major attacks in tunisia. 0ne to 2015 you will remember two major attacks in tunisia. one in the capital of tunis and more than 20 people killed there and then the terrible attack on the beach resort at sousse in which more than 30 people were killed, among them a number of british tourists. there are militants that make there are other militant organisations in tunisia, one linked to al-qaeda but it tends to operate more in the mountains along the western burger
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with algeria. thank you very much that update. —— border. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. a lovely sunny day of sunshine and right across the uk. there is a bit of cloud across east anglia and the north of scotland but compared with recent days we have more of this strong june sunshine. this will be masked by this brisk wind. quite a cool breeze will keep temperatures on the east coast down as well. it could mask the strength of the sun, it is very high uv levels at the moment. gusts of four or five to 50 mph on exposed coastal areas makes it feel much fresher than you would otherwise think —— four or five to
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50. the fine sunshine continues for many leaving school and into the evening. it's business or more of the same tomorrow, if anything warmer still in western areas. i'll have more for you later. hello, this is bbc newsroom live with annita mcveigh. the headlines: scientists say they're hopeful cervical cancer could eventually be eliminated, thanks to a vaccination programme targeting the hpv virus. reports of suicide bomb attacks in the heart of the tunisian capital — a police officer is said to have been killed. europe is in the grip of a heatwave — the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy.
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new campaign pledges from the conservative leadership candidates — borisjohnson wants a points system for immigration and jeremy hunt would scrap tuition fee debts for some young entrepreneurs. the german chancellor angela merkel is seen trembling at an official event, bringing her health into focus for the second time in as many weeks. food delivery company uber eats tightens up the way restaurants join the platform after bbc news successfully registered a fake takeaway on the site and was able to process orders. the final two candidates in the race to become the next conservative leader have announced new campaign pledges if they become prime minister. foreign secretaryjeremy hunt says he will wipe the student debt of some entrepreneurs who start up their own business and go onto employ people. let's speak now tojulianne ponan, a young entrepreneur who might have benefited from this policy
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when she left university. tells your story and what you're doing now since you've left university. since i've left university, i've formed creative nature. i took the company from loss into profit and now we are stocked in major supermarkets such as sainsbury‘s and asda. in major supermarkets such as sainsbury's and asda. and you employ workers as well? yes, eight full—time staff and three part—time staff. i'm presuming you left university with debt. yes, a little bit, but i worked throughout university so that would have helped mea university so that would have helped me a lot and i would have had a lot more cash to put in the business. so that was a bit of a barrier to the progress that you wanted to make in starting up your own business? definitely, i probably would have started a lot earlier if i had had that cash flow. jeremy hunt is
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proposing if after a number of years young entrepreneurs employ a certain number of people that he would cancel their university debt. i presume you think that's a good idea. yes, i think it's a fantastic incentive because it means it is getting people into work and it's also building the economy so they come out of university and they don't have this huge debt to pay off but they actually have some ground skills so that they can utilise in their business. do you think young entrepreneurs such as yourself should be the ones to be singled out to have their debts wiped out when some might say the ones who go into public servicejobs some might say the ones who go into public service jobs like nurses, teachers and so on should also have their debts cancelled ? teachers and so on should also have their debts cancelled?” teachers and so on should also have their debts cancelled? i think with their debts cancelled? i think with the entrepreneur incentive it's the fa ct the entrepreneur incentive it's the fact that you're getting not only yourself into work but you're also getting other people into work so you're building the economy and giving back even more. that's why i think it should be a priority.”
