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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 27, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2: europe bakes as temperatures rise to levels normally seen in the middle east. a0 degrees is forecast for france, spain and italy. here in the uk, it's a mere 30 degrees. a bit hotter than we expected. yeah, last night at the spanish steps, it was 41. 41? a lot of water, a lot of gelato. hat. just trying to stay cool. a medical success story — as scientists say they hope cervical cancer could eventually be eradicated, thanks to the vaccination programme against the hpv virus. what we will expect to see in the near future is that we are seeing really substantial declines in cervical cancer. the trial of the man accused of stabbing a fellow train passneger
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to death hears that a witness heard that darren purcille held a phone to his face and said "im going to kill this man". as the race to find theresa may's replacement continues, she makes it clear she won't automatically back her successor‘s brexit strategy. health concerns for the german chancellor, angela merkel, after she's seen shaking for the second time in two weeks. her office say she's fine. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. it's the start of the womens‘ wiorld cup quarterfinals today and the england lionesses are first up this evening, we'll have the latest from le havre ahead of their match against norway. thomasz has more on the weather. it is hot out there. the sun is beating down on us and the wave of heat is encroaching, getting closer to the uk. we will talk about waves of heat, literally ways of heat gci’oss of heat, literally ways of heat across europe in half an hour. also coming up — howzat! the teenager in istanbul who scooped up and saved a toddler who fell from a window.
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hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. the heatwave across much of europe is intensifiying with countries including france, spain and italy all expecting temperatures to peak above a0 degrees celsius today. yesterday, germany, poland, and the czech republic recorded their highest—ever june temperatures. and the uk won't escape — over the next few days, there could be highs here of 3a degrees. in france, officials have issued strict warnings about the risk to life. several cities have restricted traffic, and in some areas schools have closed. from paris, hugh schofield reports. europe is basking in an unexpectedly early spell of blasting heat.
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what it says about our changing climate may be a matter of concern, but out and about most people are for now enjoying the positives. it certainly hasn't deterred the crowds here in paris turning out to see the city sights. if you're from a place, you are going to know the best ways to stay cool and you're not going to bother coming outside, but if you're a visitor it's a different matter. if you're a tourist and you don't venture out into this heat then what's the point in being here? and most tourists were taking the temperatures in their stride. seattle is raining and 70, and we're what, 90—ish, so it's hot. it's super hot. i need lots of water! i need ice. we're going to drop a bucket of water on his head soon. across the continent temperatures have been nudging the records in places hitting the early 40s and it's set to run for a few more days. absolutely fantastic to visit such a beautiful city, but a bit hotter
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than we expected. yeah, last night at the spanish steps it was 41. when we drove here it was 37 at eight o'clock in the morning, so... a lot of water, a hat, just trying to stay cool. but the dangers are also showing. in spain, wildfires have been raging in the north—east. and the health risks to the vulnerable, especially the elderly, will only increase as the heat persists. here in frankfurt in germany, the red cross was called to attend to one victim on the street. translation: there are different types of patient groups, like elderly people and children, who have problems with direct sunlight, especially when they don't wear loose clothing or a hat. this can lead to overheating or sunstroke. in france, memories are still raw of the 2003 heat wave in which thousands of old people died unnecessarily. today, there are new procedures in place to make sure the
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elderly remain hydrated and cool. blistering heat can be fun for a while. so far, europe is coping, but also hoping that these unseasonable highs don't last beyond the weekend. hugh schofield, bbc news, paris. our environment correpsondent matt mcgrath is in bonn in germany for the united nations climate change conference and sent (tx sot) the question of cold is never far from the heart of un climate talks. a number of major fossil fuel producing countries including saudi arabia, the artist states, kuwait and russia have been trying to downplay the scientific research on climate change. they are talking about the report on 1.5 degrees produce last year. it showed the world could keep temperatures down
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toi.5 world could keep temperatures down to1.5 but it world could keep temperatures down to 1.5 but it would require a massive cost. to do that is a big ask on many countries. the uk has decided to go with the net zero law on carbon emissions by 2050, others are struggling with that and that battle over the science and the target for 2030 and 2050 is at the forefront of delegates‘s mines. some smaller countries who fear the rising waters and the threats that temperatures would bring to them are adamant at the science must be the key pa rt adamant at the science must be the key part of future talks. countries like saudi arabia, supported by australia, iran and the united states, they say there are too many uncertainties and that debate may be resulted today but it may continue for many months to come. scientists say cervical cancer could eventually be eliminated, thanks to a vaccination programme targeting the hpv virus. it's one of the main causes of the disease, and a new study has examined the impact of the vaccine on 60 millon people in ia different countries.
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lauren moss reports. when mandy was a4 she had a routine smear test. the news that she had cervical cancer changed her life. it was a huge bolt out of the blue because i did not have any symptoms, but i was treated within17 days. i had a radical hysterectomy, which means that everything was removed from me and it was a really hard going operation and i was in hospital for a week and it was then a long recovery. four years on, mandy is in remission and has checkups every six months. the majority of several cancers are caused by the human papilloma virus. more than 300,000 women worldwide die from it every year. 850 of those deaths are in the uk. a decade ago, girls aged 12 and 13 started receiving the hpv vaccine. now a study of 60 million people in ia high income countries has found eight years after vaccination among women aged 20 to 2a there was a 66% reduction in high risk strains of hpv.
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cases of genital warts were also down 54% and there was a 31% decline in precancerous lesions. the vaccine is very successful at reducing hpv infections and there are five hpv types which have seen substantial declines in the uk and they cause about 90% of cervical disease and cervical cancer. so what we'll expect to see in the near future is that we are seeing really substantial declines in cervical cancers. hpv is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. many people will develop some form of it in their lifetime with no ill effects, but charities say no one should be complacent. cervical screening still remains really, really important and just as important for people who have had the vaccination. as the study shows, the vaccination is really effective at reducing the risk of cervical cancer, but it does not fully protect against the disease, so still take up your cervical screening invitation when it is sent through. mandy's teenage daughters have both been vaccinated. from september the roll—out will continue to 12 and 13—year—old boys.
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i said to her, i would never make you do anything in your life. you have have this vaccine. it is absolutely critical. ladies, unfortunately, are still dying from this disease. you would become infertile, you cannot have children. i do not want my children to go through what i went through in the last four years, so it is just imperative that they get vaccinated. the study did not analyse data from low income countries, but a scientist and survivors are optimistic that research is a step closer to cervical cancer one day becoming a disease of the past. lauren moss, bbc news. i'm joined now byjessica kirby, cancer research uk's senior health information manager. nice to see you. nice to be talking about what is a good news stories. these results are fantastic and it is great to see what we have expected and we are seeing these results building up from studies and the beginnings of these impacts coming through, but how great to see
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this very clear, consistent drop in hbv infection rates and in the cervical changes that can lead to cancer. it kills 850 people a year and the great news about the vaccine is that can hopefully over time begin to reduce. this vaccine basically creates an immune response to the virus. the vaccine covers four types of hpv, two of the types commonly linked to cervical cancer and to link to warts. we are seeing reductions in the disease that can lead to cervical cancer and warts, so lead to cervical cancer and warts, so it is a very effective vaccine. lead to cervical cancer and warts, so it is a very effective vaccinelj remember when there was concern about this, one of the concerns was it would change behaviour. is there any evidence that has happened? there hasn't been any evidence so far of people's behaviour changing. the only impact from the vaccine is these really good reductions in the disease associated with hpv.“
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these really good reductions in the disease associated with hpv. if we wa nt to disease associated with hpv. if we want to look elsewhere to see where things might happen here, australia has been doing this for longer than we have an results there are similarly encouraging. we have seen similarly encouraging. we have seen similar results in countries across the world. there was a study in scotla nd the world. there was a study in scotland that showed very similar things. australia has been vaccinating for a couple of years younger then we have. 0verall, across the world, across the uk, it is great to see these reductions in disease. eradication of any type of cancer is something not long ago you could only dream about. eradication isa could only dream about. eradication is a strong word and it is important to remember this vaccine covers two of the tribes which cause the most cases of cervical cancer, that is around 70% of cancers. we will have to wait and see where the hpv associated cancers, you know how low they can really go. the great news is that this is showing very strong
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reductions in disease and we will fully expect to see that translating into lower rates of cervical cancer in future. introducing the vaccine to boys, how will that impact? that will be happening from this coming academic year. it is great that boys will now be able to get the vaccine. it will protect boys against hpv associated cancers. there are a range of different cancers that hpv can cause, some in the mouth and throat, and so the hope is that it will reduce the rates of all of those different types of cancer as well as genital warts. great to have some good news for a change. jessica, good to see you, thanks. boris johnson and jeremy hunt face questions from conservative party members tonight — in the second official hustings of the leadership campaign. mrjohnson is promising changes to the immigration system if he becomes prime minister. mr hunt says he will cancel the student fee debts of young entrepreneurs who start businesses.
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the think—tank the institute for fiscal studies says his campaign pledges so far could cost up to 65 billion pounds. 0ur political correspondent helena wilkinson reports. they both want the top job, but what will these two men do if they get into power, and how will they shape the country? they're starting to make promises. applause. promises that were made last night at a hustings broadcast online. boris johnson unveiled an immigration pledge. he wants an australian style points—based system, the uk to be open to immigration, but it should be controlled. yes, i do want talented people to be able to come here, and yes, i do want the agricultural sector to be able to satisfy their requirements as well, it's incredibly important. but it's got to be done on the basis of a system of democratic control, and so what i would like to do is get the migration advisory committee to look really properly at the australian style points—based system.
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as forjeremy hunt, a promise to young people who set up a business. graduates who successfully start up a business that employs ten people for five years should get their tuition fees cancelled. i think it's an incentive that sends a signal that we want young people to take the risks to start their own business and we're prepared to back them. so what's the reaction been to what the candidates have pledged? they've both promised pretty sizeable tax cuts. in borisjohnson‘s case that includes an increase in the higher rate threshold, so that benefits people who have incomes over £50,000 a year. and injeremy hunt's case there's also been pretty sizeable promises of increases in spending, particularly on defence. as the two candidates take part in further hustings we'll get to hear more about their policies on other issues, but what's not clear is how much anything other than brexit will influence the decision of tory party members when it comes to their vote. helena wilkinson, bbc
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news, westminster. ahead of the third conservative leadership hustings in bournemouth this evening — jeremy hunt has been flying the flag on the isle of wight. here is the foreign secretary with his wife lucia arriving at cowes harbour with a big blue flag with his leadership campaign slogan ‘has to be hunt'. he clearly isn't flagging on the campaign trail. he was meeting members of the local conservative association hoping they'd nail their colours to his mast. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake is at westminster. where are we on the campaign? we are hearing a lot of promises now from both of them. yes, whilst brexit is undoubtedly the dominant factor in this campaign and i'm sure the thing on which conservative party members, most of them will make up their mind when thinking about who will make the best prime minister in the
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immediate future at least, they are putting forward different ideas. as you saw in the report, borisjohnson talking about his idea for an australian style points based immigration system whereas factors such as some are having a firm job offer, their ability to speak english, will be taken into consideration above other things. forjeremy hunt, the focus on tuition fees and he is fond of telling us how he used to be an entrepreneur and he said that those who leave university, managed to set up who leave university, managed to set up their own business and employ ten oi’ up their own business and employ ten or more people would have their tuition fee debt cancelled. we can speak now to a supporter ofjeremy hunt to hear about that. why this special treatment than for entrepreneurs after university?” special treatment than for entrepreneurs after university? i am someone entrepreneurs after university? i am someone who is a graduate and did set upa someone who is a graduate and did set up a business. only about 1% of the 300,000 graduates set up a company and what jeremy is saying, if you do that, we will reward you
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by wiping off your tuition fee debt. a lot of entrepreneurs who set up businesses and do very well, they make a big thing about the fact they never went to university, so isn't this special treatment for those who have been and what about those who go through uni, go on to be successful in something else and are saddled with debt? jeremy is saying we need to make the most of all the talents we have got and it will boost our economy and boost those who have gone to work for those companies if more who leave university and take that step toward starting their own company. that is the only way we can generate the wealth to spend more on public services and deliver deep asperity we depend on a. mr hunt has said he will take the uk out of the eu without a deal if necessary. do you accept that would have an impact on the economy and make it very difficult for businesses to launch? isaidl difficult for businesses to launch? i said i have grave concerns about
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no deal as indeed jeremy has. he also understands, he has negotiated all his life that in a negotiation you cannot negotiate unless ultimately in extremis you have been prepared to walk away and that is the point he is making. obviously he doesn't want that and i am confident that he is a brilliant negotiator and will deliver a deal by october 31. perhaps by october 31 but he is not saying that is hard and fast as a deadline. isn't it an advantage to borisjohnson to be able to say, look, do or die, i will come out by the end of october. he has also said no deal is a million to one again so who knows what that means. what jeremy meant is that if it gets to october and it is absolutely clear that the eu will not budge, will not renegotiate, it will become clear before the 31st that we are leaving without a deal. equally what he also said is if we get to the 31st of
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october and we are in the final phase of kneeling to pass on legislation to finalise a deal that has been agreed, it will be crazy not to put on another couple of weeks on the process and scrap the whole thing when we could leave with a deal. a very sensible approach. he is the underdog, what sense do you have that he is cutting through with conservative party members at this point in the campaign?” conservative party members at this point in the campaign? i have my own members in the association and they are e—mailing me, saying they are now considering jeremy. trying to get the firm opinion of the conservative party, we will only find out with the vote itself, but i think he has done really well. there isa think he has done really well. there is a long way to go and in the next few days you will see a lot more positive stories from jeremy hunt. thank you very much. with that, as you heard, there will be more promises to come and it is for the party members to make up their minds.
