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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  June 28, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 2: theresa may tells the russian president the salisbury nerve agent attack was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable russian behaviour. russia needs to recognise its acts and stop acting in this way. and stop its other destabilising activities around the world. including, for example, the use of disinformation and cyber attacks. two people die from suspected heatstroke in spain as europe's heatwave is set to peak. in france, temperatures have hit a record high. we're still in the early part of the summer. normally, these very high temperatures don't come until round about august time. and, of course, it's not only the heat by day but also overnight as well, there's temperatures really staying up.
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and we haven't seen temperatures quite this high since back in 2003. police and security services wait to hear what the coroner says about them at the inquests into the deaths in the london bridge attacks. coming up on afternoon live: all the sport. the wimbledon draw‘s been made and it's been releatively kind to the brits involved. more to come. we would take a look at the all—time french record that has just been set ten minutes ago so we will take a closer look at the heatwave in europe, and it is also the hottest day of the year so far in scotland and wales, so we will look at those temperatures and the forecast for the weekend. thanks. also coming up: 4,500 tonnes of concrete and steel blown up nearly a year after the collapse of the morandi bridge in the italian city of genoa.
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hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. theresa may has told the russian leader, vladimir putin, the nerve agent attack in salisbury was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable behaviour. in a frosty meeting at the 620 summit injapan, she told mr putin there's irrefutable evidence that russia was behind the novichok attack on former russian agent sergei skripal and his daughter last year, but mr putin has dismissed it as "a fuss over spies". he also said that traitors must be punished. from the summit, rupert wingfield hayes reports. every g20 summit starts with the traditional family photo, a symbol of cooperation and friendship tween these nations.
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by comparison, mr putin's meeting with theresa may was icy cold. she told the bbc she intended to confront the russian president about the poisoning of sergei skripal in salisbury last year. we've set out the evidence. charges have been laid against two russian individuals. i want to see those individuals brought tojustice. russia needs to recognise its acts and stop acting in this way, and stop its other destabilising activities around the world. donald trump has repeatedly refused to take action against vladimir putin for russia's alleged meddling in the 2016 us election. today, he was asked if he would do so again. this meeting came a day after a newspaper interview in which president putin had launched an all—out attack on western liberal values on immigration... and on multiculturalism.
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0ur western partners have admitted that some elements of the liberal idea are no longer tenable. but it's a meeting that has not taken place that is dominating this summit, that between donald trump and chinese president xijinping. the two countries are locked in a damaging trade war, but president trump is threatening to escalate it further. today, the chinese president said that would be a huge mistake. translation: developed countries are frequently taking protectionist and one—sided measures, destroying the global trade order and the production chains. this also impacts on the common interests of our countries and overshadows peace and stability worldwide.
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japan was hoping to push a broad agenda at this g20 summit including getting commitments on climate change, or cleaning plastics from the oceans and on free trade. instead, this whole summit is being overshadowed by the us and china trade war and now all eyes are on the xijinping and donald trump meeting and the hope the two will stop the trade warfrom getting any worse. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in osaka. 0ur deputy political editorjohn pienaar is in osaka. you'd saw the look on theresa may's face. it was the portrait of cold displeasure, and that was very deliberate. 0n displeasure, and that was very deliberate. on her side, this was pressure from purpose to signal national front and an attack on british soil, but more than that to reassert britain's status as a global player deserving of respect in any situation and certainly
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should not be treated in this kind of way. there was a grim satisfaction in government circles when the international community reacted in a way that they did after the salisbury attack, joining britain in penalising russia. today theresa may was very keen to be asserting her place, speaking for that wider international community. i don't think anybody says that russia is about to change its ways, but this was about very public, clear show of displeasure to be taking a leading role in leading voice, and perhaps in that at least she may have. the inquest into the victims of the london bridge attacks will conclude later this afternoon. eight people were killed and 48 were injured in the van and knife attack in june 2017. our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford, reports from the old bailey. the chief coroner is bringing to a close eight weeks
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of sometimes harrowing, very emotional evidence as he draws these inquests to a conclusion. of course, the outcome is in some ways inevitable. he will return a conclusion of unlawful killing on eight of the people who died — that's inevitable. the whole inquest has been conducted along the lines that these people were unlawfully killed. but there will be a few issues to look out for when he draws the inquest to a conclusion this afternoon. first of all, the issue around what mi5 knew about one of the ringleaders of the attack, khuram butt. they'd identified him two years earlier as somebody who might plan an attack on the uk. they had watched him for two years, they'd monitored him quite intensely at times for two years, but somehow he was able to plan this attack almost under their noses. the relatives, the bereaved relatives, are very angry about that, but we don't know whether the coroner will feel that it's something that's appropriate for him to comment on or criticise. the other key issue that he could address this afternoon is the issue
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of barriers on the bridge to protect pedestrians. two and half months after the westminster bridge attack, there were no barriers on london bridge, and the families are hoping that he may have something to say about that and about the potential failures by the authorities to address that issue. it's all expected to end about four or five o'clock this afternoon. among the families waiting to hear the coroner's conclusions later today will be alexandre pigeard. his 26 year—old son, also alexandre, was stabbed when he came face—to—face with the attackers. he's been speaking to breakfast‘s john maguire. alexandre pigeard came to london to improve his english. injust nine months, he had made friends and was popular with colleagues, won over, his parents say, by his smile. because of this terrific smile. i have to say that this was our main goal in our education — to keep his smile alive as long as possible, until this
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terrible night when they take it off his face, in so brutal, cruel manner. he was working at a french restaurant in borough market when he heard the attackers crash their van. during the inquest, his parents have heard and seen on cctv much of what happened. he rushed from the restaurant to help. we see on the cctv, there's no doubt. there is one of his colleagues who goes down in the room. he pushes him and goes straight out. he goes to the stairs. imagine what's happening, what could happen in his head, going to help, with that generosity, and being cut down. alexandre was young, just 26 years old, and with plans for the future — to return to france and to record
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music with philippe, a musician. i'm thinking of what i'm going to do, now the inquest is over. i have to rebuild a life. i have two other kids. they need me. they have the right to live their youth, like alexandre lived. i'm going to do something with them. there will be a movie or a documentary. i would like to see all the people who saw him that night, you know? i would like to reinterview the nurse, helen kennett. she saw him with the neck cut. from the inquest, we know that she was one of the last faces he saw, and she was beautiful. she's a wonderful woman. she was — i hope he kept that until the end.
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i am not sure, but we hope. because he died really alone, on the pavement. he had so much to live for and no reason to die. a young man, much loved, who became an innocent victim of hate. john maguire, bbc news, london. jeremy hunt has urged his conservative leadership rival, borisjohnson, to be straight with people about what a no—deal brexit would mean. his comments came as the two men took questions from party members in devon in the latest hustings event. mrjohnson says the uk must leave the eu on 31st of october, "do or die", with or without a deal. but what are people who aren't party members making of the conservative leadership campaign so far? nick robinson has been speaking to a focus group of voters in reading west — a key marginal constituency. they all voted conservative at the last general election, but half of them deserted the party in the recent european elections.
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i've been speaking to a group of voters who are crucial at the moment. they all voted tory at the last general election, but half of them didn't in the european elections. two voted for the brexit party, one for the liberal democrats, and one didn't vote at all. the tories need their votes next time round if they're to stay in power. when you're looking for a leader, when you're making your mind up, what's important to you? leadership, strong. actions. likeable. is that different from strong? yeah, i think so. yeah. charisma. listen to the people. you've got to deliver your promises. mm. and we've got to trust you, that you're going to deliver. jeremy hunt, liz, do you know whatjob he does? no, no, idon‘t. if you have anything that comes into your mind when you think about him,
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words off the top of your head, what do you think? my perception is that he comes across a bit wet, a bit not really strong. however, it then comes down to would i trust what he said more than boris? i'd probably trust him more. i think he's very weak and i think he's quite sly, actually. sly, why sly? ijust think he's sly, ijust think... you don't trust him? don't trust him. let's have a look at borisjohnson. you probably know a bit better of course. can you just tell us what happened at your partner's home a couple of nights ago? i've made it a rule over many, many years, i do not talk about stuff involving my family and my loved ones. personal life, character, personality. i think he evaded that question. he didn't answer her question, boris didn't. should he talk about his personal life? no. he has a right to his privacy, as everyone else does.
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sara, you don't look quite so sure? people have a right to their privacy, but he didn't actually answer her question. and who would get a better deal from the eu, johnson or hunt? in anything, you need that charisma, you need that personality, and, out of the two, for me, it's boris. the loose cannon of boris makes you feel that if he makes a threat of walking away they are more likely to believe boris thanjeremy hunt, that you're going to walk away with no deal. you're the man for the job. if it's prime ministerjeremy hunt tomorrow, what sort of prime minister is he? boring. boring, yeah. what we've had before. david cameron. lack of charisma. boring, definitely. yeah. but... a safe pair of hands. could he be reliable? so if it's prime minister boris johnson, what do you think? enthusiastic, passionate. passionate. driven, bumbling.
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what's going to happen today? leader. what's going to happen, unpredictable. 0h, christ! that's two words, sorry! and you can watch more of nick robinson's conversations in a special programme, the view from the voters, on the bbc news channel at 9:30pm. and it'll be avaliable shortly afterwards on the iplayer. france has recorded its highest temperature since records began. the mercury has reached 44.3 degrees centigrade in carpentras near avignon. 0ur europe reporter, gavin lee, is in paris. tell us more. it is day four of the heatwave. it is the day to day where they expect temperatures will peak between 44 in the south close to avignon, an hour ago, that beats the
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record from back in 2003 when it reached the highest temperature of 43.1 degrees, and that was the year that 15,000 people who died whose deaths were attributed to this heatwave and that is why there has been this message from the government to say, pleased don't run in the streets or take chances with the sun and drink water. lots of criticism, the government were treating people with patronising tones. it has been a hard balance for the government, and the trains have run slower because of the buckling of the lines, and the interior minister has said they have not been able to cope with the heat. this area as you can see now is one of the world's arguably best paddling pools! hundreds of people here, supposed to be prohibited, the police turning a blind eye, they
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have turned this area in the area with trees around it into a cool zone. an app tells you where to head for shade including the catacombs of paris and also the cemeteries as well, there is the cool shade. it is interesting, the amount of people here who are far fewer. it is one the most famous areas which runs between the louvre and the shops are lycee, on average there are 45,000 people who cross that route, it is empty for the past couple of days so people are staying in, and we are also expecting those record—breaking temperatures that we heard today, they will likely be re—broken again as we get to the afternoon and temperatures continue to rise, whether those red alerts in the south of france. it is nice to see that those behind you are taking measures to make it work for them, but what about the rest of europe? 0na more but what about the rest of europe? on a more serious note, there have been fatalities. they have. wherever
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you go on a big city does not stop the influences, the people who want their selfies with amazing views in their selfies with amazing views in the background, but if you look at what is happening in europe, a hospital in della rachelle to the west have said they have put out an emergency appealfor west have said they have put out an emergency appeal for any nurses who are qualified to come to the hospital to help because there are so many people struggling in the heat. we also have spain as well, those wildfires, 6000 hectares, 25 square miles, still burning on the farms. according to the forest rangers there, that was from manure and a chicken farm that spontaneously combusted in the heat, but they are trying to control that, 55 people have been evacuated, no deaths. there is a sense they are gradually getting under control. two deaths in spain as well, a
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17—year—old boy who drowned, we are told he suffered hypothermia. be vigilant is the message from the government despite how incredible it looks in this weather. we will come back to you, gavin, and i do not wa nt back to you, gavin, and i do not want you setting a bad example and jumping on the water in the meantime, you have clear instructions! you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: theresa may tells the russian president the salisbury nerve agent attack was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable russian behaviour. two people die from suspected heatstroke in spain as europe's heatwave is set to peak. in france, temperatures have hit a record high. police and security services wait to hear what the coroner says about them at the inquests into the deaths in the into the deaths in the london bridge attacks. and coming up, the end of the bridge in genoa where 43 people died when it partially collapsed last year.