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don't know if you consider yourself a political person but listening to what we've seen and heard of those two candidates for the conservative leadership so far, does one of them appeal to you more than the other?” think there are strengths and wea knesses think there are strengths and weaknesses in both. i really do like jeremy hunt's incentive with the young entrepreneurs though so that it's something great that's coming out of it. great to talk to you, we wish you well with your business. thank you very much. the labour mp chris williamson — who was allowed back into the party yesterday after comments he made about their handling of anti—semitism — insists he's been fighting racism and bigotry all his life. labour's decision has been criticised by margaret hodge, who said mr williamson should be expelled. the mp for derby north insists he's done nothing wrong. if anybody examines my record as an anti racist campaign are all my life, iam anti racist campaign are all my life, i am astonished she could make such an appalling accusation. there
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is no foundation orjustification for it whatsoever. and i hope she will reflect on that and i'd like to think she will withdraw it. but listen, margaret is one person. i know one or two other people have expressed strong views but i have been overwhelmed by an avalanche of m essa g es of been overwhelmed by an avalanche of messages of goodwill from members of the labour party and that is what constitutes a labour party, grassroots membership of which there are approaching 600,000. i wouldn't say it's a consensus but the overwhelming majority of opinion is supportive of the decision to reinstate me into the labour party. the go—ahead's been given for a parliamentary by—election in the mid—wales constituency of brecon and radnorshire. the seat is vacant after its conservative mp chris davies was removed by voters in a "re—call petition" following his conviction for making false expenses. the "writ" for the contest — expected to be held five weeks today august the 1st — was moved by the government's
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chief whip, julian smith. the metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, has said too many crimes in the uk are being left unsolved. during a major speech about the future of policing in england and wales, she admitted national detection rates for some offences were "woeful". home office figures reveal that in england and wales last year only 8.2% of crimes recorded by police resulted in a suspect being charged or summonsed to appear in court. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw told me more about the commissioner's comments. if you look down the list of detection rates, you can see that right at the bottom you have sexual offences, less than 4% of those cases leading to a suspect being charged or summoned to court. for rape, in particular, it is less than 2% of allegations that end 0ther offences, such as criminal damage, the detection is about 5%, theft is around 6%.
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so i imagine these are the kind of categories of crime that she was thinking of. she was contrasting those low detection rate with homicide cases, cases of murder and manslaughter, where, historically, the detection rate has been around 90%. although, in fact, in london it has been falling for the past few years. she was saying that we should be able to bring detection rates up to similar levels like that. she is being really frank with this speech, isn't she? is that surprising in some ways, to hear a met commissioner saying that police are not doing as well at the job of solving crimes as they should be? i think, privately, a lot of police officers would express concern about this, but for such a senior figure in law enforcement to go public and say, look, this is not someone else's fault, this is something we have to take responsibility for. she says, i'm not proud of this, that detection rates are so woefully low. i think
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it is a significant moment and will focus attention on driving those rates up. this around? she was talking a lot about the use of data, computer and phone data, which can be used criminal investigations, and cctv footage and so on, which is used in homicide inquiries and managing to harness that data effectively to solve more types of other crime. to do that, you need an increase in resources, notjust staffing, but an increase in the use of technology and better technology, more up—to—date technology. those are the particular things, as well as better skills and expertise in the police service. you need people who really understand technology and how it works and can use that data to solve crimes in the way that is being done in the most serious types of offences. the german chancellor angela merkel's health has been brought into focus for the second time in as many weeks after she was again seen shaking at an official event. concerns were initially
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raised nine days ago when she was seen shaking alongside the new ukrainian president. she explained then that she was dehydrated. here — as she listened to a speech in berlin — she appears uncomfortable, folding her arms and trembling. berlin is still in the grip of an historic heatwave in place across europe. 0ur correspondentjenny hill told me about the response from berlin. her spokesman has said she is absolutely fine and will continue to travel to the g20 summit of world leaders in japan later today, but at home there are growing concerns about her health and that is really because most people accepted the chancellor's own explanation about her shaking episode last week. she was stood out in the direct sunshine, it was very, very hot and she said that she had not drunk enough water and had simply been, in effect, dehydrated.