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you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: europe is in the grip of a heatwave — the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy. as the race is on to find theresa may's replacement, she says she won't automatically back her successor‘s brexit strategy. scientists say they're hopeful cervical cancer could eventually be eliminated, thanks to a vaccination programme targeting the hpv virus. it's the start of the quarterfinals at the women's world cup. england are first up, they face norway tonight. the manager says his side are relaxed, happy and ready to win. india's batsmen are trying to set the west indies a challenging target in their world cup match at old trafford. they are 258—7 in the final over. liam brady has missed out on the main draw at wimbledon. he was beaten in the third round of
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qualifying by frenchman. i will be back with more in the next 15 minutes. the jury at the trial of a man accused of stabbing a rail passenger to death injanuary has heard from a witness of the attack. kayleigh carter told the jury she saw a man hold a phone to his face and say "i'm going to kill this man" darren pencille, denies murdering lee pomeroy after an attack on a train from guildford to london on fourth january this year. sarah walton, is at the old bailey for us now. kayleigh carter told the jury today that she saw the two men arguing on the carriage of the train that left london road station onjanuary four and she remembered hearing lee pomeroy say, i have never dealt with anyone with special needs before. he
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said that darren penn so i shouted, iam going said that darren penn so i shouted, i am going to kill this man although she admitted she hadn't remembered him using that phrase at the time and only tell police about that several days later. she then said she saw contact between the two men. she ran from the carriage telling thejury she ran from the carriage telling the jury today, i saw blood straightaway and i think i panicked after that because i had to run through it. also we heard from sarah fry who was the former girlfriend of derren pencille. she also has a child with him and she says that on the 4th child with him and she says that on the 11th of january in the hours following the attack, she received a phone call from derren pencille in which he said, i have done something bad, you will see it on the news. she also received a text message that said, i'm sorry and i love you both. the court heard witness state m e nts both. the court heard witness statements that were read out from people in surrey. that is where the train came to a stop following the attack. people there reported seeing
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attack. people there reported seeing a man running and one said he looked agitated, he had something red on his hands and also on his face. derren pencille denies murder and the trial he continues. german chancellor angela merkel has been seen shaking once again during a ceremony in berlin this morning, eight days after a similar incident. the german leader appeared uncomfortable and gripped her arms as her body trembled. last week, she appeared in a similar state of discomfort when she met the ukrainian president, but blamed the incident on dehydration. a spokesperson says the chancellor is ‘absolutely fine' and has set off for the g20 summit injapan as planned. let's talk more on this now with journalist and publicist, stefan kornelius. just how concerned are peopled by these images? can you hear me?|j
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just how concerned are peopled by these images? can you hear me? i can hear you now. just wondering how much concern there is about these latest images. public concern is growing because this is the second incident and the chancellor who is basically healthy and very robust, now seems to be ill. it needs to be explained and she will how to do this explaining when she comes back from japan. there will be rumours flying around, i'm sure. what are people saying? it has all boil down to dehydration, not drinking enough water. she never really took care of her health. she follows an extremely strict schedule. she is flying overnight to osaka, goes right to the summit. most are the leaders do arrive the night before, so she is really ha rd arrive the night before, so she is really hard on herself but on the
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other side, she also looks not healthy. she is overworked and she is in her14th healthy. she is overworked and she is in her 14th year of power so quite honestly there is probably power wearing on her. the difficulty of course is something like this tends to overshadow serious issues. when she is at the g20, she will be asked about her health. when she is at the g20, she will be asked about her healthlj when she is at the g20, she will be asked about her health. i think she always can counter those doubts if she is there. if she is agile, fit and has her arguments. she is there. if she is agile, fit and has herarguments. she neverwas really hindered in making her case and being strong but nevertheless, public debt is bad for a world leader like her. the markets don't like it, so she has to address those doubts. and very briefly, i know how journalists work, what are the suggestions that are being offered asa suggestions that are being offered as a possible cause of this? quite honestly and i should know, i don't
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have any suggestions but it is simply probably the heat. it is probably her not really taking enough time for herself. this is not working well if you work 18 hours a day for 14 years. good to talk to you. thank you very much. now, some breaking news. this is a statement from tom watson, the deputy leader of the labour party. following the chris williamson case. mr williamson has been brought back into the labour party and that has upset many of his colleagues. in a statement, tom watson says we cannot overstate the length and breadth of anger of the length and breadth of anger of the readmission of mr williamson in the readmission of mr williamson in the party. the question arises about the party. the question arises about the fairness of the process. the official recognition that mr williamson should be deferred for
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action was ignored. excuse me. forgive me. he goes on, the process has not done that. a very strong statement on chris williamson. it is signed by a large number of senior labourfigures. he signed by a large number of senior labour figures. he has signed by a large number of senior labourfigures. he has a release this on twitter. we are having a look at that and we are talking about those who signed that letter later on. that is the latest on chris williamson. there is very high pollen in london. let's have a look at the weather. tomasz is here. i have just been outside, hence the coughing. it is very hot out there. is it the same for everybody?‘ great starting point because yes, we know there is a heatwave across europe stop it hasn't necessarily
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reached us yet, but not everybody in the region of the heatwave in europe is experiencing the heat and ijust wa nt to is experiencing the heat and ijust want to show you an example. this is just across the channel, i think in belgium. england it is around 33 degrees whereas on the coast it is around 17. —— inland. we are seeing not just across the around 17. —— inland. we are seeing notjust across the continent but also around the uk, so for example, on the east coast of scotland, it has been only around 16, 17 degrees. whereas you go further inland into scotla nd whereas you go further inland into scotland and in fact in the next couple of days it could be around 30 degrees and sometimes when you look on the weather map, you think that isa on the weather map, you think that is a mistake. a very small area within 50 miles or something from 16 to maybe 30 degrees and the key is in the wind. to the south it is
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obviously incredibly hot but it is all down to the winter because the sea is cold and basically what happens is, when you get this huge temperature contrasts between europe and the north, you get this strong wind blowing and when that wind blows onto the coastline, you get these huge temperature contrasts. we are talking about a mile or two and there is a massive temperature rise. that is happening across the coastal areas around europe as well. basically at the moment, as the heatwave is approaching us, it is these western parts of the uk that are getting the highest temperatures, so here could be 20, 20 degrees in the next couple of days. there is another thing i wa nted days. there is another thing i wanted to point out, this word heatwave. what is a heatwave?m wanted to point out, this word heatwave. what is a heatwave? is it a wave of heat. that is exactly what
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it is. this is what a heatwave looks like in the atmosphere. it literally isa like in the atmosphere. it literally is a wave and so this part of the atlantic, you can see cold air coming down south. here warm air comes in from the south, we're just at the crest of the heatwave and thenit at the crest of the heatwave and then it comes back down again. when we talk about hot weather in the uk, we talk about hot weather in the uk, we talk about it coming from the south but this wave of heat is to move south but this wave of heat is to m ove a cross south but this wave of heat is to move across europe and the reason why in this country he waves don't last for very long is usually because we are at the very tip of it. that distance here doesn't last for very long, whereas in the south, there is a large supply of hot air and it lasts a lot longer. have i lost you completely? no. no shortage of hotair lost you completely? no. no shortage of hot air here. you can see why people in scotland get upset because we are obsessing with the weather in the south—east but actually this is
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affecting everybody. absolutely. i will show you in detail what is happening around the country. this cold wind blowing off the north sea, it means around 18 degrees on the norfolk, essex coast. gusts of wind 30 to 50 mph in places and then look at that more detailed map. 26 here, down to 15 in aberdeen. to change this the wind needs to change direction so it needs to stop blowing off the sea, it needs to start coming in off the land. if you look at this arrow near aberdeen, it is pointing from this direction which means the wind is coming off the sea. but we will see some subtle changes in the wind direction across the uk. rather than the wind is coming from the north here, we will see this plume of heat, the wind arrows dragging the hot air from france, spreading in across the uk
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so temperatures will be rising. tomorrow's weather. the key at this time of the air is always in the arrows. they are blowing out of the south. this is friday's temperatures, 28 degrees, we could even hit 30 degrees. and again, this is that very tip, that crest of the heatwave across the west. come saturday, that heatwave has spread further east so temperatures in the uk could reach around 34 degrees. a lot of moving around in these graphics. anyway, here are saturdays weather forecast. 33 in graphics. anyway, here are saturdays weatherforecast. 33 in london, probably around 34 in the south—east. aberdeen up to 22 because of the shift in wind direction. talking of shifts in the wind direction, that heatwave has shifted towards the east. we are getting on sunday a wind blowing off the atlantic, so that means what
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will happen, the temperatures will drop, they will drop like a stone and from 34 in the south—east, down to 24. a dramatic, monumental shift in the temperature between saturday and sunday from the 34 down to what it should be, 24 degrees this time of the year. that is it.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines... europe bakes as temperatures rise to levels normally seen in the middle east. 40 degrees is forecast for france, spain and italy. here in the uk, it's a mere 30 degrees. a bit hotter than we expected. yeah, last night at the spanish steps, it was 41. 41? a lot of water, a lot of gelato. hat. just trying to stay cool. a jury hears that a man accused of stabbing to death a fellow train passenger held a phone to his face and said, "i'm going to kill this man". a medical success story — as scientists say they hope cervical cancer could eventually be eradicated, thanks to the vaccination programme against the hpv virus. as the race to find theresa may's replacement continues, she makes it clear she won't automatically back her successor‘s brexit strategy. health concerns for the german chancellor angela merkel after she's seen shaking
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for the second time in two weeks. her office says she's fine. sport now on afternoon live. it isa it is a huge night for england's women? massive game in le havre tonight, the lionesses looking to match their run to the semi—finasl four years ago in canada, they haven't really had to hit top gear, we had that horrible match the other day in the last 16, that win over cameroon, that turned very ugly. the africans looked to down tools when those var decisisons went against them, then a series of horrible challenges that could have caused serious injury,
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especially to the england captain steph houghton, but she should be ok to face norway in le havre tonight she took full part in training yesterday. there has been a virus in the camp, millie bright one of those who was struck down but phil neville has stressed that he has the depth in his squad for any player to step up. he can always count on one of the veterans, jill scott in herfourth world cup knows what it's like to reach this business end of the tournament. we wa nt we want to be here for the duration of the tournament but it is so important to look to the next game because your mind can start to wonder and then you can overthink and that is something the squad has been very good at, sticking to the task in hand. it will be such a difficult game, they are a very physical and technical team and they will want to progress just as much as us, so it is a real moment of character when emotion is high and
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arejust character when emotion is high and are just sticking to the plan, that is what will be key, but i believe in every one of these players and we really trust in them and i'm just excited, i really am, to see that we are ina excited, i really am, to see that we are in a world cup quarterfinal. norway knocked out australia in the last round. norway are looking at revenge as a motivational tool because england knocked them out of the world cup last time round. coverage is right across the bbc this evening. kick off is at 8pm. it's on bbc one, bbc radio 5 live and the bbc sport website and app. and now to the cricket world cup? yes, simon great atmosphere at old trafford today, fa ntatstic weather and it looks like it could be close. india are on the brink iof qualifying for the semi finals —
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they've won 4 of their 5 matches so far. the other one was a washout but the windies must win this if they're to have any chance of reaching the last four. and they've done a reasonable job of containing india's powerful batting line up. a few moments ago india's innings closed on 268 for 7. here's the points table. india virtually guaranteed a place in the semi's with 9 points already and still a possible 8 to add if they win this match. they're the only unbeaten side in the competition. been a real disappointment for the windies. the west indies will be hoping with their big hitters like chris gayle and brathwaite, you would think they would be able to beat that total, but we will see.
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and more cricket news that's just reached us in the last half hour or so — marcus trescothick has anounced his retirement from professional cricket after 27 seasons at somerset. he played 76 tests for england and scored almost 6000 runs at an average of almost 44. he was part of the england side that memorably won the ashes under michael vaughan in 2005. we will have more reaction to that. he has been dropped by somerset this season for the first time and that will have played a part in his thinking. there's been heartbreak for britain's liam broady at wimbledon qualifying in roehampton this afternoon. broady needed one more victory to make the main tournament which starts on monday. he was two sets up against frenchman greg berrere but lost the next three. it would have been broady‘s fourth wimbledon appearance
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and a timely boost. his ranking has slipped to a lowly 287. chelsea are expected to complete the signing of real madrid midfielder, mateo kovacic, for £40 million despite being under a transfer ban. they can getaround that, because the croatian star spent last season on loan at stamford bridge, playing 32 games, so chelsea have already registered him. that means, providing the deal is done before the loan expires on the 30thjune, it would not contravene fifa's transfer ban which runs until the end of the january transfer window. a crafty loophole for chelsea if they can come up with £40 million. that's all the sport for now.
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labour mps and peers have signed a letter calling forjeremy corbyn to withdraw the whip from labour mp chris williamson. this is a big headache forjeremy corbyn? the mps are directly challenging jeremy corbyn personally to step into this row, they are not going to a constitutional procedure and they are not appealing the decision against chris williamson and they are not looking to bring more allegations against him, but they are to be saying they think chris williamson a's they are to be saying they think chris williamson as case is so outrageous thatjeremy corbyn himself needs to intervene. it is a move on from this morning when the mood amongst labour mps was one of anger and ranks and a sense of frustration —— labour. but they did not know what they could do. there was no appetite for more of them to walk out of the party as those other labour mps walk out of the party as those other labourmps did walk out of the party as those other labour mps did when they went to
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form change uk. there did not see an obvious route to challenge the decision, and they were wondering what they should do, but they have decided to take route one and go direct tojeremy decided to take route one and go direct to jeremy corbyn decided to take route one and go direct tojeremy corbyn and say decided to take route one and go direct to jeremy corbyn and say to him, this is so damaging to the labour party, especially at a time when it is under investigation by the equalities and human rights commission, that he personally needs to ta ke commission, that he personally needs to take charge of the process and withdraw the whip from chris williamson. that is a massive call because not least chris williamson has been one ofjeremy corbyn's biggest and most vocal and most pugnacious backers in parliament, so forjeremy corbyn to decide he will ta ke forjeremy corbyn to decide he will take action would be a massive move. what happens next?” take action would be a massive move. what happens next? i suspect, the response will be to say disciplinary process entirely independent of the
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leadership, and he cannot and should not get involved because that would be political interference in the process. i suspect that will be the response. you sense from the letter written by tom watson, they feel there has already been political interference because they question why this matter was not dealt with by the national constitutional committee of the labour party rather than this disciplinary panel and the reason is that the national constitutional committee has a broader range of sanctions to meet out and it could have booted chris williamson out of the party and there is also the insinuation that there is also the insinuation that the nec panel was rigged, although they don't explicitly say that, but that seems to be the implication. in other words the people on it were sympathetic to chris williamson. and the backdrop is a sense that chris williamson has had favourable treatment compared to the likes of alastair campbell, a prominent
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playwright who expressed his views on the eu referendum and he was kicked out of the party —— blairite. so this has the potential to blow up into a big row centred onjeremy corbyn. we can now get more on the main story, the heat wave. the heatwave spreading across europe is expected to get worse, as germany, poland and the czech republic recorded their highest—ever june temperature yesterday. schools in parts of france will be closed today, and exams delayed, as temperatures are expected to reach the mid 40s. officials there have issued stark warnings about the risk to life as a result of the hot air from northern africa that meteorologists are blaming for the heatwave. and the uk won't escape — over the next few days there could be highs of 34 degrees. but it's not quite as bad as parts of spain where temperatures will reach a sweltering 45 amid warnings of ‘significant risks' of forest fires. let's talk now to helen tait wright,
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who lives in cersay in france. it looks lovely but how does it feel? what is the temperature at the moment? about 37, and there is no need to go for sauna today, as you can probably see, there's a bigger breeze but it is quite humid —— a bit of breeze. it feels like more than 37 which is what it is saying on the thermometer. how are people coping? people are generally staying indoors, that is the advice from the government, stay indoors and make sure your windows are shut so the heat does not get into the house and make sure you drink plenty. generally try to stay out of the hottest pa rt generally try to stay out of the hottest part of the day which he is normally five o'clock in the afternoon so we haven't quite got there yet. french authorities are taking this very seriously and schools have been closed but stop and it depends what car you drive as to whether you can take it on the
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roads. i have not heard that one, but i have one car with air conditioning but i prefer the land rover which is too old for air conditioning. so i'm not driving that today. you have got some animals? nine cats? notjust humans who suffer in this heat. the cats are being very sensible and staying in the house where it is cooler, the chickens are in the run and the ducks are behind me and they have now gone back into the water. it is important to make sure the other animals have water to hand and shade to get into because it is quite extreme. it looks very nice but i'm sure there are elderly people, young people, in villages across france, that need checking on, is that happening? i think it is. after the 2003 heat wave when a lot of people
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died across france, people are more aware of the need to check on elderly people and there have been a lot of warnings in advance this time. we have a couple more days of this of going over 40 degrees and thenit this of going over 40 degrees and then it will cool off. what are they saying in the french media about this? what is to blame for these incredible temperatures?m this? what is to blame for these incredible temperatures? it is the aircoming upfrom incredible temperatures? it is the air coming up from africa, and incredible temperatures? it is the air coming upfrom africa, and i travel to africa quite a bit and it is normally hot there but it is more like dry heat. this is a freak weather event, it is not normally this hot at this time of the year. helen, thanks forjoining us. enjoy, be safe and thank you.