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the wimbledon draw‘s been made and it's been releatively kind to the brits involved. kyle edmund will open against spain on monday, joe con to place on tuesday. a big audience of 7.6 million watched england play in the women's world cup last night, they won 3—0. and sri lanka could pip england to the semifinal of the cricket world cup. they posted one of the lower scores in the world cup so far. in the united states the democratic party's leading presidential hopeful, joe biden, endured a tough night as nine fellow democrats also seeking the party's nomination took him to task on a series of key issues. in the second round of televised debates, mr biden was challenged on his age, as well as his record on race issues. gary 0'donoghue reports from miami.
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side by side but in many ways pulls apart politically. tonight saw four of the front runners take to the stage in the second debate. the man who has dominated the race so far, joe biden, has fashioned himself as a centrist and the best candidate to beat donald trump. donald trump has put us in a horrible situation. we do have enormous income and inequality, and we can make massive cuts in the $1.6 trillion in tax loopholes out there, and i would be going about eliminating donald trump's tax cuts for the wealthy. his trump's tax cuts for the wealthy. h is closest trump's tax cuts for the wealthy. his closest challenger, bernie sanders, is credited with reviving and mobilising a new left—wing progressive further in the party, and he was quick to attack those wealthy americans in the top 1%. at
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a time when we have three people in this country owning more wealth than the bottom half of america while 500,000 people are sleeping out on the streets today, we think it is time for change, real change! senator harris has been in the top five front runners but she is not well known around the country. as her fellow democrats appeared to squabble over how to write off student loans, she showed her capacity to cut through. hey, guys, america does not want to witness a food fight, they want to know how we will put food on the table! she also confronted joe biden directly on a controversial part of his political past. so—called busing, which was an attempt to desegregate schools moving black—and—white children across neighbourhoods to other schools. mr biden did not support the policy at the time. it was
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hurtful. to hear you talk about the reputations of two united states senators who built their reputations and careeron senators who built their reputations and career on the segregation of race in this country. everything i have done in my career i ran because of civil rights, i continue to think we have to make fundamental changes, and those civil rights include not just african—americans and those civil rights include not just african—america ns but and those civil rights include not just african—americans but the lgbt community. at times joe biden seemed rattled, put on the spot by several other candidates on his record and told he should pass on the torch to the next generation. joe biden was right when he said it was time to pass the torch to a new generation of americans 32 years ago. you still write today. i am still holding onto that torch. but he was not the only one who felt discomfort. a young 37—year—old meier has had to deal with the fallout of a police shooting of a black man ten days ago. he was asked why his city did
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not have more black officers. because i could not it done. i am determined to bring about when white person and black person drive the vehicle, when a police officer feels the same thing, not a fair bit of safety. in truth, the great clash between centrists and socialists did not quite happen, but to my‘s debate was a step up and energy from yesterday. all 20 candidates have had their say and over the coming days the polls will be scrutinised to see what impact these debates have had. none of the key five front runners have done themselves irreparable damage but kamala harris will feel she is in serious contention for one of those top three spots. demolition teams have blown up what remains of a motorway bridge in the italian city of genoa nearly a year after it partially collapsed, killing 43 people. high explosives were used in the demolition after thousands of residents who live nearby had been evacuated from their homes.
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james reynolds reports. at nine o'clock this morning, genoa got ready to bring down the remains of the morandi bridge. there was a short delay because of reports that a man was found refusing to leave his home near the structure. 0fficials sorted it out. water cannon were switched on, ready to catch the dust and then demolition experts pressed the button. it was all over in just a few seconds. the pile of dust covered the entire area. the operation was a success. translation: at 9:37am, the bridge came down. procedures have been strictly followed and plans are on track.
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oh, dear. italy is still recovering from the partial collapse of the bridge last summer. the structure fell when decaying cables, encased in concrete, snapped. an investigation into who is to blame has yet to reach its conclusions. the country has already begun work on a replacement bridge, designed by the country's most famous architect, renzo piano. this is what it will look like. the government says that the new structure is expected to be ready by next year. james reynolds, bbc news, frome. festival—goers at glastonbury are being urged to protect themselves from the sun with record temperatures forecast over the weekend. they are also being urged to drink
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plenty of water but, for the first time, organisers have banned the sale of plastic bottles at the festival. fiona lamdin reports from glastonbury. as temperatures soared into the 20s, worthy farm and its festival—goers are in need of hydration and, not surprisingly, queues have been building at all the water stations dotted around the festival. for the first time, glastonbury has banned the sale of single—use plastic. there is over 870 taps on site. it's all about refill and reuse. usually, we would be drinking out of plastic bottles because most vendors would be selling them on site but they're not selling them this year. instead, i bought a £5 metal cup and you can refill it at any water points. there's loads of them on site — it's easy. it's nice that you don't have the option to buy plastic bottles as well so everybody is avoiding it completely. normally, iwould pop to an ice cream van and buy a few bottles of water as well as lemonade and that kind of thing, so this year, we've decided to bring our own bottles. last year, more than a million plastic bottles were recycled
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at the festival and this is where they all came. already, it's made a huge difference. there's considerably less plastic than there was last festival. with hundreds of thousands travelling here and the mountain of tents often left behind, the founder of the climate change campaign group extinction rebellion worries about its impact. i'm sure it's got a massive footprint and it is a piece of hedonism, isn't it? it's people having a good time. from that can come quite a narcissistic side to ourselves, where we're not looking at what we are doing. individuals walk away and leave a load of mess behind. single—use tents, how disgusting is that? i think the festival needs to look at that and do what they can to prevent that and also the individuals who are here. a future challenge for this festival but for now, at least, even the police are sticking to the new glastonbury rules. 0rganisers hope, as people leave, they will not
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only take their rubbish but the festival's message. fiona lamdin, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. in europe, we have been covering this heatwave which the front meteorologists have called unprecedented in intensity forjune. the previous june unprecedented in intensity forjune. the previousjune record stood at 41 celsius but just over the the previousjune record stood at 41 celsius butjust over the last hour or so we have seen that records tumble. the alps province of france, the old record was 41, so we have obliterated this record. in the last ten minutes of going on air, that has also gone and it now stands at 45 celsius, which makes it the highest temperature not just 45 celsius, which makes it the highest temperature notjust injune in france but ever recorded! and that's a very red map. it is, and there are read weather warnings out
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in force. it is a serious thing. after the series heatwave we had backin after the series heatwave we had back in 2003,15,000 people died as a result of the heat that is why french authorities are taking this very seriously, a top level warning is in force for the hot weather we have here. it is one of those afternoons where the temperatures could edge up a little bit as we go onto the afternoon so that might not be the final record. and is notjust across be the final record. and is notjust a cross we be the final record. and is notjust across we have dealt with glastonbury, but talking of hot, scotla nd glastonbury, but talking of hot, scotland and wales breaking records. absolutely. in fact, scotland and wales breaking records. absolutely. infact, it scotland and wales breaking records. absolutely. in fact, it is the hottest day of the year so far. temperatures here have reached 28.4 celsius so that beats the mark set yesterday. and further north in the highlands of scotland, we have skies like this in the highlands. why are we not their? ! indeed. but if you
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like heat, the focus of the hot weather this weekend is moving to east wales and england, where we could see temperatures up to 30 full celsius but that heat will ebb away for the second half of the weekend. still warm, but not as warm, so changes this weekend. let's take a look at the rest of the weather. through the rest of the afternoon, the hottest weather we have seen so far this year the hottest weather we have seen so farthis year in the hottest weather we have seen so far this year in both wales and scotla nd far this year in both wales and scotland and after those high temperatures we will continue to see very warm conditions as we head through the rest of this afternoon into the evening. after such a warm day, overnight, temperatures will be slow to full back so it will be a warm and uncomfortable night for sleeping. this is 11pm, temperatures 22 celsius in cardiff, high teens across northern ireland and wales and into parts of scotland as well. looking at the weather picture, on saturday, temperatures cooling down across the north—west of the uk because the air is coming of the
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atla ntic because the air is coming of the atlantic but at the same time the hotair is atlantic but at the same time the hot air is moving up from france to affect parts of england and parts eastern wales. so weather—wise, across the north—west of the uk, a fresh feel to the weather, a few showers and thunderstorms breaking up showers and thunderstorms breaking up later in the day, and we will not see those temperatures into the high 20s that have got at the moment. in the highlands, temperatures into the low 20s but still pleasant enough. across eastern wales and england, thatis across eastern wales and england, that is where the epicentre of our heat will be with temperatures forecast to hit 33 or 30 full celsius, the hottest day of the year so far by quite a margin. it stays very warm. this is saturday evening, 11pm, 26 celsius in the centre of london, it will be an unpleasant night for sleeping, but the second half of the weekend, this weather front will introduce cooler and fresher air of the atlantic. with that, and settled across the north—west of the country with rain or thunder showers around. further south, dry weather for england but
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noticed the temperatures are coming down to a more manageable, co mforta ble down to a more manageable, comfortable 25 celsius, still warm enough, and into next week, that pressure weather extending into much of the uk as well. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: theresa may tells the russian president the salisbury nerve agent attack was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable russian behaviour. russia needs to recognise its acts and stop acting in this way. and stop its other destabilising activities around the world. including, for example, the use
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of disinformation and cyber attacks. two people die from suspected heatstroke in spain as europe's heatwave is set to peak. we're still in the early part of the summer. normally, these very high temperatures don't come until round about august time. and, of course, it's not only the heat by day but also overnight as well, those temperatures really staying up. and we haven't seen temperatures quite this high since back in 2003. police and security services wait to hear what the coroner says about them at the inquests into the deaths in the london bridge attacks. and, the butterfly that went extinct from the british countryside 40 years ago is back. sport now on afternoon live, withjohn watson. and, john — the the draw‘s been made for wimbledon. how's it looking for the brits involved ?