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it seemed a very reasonable explanation and you mentioned the heatwave, it has been very, very hot here in berlin but today we are having a bit of a respite from that, temperatures are much, much cooler than yesterday and i don't think you can point to dehydration as the reason for today's episode. she was also indoors when she began to shake. we don't have an official explanation as yet. the cause of the shaking could be anything ranging from the mundane to the very, very serious. my suspicion is that we probably won't hear anything official where it is something serious because we are edging towards the summer break, at the end of this week politicians disappear on a parliamentary recess and this comes at a time when german politics are rather difficult. mrs merkel has a successor
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waiting in the wings, her anointed heir who recently took over as the head of the party and is seen as very much the candidate to be the next chancellor, but she herself has waded into all sorts of controversy recently with a series of comments that have got her into a lot of trouble publicly and there are big question marks in the party as to who would take over if the chancellor was to decide to step down before the end of her term in 2021 so mrs merkel herself and her team would want to be adding to any kind of uncertainty any sooner than they have so my suspicion would be that perhaps we won't hear very much in the coming days unless angela merkel herself decides to come out and give the explanation. if it is the case that she felt rather under the weather because it was warm. as i say, i'm not sure that would be as easily accepted this time. breaking news from the high court,
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the government has accepted that the demand for special needs support in england has outstripped the funding given to councils. this story about special needs support is something we have been covering this week. three families are asking the court to declare last autumn's budget unlawful because it failed to deal with a shortfall. the qc said the government was actively looking at what needed to be done to address the councils' special needs budgets. the court is deciding on how future budgets can be managed. the department for education has allocated an extra £215 million over two years but as our education editor is reporting from the high court, the government has accepted that the demand for special needs support in england has outstripped the funding given to councils. the grandmother of a toddler who drowned with her father as they tried to cross into the us has told the bbc she knew she would lose them. photos of the pair lying face down
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in a river have sparked condemnation around the world. chris buckler reports from texas for long stretches, the rio grande divides mexico and america. many have tried to cross this river, but the deaths of a father and his child in these waters have put in sharp focus the human cost of the crisis at this border. 0scar ramirez left el salvador with the aim of starting a new life for his family in the united states. but he drowned, alongside his daughter valeria, on the edge of america. translation: as a mother, you get a feeling. i cried a lot when we said goodbye, because in my heart, i felt it was going to be the last time i would hug him. across this short stretch of river, america seems tantalisingly close, but there are real dangers for any families who try to get illegally into the united states.
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tens of thousands are captured by border patrol agents every single month, and that is beside the risks. often these are desperate people, but president trump believes bigger barriers and more security would be a greater deterrent. i hate it, and i know it could stop immediately if the democrats change the law. that journey across that river is a very dangerous journey. however, democrats believe it is mr trump who needs to change his policies, particularly with claims that migrant shelters are unclean, and that the treatment of some children has been uncaring. the family and friends of a 29—year—old australian student living in north korea have reported him missing to authorities. australia's department of foreign affairs confirmed it is providing the family of alex sigley with consular assistance. in a statement, it said
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it is urgently seeking clarfication with pyongyang about the situation. mr sigley speaks fluent korean and is believed to be the only australian living in north korea. he tweets often about his experiences and provides guided tours of the country. the australian government says it's seeking "urgent clarification" over the whereabouts of one of its citizens who has been living in north korea. the family of 29—year—old alek sigley say he has been out of contact since tuesday. hywel griffith reports. alex sigley has been living in pyongyang since last year. he is a student of korean literature and has also developed a bit of a side business offering foreign visitors to north korea tours around the country. according to pictures on his website and social media stream, he's been quite successful in showing everyday life as it is in north korea, sometimes in very mundane detail — things like trips to the zoo or meals that he's enjoyed. he is, according to some people, who have been on those tours, very, very cautious and clear and careful