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suzanna is here — in a moment she will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. labour mps and peers have signed a letter rejecting the decision to allow the labour mp, chris williamson, back into the party after after an investigation into comments he made about the party's handling of anti—semitism allegations. a jury hears that a man accused of stabbing to death a fellow train passenger held a phone to his face and said "i'm going to kill this man". here's your business headlines on afternoon live. us regulators have uncovered a possible new flaw in boeing's troubled 737 max aircraft that is likely to push back test flights of the modified plane. the fleet was grounded worldwide following two fatal crashes. boots is one of the high street names which has been struggling in tough market conditions — and sales have fallen in the past three months. the numbers came from its us owner — walgreens boots alliance.
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its international sales were down 1.6% in the three months to may 31, mostly due to a 1% decline at boots uk. the uk business of starbucks has reported its first annual loss since 2013. store closures, rising costs and the renegotiation of leases were behind the fall. more now on develpments at boeing following two fatal crashes involving 737 max aircraft. yes, the federal aviation authority — the us regulator says there could be another flaw on the aircraft which it discovered during during simulator tests. boeing's top—selling aircraft was grounded in march after two crashes and the company has been
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upgrading the aircraft's flight control system, which is the focus of crash investigators. what we know about this? what we know about thi57m what we know about this? it is to do with the anti—stall system and they have said they will not go up into the airuntil have said they will not go up into the air until they are able to regulate this problem to mitigate this particular issue. what is something to keep in mind, that could be a bright spot, not necessarily for boeing but for the american regulators, they have come undera lot of american regulators, they have come under a lot of criticism from people here that they were not offering enough checks on the big airline on bone itself, so the fact the faa have found this issue could boost the confidence people have in the american regulator —— on boeing itself. when could it be back in
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service? we heard from the faa that it said they would not put a timeline on it, but behind closed doors there were suggestions it could happen sometime this summer, at the end of the summer, but now we have seen the major american carriers have ta ken have seen the major american carriers have taken the max jets off their potential list of planes that could get back into rotation well into september. what has been happening to their share price? unsurprisingly the share price is taking a hit. it is trading a bit lower this morning. more importantly the question to ask is, what does this do in terms of flyer confidence and people who are going to go on these planes? boeing has been steadfast in believing that once these planes are fixed, they will be these planes are fixed, they will be the safest in the air can but the fa ct the safest in the air can but the fact you are seeing yet another
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issue and another requirement for a safety update, that could again it really erode the confidence amongst the flying public for actually getting on those planes again, but it will have to be everyone else that will make that decision. that is the issue. there might not be public confidence of these aircraft but for the airlines who have purchased them it is vital they are able to start using them again or get replacements? absolutely. major airlines are better equipped to whether this kind of delay in some way but it is small airlines which are taking the hit. we can be sure that we will see a lot of airlines requesting compensation for boeing, for the time their planes have been sitting on the tarmac and not making any money. thanks forjoining us. we will be covering that story and any updates that come up.
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boots is one of the high street names which has been struggling in tough market conditions. in april we heard that it might close stores — as part of a review of its two and a half thousand outlets across the uk. today we heard that sales at boots fell in the three months. the numbers came from its us owner — walgreens boots alliance. its international sales were down 1.6% in the three months to may 31, mostly due to a 1% decline at boots uk. it comes on the same day boots opened a "store of the future" in london's covent garden, which features new beauty brands and express pick—up lanes for prescriptions. i'm excited about this store, and not everyone will see it, because we are in cove nt not everyone will see it, because we are in covent garden, but this is a mark and this says this is the direction of travel and it lays out for our suppliers and customers and
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for our suppliers and customers and for the beauty press and for everybody, what we think a great modern contemporary boots can be and we are very excited about it. that was the boss of boots, and of course there are a lot of online players now getting into this market, so there is tough competition not just from market, so there is tough competition notjust from other bricks and mortar stores but from the online sector as well.” bricks and mortar stores but from the online sector as well. i will talk to you later, thanks for joining us. the japanese foreign minister has called on the british government not to allow a no—deal brexit. taro kono told the bbc that failure to reach an agreement would bring very negative consequences forjapanese companies operating in britain. he also said talks on a trade deal betweenjapan and britain would have to wait until after britain had left the eu. there are a few japanese auto manufacturers operations in the united kingdom and some parts
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are coming from the continent, from europe. and right now, they have very smooth operations. their stock for each part is only for a few hours. but if there is no—deal brexit and if they have to go through actual custom inspection physically, those operations may not be able to continue. and many companies worried about implications because they don't know what is going to happen. they don't know what happens legal or physically, so some companies already start moving their operation to other places in europe. so we do not want to disrupt economic relationships with the uk. we have been asking the uk government, let the japanese company know what they can expect and think should happen smoothly without any disruption.
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time for a look at the weather. not much change in the last hour or so on the weather front, warming up over the coming days, the heatwave is peaking across continental europe and here in the uk the sun is beating down on us, very strong sunshine, uv levels in some areas in the south are at an index of eight which is on the scale of 1—12 so eight is the highest it gets across our part of the world and that is very rare. the uv index has been mentioned because the weather is a bit deceiving across the south, the
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strength of the wind makes it feel a bit less heat than it actually is. we have the strong wind and strong sunshine and of course it does not feel so hot so you can easily burn if you are out there for any length of time. the strength of the wind also means around the eastern coasts it isa also means around the eastern coasts it is a bit colder and there is a 10 degrees difference between the east coast of britain and the west. the night temperatures will dip down to maybe 11 but look at these values, 16 in the channel islands and 14 in the south—west which is a sign that the south—west which is a sign that the heatwave is approaching the uk. it will only be brief in the uk, very brief indeed. these are the temperatures tomorrow, the peak of the heatwave will be across western parts of the uk, possibly 30 in the highlands. mostly high 20s in the
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rest of the uk, and the peak of the heatwave on saturday will be in central and eastern parts of the uk, 34 is possible but in the south of europe it could be as high as 45. we are not expecting those values, thankfully. this is the forecast for saturday, the highest temperatures andi saturday, the highest temperatures and i would not be surprised if it touches 30 in a few places in yorkshire as well, and then a huge contrast for sunday between saturday and sunday, the wind switches direction which can sometimes happen, a sudden shift, and then these westerlies will bring much fresher atlantic air and for many this will be a sigh of relief on those temperatures in the south—east will drop 10 degrees and in the north—east we will have showers, so if you don't like the heat, the good news is it will not last for very long. we are talking about a one day wonder but it will be very high, in the mid—30s in the south.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3: labour mps and peers sign a letter rejecting the decision to allow the labour mp chris williamson back into the party after an investigation into comments he made about the party's handling of anti—semitism allegations. europe bakes as temperatures rise to levels normally seen in the middle east. 40 degrees is forecast for france, spain and italy. here in the uk, it's a mere 30 degrees. a bit hotter than we expected. yeah, last night at the spanish steps, it was 41. 41? a lot of water, a lot of gelato. hat. just trying to stay cool. a jury hears that a man accused of stabbing to death a fellow train passenger held a phone to his face and said "i'm going to kill this man". a medical success story — as scientists say they hope cervical cancer could eventually be eradicated, thanks to
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the vaccination programme against the hpv virus. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. big night for the england lionesees, norway stand between them and a place in the world cup semi—finals, we'll have the latest from le havre. tomasz, a big day for weather.m tomasz, a big day for weather. it is andi tomasz, a big day for weather. it is and i have a sweat running down my forehead at the thought of 34 degrees in the uk come saturday. for most of us it will not be as hot and if you don't like the heat, it will not last very long either. a bit too much information there. also coming up: the teenager in istanbul who scooped up and saved
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a toddler who fell from a window. the labour deputy leader tom watson and 90 of the party's mps and peers have issued a statement demanding jeremy corbyn withdraw the whip from chris williamson. mr williamson was re—instated into the party yesterday following comments he made over its enquiry into anti—semitism. the statement said they cannot overstate ' the depth and breadth of hurt and anger‘ at the readmission for the mp for derby north. our assistant political editor norman smith is at westminster. this ratchets things up considerably. hugely. you have the party‘s deputy leader, around ten frontbenchers, 90 mps and peers in open revolt in the decision to let chris williamson off with a ticking
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off. they write saying, this is such an egregious abuse of the rules, so damaging to the labour party, particularly when under investigation by the equalities and human rights commission but mr corbett himself has to take charge and showed leadership and overturn the decision. they have loved the whole issue directly to jeremy corbyn and called on him to step up and sort it out. why? this is such a huge challenge forjeremy corbyn is because mr williamson is a political soulmate, one of his most of vocal backers but there is real anger amongst a vast swathe of the parliamentary party in large part because they think it is rigged. they question why mr williams and‘s case was not referred to the national constitution committee, which is the body which has the authority in effect to expel people
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from the party. instead his case was dealt with by a subsection of the nec which does not have that authority and they also imply that the panel itself was rigged. in other words the membership of the panel was balanced in a way to make it more sympathetic to mr williamson, but the challenge to jeremy corbyn is now immense because they are not trying to go through some complicated review procedure, they are not trying to work out how they are not trying to work out how they can appeal the decision or use they can appeal the decision or use the party‘s rule book or constitutional mechanisms. they have said, that is it, you, jeremy corbyn had to step up, show leadership and withdraw the whip from chris williamson. we have heard tom watson disagree with the leader before but this feels different. you have got going public with a letter signed by 90 people will focus on the labour leader. this suggests a major rift. it does and i suspect those around
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jeremy corbyn will view this as part of tom watson again flexing his muscles, being the internal opposition tojeremy corbyn and his supporters. we have seen it over pressing for another referendum, the fa ct pressing for another referendum, the fact tom watson has set up his own sort of think tank within the labour party to come up with policy ideas. he is seen basically as a direct threat to jeremy corbyn and he is seen basically as a direct threat tojeremy corbyn and i have no doubtjeremy threat tojeremy corbyn and i have no doubt jeremy corbyn‘s threat tojeremy corbyn and i have no doubtjeremy corbyn‘s people will think this is what is going on here, that mr watson is using this to damagejeremy that mr watson is using this to damage jeremy corbyn. mr corbyn‘s people have not responded officially. i am assuming what they will say is mr corbyn cannot get involved in this sort of thing, the disciplinary mechanisms are entirely separate to the leadership, nothing to do with the leadership and rightly so because if the leadership we re rightly so because if the leadership were to start interfering in issues of discipline, it would be seen as a
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kangaroo court. i suspect that the four position would be that mr williamson has gone through due process but that doesn‘t get away from the massive political pressure he is now under and he has been under pressure over the whole row of anti—semitism because so much of it has been directed at his leadership and its failure to stand up to those who are thought to be peddling anti—semitic views and attitudes. this is a very personal issue for jeremy corbyn, so to simply say not really my business, i can‘t get involved, i think that will be a difficult line to hold. the heatwave across much of europe is intensifiying with countries including france, spain and italy all expecting temperatures to peak above 40 degrees celsius today. yesterday, germany, poland, and the czech republic recorded their highest—everjune temperatures. )and the uk won‘t escape — over the next few days
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there could be highs here of 34 degrees. in france, officials have issued strict warnings about the risk to life. several cities have restricted traffic, and in some areas schools have closed. from paris, hugh schofield reports. europe is basking in an unexpectedly early spell of blasting heat. what it says about our changing climate may be a matter of concern, but out and about most people are for now enjoying the positives. it certainly hasn‘t deterred the crowds here in paris turning out to see the city sights. if you‘re from a place, you are going to know the best ways to stay cool and you‘re not going to bother coming outside, but if you‘re a visitor, it‘s a different matter. if you‘re a tourist and you don‘t venture out into this heat then what‘s the point in being here? and most tourists were taking the temperatures in their stride. seattle is raining and 70s, and we‘re what, 90—ish, so it‘s hot. it's super hot. i need lots of water!