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yes — british number one, kyle edmund, opens his account againstjaume munar of spain — while johanna konta plays on tuesday. and in the men's doubles where andy murray features, he could play brother, jamie, in the third round. away from british interests, rafa nadal will perhaps feel he has the toughest draw, from the all england club. here's our tennis correspondent, russel fuller. no doubt the british players in at least angles have receive very benign first dollars, with the of james ward, every player will be facing somebody else out there worlds top 65. andy murray and his partner had a visible stock too, they could play brotherjamie in the third round. elsewhere, in the round, rafa nadal and roger federer in at the same half. it has no doubt who looks to have the rocky start
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through the draw. he could play marron chill h even before reaching the quarterfinals. in the women's sections, the world number one, angelique kerber, serial volumes, maria sharapova. the highlight beyond the first round match between the two americans, 24 years apart. it is looking guys at wimbledon, we hope it will stay the same when play begins. and a huge audience watched england's women in the world cup last night? there was a peak tv audience on bbc1 of 7.6 million last night for england's 3—0 win over norway in the world cup quarterfinals. that's a record for a women's
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football match in the uk, several thousand were watching at on big screens at glastonbury — that came after a request from england's georgia stanway, who came on as a sub last night. her brother is at the festival and stanway made a plea on twitter for them to show the match so that he could see her play. the girls were giving me stake sale they were not a chance i would get out. it was showing is the day, hundreds of thousands of people were watching. apparently, my brother was on someone's shoulders when i came on someone's shoulders when i came on the pitch and he was loving league glory. it is unavailable that they even played it, it was the perfect time to get the game on at glastonbury. 0bviously, that is thousands and thousands of people watching so unbelievable. nottingham forest have sacked manager martin 0'neill, replacing him with former france international, sabri lamouchi, as their new head coach. forest were four points outside the championship play—offs
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when 0'neill took charge, but he was unable to guide them to a top—six finish. lamouchi was recently in charge of rennes in the french top flight, taking them from the relgation places to the europa league. ac milan have been banned from european competition next season. that's after breaking uefa's financial fair play rules. the club, which finished fifth in italy's serie a, will miss next season's europa league. any club which has overspent in a three—year period, breaking uefa rules, faces sanctions. roma will take their place in the group stage, and torino will now enter the qualifying round. england's cricketers will be hoping that south africa can beat sri lanka in today's cricket world cup match. sri lanka are one of three teams that can deny england a semifinal spot. and they stand a good chance. it's good news, so far, sri lanka were bowled out forjut 203, with no batsmen getting past 30. chris morris and dwayen pretorius
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each took 3 wickets. so south africa will fancy their chances of chalking up just their second win of the tournament. which would serve as a boost for england. hey need something after former england captain, michael vaughan, has torn intojonny bairstow after the opener claimed that the media aren't supportive enough and that people want england to fail. vaughan has posted his response to that on social media: strong words from michael bond. that's all the sport for now, but there's more on the bbc sport website, including the latest from second practice for the austrian grand prix. that's bbc.co.uk/sport.
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the england manager phil neville says his lionesses put in the best performance of his reign so far as they booked a place in the women's world cup semi—final. they beat norway 3—0 last night, and they'll now face either hosts, france, or holders, usa. 0ur sports correspondent, jane dougall, reports. elation for england after an emphatic win. her manager says she is the best player in the world... here's lucy bronze. what a goal! and bronze showed why, scoring england's third goal and sending them to lyon. i have been dreaming of playing in lyon and getting to that semifinal again. i have had to wait four years. there is all that kind of pressure and passion came out in that strike. it was bronze who was the playmaker from the start, shooting down the
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right to cut back. jill scott was there. then a tap—in from ellen white and she was celebrating. her fifth goal in this world cup, making her joint top scorer. back in england, glastonbury even changed the music momentarily. # it's coming home, it's coming # football's coming home...# the girls were so good. that lucy bronze goal wasjust phenomenal, honestly. i can feel it's been building. even to this moment, like, it's well exciting and we're really excited to see it. we are into the semifinals now. 0ne lioness, georgia stanway, had asked organisers to show the match for her brother. hundreds of thousands of people watching. apparently my brother was on someone's shoulders when i came on the pitch and everyone was clapping him, so he was loving the glory. now either the hosts france or the holders usa stand in england's way of reaching their first final in a major tournament. to be in a semifinal, you're going to play the best teams in the world. them two are two top teams that we really fully respect.
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0bviously france is the host nation, so they're favourites and usa are number one in the world. so, for us, we know it's going to be a tough test but we make sure that we'll give it our all. so far, they have — inspiring the previous generation and the next. rosie mcdonnell was at the game last night, and hasjust arrived home in birmingham. thanks forjoining us. how was it last night? and aye it was brilliant, well of the travel. i can see your england shirt on, are you a football like yourself?” see your england shirt on, are you a football like yourself? i am, i have been playing for coventry united for the past two seasons. do you think the past two seasons. do you think the point made in that report is too, that this inspires the next generation? yes, massively, ithink more than ever. at the moment, women's football is very exciting, especially at the advertising that has come of it this time around. it
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is really inspiring to people who maybe haven't thought of before, and pursuing people to give it a go, i personally haven't been to an international match before either. do you think that is a sound that resonates for the players themselves and ops their energy levels, the thought of having so much support, they know people are watching at glastonbury, they know the england manager is a super excited, they know david beckham is watching.|j know david beckham is watching.” think it's probably difficult for them, were so many people watching, it's a bit more on the shoulders. i think women's football is a bit different in that there is an expectation every time the women's footballers do a bit better, it brings a bit more to football in this country, and we pushed on a little bit more. i do feel for the players because of that pressure. the england side have never won a big tournament before but phil neville is sounding hungry, do you think it's possible? i think it is
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absolutely possible, we are ranked third in the world now, i believe. you're just saying that we have some of the best players in the world with lucy bronze. 0n of the best players in the world with lucy bronze. on our day, i don't see why it is not possible, we have the desire there. it is interesting to hear phil neville calling lucy bronze in the world, not the best best women's player but the best player, do you think that is at the size of it? i think it is an interesting comment. but men bring different things to the game that men do, and each footballer brings their own talents to it. and i think phil neville was right when he gave for that comment, she had a great game last night. who would you like to be against on tuesday night, the host or at the holders?”
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like to be against on tuesday night, the host or at the holders? i would like france actually, something a bit differently, i think it would bring a great audience and a bus to the game. all the very best, rosy, and let's hope that they win. now we are going to look very shortly out of the business. we will have a look at the headlines on afternoon live. no, we won't. theresa may tells the russian president the salisbury nerve agent attack was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable russian behaviour. two people die from suspected heatstroke in spain as europe's heatwave is set to peak. in france, temperatures have hit a record high police and security services wait to hear what the coroner says about them at the inquests into the deaths in the london bridge attacks.
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here's your business headlines on afternoon live: the designer of the imac, the ipod and the iphone is leaving apple. sirjony ive will set up his own venture called lovefrom. the designer who was born in britain said it was "a natural and gentle time to make this change." he said that lovefrom's first client would be apple. but it comes at a time when investors are worried about falling iphone sales. the danish billionaire family that controls the toy firm lego is buying merlin entertainments for £4.8 billion. it's the company that owns legoland as well as madame tussauds, the london eye, alton towers and chessington world of adventures. merlin profits were hit by a drop in visitor numbers after a crash in 2015 at one of its alton towers rollercoasters. nokia has distanced itself from comments its chief technology officer made about huawei in a bbc interview. marcus weldon said that the uk should be wary of using the chinese firm's equipment.
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he said that huawei's telecoms kit had vulnerabilities that meant it posed a risk to 5g networks. it comes as the us is putting pressure on allies, including the uk, to bar the firm over security fears. nokia said his comments did not reflect the compa ny‘s official position. international pride month is coming to a close for this year this is that the whole reason pride is celebrated around the world. one thing that has been point out that there is that some workplaces still have quite a bit to do to educate the people there. what does that mean? aye they were referring to a big national survey done, the lgbt+
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survey which found that a substantial chunk of people who identified as lg bt+ substantial chunk of people who identified as lgbt+ were being held back professionally and they put it down to their sexual orientation. so it is kind consciousness raising? exactly. that was backed up in the survey. people felt that their sexual orientation was not reflected ata sexual orientation was not reflected at a management level, all sorts of things likely felt could be worked on in different businesses. when you think about what can be done specifically, we got the thoughts of hepzi pemberton, founder of the equality group. there's three big things you can be doing. the first is to make sure you have proper policies and procedures around anti—discrimination. the education is extremely important in making sure people are really aware of what they can be doing, they are a real understanding of this community. and also having allies. so people that are visibly supportive of the lgbt+ community
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and employees, specifically. let's talk a bit more jony i've leaving apple — because that's a big departure? yes, you're talking here about someone who goes to the very core of apple — as it were. even his boss tim cook said sirjony‘s "role in apple's revival cannot be overstated" — so it's more than a standard "thanks and best wishes for the future" that most people get when they leave afirm. he was so influential — designing the imac, ipod and iphone. so much so, that our tech correspondent rory cellanjones says that along with steve jobs, the two men were like the lennon and mccartney of apple. together, they shared the idea that the look and feel of a product was as important as the technology inside it.
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let's talk to samira hussain in new york. how big a loss will this be to apple — can they afford to lose someone someone of his calibre? it comes at a time which iphone sales are slipping. it is a really difficult time to see someone who was so crucial in revolutionising apple and was really out of the forefront of all the design aspects of their products to be leaving. you can tell that investors are a bit worried about that because out of the news, we sure that the share price fell, losing some $200 on its price. it's really significant because it now compound these fears about what happens next for apple. are they really going to be able to make another product that will captivate people as much as the
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iphone, ipad, imacs have? that more do we know about this new company — lovefrom? it has been reported this company will go home a lot more creative freedom. he wants to work on projects, which also include some working with apple. i think a lot of people will be looking to try to get some of his expertise, if he can be light revolutionary arm for apple, who knows what other companies will be doing to try and get his expertise. thank you forjoining us. do you know how he started out? toilets and toothbrushes. design them. eventually, designing the most valuable product the world has ever seen. that is setting an example. i'm sketching some designs, see
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where they go. the church of england has appointed its first black female bishop. rose hudson—wilkin will take over as the bishop of dover in november. this born and raised injamaica, ms hudson—wilkin has served as chaplain to the queen and currently serves as the chaplain to the speaker of the house of commons. she has previously spoken out about the church's senior clergy needing to be more ethnically diverse. a rare butterfly can now be seen in england for the first time in more than forty years. the chequered skipper became extinct in england in 1976. now the wildlife charity, butterfly conservation, says a project to bring it from belgium and re—introduce it in northamptonshire appears to have been a success. martin borley reports. the hunt is on for the country's rarest butterfly. it has been a life—or—death struggle for the chequered skipper since they were reintroduced
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to england one year ago. the national spotlight was on this tiny insect when 42 chequered skippers, caught in belgium, were released at this secret location in rockingham forest. since then, britain's weather is unlikely to have helped the butterfly‘s survival. just after the butterflies emerged, it was really cold and damp, so they weren't very active. and then we had a really hot, dry summer where the vegetation got really parched. and then that was followed by quite a mild, dry winter. so we are really not sure of the effect that is going to have had on the butterflies. but this is proof that the chequered skipper has survived. i have just spotted a skipper, he is just perched there. and it is a male, and it is definitely one of our english skippers. confirmation they have survived. yes, very exciting. but this is just the start. it will take many years before the butterfly‘s long—term survival is guaranteed. we have done the easy bit, really. releasing butterflies,
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doing this reintroduction, we are in the second year of a three—year project. we will know if it is a success in the long term when we start picking up the butterfly in other woodlands where we didn't let it go. in belgium, 24 more chequered skippers have been caught and then released in rockingham forest to bolster the newly emerged english butterflies. this is a female, an amazing view i don't think i've ever got this close to a chequered skipper. so she will mate really quickly, sometimes within one hour or two of emergence. then she will be ready to lay her eggs. as soon as it warms up a bit, she will be off looking for suitable locations. a new generation of chequered skipper. exactly, so then we will hopefully be back again next year looking for even more chequered skippers emerging in this habitat. there is huge excitement from naturalists and volunteers about the success they have had so far. but it is still early days, hopes are high that this beautiful, tiny butterfly is finally back for good. martin borley
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with that report. time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes. scotla nd scotland and wales are both enjoying the hottest day of the year so far. we have seen temperatures at the highlands of scotland up to 27 celsius, it could get up to 28 today with clear blue sunny weather. as we head into the weekend, the focus of the really hot weather will move more into england, with temperatures potentially reaching 54 celsius, before falling back during the second half of the weekend as fresher air begins to move in from the west. —— 34 celsius. today, scotla nd the west. —— 34 celsius. today, scotland has already recorded its hottest day of the year, same with
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wales, certainly pretty hot weather across these northern and western areas, temperatures in cardiff 28 celsius. after such a one day, temperatures will be slow to fall overnight, if you're thinking of heading off to bed, 11 o'clock temperatures will still be up to the low 20s in cardiff and the high teens in parts of scotland and northern ireland as well. into the weekend, we still have warm air coming up from france into england and parts of wales, elsewhere, the wind is coming in at more of the atla ntic wind is coming in at more of the atlantic for northern ireland and scotland, and western fringes of england and wales. so temperatures easing back a little bit. during saturday, we are expecting storms to break out in north—western areas. temperatures in the highlands will be more around 22 celsius for the warmest weather. the hotspots are focused around england, a number of
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aid is getting to around 30 to the hottest places could see 54 celsius. —— 54 celsius. improvements in some respect as we go into sunday, fresher air moves in off the atlantic and that will drop the temperatures. it will turn increasingly unsettled across north—western areas with some heavy and thundery objects of rain. should they dry to the south—east, with temperatures easing back to the more co mforta ble temperatures easing back to the more comfortable 25 celsius.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 3: theresa may tells the russian president the salisbury nerve agent attack was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable russian behaviour. russia needs to recognise its acts and stop acting in this way and stop its other destabilising activities around the world, including, for example, the use of disinformation and cyber attacks. two people die from suspected heatstroke in spain as europe's heatwave is set to peak. in france, temperatures have hit a record high. we're still in the early part of the summer. normally, these very high temperatures don't come until round about august time. and, of course, it's not only the heat by day but also overnight as well, those temperatures really staying up. and we haven't seen temperatures quite this high since back in 2003.