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to give respect to his north korean hosts. that stream of twitter messages stopped two days ago on the 24th ofjune. according to his family in perth, australia, that is unusual for him not to be in daily contact so clearly they are concerned. the australian government say they are urgently trying to work out his whereabouts, but they don't have an embassy in north korea so they are depending on a consular agreement with the swedish embassy, so work is going on behind the scenes to ascertain his whereabouts. there are some unconfirmed reports that he has been detained or arrested. unconfirmed, clearly — however, that is a cause for concern, given the precedent of some western people being arrested there and detained. his family clearly hoping that this will be resolved sooner rather than later and he will be back in contact with them. italy says it won't allow any migrants to disembark from a rescue boat that's currently off the coast
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of the island of lampedusa. sea—watch 3 is carrying 42 migrants, including women and children, whom it rescued in the mediterranean two weeks ago. despite the risk of heavy fines, the ship's captain says she had to head to italy because the migrants are exhausted. ramzan karmali reports. the charity ship sea—watch 3 heading to the italian island of lampedusa. from a distance, it looks like any other vessel heading to shore. but this boat is carrying 42 migrants rescued two weeks ago from a rubber boat in the mediterranean. since that rescue, it has been sailing back and forth off the coast of italy's southernmost island. an exhausted captain described what happened when officials climbed on board. they have checked all our ship certificates and passports of the crew and now they are waiting for further instructions from their superiors. i really hope they will take the rescuees off the ship. but italy's interior minister matteo
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salvini was furious the ship had even entered italian waters and vowed that the dutch—registered vessel would not be allowed to disembark. he also said that he had lodged a diplomatic protest with the netherlands. translation: sea-watch, a ship operating outside the law, is endangering the lives of dozens of immigrants for a little political game, for a little disgusting and shady political game. they are the ones who are playing with the lives of human beings. italian authorities had earlier warned that they would impose heavy fines or even impound the ship, but the charity that runs the boat said that the captain of sea—watch 3 had no alternative but to head for lampedusa. it also accused european institutions of not fulfilling their responsibilities to safeguard people rescued at sea. this isn't the first time the ship has been used to rescue migrants from the mediterranean and also not
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the first time it has angered italian authorities. the last time, it took assurances from six european countries that they would take on the rescued migrants before it was allowed to dock. and unless european countries can agree on a plan to deal with this crisis in the long—term, similar stand—offs off the italian coast are likely to be repeated. in a career spanning more than 30 years, kylie minogue has achieved most things in music. but there's one ambition she's yet to fulfill. until this weekend that is. the princess of pop will step on stage at the glastonbury festival, 14 years after breast cancer forced her to cancel a headline slot. to warm up she performed in the grand surroundings of kensington palace where my colleague naga munchetty managed to get an exclusive chat. so, kylie, thank you for talking to me. i mean, look at this! i got you a palace,
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i got you a throne. we have two micro thrones. what else would i get for the princess of pop? all of this, really, is a bit of a warm—up for glastonbury, isn't it? yeah. was that a gulp? really, after all this time? it's a big dealfor me, yeah. why? tell me. there is history with this, isn't there? yeah, it's the legends slot, i keep calling it the afternoon slot to take the pressure off, but i think most people know i was meant to headline in 2005 and i had my breast cancer diagnosis so i couldn't do that, so by the time i am standing on that stage doing my show, it will all hit me. you know those things, you have to just put them aside and get on with life,
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but it will all come to me. all the more reason to celebrate. i'm telling myself that. absolutely. i made it here! will i see you in wellies? i am prepared and i do have wellies. gold hot pants? no, i don't think so. oh, really?! one of the things people always ask me is when you interview someone who is famous, they appear lovely. are they as lovely? i genuinely say, she's fantastic. is that a mental attitude, have you decided, this is the person you are going to be? ijust think this is the person i am. i'm not lovely all the time! people sometimes get the look. i want to see the look. you don't want to see it, really. give me the look and i will