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i need ice. we're going to drop a bucket of water on his head soon. across the continent temperatures have been nudging the records in places hitting the early 40s and it‘s set to run for a few more days. absolutely fantastic to visit such a beautiful city, but a bit hotter than we expected. yeah, last night at the steps it was 41. when we drove here it was 37 at eight o'clock in the morning, so... a lot of water, a hat, just trying to stay cool. but the dangers are also showing. in spain, wildfires have been raging in the north—east. and the health risks to the vulnerable, especially the elderly, will only increase as the heat persists. here in frankfurt in germany, the red cross was called to attend to one victim on the street. translation: there are different types of patient groups, like elderly people and children, who
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have problems with direct sunlight, especially when they don‘t wear loose clothing or a hat. this can lead to overheating or sunstroke. in france, memories are still raw of the 2003 heat wave in which thousands of old people died unnecessarily. today, there are new procedures in place to make sure the elderly remain hydrated and cool. blistering heat can be fun for a while. so far, europe is coping, but also hoping that these unseasonable highs don‘t last beyond the weekend. hugh schofield, bbc news, paris. our environment correpsondent matt mcgrath is in bonn in germany for the united nations climate change conference and sent us this update. the question of cold is never far from the heart of un climate talks. a number of major fossil fuel producing countries including saudi
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arabia, the united states, kuwait and russia have been trying to downplay the scientific research on climate change. they are talking about the report on 1.5 degrees which was produced last year. it showed the world could keep temperatures down to 1.5 but it would require a massive cut in carbon emissions by 2030. to do that isa carbon emissions by 2030. to do that is a big ask on many different countries. the uk has decided to go with the net zero law on carbon emissions by 2050, others are struggling with that and that battle over the science and the target for 2030 and 2050 is at the forefront of delegates mines. some small island states and smaller countries who fear the rising waters and the threats that temperatures would bring to them are adamant that the science must be the key part of future talks. countries like saudi arabia, supported by australia, iran and the united states say there are too many uncertainties and that
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debate may be resolved here today but it may continue for many more months to come. the jury at the trial of a man accused of stabbing a rail passenger to death injanuary has heard from a witness of the attack. kayleigh carter told the jury she saw a man hold a phone to his face and say "i‘m going to kill this man" darren pencille, denies murdering lee pomeroy after an attack on a train from guildford to london on fourth january this year. our correspondent sarah walton has spent the day in court kayleigh carter told the jury that she saw the two men arguing on the carriage of the train that left the london road station in guildford on january four and she remembered hearing lee pomeroy say, i have never dealt with anyone with special needs before. she also said that darren pencille had a phone to his face and shouted, i am going to kill this man, although she admitted she hadn‘t remembered him using that phrase at the time and only told
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police about that several days later. she then said she saw contact between the two men and she ran from the carriage, telling the jury today, i saw blood straightaway and i think today, i saw blood straightaway and ithinki today, i saw blood straightaway and i think i panicked after that because i had to run through it. also at the old bailey we had from sarah fry who is the former girlfriend of darren pencille, she also has a chance with him and she says that on the 4th of january in the hours following the attack, she received a phone call from darren pencille in which he said, i have done something bad and you will see it on the news later. that night she also received a text message that said, iam also received a text message that said, i am sorry and i love you both. the court also heard today witness statements that were read out from people in west climbed on in surrey, that is where the train came toa in surrey, that is where the train came to a stop following the attack. people there reported seeing a man running and one said he looked agitated, he‘s had something red on his hands and also on his face. darren pencille denies murder and
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the trial he continues. scientists say cervical cancer could be significantly reduced thanks to a vaccination programme targeting the hpv virus. it‘s one of the main causes of the disease, and a new study has examined the impact of the vaccine on 60 millon people in 14 different countries. lauren moss reports. when mandy was 44 she had a routine smear test. the news that she had cervical cancer changed her life. it was a huge bolt out of the blue because i did not have any symptoms, but i was treated within 17 days. i had a radical hysterectomy, which means that everything was removed from me and it was a really hard going operation and i was in hospital for a week and it was then a long recovery. four years on, mandy is in remission and has checkups every six months. the majority of several cancers are caused by the human papilloma virus. more than 300,000 women worldwide die from it every year. 850 of those deaths are in the uk.
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a decade ago, girls aged 12 and 13 started receiving the hpv vaccine. now a study of 60 million people in 14 high income countries has found eight years after vaccination among women aged 20 to 24 there was a 66% reduction in high risk strains of hpv. cases of genital warts were also down 54% and there was a 31% decline in precancerous lesions. the vaccine is very successful at reducing hpv infections and there are five hpv types which have seen substantial declines in the uk and they cause about 90% of cervical disease and cervical cancer. so what we‘ll expect to see in the near future is that we are seeing really substantial declines in cervical cancers. hpv is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. many people will develop some form of it in their lifetime with no ill effects, but charities say no one should be complacent. cervical screening still remains really, really important and just as important for people who have had the vaccination.
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as the study shows, the vaccination is really effective at reducing the risk of cervical cancer, but it does not fully protect against the disease, so still take up your cervical screening invitation when it is sent through. mandy‘s teenage daughters have both been vaccinated. from september the roll—out will continue to 12 and 13—year—old boys. i said to her, i would never make you do anything in your life. you have have this vaccine. it is absolutely critical. ladies, unfortunately, are still dying from this disease. you would become infertile, you cannot have children. i do not want my children to go through what i went through in the last four years, so it is just imperative that they get vaccinated. the study did not analyse data from low income countries, but scientists and survivors are optimistic that research is a step closer to cervical cancer one day becoming a disease of the past. two suicide bombers have blown themselves up in separate attacks on police in the centre of tunisian capital, tunis. one officer has been killed —
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several others have been injured, alongside civilians. there was a similar attack on capital‘s main thoroughfare late last year, when nine people were hurt. in 2015 an assault on a museum in the capital left twenty—two people dead. (pres) you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines labour mps labourmps and labour mps and peers reject the readmission of chris williamson back into the party. ajury hears into the party. a jury hears that a man accused of stabbing to death a fellow train passenger held a phone to his face and said, i am going to kill this man. europe is in the grip of a heatwave, the highest ever temperatures for june have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings have been issued in france, spain and italy. in sport it is the start of the quarterfinals of the women‘s world cup in france. england face norway tonight. the manager says his side
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are relaxed, happy and ready to win. west indies had to beat india to have any chance of reaching the semifinals in the cricket world cup. they are facing 269 for victory. nine without loss very early in their reply. ian brady has mist out in the draw. i will have more details on that story and the rest in the next 15 minutes. boris johnson and jeremy hunt face questions from conservative party members tonight — in the third hustings of the leadership campaign. mrjohnson is promising changes to the immigration system if he becomes prime minister. mr hunt says he will cancel the student fee debts of young entrepreneurs who start businesses. the think—tank the institute for fiscal studies says his campaign pledges so far could cost up to 65 billion pounds. our political correspondent helena wilkinson reports.
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keeping his campaign afloat. jeremy hunt on the isle of wight earlier. he made quite an entrance. supporters aside, jeremy hunt made a new pledge, a promise to young people who set up a business.” new pledge, a promise to young people who set up a business. i want to encourage our brightest, best young graduates to get out there and do what bill gates did, what mark zuckerberg did, create the great companies of the future. if you are going to take the risk, manage to set upa going to take the risk, manage to set up a successful business, we will cancel your tuition fees. not far away, borisjohnson arrived ahead of tonight ‘s hustings. he had promised changes to the immigration system based on the australian style if he became prime minister. one of the reasons people voted to take back control of our immigration syste m back control of our immigration system is they wanted democratic
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oversight of it and what we would be able to do with a points—based syste m able to do with a points—based system is to decide exactly how many people will be in each sector, that will be subject to parliamentary control. what has been the reaction? they promise pretty sizable tax cuts. in boris johnson‘s they promise pretty sizable tax cuts. in borisjohnson‘s case that is people in higher thresholds. and injeremy is people in higher thresholds. and in jeremy hunt ‘s case, . .. is people in higher thresholds. and in jeremy hunt 's case,... we will hear more about their policies on other issues but what is not clear is how much anything other than brexit will influence a decision of tory party members when it comes to their vote. german chancellor angela merkel has been seen shaking once again during a ceremony in berlin this morning, eight days after a similar incident. the german leader appeared uncomfortable and gripped her arms
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as her body trembled. last week, she appeared in a similar state of discomfort when she met the ukrainian president, but blamed the incident on dehydration. a spokesperson says the chancellor is ‘absolutely fine‘ and has set off for the g20 summit injapan as planned. earlier i spoke to the german journalist and publicist, stefan kornelius. i started by asking him just hw concerned people were by the latest images of angel merkel. well, it has all boil down to dehydration. not drinking enough water and she never really took care of her health. she follows an extremely strict schedule. she is flying overnight to a sucker, goes right into the summit, most other leaders do arrive the night before so she‘s really hard on herself but on the other side she also looks not that healthy. she has put on weight,
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she is overweight and she is in her 14th year of power and that is probably power wearing on her. the difficulty is something like this tends to overshadow serious issues. when she is at the g20, she will be asked about her health.” when she is at the g20, she will be asked about her health. i think she a lwa ys asked about her health. i think she always can counter those doubts if she is there, if she is sort of agile, fit and has her arguments. she never was really hindered in making her case and being strong, but nevertheless public doubt is bad for a world leader like her, the markets don‘t like it so she has to address those doubts. and very briefly, i know howjournalists work, what are the suggestions that are being offered as a possible cause of this? quite honestly and i should know, i don‘t have any suggestion. it is simply probably the heat and it is probably her not
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really taking enough time for herself. this is not working well if you work 18 hours a day for 14 yea rs. the two candidates for the leadership of the liberal democrats have been setting out how they plan to force another brexit referendum. ed davey and jo swinson were taking part in a debate on the bbc‘s victoria derbyshire programme. they also spoke of their regrets about their time in government. our political correspondent nick eardley was watching. jo swinson and ed davey are both here. it‘s notjust the conservatives choosing a new leader. welcome to a lib dem special. ed davey and jo swinson both want to lead their party. today, they set out why. and the big issue was brexit. both want another referendum and ultimately to stay in the european union, but how? the prospect of a no deal exit is one that is focusing minds in the conservative party right now including amongst people who are currently ministers who have been arguing in private
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for a people‘s vote but have not yet backed it because of collective responsibility. ed davey predicted mps could bring down a pm who supported no deal. i'd like to have a government of national unity, bringing the parties together, probably headed up by a backbench labour mp and that would just be a temporary government for one purpose and one purpose alone, to pass the legislation for a people's vote. both said they‘d accept the result of another referendum and they are open to working with other parties to get it, but they are less keen on the idea of coalitions, after the experience of going into power with the conservatives. like many people was absolutely horrified by the coalition and by your participation on in austerity. both were ministers, both have policy regrets. i wasn't very happy with the second bedroom tax, for example. but you voted for it. if you're on a compromise situation by the very
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nature of that word you don't get everything you want. what do you regret, jo swinson. is a bedroom tax, absolutely we shouldn‘t have let that through in coalition and we shouldn‘t have gone back on what we said on tuition fees. one of the candidates could have taken a rather different path. mi6 tried to recruit me to be a spy overseas but i'd just been appointed to the economic adviser for paddy ashdown, so i never became 00 davy. but he now he is firmly focused on politics and even looking at life beyond brexit. my priority is first to tackle inequality. i'd want to make sure those communities and regions that have been left behind get the investment and support they deserve. we need to reshape the economy, tackle the climate emergency and harness the technological revolution in order to do that. the lib dems struggled after the coalition years to make their mark in british politics, but after finishing second in the european election they are on a high. the challenge for whoever takes over will be to build on that and to try and make the party a significant force at westminster again.
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whoever wins will find getting attention difficult right away. the new lib dem leader takes over the same day as the new prime minister. nick eardley, bbc news. do you know when you have those moments when you are on the computer and it is not quite loading as fast as you would like, we have that happening right now with the weather. 50%. that is the thing right there above tomasz‘s head. tell me just how hot it is out there. it is obviously a historic heatwave across europe and the idea is that here in the uk the heat hasn‘t quite reached us yet. the peak of the heatwave will be in different parts of the country at different parts of the country at different times. for scotland for example which doesn‘t often get high temperatures, the peak of the heat will be tomorrow, so in the west and
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highlands, i wouldn‘t be surprised if it hit 30 celsius. it will not be a record but it will be close. the next day on saturday, it is the south—east of the country where we will get around 34 degrees and that is about a degree and a half away from ourjune record but we are not expecting record—breaking temperatures here in the uk. we are nearly there. there we go. obviously a lot of sunshine beating down on us but focus on the north sea coast, people have been complaining because it has been quite chilly. i felt the chill yesterday in london. you have cold air blowing down the north sea
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coast, you can see the colours there, yellow on the north sea coast whereas in the west it is the orange colours. further south and we talked about this an hour ago, but we were talking about what a heatwave is and i asked you what is a wave of heat? you replied, it is a heatwave. exactly. quite literally it is a wave of hot air in the middle part of the atmosphere and sort of a flat cross section would look something like this. we talk about hot air coming from the south, then it has to go back down again because it will not go up to the arctic. we are on the tip of it here, that is why we haven‘t got the extreme heat. the extreme heat is in the further south and centre. as well as this wave with the wind is going up and down again, this wave has also got to propagate or move from west in an
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easterly direction. if you think that distance there is and i us for very long because this will move into... it will propagate and then we get that cooler air out in the atlantic. i will show you exactly what will be happening with this. here is the heat, this is friday. so we have got to saturday, get that plume of heat and then, come sunday, a cold front wishes across come off it goes with the heat towards the eastern parts of europe and we get those atlantic winds coming out of the west. for folks that don‘t like the west. for folks that don‘t like the heat, the good news is it will only last for one day. but at the weekend, saturday anyway it will be warm. yes, 34 degrees. and then sunday will be a lot cooler. shall we go on to the general forecast?