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police and security services wait to hear what the coroner says about them at the inquests into the deaths in the london bridge attacks. coming up on afternoon live: all the sport with john watson. the draw has been made for the first round of wimbledon. it has been pretty favou ra ble round of wimbledon. it has been pretty favourable for the british players. thanks, john. and chris has all the weather. the heatwave in europe and going. records have been tumbling so we will take a closer look at what is going on in france and also it is the warmest day of the year in scotla nd the warmest day of the year in scotland and wales. the full week in focus details. 4,500 tonnes of concrete and steel blown up nearly a year after the collapse
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of the morandi bridge in the italian city of genoa. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. theresa may has told the russian leader, vladimir putin, the nerve agent attack in salisbury was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable behaviour. in a frosty meeting at the g20 summit injapan, she told mr putin there's irrefutable evidence that russia was behind the novichok attack on former russian agent sergei skripal and his daughter last year, but mr putin has dismissed it as "a fuss over spies". he also said that traitors must be punished. from the summit, rupert wingfield hayes reports. every g20 summit starts with the traditional family photo, a symbol of cooperation and friendship between these nations.
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by comparison, mr putin's meeting with theresa may was icy cold. she told the bbc she intended to confront the russian president about the poisoning of sergei skripal in salisbury last year. we've set out the evidence. charges have been laid against two russian individuals. i want to see those individuals brought tojustice. russia needs to recognise its acts and stop acting in this way, and stop its other destabilising activities around the world. donald trump has repeatedly refused to take action against vladimir putin for russia's alleged meddling in the 2016 us election. today, he was asked if he would do so again. this meeting came a day after a newspaper interview in which president putin had launched an all—out attack on western liberal
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values on immigration... ..and on multiculturalism. translation: there is also the so—called liberal idea which has outlived its purpose. 0ur western partners have admitted that some elements of the liberal idea, such as multiculturalism, are no longer tenable. but it is a meeting that has not taken place that is dominating this summit — that between donald trump and chinese president xijinping. the two countries are locked in a damaging trade war, that president trump is threatening to escalate it further. today, the chinese president said that would be a huge mistake. translation: developed countries are frequently taking protectionist and one—sided measures, destroying the global trade order and the production chains. this also impacts on the common interests of our countries and overshadows peace
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and stability worldwide. japan was hoping to push a broad agenda at this g20 summit including getting commitments on climate change, or cleaning plastics from the oceans and on free trade. instead, this whole summit is being overshadowed by the us and china trade war and now all eyes are on the xijinping and donald trump meeting and the hope the two will stop the trade warfrom getting any worse. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in osaka. 0ur deputy political editor, john pienaar, is in osaka. you saw the look on theresa may's face during that posed handshake with vladimir putin. it was a portrait of cold displeasure, and that surely was very deliberate. 0n theresa may's side, this was pressure for a purpose — yes, to signal national affront at an attack on british soil but, more than that, to reassert britain's status as a global player deserving of respect in any situation and certainly should not be treated in this kind of way.
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there was a certain grim satisfaction in government circles when the international community — america, europe — reacted in the way that they did after the salisbury attack, joining britain in penalising russia. today, theresa may was very keen it seems to me to be asserting her place, speaking for that wider international community. i don't think anyone in government — any official, any minister — imagines that russia is about to suddenly change its ways or show a great contrition, but this was about a very public, very clear show of displeasure to be taking a leading role, a leading voice, and perhaps in that at least theresa may may have succeeded. the inquest into the victims of the london bridge attacks will conclude later this afternoon. eight people were killed and 48 were injured in the van and knife attack in june 2017. 0ur correspondent, sarah campbell, is at the old bailey. what have you been learning? for the
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last eight weeks, in the old bailey, thejury last eight weeks, in the old bailey, the jury has heard last eight weeks, in the old bailey, thejury has heard how last eight weeks, in the old bailey, the jury has heard how the attack unfolded. it was a busy summer night around the borough market area of london, many people had been out watching the champions league final, the clubs were all busy, and it was just after 10pm that witnesses reported seeing a white transit van being driven at speed and erratically across london bridge, seemingly targeting pedestrians. two people were killed on the bridge itself, the three occupants then left the van, and within the space ofa left the van, and within the space of a few minutes killed a further six people, stabbing them to death. eight people were killed in total and 48 were injured. there is little question that the chief coroner will find that they were unlawfully killed, but the inquest is about more than that, it is about looking all the circumstances deaths,
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looking at whether authorities could have helped prevent the loss of life. a couple of issues which the families have concerned over regard the intelligence services. khuram butt, the ringleader of the three attackers, had been under investigation by m15 for the previous two years. they had been aware that he had connections with extremists, they knew he was sharing extremists, they knew he was sharing extremist material, he was filmed at a rally in regents park which will be shown as part of channel 4's documentary. in 2015, his brother—in—law called the anti—terror hotline about concerns he had about khuram butt, but we had at the inquest that that went to a different team and there was no follow—up. take that into account, he was able to plan and carry out this attack. the second issue that the families have been concerned about is barriers or a lack of on london bridge. it camejust about is barriers or a lack of on london bridge. it came just two and a half months after the westminster bridge attack where a vehicle
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mounted curbs and drove into pedestrians, the same thing happened on the 3rd ofjuly 2017, so the question they are asking, why would barry is not in place on london bridge? what is happening at the moment is that the coroner is going through in great detail all these eight weeks of evidence, summing it up, then he will come to his conclusions. interestingly, a couple of hours ago, he was talking about the evidence given by khuram butt‘s family, his sister, sister—in—law and his brother... sorry, his wife. he basically said, talking about each of them, he said he did not find any of them convincing witnesses and all of them now accept that they should have done more. we are expecting his full conclusions before the end of the afternoon. we will come back to you when we get this conclusions. france has recorded its highest temperature
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since records began. the mercury has reached 45.1 degrees centigrade in villevieille near montpellier in southern france. in spain, two people have died from suspected heatstroke and firefighters are dealing with catalonia's worst wildfires in 20 years. keith doyle reports. almost the whole of france is on alert because of the excessive heat with parts of the south and the highest red alert stop that means there is a danger to life. and here in the south, this afternoon, the temperature reached 44.3 celsius, the highest ever recorded on mainland france. the previous french record was 44.1 degrees in 2003 when the heat is thought to have contributed to the deaths of 15,000 people. many schools have been closed and people have been warned to ta ke closed and people have been warned to take what precautions they can. 0vernight, parks in paris were open, offering some refuge from the night—time heat and humidity. time
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to do what it has been too hot to do during the day. an official app is directing people to cooler places or islands of freshness, as they have been called. shaded areas of parks, cooler buildings and even cemeteries. police have been turning a blind eye to people using the usually out of bounds fountain is close to the eiffel tower to cool off. an emergency meeting has been held by the french government, the prime minister warning people to be responsible, while some the government of scaremongering and an increased number are being treated in hospitals for heat —related problems. the heatwave that is effective most of the continent is blamed on hot air moving north from the sahara. we are still in the early pa rt the sahara. we are still in the early part of the summer. normally these high temperatures do not come until august and it is not only the heat by day but also overnight, there is temperatures really staying up. we have not seen temperatures this high since back in 2003. in
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spain, it is usually hot injune but not this hot. wildfires are out of control in parts of the north—east, over 6000 hectares, 25 square miles are affected. fire crews in the military have been brought in to try and bring them under control. authorities say to people have died of heat —related courses and one of them is a 17—year—old farm worker. across the siberian peninsular, high temperature records are being broken. germany, italy and the balkans are also reaching new heat highs which are expected to last until sunday. jeremy hunt has urged his conservative leadership rival, borisjohnson, to be straight with people about what a no—deal brexit would mean. his comments came as the two men took questions from party members in devon in the latest hustings event. mrjohnson says the uk must leave the eu on 31st of october, "do or die", with or without a deal. but what are people who aren't party members making of the conservative leadership campaign so far?
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nick robinson has been speaking to a focus group of voters in reading west — a key marginal constituency. they won't be able to vote in the leadership election, but they all voted conservative at the last general election. half of them then deserted the party in the recent european elections. i've been speaking to a group of voters who are crucial at the moment. they all voted tory at the last general election, but half of them didn't in the european elections. two voted for the brexit party, one for the liberal democrats, and one didn't vote at all. the tories need their votes next time round if they're to stay in power. when you're looking for a leader, when you're making your mind up, what's important to you? leadership, strong. actions. likeable. is that different from strong? yeah, i think so. yeah. charisma.
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listen to the people. you've got to deliver your promises. mm. and we've got to trust you, that you're going to deliver. jeremy hunt, liz, do you know whatjob he does? no, no, idon't. if you have anything that comes into your mind when you think about him, words off the top of your head, what do you think? my perception is that he comes across a bit wet, a bit not really strong. however, it then comes down to would i trust what he said more than boris? i'd probably trust him more. i think he's very weak and i think he's quite sly, actually. sly, why sly? ijust think he's sly, ijust think... you don't trust him? don't trust him. let's have a look at borisjohnson. you probably know a bit better, of course. can you just tell us what happened at your partner's home a couple of nights ago? i've made it a rule over many, many years, i do not talk
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about stuff involving my family and my loved ones. personal life, character, personality. i think he evaded that question. he didn't answer her question, boris didn't. should he talk about his personal life? no. he has a right to his privacy, as everyone else does. sara, you don't look quite so sure? people have a right to their privacy, but he didn't actually answer her question. and who would get a better deal from the eu, johnson or hunt? in anything, you need that charisma, you need that personality, and, out of the two, for me, it's boris. the loose cannon of boris makes you feel that, if he makes a threat of walking away, they are more likely to believe boris thanjeremy hunt, that you're going to walk away with no deal. you're the man for the job. if it's prime ministerjeremy hunt tomorrow, what sort of prime minister is he? boring. boring, yeah. what we've had before.