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give you mine back. ready, set, go. it's terrifying! it's scary. you are also performing for the 50th anniversary of the stonewall riots, for brighton. yes, the community and i have been a solid partnership for so long. how did that come about? not too much to do with me, i have to confess. i feel like the lgbt communityjust adopted me and said, somehow we know she is one of us. it's a hard thing to explain, because it'sjust normal to me. didn't you say you wouldn't get married unless australia changed the rules, wasn't that one of the moments? yeah. that's quite a big statement to make, isn't it? yes, and they did change it. i usually shake hands at the end
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of an interview, are you a hugger? i'm a hugger, naga! i'm not going to shake your hand! i might steal your dress. thank you so much, it has been an absolute pleasure. kylie performs at glastonbury on sunday and her album step back in time is out tomorrow. a teenager in istanbul has been called a hero for catching a toddler as she fell from the second floor of a block of flats. feuzi zabaat — seen here in the yellow t—shirt — saw that two—year—old doha muhammed was about to fall from her home on the second floor so he stood beneath the window. he managed to catch the toddler mid—air after she stumbled and fell whilst the girl's mum was inside cooking. zabaat‘s quick thinking saved doha from what would have been a serious injury. the incident was captured on the cctv of a neighbouring shop. in a moment it's time for the one o'clock news with reeta chakrabarti
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but first it's time for a look at the weather with helen willets. good morning. it's been mostly cloudy over the last few days. we've had rain and thunderstorms but finally today many of us will get to see those blue skies and sunshine. 0ver see those blue skies and sunshine. over the next few days it's going to turn very warm. it's not sunny for all of us, we've had some cloud in central and eastern parts along the coast of norfolk and suffolk that cloud could linger and there is cloud could linger and there is cloud in the far north of scotland. 0therwise, plenty of sunshine, quite breezy, especially towards the south but the wind is coming in from the northeast and that means those north sea coasts always a bit cooler and fresher, temperatures of 17 to 18 celsius. the further west, the highest temperatures, up into the mid 20s, across western areas of england and wales. through tonight, because of that northeasterly wind, it will start to drag on more cloud from the north sea so by tomorrow morning, many of us will start off
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with a fair morning, many of us will start off withafairamount morning, many of us will start off with a fair amount of cloud again. temperatures getting down to around nine to 15 celsius but the cloud will tend to clear away. high pressure is moving towards the east during friday. that will set up a southeasterly wind, bringing the very southeasterly wind, bringing the very warm southeasterly wind, bringing the very warm air that we've had recently across parts of europe so you notice towards these western areas again we've got the orange colours to give you warmer air. 0n friday morning the cloud will burn our way back to the coasts. it might linger a cost eastern areas but lots of sunshine expected during friday afternoon and maximum temperatures up afternoon and maximum temperatures up again to 26 to 29 celsius in parts of western scotland, western fringes of england and wales, still a little bit fresher and on the north sea coasts, but by saturday, you've got the southeasterly, so highest temperatures will be towards the east where you could see up to about 32 celsius in the south. a bit
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fresher further north and west. a bit more cloud on saturday and showers for scotland and northern ireland. that's because we've got this weather front moving eastwards and as we going to sunday, the wind changes again. it's going to come from a westerly direction so we cut off that warm air coming in from the near continent. it will be a fresher feel, it will bring more cloud, some showers across northern and western areas throughout the day, temperatures down considerably compared to saturday, 20 to 24 celsius but it will still feel fairly pleasant when you get the sunshine. bye—bye.
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europe braces itself for more scorching weather, as a heatwave sets records forjune. with temperatures in the 40s across several countries, people are using all resources to help stay cool. we'll bring you the latest from our correspondent in paris, and we'll be asking how far this heatwave can be blamed on man—made climate change. also this lunchtime: as the race is on to find her replacement, theresa may says she won't automatically back her successor‘s brexit strategy. scientists say cervical cancer could be eradicated, thanks to the success of a vaccine against the virus that causes it. the food delivery firm uber eats tightens up the way restaurants join its platform, after a bbc investigation on food standards. and england prepare to take
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on norway for a place in

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