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let‘s ta ke we go on to the general forecast? let‘s take a closer look. at what is happening right now. i want to emphasise the strength of the wind blowing out of the east. 50 miles an hour, even 60 has been reported in cornwall and coast of devon. very windy in the south—west of the country, certainly strong enough to break a branch or two and that same easterly wind is causing those lower temperatures on those north sea coasts, whereas in the western parts of scotland, easily temperatures in the mid 20s. again tomorrow it looks as their western areas will have the highest temperatures but the sun is beating down on us. a lot of cloud, again drifting off the north sea. ten, 11 degrees, but no to 16, 14, thatis ten, 11 degrees, but no to 16, 14, that is the sign of warm air coming out of france and that is exactly where we will see that plume of heat, spreading and spreading all the way into western parts of
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scotla nd the way into western parts of scotland and we have 28 on the weather map here, but locally, one or two locations could get up to 30 degrees. still pretty cool on the aberdeenshire coast line, around 15, 18 degrees and then saturday, it will properly peak at 34 whilst other parts of europe get that excruciating 40 to 45 celsius. saturday, with the southerly wind, the chance of some showers coming through, possibly even thunderstorms. here is the head, a conservative estimate there, 33, could be around 30 in yorkshire as well. we showed you that weather front animation with those winds blowing out of the atlantic. you can see that he‘d been pushed away into germany and poland as well. sunday, a completely different day. a lot more comfortable for most of us because it will be some 10 degrees lower, 24 is decent enough. some showers in scotland and only 15
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degrees in stornoway and a shivering 13 degrees therefore our friends in the northern isles. some big changes happening over the next two or three daysin happening over the next two or three days in terms of the temperatures, some of us will love one thing, others will love the other and then it is all going to go the other way round again. you know what i mean. goodbye.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines... 90 labour mps and peers say they cannot overstate the "depth and breadth of hurt and anger" at the readmission of the derby north mp to the party, following his suspension over allegations of anti—semitism. europe is in the grip of a heatwave. .. the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy. a jury hears that a man accused of stabbing to death a fellow train passenger held a phone to his face and said "i‘m going to kill this man". a medical success story — as scientists say they hope cervical cancer could eventually be eradicated, thanks to the vaccination programme against the hpv virus. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster. a huge night for england‘s women footballers tonight. it is going to be quite warm, although not as hot as the rest of europe. phil neville says he is a
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big believer in looking in their eyes, he says they looked relaxed and happy and they look like they are ready to win but of course they wa nt to are ready to win but of course they want to match at least what they did in canada four years ago in reaching a world cup semifinal. interesting to see how they have recovered physically and mentally after the horrible match the other day in the last 16 against cameroon. that turned very ugly. the africans looked to down tools when those var decisisons went against them, then a series of horrible challenges that could have caused serious injury, especially to the england captain steph houghton, but she should be ok to face norway in le havre tonight — she took full part in training yesterday. there has been a virus in the camp, millie bright one of those who was struck down but phil neville has stressed that he has the depth in his squad
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for any player to step up. he can always count on one of the veterans, jill scott, in herfourth world cup, she knows what it‘s like to reach this business end of the tournament. once you get past the halfway mark... we want to be here for the duration of the tournament but it is so important to look to the next game because your mind can start to wander and then you can overthink and that is something the squad has been very good at, sticking to the task in hand. it will be such a difficult game, they are a very physical and technical team and they will want to progress just as much as us, so it is a real moment of character, when emotion is high. just sticking to the plan,
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that is what will be key. but i believe in every one of these players and we really trust in them. i‘m just excited, i really am, to see that we are in a world cup quarterfinal. norway are a very good team, knocking out australia in the last 16. coverage is right across the bbc this evening. kick off is at 8pm — it‘s on bbc one, bbc radio 5 live and the bbc sport website & app. and now the cricket world cup? the west indies have got to win? yes, simon, great atmosphere at old trafford today, fa ntatstic weather and it looks like it could be close. india are on the brink of qualifying for the semi finals — they‘ve won 4 of their 5 matches so far. west indies chasing 269 for victory.
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kemar roach took 3 wickets as they kept the india total down. virat kohli and mahndra singh dhoni made half centuries. chris gayle has gone for the windies. and they have also lost another wicket, so this is a wobbly start for the west indies. after 27 seasons at somerset the former england batsmen marcus trescothick will retire at the end of the season. the 43 year old played 76 tests for england and scored almost 6000 runs at an average ofjust under 44. he was part of the england side that memorably won the ashes in 2005. his 52 centuries for somerset is a record for the county. he has recently been dropped from the first team for the first time in his career so that has probably had some part in his decision to retire but what a career that has been. liam broady has been knocked out of wimbledon qualifying
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in the final round, he was just one victory from a fourth appearance in the main draw. the british player was two sets up against frenchman greg berrere but lost the next three. he misses out on a place in the main draw. chelsea are expected to complete the signing of real madrid midfielder mateo kovacic, for £40 million, despite being under a transfer ban. they can getaround that, because the croatian star spent last season on loan at stamford bridge, playing 32 games, so chelsea have already registered him. that means, providing the deal is done before the loan expires on the 30thjune, it would not contravene fifa‘s transfer ban which runs until the end of the january transfer window. a crafty loophole for chelsea. that‘s all the sport for now.
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let‘s get more on the open letter signed by over 90 labour mps and peers, demanding jeremy corbyn reverse the decision to re—instate the whip to chris williamson. mr williamson was suspended in february following comments he made about its handling of an inquiry into anti—semitism. the party‘s deputy leader tom watson is among the signatories the labourmp, wes streeting is chair of the all party parliamentary group on britishjews — he also signed the letter and he‘s in our westminster studio. it is an angry letter stop it is because it is amplifying the anger and concern felt by many decent people in the labour party including jewish people and the broaderjewish community who are horrified and one of my own labour party members in ilford north said this decision felt like a punch in the stomach, to him and otherjewish members, chris williamson has clear form of downplaying and dismissing concerns about anti—semitism in the labour party and this is a man who said, we
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have been too apologetic, yet the equalities human rights commission for only the second time in the history of that commission has chosen to investigate a political party for racism and our failure to deal with it, the first party they investigated was the british national party. now they are investigating our party, not only do i think that chris williamson is downplaying anti—semitism and that has been a kid you between factor to labour becoming institutionally anti—semitic —— that has been a big pa rt anti—semitic —— that has been a big part contributing to labour. and the way in which members of the panel we re way in which members of the panel were substituted one for another has led to this conclusion... substituted by whom ? led to this conclusion... substituted by whom? the original panel had different members of the nec and that panel was put to one side earlier this week and the next day a different panel was put together with different members of the nec who reached a different
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conclusion. by whom? labour party officials who have looked at the issue and recommended further action against chris williamson but those members of the nec have not looked at it and this smells, it does not smile right and it does not pass the smell test. —— it does not smell right. the good news is that regardless of what the nec have decided, the question of who holds the labour whip is a matterfor the leadership so ifjeremy corbyn is serious about tackling anti—semitism andi serious about tackling anti—semitism and i have to say after years of inaction i‘m not sure he is, but if he seriously has a chance to demonstrate it right now by removing the whip from chris williamson and failing to do so will tell us that the problem is notjust with the national executive committee or the people who piled in onjewish mps who have called out chris in the last 24 hours, but actually the problem starts at the top, so if jeremy corbyn wants to tackle
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anti—semitism he has a chance to demonstrate it and ourfailure anti—semitism he has a chance to demonstrate it and our failure to do so will have huge consequences for the labour party. which are what? we have seen the erosion of trust and the perception of our party which is historically the anti—racist party, is institutionally anti—semitic, but jeremy corbyn himself has a problem and is failing to tackle it and if he can‘t tackle it in the party then he can‘t tackle it in the party then he won‘t be trusted to tackle it in the country as prime minister. we will continue to haemorrhage support not just with jewish members will continue to haemorrhage support notjust withjewish members and voters but decent minded people who expect frankly better of the labour party and we do have the investigation and just in case there are members of the shadow cabinet who do not under understand what that investigation is, this is not the e hrc giving us a bit of consultancy, this is a body coming in to investigate whether the labour party has engaged in institutional racism and whether we are criminally culpable as a result, it is
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incredibly serious and only the bnp have been treated this way. i feel like this is deja vu and i have been on your programme and many others talking about this and our failure to tackle anti—semitism and it seems whenever there is a decision to be made the response of the labour leadership is not to tackle the problem but to think about how they can shoot themselves in the labour party in the face. that is what has happened today with the chris williamson decision. 90 signatories including the deputy leader, to an outside of this could look like a coup. —— outsider. outside of this could look like a coup. -- outsider. this is holding up coup. -- outsider. this is holding upa mirrorto coup. -- outsider. this is holding up a mirror to jeremy coup. -- outsider. this is holding up a mirror tojeremy corbyn at the labour party to ask if we are willing to stand by and allow this to happen. jeremy corbyn has a responsibility to lead and it is not just by the way the critics of jeremy corbyn who are saying this. we have seen current and former members of the national executive committee and media commentators who are known for being on the airwaves
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defending jeremy corbyn, who are baffled by this decision. they understand the damage this is doing and they recognise that labour has and they recognise that labour has an anti—semitism problem and they wa nt an anti—semitism problem and they want something done about it, so this isn‘t just about want something done about it, so this isn‘tjust about one particular perspective on the labour party demanding something is done. this is a breadth of opinion across the labour party of people who are frankly horrified at our tackling of anti—semitism and want to see something done about it. many people are responsible for tackling this on the national executive committee and in the party but there‘s one person who can remove the whip from chris williamson immediately and that is jeremy corbyn and he has got to decide whether it is one rule for his mates and for everybody else and whether he is serious about tackling this pernicious form of racism and whether he is prepared to be a bystander —— or where that he is prepared to be a bystander, so as the letter says, over to you, jeremy. labour say he could face further action if he repeats any
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similar behaviour, chris williamson, and they feel the sanction is appropriate and they will move on. the latter, —— the latter, the drama that surrounds them, we have heard them before, but at what point do something change when you are basically threatening jeremy corbyn saying you have got to do something about this? —— the letter. saying you have got to do something about this? -- the letter. the onus is onjeremy corbyn and i‘m almost tired of saying this... we all are. now you have issued an ultimatum, if you do not withdraw the whip from chris williamson, what will you and the group of 90 actually do? there are the group of 90 actually do? there a re steps the group of 90 actually do? there are steps we can take in accordance with the labour party‘s rule book andi with the labour party‘s rule book and i would preferjeremy corbyn to now show real leadership. he has an opportunity to do that immediately. i need to push you on this. jeremy
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corbyn tends not to respond to this kind of thing, so what is the next stage in this? i understand you want to press me but i‘m not going to give you an answer right now. there are give you an answer right now. there a re steps give you an answer right now. there are steps we can take ourselves. that you have discussed? as parliamentarians to take action against chris williamson and to hold the leadership to the promises they have made time and time again on tackling anti—semitism which they need to live up to, but i would prefer, i would need to live up to, but i would prefer, iwould ratherjeremy need to live up to, but i would prefer, i would ratherjeremy corbyn looks and listens and hears the concern is not just looks and listens and hears the concern is notjust from people like me but from people right across the labour party, some of his closest friends and allies, who campaigned for him in two leadership elections and who want him to be prime minister and who think he‘s the best thing sliced bread —— since sliced bread, these people wonder what has
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gone wrong, and sojeremy corbyn has got the chance to show that he will tackle this and to prove us wrong. but i don‘t think you will. tackle this and to prove us wrong. but i don't think you will. you want him out now? i make no bones about it in terms of his leadership, and i don‘t think i can ever have confidence in him as leader but that is not the question and that is a minority opinion. within the labour party. i just want to not minority opinion. within the labour party. ijust want to not have to keep coming on your programme and saying publicly that the labour party needs to get a grip and that jeremy corbyn needs to do something having exhausted all of the private avenues that exist for challenging and enquiring and pressing and all the rest of it, this is a humiliating position for the labour party to be in and i cannot for the life of me understand beyond not wanting to act why the labour leadership does not act. jeremy cannot hide behind process because if chris williamson has the whip
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thatis if chris williamson has the whip that is the decision forjeremy corbyn and if he believes he should not have the whip he can take it away, and leadership begins at the top and the back rest withjeremy corbyn and i now expect him to act. always good to have you on the programme, thanks for joining always good to have you on the programme, thanks forjoining us. let‘s get more on our main story today — the heatwave spreading across europe is expected to get worse, as germany, poland and the czech republic recorded their highest—ever june temperature yesterday. schools in parts of france will be closed today, and exams delayed, as temperatures are expected to reach the mid 40s. officials there have issued stark warnings about the risk to life as a result of the hot air from northern africa that meteorologists are blaming for the heatwave. and the uk won‘t escape — over the next few days there could be highs of 34 degrees. but it‘s not quite as bad as parts of spain, though, where temperatures will reach a sweltering 45 amid warnings of ‘significant risks‘ of forest fires.
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let‘s talk now to david bouton, who‘s in parc asterix in paris with his class of year 7 students. how hot is it? good afternoon. it is really hot. 32 degrees in the shade, and in the sun it feels scorching hot. we are trying to get away from it and we are trying to get in the shade as much as we can. i‘m under beautiful wisteria waiting for your call, so we are surviving. you are ona trip call, so we are surviving. you are on a trip for three days, what precautions are you taking? the stu d e nts precautions are you taking? the students have all got to wear a hat and we are meeting them every hour and we are meeting them every hour and a half and we are making sure that they drink enough water. the worst hours of the day, inside a restau ra nt worst hours of the day, inside a restaurant which had air conditioning, the hotel is
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air—conditioned, so we are lucky we are ina air—conditioned, so we are lucky we are in a place with dry rides so we tell them to automate and get wet on the wet rides so they can carry on feeling fresh for at least half an hour. a lot of schools are closed as a result of this, was their pressure on you to say let‘s postpone this? some parents were concerned about the heat because the media issued a lot of warnings with regards to temperatures soaring. it is not the first time this is happening to us, we are coming to paris and we are not going to miss the area and if we make sure that the boys drink a lot and go to bed early enough and rest and go to bed early enough and rest and stay in the shade, there are not that many risks, i think. as long as everybody remains sensible and has a
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hat and sun cream and follows the guidelines, it is totally safe. you have been on trips like this before, youngsters are not always like that. youngsters are not always like this, year seven are 11 and 12 so we need to be here to remind them to drink and remind them they need to fill up their water bottle and the contract they have with us is to have a right, have half a bottle, another right, have half a bottle, another right, and then the other half of the bottle. enjoy the rest of the day. we are going to versailles and then we will be returning to the uk tomorrow evening. have a good rest of the trip. david, thanks for joining us. they are not allowed in the fountains of versailles! i think they find people. —— fine.
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suzanne is here — in a moment she will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. labour mps and peers sign a letter rejecting the decision to allow the labour mp, chris williamson, back into the party after an investigation into comments he made about the party‘s handling of anti—semitism allegations. a jury hears that a man accused of stabbing to death a fellow train passenger held a phone to his face and said "i‘m going to kill this man". europe is in the grip of a heatwave. .. the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy. suzanne: here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. vauxhall‘s owner psa says it will build the next—generation astra at its ellesmere port facility in cheshire but only if the uk exits the european union on favourable terms. more on this shortly. us regulators have uncovered
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a possible new flaw in boeing‘s troubled 737 max aircraft that is likely to push back test flights of the modified plane. the fleet was grounded worldwide following two fatal crashes. boots is one of the high street names which has been struggling in tough market conditions — and sales have fallen in the past three months. the numbers came from its us owner — walgreens boots alliance. its international sales were down 1.6% in the three months to may 31, mostly due to a 1% decline at boots uk. so tell me more about this announcement from vauxhall owner — psa — about the ellesmere port car plant. we‘ve been waiting on confirmation on this for some time — about whether the firm will continue to build the new astra model at the factory which employs around a thousand people — it says it will— but only if brexit goes well. so what does that mean?