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david cameron. lack of charisma. boring, definitely. yeah. but... a safe pair of hands. could he be reliable? so, if it's prime minister boris johnson, what do you think? enthusiastic, passionate. passionate. driven, bumbling. what's going to happen today? leader. what's going to happen, unpredictable. 0h, christ! that's two words, sorry! and you can watch more of nick robinson's conversations in a special programme, the view from the voters, on the bbc news channel at 9:30pm. and it'll be avaliable shortly afterwards on the iplayer. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: theresa may tells the russian president the salisbury nerve agent attack was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable russian behaviour. two people die from suspected heatstroke in spain as europe's heatwave is set to peak.
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in france, temperatures have hit a record high coming up, festival—goers enjoy the weather on what's set to be the hottest glastonbury on record. the wimbledon draw has been drawn. kyle edmund will open against spain on monday. johanna konta place on tuesday. a bad day for red bull and mercedes in practice as max verstappen and valtteri bottas both crash out but neither driver was hurt. sri lanka, one of the teams that could pip england to the semifinals of the cricket world cup, lost early wickets in south africa and have posted one of the lowest scores so far. more to come at half past. family and friends of a 12—year—old girl
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who drowned in the river irwell in bury have visited the scene to pay tribute to her. greater manchester police have called it a tragic incident and have reminded people against cooling off in lakes, rivers and reservoirs. mustaf 0mar, the girl's uncle, spoke of his famillies grief, she was a sweet innocent child, she stayed home all the time, she helped her mum 20 47, her mum is new to the country as well. there was no doubt in the household, she helped her brothers and sisters every morning. 0ur memories of her is loving and caring, peaceful, helping, everything a child is supposed to be. it has all been taken away now. demolition teams have blown up what remains of a motorway bridge in the italian city of genoa, nearly a year after it partially collapsed, killing 43 people. high explosives were used in the demolition, after thousands of residents who live nearby had been evacuated from their homes. james reynolds reports.
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at nine o'clock this morning, genoa got ready to bring down the remains of the morandi bridge. there was a short delay because of reports that a man was found refusing to leave his home near the structure. 0fficials sorted it out. water cannon was switched on, ready to catch the dust, and then demolition experts pressed the button. it was all over in just a few seconds. the pile of dust covered the entire area. the operation was a success. translation: at 9:37am, the bridge came down. procedures have been strictly followed and plans are on track. oh, dear!
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italy is still recovering from the partial collapse of the bridge last summer. the structure fell when decaying cables, encased in concrete, snapped. an investigation into who is to blame has yet to reach its conclusions. the country has already begun work on a replacement bridge, designed by the country's most famous architect, renzo piano. this is what it will look like. the government says that the new structure is expected to be ready by next year. james reynolds, bbc news, rome. the england manager phil neville says england put in the best performance of his reign so far as they booked a place in the football world cup semi—final. they beat norway 3—0 last night and they'll now face either hosts france or holders usa. our sports correspondent jane dougall reports.
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elation for england after an emphatic win. her manager says she is the best player in the world... here's lucy bronze. what a goal! and bronze showed why, scoring england's third goal and sending them to lyon. i have been dreaming of playing in lyon and getting to that semifinal again. i have had to wait four years. there is all that kind of pressure and passion came out in that strike. it was bronze who was the playmaker from the start, shooting down the right to cut back. jill scott was there. then a tap—in from ellen white, and she was celebrating. her fifth goal in this world cup, making her joint top scorer. back in england, glastonbury even changed the music momentarily. # it's coming home, it's coming # football's coming home...# the girls were so good. that lucy bronze goal wasjust phenomenal, honestly. i can feel it's been building. even to this moment, like, it's well exciting and we're
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really excited to see it. we are into the semifinals now. 0ne lioness, georgia stanway, had asked organisers to show the match for her brother. hundreds of thousands of people watching. apparently, my brother was on someone's shoulders when i came on the pitch and everyone was clapping him, so he was loving the glory. now either the hosts france or the holders usa stand in england's way of reaching their first final in a major tournament. to be in a semifinal, you're going to play the best teams in the world. them two are two top teams that we really fully respect. obviously, france is the host nation, so they're favourites, and usa are number one in the world. so, for us, we know it's going to be a tough test but we make sure that we'll give it our all. so far they have, inspiring the previous generation and the next. festival—goers at glastonbury are being urged to protect themselves from the sun with record temperatures forecast over the weekend. they are also being urged to drink plenty of water but, for the first time, organisers have banned the sale of plastic
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bottles at the festival. fiona lamdin reports from glastonbury. as temperatures soared into the 20s, worthy farm and its festival—goers are in need of hydration and, not surprisingly, queues have been building at all the water stations dotted around the festival. for the first time, glastonbury has banned the sale of single—use plastic. there is over 870 taps on site. it's all about refill and reuse. usually, we would be drinking out of plastic bottles because most vendors would be selling them on site but they're not selling them this year. instead, i bought a £5 metal cup and you can refill it at any water points. there's loads of them on site — it's easy. it's nice that you don't have the option to buy plastic bottles as well so everybody is avoiding it completely. normally, i would pop to an ice cream van and buy a few bottles of water as well as lemonade and that kind of thing, so this year, we've decided to bring our own bottles. last year, more than a million plastic bottles were recycled
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at the festival and this is where they all came. already, it's made a huge difference. there's considerably less plastic than there was last festival. with hundreds of thousands travelling here and the mountain of tents often left behind, the founder of the climate change campaign group extinction rebellion worries about its impact. i'm sure it's got a massive footprint and it is a piece of hedonism, isn't it? it's people having a good time. from that can come quite a narcissistic side to ourselves, where we're not looking at what we are doing. individuals walk away and leave a load of mess behind. single—use tents — how disgusting is that? i think the festival needs to look at that and do what they can to prevent that and also the individuals who are here. a future challenge for this festival but for now, at least, even the police are sticking to the new glastonbury rules. 0rganisers hope, as people leave, they will not only take their rubbish
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but the festival's message. fiona lamdin, bbc news. 0ur entertainment correspondent is also there. the water issue, the no single use plastic bottles, the heat, the music, the football, how's it going? it is going very well. as far as water is concerned, glastonbury somewhere where they prepare for all eventualities, torrential rain and mud through to blistering heat, they have got plenty of taps all over the site, there will be queues, people are getting all the water they need as far as we getting all the water they need as faras we can getting all the water they need as far as we can see, and they seem to be enjoying the first afternoon of music here and hopefully lots of people are wearing hats and covering up people are wearing hats and covering up with sunscreen and looking after themselves and taking all the advice. the music got under way earlier on at the pyramid stage. we had an abba tribute act earlier,
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particular favourite of mine. sheryl crow is on at the moment. bastille, lauren hill and storm see, the first british act to headline on the pyramid stage. we have got the cure, the killer is doing headline tests, and the legendary kylie minogue, she was supposed to play here in 2005 but had to withdraw after she was diagnosed with breast cancer. she is now back to do a full set on sunday afternoon. the revellers seem to be having a wonderful time so far, enjoying the heat and hopefully at the end of sunday they hope they will go home with notjust happy memories but notjust mud stained clothing. i know you will have fun, a shout out to everybody there and to kylie, we hope it all goes really well. time for a look at the weather.
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we will take a look at the heatwave that has been building in france. we have set a new temperature record, it now stands at 45 celsius. it is the first time temperatures have ever gone above the 45 celsius mark. the previous june ever gone above the 45 celsius mark. the previousjune record was 41, so we have not just the previousjune record was 41, so we have notjust broken the record, it is completely obliterated the record! french forecasters have said this is an unprecedented heat spell forjune in terms of its intensity. why is it happening? as it winds from the sahara? the winds have been coming in from the sahara which has warm the air, but when some full on light, and it is that combination of preheated air in africa and then southern french sun, clear blue skies, that have added to the heat. they are two of the main ingredients. we also have a blocked
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weather pattern out in the atlantic which means the cooler fresh atla ntic which means the cooler fresh atlantic air that will try to get to western europe can't, so that is one of the other ingredients. there is also an element of climate change. french forecasters have been looking at the frequency of heat waves, and they say that in the last 34 years, heat waves have become twice as common as they were in the previous 30 odd years, and there is an expectation from french forecasters that by the year 2050 the frequency of such heatwaves will double again, and we find that the heatwaves are starting earlier and finishing late in the summer season, so there are some elements to be considered. the map is read in italy and spain as well? we have seen a number of temperature records. the czech republic, poland and germany all setting new marks. for us, 29just doesn't really look anything impressive compared with what's going on in europe but that is
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wales's hottest day of the year so far. 29 as well in the highlands of scotland, both have clear blue skies the moment. so, from the highlands, that's what they look like at the moment, but the realfocus that's what they look like at the moment, but the real focus of our hot weather shifts more to england as we head into the first part of the weekend. temperatures could get to 34 celsius by a comfortable margin, the uk's hottest day of the year tomorrow, but some of that he will begin to ebb away a little bit as we head into the second half at the weekend, and sunday sees a high ofa the weekend, and sunday sees a high of a more manageable 25 celsius. we have talked about the sunshine, and after such a warm day, temperatures will be very slow to fall away from these values as we head to the evening and by the time we get into the early part of the night, at
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11pm, these are the kinds of temperatures you might expect out and about, a bit uncomfortable at 22 in cardiff, generally temperatures into the high teens across the north and west of the country. from there, into the weekend, the focus of the heat really starts to form across england because we are pulling in some of that hot air from france, but notice the winds coming more from the atlantic across western england, wales, northern ireland and scotland, to the peak of the heat is behind us. still, plenty of sunshine around for most areas, more in the way of cloud from the northwest weather could be a few passing showers. as showers. as far as temperatures go, 29 in the highlands, temperatures to saturday afternoon afresh at 22 celsius, one or two showers dotted around. warm weather for england and wales but not as hot as today. across england, temperatures peak at 33 or 34 celsius. this is up on saturday, 26
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celsius. this is up on saturday, 26 celsius in london! a warm and sultry night. the second half at the weekend sees this cold front pushed its way eastwards. we get a cooler fresh atlantic air flowing in behind upfront so temperatures will be easing significantly as we had to sunday. still a fair bit of dry weather around, the best of any sunshine in southern and eastern areas. the north and west always his thick clouds, and temperature is 25 celsius in london, still pretty warm, but generally high teens to low 20s. not exactly a heatwave for us. the really hot weather only lasting a day or two, but it will be the hottest day of the year for the uk tomorrow with highs up to 33 or 34 celsius.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: theresa may urges russian president putin to hand over the salisbury nerve agent attackers, calling it a despicable act — part of a pattern of unacceptable russian behaviour. russia needs to recognise its acts and stop acting in this way. and stop its other destabilising activities around the world. including, for example, the use of disinformation and cyber attacks. police and security services wait to hear what the coroner says
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about them at the inquests into the deaths in the london bridge attacks. two people die from suspected heatstroke in spain, in france temperatures hit a record high, as europe's heatwave continues. we're still in the early part of the summer. normally, these very high temperatures don't come until round about august time. and, of course, it's not only the heat by day but also overnight as well, those temperatures really staying up. and we haven't seen temperatures quite this high since back in 2003. sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson. and john — the the draw‘s been made for wimbledon? how's it looking for the brits. yes — british number one, kyle edmund, opens his account
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againstjaume munar of spain — while johanna konta plays on tuesday. and in the men's doubles where andy murray features, he could play brother, jamie, in the third round. away from british interests, rafa nadal will perhaps feel he has the toughest draw, from the all england club. here's our tennis correspondent, russel fuller. no doubt the british players have received very benign first draws, with james ward, every player will be facing somebody else out there worlds top 65. andy murray and his partner had a reasonable start too, they could play brother jamie in the third round. elsewhere, in the round, rafa nadal and roger federer in the same half. it has nadal who looks to have the rocky start through the draw. he could play cilic even before reaching the quarterfinals. in the women's sections,
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the world number one, angelique kerber, serena williams , and maria sharapova. the highlight beyond the first round match between the two americans, 24 years apart. and a huge audience watched england's women in the world cup last night? there was a peak tv audience on bbc one of 7.6 million last night for england's 3—0 win over norway in the world cup quarterfinals. that's a record for a women's football match in the uk, several thousand were watching at on big screens at glastonbury — that came after a request from england's georgia stanway, who came on as a sub last night. her brother is at the festival and stanway made a plea on twitter for them to show the match
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so that he could see her play. the girls were giving me state, saying there was no chance i would get out. 0bviously, saying there was no chance i would get out. obviously, it was shown yesterday. hundreds of thousands of people watching. apparently my brother was on someone's shoulders when i came on the pitch and everyone was clapping him, so he was loving the glory. but it is unbelievable that they even pleaded, it was the perfect time to get to the game on at glastonbury. 0bviously, that is thousands and thousands of people watching so it is unbelievable. nottingham forest have sacked manager martin 0'neill, replacing him with former france international, sabri lamouchi, as their new head coach. forest were four points outside the championship play—offs when 0'neill took charge, but he was unable to guide them to a top—six finish. lamouchi was recently in charge of rennes in the french top flight, taking them from the relgation places to the europa league.
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danny cipriani has been added to the england world cup squad. he originally missed out but with players unavailable, he has been included in next week's campus. the world cup training squad will then be announced on thursday, the 4th of july, he will be hoping to force his way into the reckoning. england's cricketers will be hoping that south africa can beat sri lanka in today's cricket world cup match. sri lanka are one of three teams that can deny england a semifinal spot. it's good news, so far, sri lanka were bowled out forjut 203, with no batsmen getting past 30. chris morris and dwayen pretorius each took 3 wickets. so south africa will fancy their chances of chalking up just their second win of the tournament. formula 1 is often accused of being
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boring but the season could be getting interesting this weekend as practice is anything to go by. when the conditions were thought to be behind crashes —— windy conditions. plenty to do for the mechanics before race day. sebastien at their total was lucky to avoid damaging his ferrari as we seen here. unsurprisingly, the quickest time of the day was accorded by lewis hamilton. it seems there is no stopping him as he marches toward yet another world title. this the chief coroner at the inquest into the victims of the london bridge attacks is bringing to a close eight weeks of what has been at times, harrowing evidence. in the next couple of hours, he will return his conclusion in the case of the eight people who died in the van
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and knife attack in 2017. philippe pigeard's 26—year—old son, alexandre, was stabbed when he came face to face with the attackers. he's been speaking tojohn maguire. alexandre pigeard came to london to improve his english. injust nine months, he had made friends and was popular with colleagues, won over, his parents say, by his smile. because of this terrific smile. i have to say that this was our main goal in our education — to keep his smile alive as long as possible, until this terrible night when they take it off his face, in so brutal, cruel manner. he was working at a french restaurant in borough market when he heard the attackers crash their van. during the inquest, his parents have heard and seen on cctv much of what happened.
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he rushed from the restaurant to help. we see on the cctv, there is no doubt. there is one of his colleagues who goes down in the room. he pushes him and goes straight out. he goes to the stairs. imagine what's happening, what could happen in his head, going to help, with that generosity, and being cut down. alexandre was young, just 26 years old, and with plans for the future — to return to france and to record music with philippe, a musician. i'm thinking of what i'm going to do, now the inquest is over. i have to rebuild a life. i have two other kids. they need me. they have the right to live their youth, like alexandre lived. i am going to do
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something with them. there will be a movie, or a documentary. i would like to see all the people who saw him that night, you know? i would like to reinterview the nurse, helen kennett. she saw him with the neck cut. from the inquest, we know that she was one of the last faces he saw, and she was beautiful. she is a wonderful woman. she was — i hope he kept that until the end. i am not sure, but i hope. because he died really alone, on the pavement. he had so much to live for, and no reason to die. a young man, much loved, who became an innocent victim of hate. john maguire, bbc news, london. in the united states, the democratic party's leading
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presidential hopeful, joe biden, endured a tough time in a televised debate. nine fellow democrats also seeking the party's nomination took him to task on a series of key issues. in the second round of televised debates, mr biden was challenged on his age, as well as his record on race issues. gary 0'donoghue reports from miami. side by side, but in many ways, poles apart politically. tonight saw four of the front runners take to the stage in this second nbc debate. the man who's dominated the race so far, 76—year—old former vice president to barack 0bama, joe biden, has fashioned himself as a centrist and the best candidate to beat donald trump. donald trump has put us in a horrible situation. we do have enormous income inequality and the one thing i agree on is, we can make massive cuts in the $1.6 trillion in tax loopholes out there and i would be going about eliminating donald
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trump's tax cuts for the wealthy. his closest challenger, self—styled democratic socialist, bernie sanders, is credited with reviving and mobilising a new left—wing progressive fervour in the party. and he was quick to attack those wealthy americans in the top 1%. and at a time when we have three people in this country earning more wealth than the bottom half of america, while 500,000 people are sleeping out on the streets today, we think it's time for change, real change. senator kamala harris has been in the top five front runners but she's not well known around the country. as her fellow democrats appeared to squabble over how to write off student loans, she showed her capacity to cut through. hey guys, you know what, america does not want to witness a food fight, they want to know how we are going to put food on their table.
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she also confronted joe biden directly on a controversial part of his political past. so—called ‘busing', which was an attempt to desegregate schools by moving black and white children across neighbourhoods to other schools. mr biden didn't support the policy at the time. it was hurtful to hear you talk about the reputations of two united states senators who built their reputations, and careers on segregation of race in this country. everything i've done in my career, i ran because of civil rights, i continue to think we have to make fundamental changes in civil rights and those civil rights, by the way, include not just only african—americans, but the lgbt community. at times, joe biden seemed a little rattled, put on the spot by several other candidates on his record and told he should pass on the torch to the next generation. joe biden was right when he said it was time to pass the torch to a new generation of americans 32 years ago.
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he's still right today. i'm still holding onto that torch. but he wasn't the only one who felt discomfort. the young 37—year—old gay mayor from indiana, pete buttigieg, has had to deal with the fallout of a police shooting of a black man ten days ago. he was asked why his city did not have more black officers. because i couldn't get it done. i am determined to bring about a day when a white person driving a vehicle and a black person driving a vehicle, when they see a police officer approaching, it feels the exact same thing. a feeling, not of fear, but of safety. in truth, the great clash between centrists and socialists didn't quite happen, but tonight's debate was a step up in energy from yesterday. so all 20 candidates have had their say and over the coming days, the polls will be scrutinised to see what impact these debates have had. none of the key five front runners have done themselves irreparable damage, but after tonight's performance, kamala harris will feel she is in serious contention for one
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of those top three spots. gary 0'donoghue, bbc news, in miami. ben is here with the business news in a moment. theresa may tells russia's president to hand over the men responsible for the salisbury nerve agent attack. she called it a despicable act — part of a pattern of unacceptable russian behaviour. europe's heatwave is continuing, with temperatures hitting a record—high in france. in spain, two people die from suspected heatstroke and wilfires broke out in catalonia. police and security services wait to hear what the coroner says about them at the inquests into the deaths in the into the deaths in the london bridge attacks. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: the designer of the imac, the ipod and the iphone is leaving apple. sirjony ive will set up his own venture called lovefrom.
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the designer who was born in britain said it was "a natural and gentle time to make this change." he said that love from's first client would be apple. but it comes at a time when investors are worried about falling iphone sales. the danish billionaire family that controls the toy firm lego is buying merlin entertainments for £4.8 billion. it's the company that owns legoland as well as madame tussauds, the london eye, alton towers and chessington world of adventures. merlin profits were hit by a drop in visitor numbers after a crash in 2015 at one of its alton towers rollercoasters. nokia has distanced itself from comments its chief technology officer made about huawei in a bbc interview. marcus weldon said that the uk should be wary of using the chinese firm's equipment. he said that huawei's telecoms kit had vulnerabilities that meant it posed a risk to 5g networks.
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yes — up to nine possible buyers have shown an interest. but that doesn't necessarily translate into firm bids. this is after britain's second largest steel producer was put this into compulsory liquidation last month — when greybull capital, its owner, failed to secure extra funding to continue running it. at stake — the future of a company, which produces high—cost long steel products used in construction and rail networks, and employs 25,000 people. sarah corker has been looking at it all in more detailfor us.
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growing up in britain's steel town, students atjohn liggett college in scunthorpe say when the steelworks are in trouble, the whole town feels it. they have sold it quite a few times, it's been through quite a few phases, and yet it always seems to somehow turn out 0k. but i think, at the same time, it's always still been rocky. it has a massive spirit to just stay alive as long as it is able to because it's what scunthorpe relies on. with the steelworks having trouble — being from a poor family, having to travel further afield for any form of work experience or even a job will become quite difficult. it's been nearly six weeks of uncertainty for families here. british steel collapsed in may, its problems blamed on a slump in orders because of brexit. a new owner must be found or these steelworks have no future. several companies have emerged as possible buyers, including liberty steel. the global company is actually
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a neighbour of british steel and already employs around 145 people in scu nthorpe. there is also thought to be interest from a chinese state steel—maker, and one of india's leading steel manufacturers, while firms based in france and russia have shown an interest in parts of the rail business. they all have until sunday to put in a bid, although unions say that deadline could be extended if they ask for more time to put together a takeover plan. there are concerns that any deal could lead to the business being broken up, that's something unions and the government are resisting. well, we will watch that one over the weekend. another big story in business. the strange code that it was a gentle time to leave apple? business. the strange code that it was a gentle time to leave apple7m is an odd way to describe it. this
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is an odd way to describe it. this is someone that is so influential. he accounts for a large slice of apple creativity. even his boss, tim cook, said sirjony‘s "role in apple's revival cannot be overstated" — so it's more than a standard "thanks and best wishes for the future" that most people get when they leave a firm. he was so influential — designing the imac, ipod and iphone. all things that made apple such an unflinching company. so much so, that our tech correspondent rory cellanjones says that along with steve jobs, the two men were like the lennon and mccartney of apple. together, they shared the idea that the look and feel of a product was as important as the technology inside it.
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kate bevan is the editor of which computing. how big a loss is this to apple? it's an enormous loss, he has been such a huge part of the design and look of the company. what does it say about the future of apple as a company? an imac for many years, it has all been about selling iphones and imacs. now they have been living into services and contents. it really signals a shift away from hardware into services and content. what more do we know about his new theremin? and aye we don't know much about from apple being its first major client. it will be interesting. there are some chart
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that may be how well we will be one of its clients, we don't know. it will be interesting to see who comes up will be interesting to see who comes up the ranks through apple. will be interesting to see who comes up the ranks through applem will be interesting to see who comes up the ranks through apple. in terms of successors, given his influence and personality let you brought to the company, presumably let filters down and there must be many portages that are steeped in his views in the importance of design? yes, him living on does give space for that pipeline to come through. it might bea pipeline to come through. it might be a nice example if a women or a person of colour comes through, just to give apple a 21st century take, if you like. he was once tipped as a future chief exec at bug free but that never came to pass, did it? yes, he stepped away from managerial responsibilities when he was designing things. you never think of him asa designing things. you never think of him as a leading manager, you think of him as a design guru which is a
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cliche but true. in your review, his best design? i think the very thin all in one imac is a thing of beauty. and he started to designing toilet seats you were telling me? toothbrushes and toilet seats. scientists in brazil say they've unearthed the fossilised remains of an entirely new species of dinosaur. it's estimated the animal lived around 90 million years ago. tim allman has more. ok, it's not much of a looker, but it is quite special in its own way. vespersaurus paranaensis, a dinosaur we never even knew existed. these are some of its remains, discovered by palaeontologists in the south—west of the country.