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in a statement it says... "the decision on the allocation to the ellesmere port plant will be "conditional on the final terms of the uk‘s exit "from the european union and the acceptance of "the new vehicle agreement, which has been negotiated "with the unite trade union." obviously with the state of play in british politics at the moment — we don‘t know what the final terms of the uk‘s exit will be — as far as the new vehicle agreement is concerned — that‘s essentially cost cutting at the plant — which has been negotiated with the union — final confirmation of that it seems is needed. what we also don‘t know is exactly how much of a share of the astra production will be at ellesmere port — because the group also announced today that another plant —
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a factory in ruesselsheim in germany will also manufacture the model — it has been earmarked to build the electric version of the astra — but production could be upscaled if the uk does not leave on favourable terms. also — you there‘s been an increase in the number of ebay millionaires compared to last year. what‘s an ebay millionaire? the definition is businesses who sell products via the platform which have revenues over £1 million. 1300 people have entered the club — over the past 12 months — an increase of 18 per cent. we can talk to one of them now — she‘s called claire hines — and she is the founder of the lingerie outlet store based in swindon. tell me how you began your business? i began my business in the recession in 2009, and discovered that laundry was being sold at a sale price and sol was being sold at a sale price and so i thought —— linger —— lingerie.
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i thought people might prefer to spend £15 on a good fitting bra. and now they do. pretty impressive what you have done, how has business on the platform helped you? what ebay offers and for anyone who wants to start a business, it offers the marketing for you and it teaches you about how to look after a customer. customer service especially in this country still isn't as great as it should be and what ebay does it helps you do that and in any marketplace, they will do that, as well, so it was a really obvious move to start selling products on ebay. you started your business as a single mother with a small charge you must have faced obstacles? many
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obstacles and sleepless nights, absolutely, but over time i created absolutely, but over time i created a website and looking at other channels as well, and we have a great team, anyway, and i think when you run a business you have got to be driven and you have got to have courage of your convictions. and a good idea. as long as you have got all of that, then go for it, start a business. i have inspired a few people to start businesses but i would always say start it on something like ebay where they can help and guide you because they are a great bunch of people. thanks for joining us. interesting, there, clear talking about how she started the —— claire talking about how she started her business in the recession. have you heard of the lipstick effect? the lipstick effect is the theory
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that when facing an economic crisis consumers will be more willing to buy less costly luxury goods. lipstick index was coined by leonard lauder — chairman of the board of estee lauder, used to describe increased sales of cosmetics during the early 2000s recession. — perhaps we should coin a new phrase — the lingerie effect. thanks forjoining us. time for a look at the weather. continental europe is pretty much in the peak of its current heat wave and the next couple of days will see more of that back in the uk it has not been too hot so far but the sun is beating down and at the moment actually some huge contrasts in the temperature between western parts of the uk and the east. it is down to the uk and the east. it is down to the wind blowing from the north sea, it means there is a 10 degrees difference between coastal areas in some western parts of the uk. lots of sunshine, strong sunshine, but it feels cold on the sea coast. the winds are very strong, in fact gusts in excess of 40, 50 mph around some of the headlands in the south—west and 18 degrees in kent but by the
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time you get to the coast of cornwall and devon there is an 8 degrees difference, 26 is expected in western parts of scotland but on the coast of aberdeen it is in the high teens, so i think we will keep that contrast into tomorrow as well between the east coast and the west, the breeze will continue, but we are starting to import from the south some pretty warm and muggy air and you can see the wind arrows blowing in from france across western parts of the uk and this is pretty much a plume of hot air which is blowing out of the continent so that means across western parts of scotland we might even hit 30 degrees, maybe 28, and you can see the contrast between the west and also the east of the country, but on saturday it is a different story. temperatures could even hit the mid 30s in the uk, especially around the south—east and east anglia. looking at saturday,
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the subtle change in the wind direction, coming infrom the subtle change in the wind direction, coming in from the south, even slightly east of south which means the hot air will be pushed towards more central and eastern areas and even in yorkshire we could see highs of close to 30 degrees and then a dramatic change by the time we get to sunday, we lose the southerly wind and instead the wind is coming straight out of the atlantic, much fresher air and we are talking about a 10 degrees drop over the space of a day and on top of that showers are also in the forecast for northern areas. look at these values, much closer to the norm. goodbye.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4pm. 90 labour mps and peers say they cannot overstate the "depth and breadth of hurt and anger" at the readmission of chris williamson, the derby north mp to the party, following his suspension over allegations of anti—semitism. a jury hears that a man accused of stabbing to death a fellow train passenger held a phone to his face and said, "i‘m going to kill this man". europe bakes as temperatures rise to levels normally seen in the middle east. 40 degrees is forecast for france, spain and italy. here in the uk, it‘s a mere 30 degrees. it is hotter than we expected. yeah, la st it is hotter than we expected. yeah, last night at the spanish steps it was 41. 41? a lot of water, a lot of
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gelato, this hat, just trying to stay cool. a medical success story — as scientists say they hope cervical cancer could eventually be eradicated, thanks to the vaccination programme against the hpv virus. vauxhall owners peugeot say they will build the new astra at ellesmere port in cheshire — but that decision depends on what happens with brexit. coming up on afternoon live all the sport iwtholly. phil neville says the and lionesses are relaxed and ready to win ahead of tonight‘s world cup quarterfinal against norway. we will be live in le havre are a little later. thanks olly, and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. tomasz has all the weather. in the uk the temperatures are rising and the peak in our heat is going to be on saturday with temperatures expected up to 34 celsius. thank you very much, talk to you later on. also coming up — the teenager in istanbul who scooped up and saved a toddler who fell from a window.
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hello, everyone — this is afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. the labour deputy leader tom watson and 90 of the party‘s mps and peers have issued a statement demanding jeremy corbyn withdraw the whip from chris williamson. mr williamson was re—instated into the party yesterday following comments he made over its inquiry into anti—semitism. the statement said they cannot overstate the depth and breadth of hurt and anger at the readmission for the mp for derby north. our political correspondent nick eardley is in the central lobby of the houses of parliament. this is a real ratcheting up of the row in the labour party over chris williamson‘s membership. he was suspended back in february but the decision last night to let him back in with what was
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essentially a slap on the wrists, a formal warning, has provoked fury in the party. now, at the top level the labour leadership says this wasn‘t their decision, this was something that panel that took advice from a qc, and that if this does happen again mr williamson could face more severe punishment. but in the last few minutes we have an interview from jeremy corbyn in. i should say this was recorded before the letter this was recorded before the letter this afternoon but here is what he had to say. we deal with anti—semitism very seriously, there is no place for anti—semitism in our society and obviously not in our party as well. and anyone that makes anti—semitic remarks can expect to be at the very least reprimanded, and if they are very serious and engage in anti—semitic activity, then they are expelled from the party. some in the party don't think it is being taken seriously enough
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at the moment. i‘m joined by the deputy leader of the labour party tom watson now. who do you blame for chris williamson being readmitted to the party? the two members of the 3—person committee in my view made a mistake. two of them voted to essentially stop a full investigation into the hurt and anger and upset he has caused in his public utterances. it is obviously a mistake and i‘m bewildered by the decision. what they have done is taken away a proper disciplinary enquiry that would have got to the fa cts enquiry that would have got to the facts of this case and that‘s why i‘ve put my name to a public letter signed by many of my parliamentary collea g u es signed by many of my parliamentary colleagues because i think now the only way this can be dealt with now, the only way the british jewish community can be satisfied that we ta ke community can be satisfied that we take anti—semitism seriously in our party is for the whip to be removed from him and for our chief whip to conduct an investigation. for that to happen, it requiresjeremy to make that decision and that‘s why i think it‘s so important. i wouldn‘t
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normally do this but this is so important, the upset and the anguish is so great that we need to act very swiftly to reassure people we take anti—semitism seriously in the labour party. do you thinkjeremy corbyn has done enough to address this issue? we are facing an ehrc enquiry that will run its course, andi enquiry that will run its course, and i hope that that enquiry is vigorous and roots out anti—jewish racism and tells us where our own procedures are in order to deal with it. but actually, in this case the behaviour of two of our nec members who are appointed on the authority of our general secretary, is such that the only way we can now be serious to the public that we are dealing with these issues is to take another disciplinary route, which is forjeremy to remove the whip from chris williamson, which would allow our chief whip to conduct a parliamentary enquiry. as you know, there are some of your colleagues who don‘t think the timing of this
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isa who don‘t think the timing of this is a coincidence, that it is part of labour preparing for a snap general election and mr williamson has been let in for two reasons, one is he is a marginal seat and the second disc he is an ally of mr corbyn.” a marginal seat and the second disc he is an ally of mr corbyn. i don't know why at this particular time the decision was made on this enquiry. i have not been party to that. what i would say is chris williamson is entitled to a proper investigation. the magnitude of the allegations against him are so great and the upset and anger caused obviously required referring to that kind of enquiry. we should move swiftly now to re m ove enquiry. we should move swiftly now to remove the whip and to do an investigation as quick as we can.” should say we have heard from mr williamson today and he denies any anti—semitism, he says he has spent his whole career fighting racism. but there are some others who left your party over this issue, luciana berger, mp, being one of them and she said last night, what is your red line? to people still in the labour party, when will you say enough is enough and i can‘t do this
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any more? on chris williamson, he should have done, he should have marked the upset and anger he has caused the jewish marked the upset and anger he has caused thejewish community and if he had any ounce of humility of decency he would have at least apologised today but he has decided not to do that, which i think will cause even more offence, it certainly caused offence to me and luciana berger is right to call that out. she was bullied out of the labour party by anti—jewish racists in her own party and i still think thatis in her own party and i still think that is a stain of shame on our party but you‘ve got to make a decision in politics and for me the century old institution that i am deputy leader of requires protecting and revering and that means we have got to drive out racism in all its forms and that‘s why we need swift action today to remove the whip from chris williamson, because these two nec members who behaved on their own, have let everyone down and they harm the reputation of the labour party, and more importantly, they have caused yet more upset with the
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british jewish community and have caused yet more upset with the britishjewish community and it is com pletely britishjewish community and it is completely unacceptable. some of our viewers will be sitting at home thinking, we have heard this all before, we have heard debates within the labour party, pressure on mr corbyn on the issue of anti—semitism, and nothing has been done. is the truth not that the party can‘t get a grip on this issue? people are going to form that view if we don‘t act swiftly. we have never had an mp accused of stirring up so much upset in a particular community in britain. it a full enquiry and that is why this decision was so bewildering, it was so obvious that it needed to run its course and it hasn‘t and sadly the only route left is forjeremy to step in, show leadership, remove the whip and allow for a proper enquiry. have you had any conversations today with mr corbyn today beyond the letter? not yet but i will have conversations with him, obviously. i think this is quite a fast—moving story and i wasn‘t aware that the
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committee had made the decision until early this morning. tom watson, thanks very much forjoining us. simon, as i say, this storyjust isn‘t going away. we have not heard back from the labour leader‘s office yet on that letter and the cause from tom watson and 89 others, including ten, i should say, on the labour front bench in the commons, we have not heard back from mr corbyn on those calls for the whip to be removed from mr williamson. a lot of pressure on this issue. not going away. studio: nick, thank you very much. nick eardley there. the jury at the trial of a man accused of stabbing a rail passenger to death injanuary has heard from a witness of the attack. kayleigh carter told the jury she saw a man hold a phone to his face and say, "i‘m going to kill this man." darren pencille, denies murdering lee pomeroy after an attack on a train from guildford to london on 4th january. sarah walton, is at the old bailey for us now. as you say, kayleigh carter told the jury as you say, kayleigh carter told the jury today that she saw the two men
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arguing in the carriage as she was ina train arguing in the carriage as she was in a train leaving from the london road station in guildford heading towards london on the 4th of january this year. she said she heard lee pomeroy say, i‘ve never dealt with anyone with special needs before. and then she saw darren pencille with a phone to his face while he shouted i‘m going to kill this man. although under cross—examination, she did say she hadn‘t recalled him using that phrase straightaway. she told police about that several days later. the court here at the old bailey also heard from sarah fry, a former girlfriend of darren pencille, and they also have a child together, and she said in the hours following the attack she received a phone call from him when he said, i‘ve done something bad and you‘ll see it on the news later. she also got a text message later from him that night saying, i‘m sorry and i love you both. this afternoon the jury love you both. this afternoon the jury also heard from darren pencille‘s mother ingrid robinson and she told the court that in his
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20s darren pencille was told he was a paranoid schizophrenic and had been admitted to hospital on a few occasions. under cross—examination she said darren pencille was not goodin she said darren pencille was not good in crowded situations, that he thought people were looking at him and that they wanted to do something to him. she agreed that her son had real difficulties on public transport. she said there were times that he would ring her from a bus transport. she said there were times that he would ring herfrom a bus in a panic. darren pencille denies murder and the trial here continues. sarah walton, thank you very much, at the old bailey. the heatwave across much of europe is intensifying with countries including france, spain and italy all expecting temperatures to peak above 40 degrees celsius today. yesterday, germany, poland, and the czech republic recorded their highest—ever june temperatures. and the uk won‘t escape — over the next few days there could be highs here of 34 degrees. in france, officials have issued strict warnings about the risk to life. several cities have restricted traffic, and in some areas schools have closed.