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it's at theropod, the same family as the velociraptor and the tyrannosaurus rex. believed to be around 1.5 metres in length, it was thought to be carnivorous, feeding on other small animals. translation: this is the first time this species has been registered here in brazil and, globally, it's a new species. this region of brazil is rich in dinosaur remains. now there is plenty of lush vegetation but 90 million years ago this area was all desert. careful analysis of the creature's bones and the unique nature of its claws told scientists this was something different. the hope is this discovery will prompt fresh research and new discoveries. maybe other previously unknown dinosaurs will be unearthed. tim allman, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes.
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hello again. scotland and wales are both enjoying the hottest day of the year so far. we have seen temperatures in the highlands of scotland up to 27 celsius, it could get up to about 28 today with clear, blue, sunny weather. as we head into the weekend, the focus of the really hot weather will move more into england, with temperatures potentially reaching 33—34 celsius, before falling back during the second half of the weekend as fresher air begins to move in from the west. through the rest of today, scotland has already recorded its hottest day of the year, and same with wales, certainly pretty hot weather across these northern and western areas, temperatures in cardiff — 28 celsius. after such a warm day, despite the clear skies and light winds, temperatures will be slow to fall overnight. now if you're thinking of heading off to bed at 11 o'clock temperatures will still be up
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to the low 20s in cardiff, and the high teens across parts of scotland and northern ireland as well. a little too warm for sleeping for some. into the weekend, we still have warm air coming up from france into england and parts of wales, elsewhere, the wind is coming in more off the atlantic for northern ireland, scotland, and westermost fringes of wales and south—west england. so temperatures easing back a little bit here. during saturday, we are expecting some thundery showers to break out across north—western areas. with that, there is slightly cooler air working in off the atlantic, so temperatures in the highlands will be more around 22 celsius for the warmest weather. the hotspots are really focused around england, with a number of areas getting to around 30, and the hottest places could see 34 celsius. through the night time, temperatures fall back no lower than around 26 celsius by the time we get to 11 o'clock at night,
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that is saturday night, pencil that on in for a very uncomfortable night of sleep ahead. improvements in some respect as we go into sunday, fresher air moves in off the atlantic and that will drop the temperatures. it will turn increasingly unsettled across north—western areas with some heavy and thundery objects of rain. should stay dry to the south—east, with temperatures easing back to a more comfortable 25 celsius.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 4: police and security services wait to hear what the coroner says about them at the inquests into the deaths in the london bridge attacks. two people die from suspected heatstroke in spain as europe's heatwave is set to peak. in france, temperatures have hit a record high. we're still in the early part of the summer. normally, these very high temperatures don't come until round about august time. and, of course, it's not only the heat by day but also overnight as well, those temperatures really staying up. and we haven't seen temperatures quite this high since back in 2003. theresa may tells the russian president the salisbury nerve agent attack was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable russian behaviour. russia needs to recognise its acts and stop acting in this way
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and stop its other destabilising activities around the world, including, for example, the use of disinformation and cyber attacks. coming up on afternoon live: all the sport. news on a favourable draw for the british hopefuls at wimbledon. thanks, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half past. chris fawkes has all the weather. it has been the hottest day of the year so far it has been the hottest day of the yearso far in it has been the hottest day of the year so far in both scotland and wales but the focus of the hot weather shifts to england for the start of the weekend. i will tell you just how hot the weather will get a little bit later on. also coming up: festival—goers enjoying the sun as they prepare for what's set to be the hottest glastonbury on record.
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hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. the chief coroner at the inquest into the victims of the london bridge attacks is due to conclude shortly. it brings to an end eight weeks of what has been, at times, harrowing evidence. eight people were killed and 48 were injured in the van and knife attack in june 2017. 0ur correspondent, sarah campbell, is at the old bailey and sent this update. for the last eight weeks, in the old bailey, court! has heard how the attack unfolded. it was a busy summer night around the borough market area of london, many people had been out watching the champions league final, the pubs and clubs were all busy, and it was just after 10pm that witnesses reported seeing a white transit van being driven at speed and erratically across london bridge, seemingly targeting pedestrians.
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two people were killed on the bridge itself, the three occupants then left the van and, within the space of a few minutes, had killed a further six people, stabbing them to death. eight people were killed in total and 48 were injured. there's little question that the chief coroner will find that they were unlawfully killed, but the inquest is about more than that — it is about looking all the circumstances deaths, looking at whether authorities could have helped prevent the loss of life. a couple of issues which the families have concern over regard the intelligence services. khuram butt, the ringleader of the three attackers, had been under investigation by m15 for the previous two years. they had been aware that he had connections with extremists, they knew he was sharing extremist material, he was filmed at a rally in regents park which will be shown
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as part of a channel 4‘ documentary. in 2015, his brother—in—law called the anti—terror hotline about concerns he had about khuram butt, but we heard at the inquest that that went to a different team and there was no follow—up. take that into account, yet he was able to plan and carry out this attack. the second issue that the families have been concerned about is barriers or a lack of them on london bridge. it came just two and a half months after the westminster bridge attack where a vehicle mounted curbs and drove into pedestrians, the same thing happened on the 3rd ofjuly 2017, so the question they are asking is why weren't barriers in place on london bridge? what is happening at the moment is that the coroner is going through in great detail all these eight weeks of evidence, summing it up, then he will come to his conclusions. interestingly, a couple of hours ago, he was talking
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about the evidence given by khuram butt‘s family, his sister, sister—in—law and his brother... ..sorry, his wife. he basically said, talking about each of them, he said he did not find any of them convincing witnesses and all of them now accept that they should have done more. we are expecting his full conclusions before the end of the afternoon. let's talk now to the former head of the civil contingencies secretariat, a government department responsible for emergency planning in the uk, mike granatt. i know you will have been paying close attention to the london bridge attacks inquest. what do you think the chief coroner is going to say at the chief coroner is going to say at the end of today? he will have quite a lot to say about what might have been able to have been done on greater surveillance on the ringleader. the authorities were warned about him. the family was on
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the radar but somehow the prioritisation system did not bring him up. the second thing they might be talking about is risk management at the scene, how that kept paramedics out of the area, and perhaps made it more difficult to treat those who had been injured and those who subsequently died. thirdly, he might comment on communications. it was a very fast moving event, there is always close at the beginning, but the key is to get full picture as fast as possible. he may well comment on that. going back to the first thing you mentioned there, the question of how the gaps injoining up the intelligence, is that something we have heard over and over again in these cases, does it concern you, someone so experienced in this, that we still seem to be letting these la pses we still seem to be letting these lapses happen? it concerns but does
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not surprise me. it is very difficult to see how you get a perfect system out of this. we know the security authorities including police have got their eye on a couple of thousand people at least ata couple of thousand people at least at a time. they have to prioritise what are essentially limited resources . what are essentially limited resources. they have to make decisions about what they and put together an intelligence picture that allows them to come to come to a conclusion that keeps people safe and make sure we keep an eye on those for the most dangerous. i don't think the problem will ever be solved in a free society to the extent where you stop everything but i have no doubt that the day after this happened questions would have been asked internally and they will been asked internally and they will be looking for lessons to learn from that day. and then you mentioned the risk management on the night stop do you think that was handled... from what you heard that the inquest, other lessons to be learnt there? you have to look at the of this. there will always be a need to keep
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people safe. people who are not in a position to protect themselves or other people do not rush into something extremely dangerous, so you hold back people like paramedics. in the meantime, there are police officers not trained in that way trying to help people. that risk management process has got better over the years, but it can whiz be improved. the key will a lwa ys whiz be improved. the key will always be communication and command and control at the scene, but in a scenario like this, where things move quickly, people are moving quickly, information is flowing in in large amounts but a lot of the uncoordinated, that will always be a problem. that was your third point, the communications there again, is this an inevitable problem as you have said in such a fast moving situation, or do you think there is something different, better that could be done? it is a problem but a problem that needs to be treated better each time this happens. the
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question would be, how was information coordinated. when it was identified as a terrorist attack, what systems were in place for joining people together? the key question there will be, were people talking to each other effectively, was information being assessed effectively? just before i let you 90, effectively? just before i let you go, one last question on the barriers, because this has come up asa barriers, because this has come up as a possible source of criticism from the chief coroner, the absence of barriers despite the westminster bridge attack a couple of months earlier and the suggestion that paris should have been put in place. do you think we will hear more on that from the coroner?” do you think we will hear more on that from the coroner? i think we will. it is inevitable. as i recall, there was a survey done that suggested that barriers should be put in place but it takes time and resources and there are other locations that might have a priority. the question is, what priority. the question is, what priority do you give these locations, how fast can you get
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these things in place? and we will go to the old bailey when we have the outcome of that inquest from the chief coroner. france has recorded its highest temperature since records began. the mercury has reached 45.1 degrees centigrade in villevieille near montpellier in southern france. 0ur europe reporter gavin lee sent this update from paris. this is the centre of paris, right underneath the eiffel tower. it is so hot here at the moment, record temperatures in france. these areas here, the gardens and fountains are usually banned to the public, children and families are paddling and probably the world's best open—air paddling pool right now because the police in paris say people have to keep cool, and the authorities are making sure that families and all sorts of people who come here, tourists as well, keep
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cool in the shade, they have set up an app so people can tap in and work out where the nearest tree areas with breezes are, where the areas of cooler, museums, for example, where people are taking shelter, and the temperature, well, if you go to the south of france, the highest ever on record, 45.1 celsius in the town today, that is something unheard of, and it may even break that later this evening. it is getting hotter throughout the day. we have problems with pollution as well because the traffic, in these areas where there is low pressure, pollution stays at an unhealthy level, so 60% of traffic has been told to stay away from paris if they are to polluting. here is a family from new zealand. we have got him, jack, chloe and quinn. chloe, you live in paris. for you being christian, living here,
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being at the moment? -- parisienne. it is cool. i have never seen it like this with people in the fountain. so many people being allowed today. jack, give me a sense of what it is like for you being here in this heat wave? in new zealand, you don't get it like this, so we zealand, you don't get it like this, so we have to get used to it. even in new zealand, we never see people swimming and fountains. what are you doing to keep cool? swimming in the fountain. suntan lotion, kim? they are old enough to do that themselves now. we have packed water with us, hopefully we can find somewhere to refill our water bottles, suntan lotion, that is about it, really. have a great rest of your holidays, thank you for talking to me, kim,
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quinn, chloe and jack. the other thing worth bearing in mind is climate change. there is a science conference going on in france at the moment where scientists are looking at the link between this heat and the climate and into loose they are worried we will start to regularly see this temperature becoming the new normal, year upon year. theresa may has told the russian leader, vladimir putin, the nerve agent attack in salisbury was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable behaviour. in a frosty meeting at the g20 summit injapan, she told mr putin there's irrefutable evidence that russia was behind the novichok attack on former russian agent sergei skripal and his daughter last year. but mr putin has dismissed it as "a fuss over spies". he also said that traitors must be punished. from the summit, rupert wingfield hayes reports. every g20 summit starts with the traditional family photo, a symbol of cooperation and friendship between these nations.