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from paris, hugh schofield reports. europe is basking in an unexpectedly early spell of blasting heat. what it says about our changing climate may be a matter of concern, but out and about most people are, for now, enjoying the positives. it certainly hasn‘t deterred the crowds here in paris turning out to see the city sights. if you‘re from a place you are going to know the best ways to stay cool and you‘re not going to bother coming outside, but if you‘re a visitor it‘s a different matter. if you‘re a tourist and you don‘t venture out into this heat then what‘s the point in being here? and most tourists were taking the temperatures in their stride. seattle is rainy and 70s, and we‘re what, 98—ish, so it‘s hot. it's super hot. i need lots of water! i need ice! we're going to drop a bucket
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of water on his head soon. across the continent, temperatures have been nudging the records, in places hitting the early 40s and it‘s set to run for a few more days. absolutely fantastic to visit such a beautiful city, but a bit hotter than we expected. yeah, last night at the spanish steps it was 41. when we drove here it was 37 at eight o'clock in the morning, so... a lot of water, a lot of gelato, hat, just trying to stay cool. but the dangers are also showing. in spain, wildfires have been raging in the north—east. and the health risks to the vulnerable, especially the elderly, will only increase as the heat persists. here in frankfurt in germany, the red cross was called to attend to one victim on the street. translation: there are different types of patient groups, like elderly people and children, who have problems with direct
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sunlight, especially when they don‘t wear loose clothing or a hat. this can lead to overheating or sunstroke. in france, memories are still raw of the 2003 heat wave in which thousands of old people died unnecessarily. today, there are new procedures in place to make sure that the elderly remain hydrated and cool. blistering heat can be fun for a while. so far, europe is coping, but also hoping that these unseasonable highs don‘t last beyond the weekend. hugh schofield, bbc news, paris. our environment correspondent matt mcgrath is in bonn in germany for the united nations climate change conference and sent us this update. the question of cold is never that far from the heart the question of coal is never that far from the heart of un climate talks here in bonn this week. a number of major fossil
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fuel producing countries including saudi arabia, the united states, kuwait and russia have been trying to downplay the scientific research on climate change. they are talking about the ipcc report on 1.5 degrees which was produced last year. it showed the world could keep temperatures down to 1.5 but it would require a massive cut in carbon emissions by 2030. to do that is a big ask on many different countries. the uk this morning has decided to go with the net zero law on carbon emissions by 2050, others are struggling with that and here at the un that battle over the science and the target for 2030 and 2050 is at the forefront of delegates‘ mines. some small island states and smaller countries who fear the rising waters and the threats that temperatures would bring to them are adamant that the science must be the key part of future talks. countries like saudi arabia, supported by australia, iran and the united states, an unusual alliance, say there are too many uncertainties and that debate may be resolved here today but it may continue
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for many more months to come. matt mcgrath in bonn. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. labour mps and peers sign a letter rejecting the decision to allow the labour mp, chris williamson, back into the party after an investigation into comments he made about the party‘s handling of anti—semitism allegations. a jury hears that a man accused of stabbing to death a fellow train passenger held a phone to his face and said, "i‘m going to kill this man." europe is in the grip of a heatwave. the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy. and in sport. it‘s the start of the quarter—finals in the womens‘ world cup. england lionesses are first up. phil nevilles side face norway in le havre tonight. the manager says his side are relaxed, happy and ready to win. west indies have to beat india
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to have anychance of reaching the cricket world cup semi—finals. they are chasing 269 for victory and are currently on 50. liam broady has missed out on a place in the main darw at wimbledon. the british player was beaten in the third round of qualifying by frenchman gregoire barrere. i‘ll be back with more on those stores (e.g. i‘ll be back with more on those stories later. scientists say cervical cancer might one day be eradicated because of the success of a vaccination programme targeting the hpv virus. it‘s one of the main causes of the disease, and a new study has examined the impact of the vaccine on 60 million people in 14 different countries. lauren moss reports. when mandy was 44 she had a routine smear test. the news that she had cervical cancer changed her life. it was a huge bolt out of the blue because i did not have any symptoms,
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but i was treated within 17 days. i had a radical hysterectomy, which means that everything was removed from me and it was a really hard going operation and i was in hospital for a week and it was then a long recovery. four years on, mandy is in remission and has check—ups every six months. the majority of cervical cancers are caused by the human papilloma virus. more than 300,000 women worldwide die from it every year. 850 of those deaths are in the uk. a decade ago, girls aged 12 and 13 started receiving the hpv vaccine. now a study of 60 million people in 14 high income countries has found eight years after vaccination among women aged 20 to 24 there was a 66% reduction in high risk strains of hpv. cases of genital warts were also down 54% and there was a 31% decline in precancerous lesions. the vaccine is very successful at reducing hpv infections and there are five hpv types which have seen substantial declines in the uk and they cause about 90% of cervical disease and cervical cancer. so what we‘ll expect to see in the near future is that we are seeing really substantial declines in cervical cancers.
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hpv is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections. many people will develop some form of it in their lifetime with no ill effects, but charities say no one should be complacent. cervical screening still remains really, really important and just as important for people who have had the vaccination. as the study shows, the vaccination is really effective at reducing the risk of cervical cancer, but it does not fully protect against the disease, so still take up your cervical screening invitation when it is sent through. mandy‘s teenage daughters have both been vaccinated. from september the roll—out will continue to 12 and 13—year—old boys. i said to her, i would never make you do anything in your life. you have to have this vaccine. it is absolutely critical. ladies, unfortunately, are still dying from this disease. you would become infertile, you cannot have children. i do not want my children to go through what i went through in the last four years, so it is just imperative that they get vaccinated. the study did not analyse data
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from low income countries, but scientists and survivors are optimistic it shows that to cervical cancer one day becoming a disease of the past. two suicide bombers have blown themselves up in separate attacks on police in the centre of tunisian capital, tunis. one officer has been killed — several others have been injured, alongside civilians. there was a similar attack on capital‘s main thoroughfare late last year, when nine people were hurt. in 2015, an assault on a museum in the capital left 22 people dead. boris johnson and jeremy hunt face questions from conservative party members tonight — in the third hustings of the leadership campaign. mrjohnson is promising changes to the immigration system if he becomes prime minister. mr hunt says he will cancel the student fee debts of young entrepreneurs who start businesses. the think—tank the institute for fiscal studies says mr hunt‘s campaign pledges so far could cost up to £65 billion. our political correspondent helena wilkinson reports. keeping his campaign afloat.
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jeremy hunt arrived on the isle of wight earlier. his wife, lucia, by his side, the self—confessed underdog made quite an interest. can i kiss granny? supporters aside, jeremy hunt made a new pledge, a promise to young people who set up a business. i want to encourage our brightest, best young graduates to get out there and do what bill gates did, what mark zuckerberg did, create the great companies of the future. my plan says if you are going to take the risk, manage to set up a successful business, we will cancel your tuition fees. not far away, boris johnson arrived ahead of tonight‘s hustings. he promised changes to the immigration system based on the australian style if he became prime minister. one of the reasons people voted to take back control of our immigration system was they wanted democratic oversight
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of it and what we would be able to do with a points—based system is to decide exactly how many people we'll need in each sector, and that will be subject to parliamentary control. what has been the reaction? they promised pretty sizeable tax cuts. in borisjohnson‘s case that is people in higher thresholds. that benefits people earning over £50,000 per year. jeremy hunt has promised increases in spending, particularly on defence. as the two candidates take part in further hustings, we will get to hear more about their policies on other issues. but what is not clear is how much anything other than brexit will influence a decision of tory party members when it comes to their vote. german chancellor angela merkel has been seen shaking once again during a ceremony in berlin this morning, eight days after a similar
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incident. the german leader appeared uncomfortable and gripped her arms as her body trembled. last week, she appeared in a similar state of discomfort when she met the ukrainian president, but blamed the incident on dehydration. a spokesperson says the chancellor is absolutely fine and has set off for the g20 summit injapan as planned. jenny hill gave us the latest from berlin. angela merkel‘s spokesman has insisted that the chancellor is fine, she has gone off as planned to the g20 summit of world leaders injapan, leaving behind her, though, at home, real concerns about her health. mrs merkel always appears to be in robust health. she has a punishing schedule. she is seen as a strong leader who can deal with that, and so this has come as a real shock. and, of course, the fact that it has happened now twice is really adding to those concerns. when mrs merkel appeared to shake uncontrollably during a reception last week, she was stood outside in the hot sunshine in the direct glare of the afternoon sun and she said afterwards she had simply been dehydrated. what happened this morning
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took place in rather different circumstances. she was indoors and the temperature will have been much cooler because whilst berlin has experienced a heat wave in the last couple of days, today actually we‘ve had a bit of a respite and the temperatures have really come down. there has, as yet, been no official explanation for what is wrong. i wouldn‘t be surprised if we actually don‘t really get one. i think mrs merkel‘s team will be very keen to try and push this away, sweep it under the carpet, because in the next few days, germany pretty much goes on holiday. mrs merkel, parliament, they all disappear off on their summer recess. and the reason that her team will want to minimise any focus on what‘s happened this morning is because this is a really tricky time for german politics. mrs merkel some time ago handed over some of her power to a woman called annegret kramp—karrenbauer. she is now party leader of mrs merkel plus my conservatives of mrs merkel‘s conservatives
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and is widely seen as the person most likely to become germany‘s next chancellor, mrs merkel‘s heiress anointed, if you like. but in recent weeks and months she has made a series of public gaffes, made controversial statements and there are a lot of question marks out there in germany as to whether she is really a suitable candidate to run germany in the future. mrs merkel and her team will not want to be adding to any sense of insecurity at this point in time. jenny hill in berlin. vauxhall owners peugeot say they will build the new astra at ellesmere port in cheshire, but that decision depends on what happens with brexit. the company would also require the acceptance of an agreement made with the unite trade union. peugot has been restructuring it‘s operations to boost profitability after aquiring loss—making brands from general motors. world leaders have been arriving injapan — ahead of a crucial g20 summit. trade wars, iran and climate change — all likely to dominate — and already the battlelines are being drawn. on the us—china trade war — it‘s reported bejing will tell donald trump the ban
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on huawei will need to be dropped to end the dispute. meanwhile, french president emmanuel macron says he‘ll try to convince the us to drop some iranian sanctions to give negotiations a chance. he also wants real progress on climate change. james robbins reports from osaka. the world is coming to osaka and the obachaan, this week nicknamed bg 20 grannies, are out promising laughter and happiness. so it‘s a shame the summit is most unlikely to be harmonious, positive or uplifting. heavy rain greeted the leaders, predicted to keep falling through most of their summit. head—to—head talks between china‘s president xi jinping and donald trump will be critical. their escalating trade war
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is dragging down much of the rest of the world too. so, any sort of truce here would be hugely welcome. but the biggest summit split with president trump is over climate change. he‘s leaning onjapan to drop from this g20‘s agreed conclusions any reference to reducing the use of fossil fuels. la marseillaise plays. it‘s all too much for emanuel macron, the president of france. he‘s arguing precisely the opposite case to japan‘s prime minister shinzo abe. translation: if we don't go far enough with our climate ambitions then we‘re holding this summit for nothing. prime minister abe and i care about the g20. we‘re fighting to have an ambitious text. over the next days and nights in osaka, while some city life goes on as normal, world leaders and their teams will be struggling to find common ground. theirjapanese hosts really worry the global order may be breaking down. we saw sort of an international community divided up into certain blocks before world war ii.
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and it didn't help the world economy. so, i think we need to be united, we need to cooperate, and notjust economically, but politically. at a time when the international system seems to be under almost unprecedented strain, japan would love nothing more than to be seen emerging from the summit as some sort of peacemaker. but the divisions between donald trump in particular and much of the rest of the world are so deep over climate change, over trade, that just keeping the idea of global partnership alive, that may be enough of an ambition for this meeting. james robbins, bbc news, osaka. istanbul‘s new mayor has
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formally taken office. imamoglu takes control of the turkish city days after dealing president tayyip erdogan a stinging electoral blow in the re—run of a mayoral election. imamoglu of the main opposition republican people‘s party, received his mandate at the istanbul provincial election board for the second time in three months. his initial victory was annulled over repeated appeals by president erdogan‘s ruling ak party. he won by more than 800,000 votes. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. well, that strong sunshine is beating down on us today and the temperatures will be rising over the next couple of days. it‘s still pretty chilly on the north sea coast, anywhere from aberdeenshire all the way down to east anglia and the south—east. it‘s been quite blustery here. we‘ve had a lot of cloud and you can see the yellows, that coastal strip, where it is cool and the oranges here in the west where it‘s a lot, lot warmer. there could even be some 10 degrees difference between the east and the west. and the winds are strong
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in some areas, gusting in excess of 40 mph, particularly around cornwall and devon. anyway, here are today‘s highs, easily 25 or 26 degrees across western parts of the uk. only 17 degrees in norwich with that wind off the north sea. tonight‘s temperatures dropping to just about single figures in the north—east of england but really starting to turn very muggy, very warm there in the south—west, 14 degrees. now, look at the dramatic temperature rise in the south between friday and saturday, up to 33 or 34.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. 90 labour mps and peers say they cannot overstate the "depth and breadth of hurt and anger" at the readmission of chris williamson, the derby north mp to the party, following his suspension over allegations of anti—semitism. europe is in the grip of a heatwave. .. the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy. a jury hears that a man accused of stabbing to death a fellow train passenger held a phone to his face and said "i‘m going to kill this man". a medical success story — as scientists say they hope cervical cancer could eventually be eradicated, thanks to the vaccination programme against the hpv virus. vauxhall owners peugeot say they will build the new astra at ellesmere port in cheshire — but that decision depends on what happens with brexit.
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sport now on afternoon live with olly foster. olly — a huge night for england‘s women footballers tonight. three hours from kick—off. the women‘s world cup quarterfinal sta rts women‘s world cup quarterfinal starts this evening. england lionesses are first up. phil nevilles side face norway in le havre tonight. the manager says his side are relaxed, happy and ready to win. kick off at eight o‘clock tonight against norway with a place in the world cup semi—finals at stake. let‘s cross live to le havre and joinjane dougal who has been with the team. it will be interesting to see how they have recovered physically and menatlly after that ugly game against cameroon in the last 16. and what about norway,
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knocked out by england in the last 16 four years ago they say they are motivated by that , but they are also really strong, knocking out the matildas in the last round. you mention the beach, they have been playing games and team bonding. there have been some ethics from the cameroon game. we are told the captain steph houghton is a doubt, following their crunching tackles he experienced in the remaining minutes of that match against cameroon. she trained with the squad yesterday but phil neville said she is a doubt as to whether she will start or not. also her partner at central defence, mille bright, has a virus, she is a major doubt for tonight‘s match. they have played a —— beside each other for they have played a —— beside each otherfor england‘s, they have played a —— beside each other for england‘s, the constants in defence, to not have her will be et al. the blow. phil neville has said the two mac players who would come then instead of those two might brb mcmanus and leo williamson. he said he would trust those two mac with his life. that is why you has a squad of 22 players and he is not
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afraid to rotate as we have seen in previous games. what about norway, knocked out by england in the last 16 for might years ago, they are motivated by that but they are struggling, having knocked out australia in the last round? yes, that would motivate them. what has changed, norway has become an even stronger team even though some of the players are not fully professional. we watch them training. there are familiar faces in that squad, a couple of the players play for chelsea, especially the captain. both central defenders for chelsea, playing well for norway. you mentioned the hysteria match, they managed to contain one of the best players in the world, some care. they put a still you‘re out on penalties after taking them
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to extra time. that has given them momentum. even phil neville has said he the them is the surprise team of the tournament. a lot has been said of the rising temperatures here in france and how fat will be for both teams to perform tonight in the stadium. there is a bit of a piece which will help keep temperatures down, it also kicks off at nine o‘clock local time so it will be cooler by then. england will be playing in all white tonight so that will reflect any reason the sun. kick—off not long from life. will reflect any reason the sun. kick-off not long from life. it will be all right on the night, thank you very much indeed. you can follow that much across the bbc. to another world the cricket. —— world cup. west indies are chasing 269 against india at old trafford, they have to win to have any chance of reaching the semi—finals, india can probably afford to lose. kemar roach took three wickets as they kept the india total down.
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virat kohli and mahndra singh dhoni made half centuries. chris gayle and shai hope went cheaply, just when they looked to be rallying a third wicket fell. and a fourth gone, west indies really warbling now. they are struggling early on in that supply. some big hitters still to come. after 27 seasons at somerset the former england batsmen marcus trescothick will retire at the end of the season. the 43 year old played 76 tests for england and scored almost 6000 runs at an average ofjust under 44. he was part of the england side that memorably won the ashes in 2005. his 52 centuries for somerset is a record for the county. he has recently been dropped from the first team for the first time in his career. liam broady has been knocked out of wimbledon qualifying in the final round, he was just one victory from a fourth appearance in the main draw.
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the british player was two sets up against frenchman greg berrere but lost the next three. that‘s all the sport for now. we will be back every hour kick—off in france at the women‘s world cup quarterfinal, england against norway. that‘s for now. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide — and see what‘s happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to yorkshire, where look north‘s hayley brewer is talking about an increase in the amount of attacks on transgender people... janine machine from look east is joining us from cambridge to tell us about two cambridge university graduates who are highlighting what it‘s like to be a black student at a predominantly white institution. so hayley — why has there been such a sharp increase in reported
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transgender crimes? there seems to be a number of reasons. the police have to meet the other building trust with the trans community and encouraging people to report incidents. the home office see the increase is largely due to better reporting and recording of the hate crimes. however the equal rights charity stonewall see the high figures are because transphobia is everywhere in society. sue pascoe transitioned a few years ago and says at times she is frightened to leave the house. i was frightened notjust for myself, leave the house. i was frightened not just for myself, but for all the trans community because it is happening to all of us in different ways. it is really frightening sometimes. the amount of abuse that is coming through and i know that
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many of our frightened to come out of houses. many people suffer for yea rs of houses. many people suffer for years after the incident so what have been people telling about their experiences? they have said it affects the confidence and mental health. some people have been frightened to go out, they have suffered bullying and chilling online. some people have had counselling and had window and door alarms fitted to make them safer. andy told me how she was attacked at work. a guy keynote of a block of flats and called me a paedophile. he threatened to start me, smashed my carup. he threatened to start me, smashed my car up. he held her dog chain up to my face. really unbelievable. —— a guy came out of a block of flats.
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what have the police been saying — because often victims will turn to officers as their first port of call for help? they said it was treat everyone with respect and will handle all cases respectfully. they will handle all cases, however small. often people have received use of abuse before they get to the end of their tether and contact them for a help. thank you very much. more on look north tonight on that. let us go to janine. two black graduates have written a book about what it‘s like being a black student at cambridge university and some of it‘s not that complimentary. it is complimentary about the standard of education but it‘s the environment and attitudes towards them as black students. they both graduated with first—class honours degrees in history and admitted they had a good time but said changes needed, not only to get more black stu d e nts needed, not only to get more black students into the university but also to look at diversity in the teaching staff on the courses that
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are run there. they felt like outsiders, about people constantly trying to touch their ear. they felt limited in their study options because there were no tutors to could supervise the kind of dissertations they were interested in pursuing. even though there were great lecturers in african history, they were not black or from africa. they said they felt pressure to be the voice of the entire black population. in academia, they talk about how the second something in your curricula comes up about black people, they look edgier to see what you have to say. actually i am here to learn as well. —— look at you. are both here to learn but that is burden which we did not ask for which has been placed on us because we're black. how much do you know black history?
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this isn‘t the first time we‘ve heard cambridge university being criticised for a lack of black students. true, if you look at the figures you can understand why. if you look at the students in 2013, eight of the thousand 500 only 38 were black. from 2012, one college admitted no black students at all, six colleges admitted fewer than two mac each year. the university said a trying ha rd to year. the university said a trying hard to address this problem, and have made a commitment to tackle underrepresentation but this book with —— business questions about whether this is working. the two mac stu d e nts whether this is working. the two mac students say this is no being questioned but saying it is more about gender and sexuality than race now. we asked them if they would be going into academia themselves to feel that void for others that they had talked about. it seems they will not. one wants to go into broadcasting and the other wants to study law and you can hear more from
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them at 6:30pm tonight. janine, you still do not follow me on twitter. ideas. i have been following you around london for months, you just did not notice. i did not know him in twitter. this has taken a strange twist and we believe that there. healy, good to see you, thank you both very much indeed. talk to you later, janine. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them on the bbc iplayer. you are watching afternoon live. the grandmother of a toddler
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who drowned with her father as they tried to cross into the us to seek asylum, has told the bbc she knew she would lose them. photos of the little girl with her arm around herfather‘s neck, lying face down in a river, have sparked condemnation around the world. the family were from el salvador in central america. chris buckler reports from texas for long stretches, the rio grande divides mexico and america. many have tried to cross this river, but the deaths of a father and his child in these waters have put in sharp focus the human cost of the crisis at this border. oscar ramirez left el salvador with the aim of starting a new life for his family in the united states. but he drowned, alongside his daughter valeria, on the edge of america. translation: as a mother, you get a feeling. i cried a lot when we said goodbye, because in my heart, i felt it was going to be the last time i would hug him. across this short stretch of river, america seems tantalisingly close, but there are real dangers for any
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families who try to get illegally into the united states. tens of thousands are captured by border patrol agents every single month, and that is beside the risks. often these are desperate people, but president trump believes bigger barriers and more security would be a greater deterrent. i hate it, and i know it could stop immediately if the democrats change the law. that journey across that river is a very dangerous journey. however, democrats believe it is mr trump who needs to change his policies, particularly with claims that migrant shelters are unclean, and that the treatment of some children has been uncaring. (pres)well migration and what to do about the surge of arrivals on the us mexico border — featured heavily in the first
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televised debate of democratic contenders for the twenty—twenty presidential race. but health care, iran and gun control were also discussed — with candidates desperate to use this chance to stand out in a very crowded field. gary o‘donoghue has the story from miami. one party, ten candidates all vying for the chance to make a big breakthrough in front of a national tv audience. after a slow start, it was health care that stirred some passions. candidates asked to raise their hand if they would get rid of private insurance. it is a key policy for one of the front runners, senator elizabeth warren. health care is a basic human right and i will fight for basic human rights. but one candidate, former congressman, beto o‘rourke, who needed a big lift from tonight, clashed with new york mayor bill de blasio when he defended the choice of public and private health care. i think the choice is fundamental. private insurance is not working for tens of millions of americans.
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when you talk about the deductibles, the premiums, the out—of—pocket expenses, it‘s not working. how can you defend what is not working? immigration was bound to be a central topic given the emergence of a horrifying image of a drowned man and his two—year—old daughter on the banks of the rio grande as they try to enter the united states. senator cory booker spoke for many of the candidates. when people come to this country they do not leave their human rights at the border. but on the question of solutions, there were disagreements. should crossing the border illegally be a crime? you are seeing the violence. generally the candidates stayed away from attacking donald trump, but there were some sharp words. i don't think we should conduct foreign policy in a bathrobe at five in the morning. the biggest threat to the security
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of the united states is donald trump. on january the 20th, 2021, we will say adios to donald trump. these ten candidates agreed on quite a lot, not surprising, because they are all from the same party but there were significant clashes on health care and immigration, a sign that there is a real choice on policy as well as personality. later today, we will do it all over again with the next ten democrats who want to be president. gary o‘donoghue, in the spin room, in miami. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. labour mps and peers sign a letter rejecting the decision to allow the labour mp, chris williamson, back into the party after an investigation into comments he made about the party‘s handling of anti—semitism allegations. a jury hears that a man accused of stabbing to death
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a fellow train passenger held a phone to his face and said "i‘m going to kill this man". europe is in the grip of a heatwave — the highest—ever temperatures forjune have been recorded in germany, poland and the czech republic. warnings are issued in france, spain and italy. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. vauxhall‘s owner psa says it will build the next—generation astra at its ellesmere port facility in cheshire but only if the uk exits the european union on favourable terms. more on this shortly. us regulators have uncovered a possible new flaw in boeing‘s troubled 737 max aircraft that is likely to push back test flights of the modified plane. the fleet was grounded worldwide following two fatal crashes. boots is one of the high street names which has been struggling in tough market conditions — and sales have fallen in the past three months. the numbers came from its us owner — walgreens boots alliance. its international sales were down 1.6% in the three months to may 31, mostly due to a 1% decline
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at boots uk. first, let us get more on that pst foxhole announcements. what is it mean? we have been waiting for this for a while. whether the firm will continue to build the new astra model at the factory which employs around a thousand poeple — it says it will— but only if brexit goes well. it does not give much more detail about what it wants to see but it has indicated that it wants frictionless trade and would not be happy with the no deal so it is another sign of business saying this is the danger of a no—deal brexit. we also have results from bits
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today? we have. they opened the story of the future in covent garden today. they want to make it easier today. they want to make it easier to order and pick up prescriptions but at the same time, sales are down soa but at the same time, sales are down so a turnaround is needed. simon french is chief economist for panmure gordon. let us have a chat. those figures from boots show that there are problems for the chain at the moment, whitey think that is? problems for the chain at the moment, whitey think that i57m problems for the chain at the moment, whitey think that is? it is a tough operating environment, certainly on the uk high street. shares in the parent company are down 20% this year, part of that is struggling international operations but on the high street there are challenges regarding cost base. the national living wage was raised which place margins and also consumer confidence and challenges
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regarding behavioural shift, how we consume our medicines and pharmaceutical products, shifting away from shops towards online. let us move on to psa group, the enhancement they want to continue to manufacture the astra it —— at ellesmere port but there are strings attached, it is all to do with what came to brexit deal that is. what you think this says about the company because has lots of options, it has a plant in germany as well? let us take the good news first. it isa let us take the good news first. it is a foot of confidence in the capability of ellesmere port but it underlines the decision about the decision to produce the next future of astra will depend on tariffs that the uk may have to repeat to the european union in the event of a no deal. i would caveat this by saying all manufacturers, cars and otherwise are in a lobbying battle with the government to encourage
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them to put in places fewer afflictions to treat as possible but this is part of that. also with tight margins, they do not want to see 10% knocked out of that. let us move on to starbucks because of their disappointing numbers, the first loss for quite a few years. that is correct. starbucks is another operation in the uk which is facing some high street pressures we have talked about. the european operation is also struggling a little bit. what is interesting from the investor standpoint is whether a defensive sector, coffee, consumers kept buying it but with the economy slowing down globally, perhaps it will affect our patterns of buying coffee and there are signs that is happening. looking at the wider market, a lot of fluctuations today, there is quite a lot of uncertainty
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surrounding global trade ahead of the 620 surrounding global trade ahead of the g20 summit? yes, investors are going into the weekend whenjen what will come out of this crucial discussion between china, america and will be the rampart of tariffs. that is the key thing which is keeping investors cautious going into the weekend of trading. thank you very much, simon french, chief economist joining you very much, simon french, chief economistjoining us there. a lot of uncertainty as we head towards the 620 uncertainty as we head towards the g20 summit, spies global trade is concerned anyway. thank you very much. the duke and duchess of sussex will undertake an official visit to south africa this autumn at the request of the foreign and commonwealth office. the duke will also undertake a working visit to botswana while they are in the region. an algerian teenager has been called a hero for catching a toddler
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as she fell from the second floor of a block of flats in the turkish city of istanbul. feuzi zabaat — seen here in the yellow t—shirt — saw that two—year—old doha muhammed was about to fall from her home on the second floor — so he stood beneath the window. he managed to catch the toddler mid—air after she stumbled and fell whilst the girl‘s mum was inside cooking. feuzi zabaat‘s quick thinking saved doha from what would have been a serious injury. the incident was captured on the cctv of a neighbouring shop. here‘s what feuzi had to say. translation: i was walking down the street when i saw the little girl at the window. she fell and thank god, i caught her before she touched the ground. remarkable. that‘s it from your afternoon live team for today, next the bbc news at five with ben brown. time for a look at the weather. here‘s tomasz schafernaker. well, continental europe is pretty
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much in the peak of its current heatwave and the next couple of days will see more of that back in the uk it has not been too hot so far but the sun is beating down and at the moment actually some huge contrasts in the temperature between western parts of the uk and the east. it is down to the wind blowing from the north sea, it means there is a 10 degree difference between coastal areas and some western parts of the uk. lots of sunshine, strong sunshine, but it feels cold on the north sea coast. the winds are very strong, in fact gusts in excess of 40, 50 mph around some of the headlands in the south—west and 18 degrees in kent but by the time you get to the coast of cornwall and devon there is an 8 degrees difference, 26 is expected in western parts of scotland but on the coast of aberdeenshire it is in the high teens, so i think we will keep that contrast into tomorrow as well between the east coast and the west, the breeze will continue,
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but we are starting to import from the south some pretty warm and muggy air and you can see the wind arrows blowing in from france across western parts of the uk. this is pretty much a plume of very hot air which is blowing out of the continent so that means across western parts of scotland we might even hit 30 degrees, maybe 28, and you can see the big contrast between the west and also the east of the country, but on saturday it is a different story. temperatures could even hit the mid 30s in the uk, especially around the south—east and east anglia. looking at saturday, the subtle change in the wind direction, coming in from the south, even slightly east of south which means the hot air will be pushed towards more central and eastern areas and even in yorkshire we could see highs of close to 30 degrees and then a dramatic change by the time we get to sunday, we lose the southerly wind and instead the wind is coming straight out of the atlantic,
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much fresher air and we are talking about a 10 degree drop over the space of a day and on top of that showers are also in the forecast for northern areas. look at these values, much closer to the norm. goodbye.
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today at 5: more than 90 labour mps and peers demand jeremy corbyn takes further action against the mp chris williamson in a row over anti—semitism in the party. mr williamson — a close ally of the labour leader — was readmitted to the party five months after being suspended — mr corbyn has defended the party‘s approach. we deal with anti—semitism very, very seriously, there is no place for anti—semitism in our society and obviously not in our party as well. we‘ll be speaking to a senior mp who signed the letter demanding thatjeremy corbyn now remove the labour whip from mr williamson. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: the lee pomeroy murder trial — a jury hears that the man accused of stabbing him to death held a phone to his face and said "i‘m going to kill this man."

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