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by comparison, mr putin's meeting with theresa may was icy cold. she told the bbc she intended to confront the russian president about the poisoning of sergei skripal in salisbury last year. we've set out the evidence. charges have been laid against two russian individuals. i want to see those individuals brought tojustice. russia needs to recognise its acts and stop acting in this way, and stop its other destabilising activities around the world. donald trump has repeatedly refused to take action against vladimir putin for russia's alleged meddling in the 2016 us election. today, he was asked if he would do so again. this meeting came a day after a newspaper interview in which president putin had launched an all—out attack on western liberal
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values on immigration... ..and on multiculturalism. translation: there is also the so—called liberal idea which has outlived its purpose. 0ur western partners have admitted that some elements of the liberal idea, such as multiculturalism, are no longer tenable. but it is a meeting that has not taken place that is dominating this summit — that between donald trump and chinese president xijinping. the two countries are locked in a damaging trade war that president trump is threatening to escalate it further. today, the chinese president said that would be a huge mistake. translation: developed countries are frequently taking protectionist and one—sided measures, arbitrarily triggering trade friction and a technology blockade, and destroying the global trade order and the production chains. this also impacts on the common interests of our countries and overshadows peace and stability worldwide.
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japan was hoping to push a broad agenda at this g20 summit, including getting commitments on climate change, on cleaning plastics from the oceans and on free trade. instead, this whole summit is being overshadowed by the us—china trade war, and now all eyes are on the xi jinping and donald trump meeting and the hope the two will stop the trade warfrom getting any worse. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in osaka. 0ur deputy political editor, john pienaar, is in osaka. you saw the look on theresa may's face during that posed handshake with vladimir putin. it was a portrait of cold displeasure, and that surely was very deliberate. 0n theresa may's side, this was pressure for a purpose — yes, to signal national affront at an attack on british soil but, more than that, to reassert britain's status as a global player deserving of respect in any situation and certainly should not be treated in this kind of way.
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there was a certain grim satisfaction in government circles when the international community — america, europe — reacted in the way that they did after the salisbury attack, joining britain in penalising russia. today, theresa may was very keen it seems to me to be asserting her place, speaking for that wider international community. i don't think anyone in government — any official, any minister — imagines that russia is about to suddenly change its ways or show a great contrition, but this was about a very public, very clear show of displeasure to be taking a leading role, a leading voice, and perhaps in that at least theresa may may have succeeded. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: theresa may tells the russian president the salisbury nerve agent attack was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable
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russian behaviour. in france, temperatures have hit a record high. the wimbledon jewel has been relatively kind to the brits involved. it's been a bad day for red bull and mercedes in practice ahead of the austrian grand prix as max verstappen and valtteri bottas both crash out. neither driver was hurt. and sri lanka — one of the teams that could pip england to the semi finals of the cricket world cup — lost early wickets against south africa and have posted one of the lowest scores of the world cup — 203 all out. family and friends of a 12—year—old girl who drowned in a river in greater manchester, have paid tribute, describing her
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as loving and caring. police say the incident in bury is tragic and have reminded people against cooling off in lakes, rivers and reservoirs. the 12—year—old's uncle has been speaking of his family's grief. she was a sweet innocent child, she stayed home all the time, she helped her mum 24/7, her mum is new to the country as well. there was no doubt in the household, she helped her brothers and sisters every morning. 0ur memories of her is loving and caring, peaceful, helping, everything a child is supposed to be. it has all been taken away now. demolition teams have blown up what remains of a motorway bridge in the italian city of genoa nearly a year after it partially collapsed, killing 43 people. high explosives were used in the demolition, after thousands of residents who live nearby had been evacuated from their homes. james reynolds reports. at nine o'clock this morning, genoa got ready to bring down
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the remains of the morandi bridge. there was a short delay because of reports that a man was found refusing to leave his home near the structure. 0fficials sorted it out. water cannon was switched on, ready to catch the dust, and then demolition experts pressed the button. it was all over in just a few seconds. the pile of dust covered the entire area. the operation was a success. translation: at 9:37am, the bridge came down. procedures have been strictly followed and plans are on track. oh, dear! italy is still recovering from the partial collapse
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of the bridge last summer. the structure fell when decaying cables, encased in concrete, snapped. an investigation into who's to blame has yet to reach its conclusions. the country has already begun work on a replacement bridge, designed by the country's most famous architect, renzo piano. this is what it will look like. the government says that the new structure is expected to be ready by next year. james reynolds, bbc news, rome. the england manager, phil neville, says england put in the best performance of his reign so far as they booked a place in the world cup semifinal. they beat norway 3—0 last night and they'll now face either hosts france or holders usa. our sports correspondent jane dougall reports.
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elation for england after an emphatic win. her manager says she is the best player in the world... here's lucy bronze. what a goal! and bronze showed why, scoring england's third goal and sending them to lyon. i have been dreaming of playing in lyon and getting to that semifinal again. i have had to wait four years. there was all that kind of pressure and passion came out in that strike. it was bronze who was the playmaker from the start, shooting down the right to cut back. jill scott was there. then a tap—in from ellen white, and she was celebrating. her fifth goal in this world cup, making herjoint top scorer. back in england, glastonbury even changed the music momentarily. # it's coming home, it's coming # football's coming home...# the girls were so good. that lucy bronze goal wasjust phenomenal, honestly. i can feel it's been building. even to this moment, like, it's well exciting and we're really excited to see it.
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into the semifinals now. 0ne lioness, georgia stanway, had asked organisers to show the match for her brother. hundreds of thousands of people watching. apparently, my brother was on someone's shoulders when i came on the pitch and everyone was clapping him, so he was loving the glory. now either the hosts france or the holders usa stand in england's way of reaching their first final in a major tournament. to be in a semifinal, you're going to play the best teams in the world. them two are two top teams that we really fully respect. obviously, france is the host nation, so they're favourites, and usa are number one in the world. so, for us, we know it's going to be a tough test but we make sure that we'll give it our all. so far they have, inspiring the previous generation and the next. festival—goers at glastonbury are being urged to protect themselves from the sun with record temperatures forecast over the weekend. they are also being urged to drink plenty of water and, for the first time, organisers have banned the sale of plastic bottles at the festival.
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0ur entertainment correspondent, liz mzimba, is at glastonbury. people come here, hoping for two things, great music and great weather, and as you say this looks like being a scorching weekend. probably not record temperatures for glastonbury, that belongs to 2017 when on one day it reached 31 celsius. we were not quite get that this time around but it will be extremely hot, especially for a festival that somewhat unfairly people feel synonymous with wet and rain and mud. but all over the site, people are looking after themselves with the heat, there are water taps all over the festival area, lots of the shops selling food, they have made a huge effort to make sure that water will not be an issue over the
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weekend particularly with this kind of weather. and the music has now started to swell after showing the football match on the big screen. 0n the pyramid stage behind me, we began with the abba tribute band, and right now we have the band bastille. they are having their first appearance on the maid pyramid stage. 70—80,000 people now flocking into this particular area. people go toa into this particular area. people go to a huge amount of effort to tally up to a huge amount of effort to tally up where they want to go because they are so many different stages to try to make sure they won't miss anyone they want to, avoid any clashes, so people have been coming infor clashes, so people have been coming in for the last 10—15 minutes or so, but the big one tonight is stormzy, the british rapper, the first black british rapper to headline here at glastonbury. he played the other stage a couple of years ago, he has
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graduated to the headline slot, a huge success, a wonderful great symbolic figure, a brilliant musician, known for his outspoken political beliefs as well, and that has all the promise of being a fabulous set tonight. 0ver has all the promise of being a fabulous set tonight. over the rest of the weekend, we have liam gallagher, the cure, kylie minogue on sunday afternoon. she was supposed to play in 2005 but had to withdraw when she was diagnosed with breast cancer, she is now finally back to play a full set for fancy a glastonbury, and that also promises to be one of the highlights of the weekend which started off today, the music is now going on until sunday. we are about to go to the weather. can you get your cameraman to pound down and see how much mud there is? just to be absolutely sure? has it not been raining there at all, it looks so dry! it rained a little on
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monday and tuesday, but of course it has been so hot since then that it has been so hot since then that it has dried out, and the big crowds did not start to arrive until wednesday and thursday. the ground has not got churned up by people when it is wet, so a very trite glastonbury makes it easier to get around and heightens the enjoyment to so many people. i hope everyone will have a brilliant time. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. scotla nd scotland and wales are both enjoying the hottest day of the year so far. we have seen temperatures in the highlands of scotland up to 27 celsius, could get up to 28 degrees or so today with clear blue sunny weather but as we head into the weekend, the focus of the really hot weather will move into england with temperatures potentially reaching 34 celsius. before falling back as fresh air starts to move in from the west. but still warm enough across
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the london area. we are looking to the london area. we are looking to the weather across the rest of today, scotland has recorded its hottest day of the year so far. i would not be surprised if we get to 30 by the end of the day in wales. hot weather across these northern and western areas, and temperature is 28. after such a warm day, despite the clear skies and light winds, temperatures will be slow to fall overnight. if you are thinking of heading off to bed at 11pm, temperatures will still be in the low 20s in cardiff and the high teens across scotland and northern ireland. a bit too warm for sleeping for some of you. on into the weekend, warm air comes up from france into england and parts of wales, but elsewhere the winds coming on of the atlantic for northern ireland, scotland and western most fringes of wales and south—west england, so it is here where temperatures eased back a bit. as the day goes by on saturday, we are expecting thundery showers to break out across north—western areas. with that, we have the cool
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air working areas. with that, we have the cool airworking and of areas. with that, we have the cool air working and of the atlantic, so instead of temperatures being on the high 20s in the highlands, 22 degrees or so for the warmest weather. the hotspots are focused on england where a number of areas get to 30, and the hottest places could see 34 celsius. through the night time, temperatures full—back no lower than 26 celsius by the time we get to 11pm. that saturday night. very uncomfortable night's sleep. improvements as we going to sunday, the fresher air moves and of the atlantic, dropping the temperatures. along with that, it will turn increasingly unsettled across north—western areas with heavy and at times thundery bursts of rain. it should stay dry with temperatures easing back to a more comfortable 25 celsius. that is your weather. this is bbc news —
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our latest headlines: police and security services wait to hear what the coroner says about them at the inquests into the deaths in the london bridge attacks. temperatures hit record highs in france, and two people die in spain from suspected heatstroke — as europe's heatwave hits its peak. we're still in the early part of the summer. normally, these very high temperatures don't come until round about august time. and, of course, it's not only the heat by day, but also overnight as well, those temperatures really staying up. and we haven't seen temperatures quite this high since back in 2003. theresa may tells the russian president the salisbury nerve agent attack was a despicable act and part of a pattern of unacceptable russian behaviour. russia needs to recognise its acts and stop acting in this way, and stop its other destabilising activities around the world. including, for example, the use of disinformation and cyber attacks. sport now on afternoon live —
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withjohn watson. john, don't draw today, quite good for the brits but not so good for rafa nadal? yes — british number one, kyle edmund opens his account againstjaume munar of spain, a player ranked well outside the world's top 50, while former wimbledon semi finalist johanna konta plays romanian qualifier ana bogdan on tuesday. andy murray could meet brother, jamie, in the third round of the men's doubles, while rafa nadalfaces perhaps the toughest draw of the big names in the men's singles. as our tennis correspondent, russel fuller, explains. no doubt the british players have received very
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benign first draws, with the exception of james ward, every player will be facing somebody else outside the world's top 65. andy murray and his partner have a reasonable start too, they could play brother jamie in the third round. elsewhere, in the draws, rafa nadal and roger federer in the same half. it is nadal who looks to have the rockier route through the draw. he could play cilic even before reaching the quarterfinals. in the women's singles, one loaded top section of the draw the world number one ashleigh barty, angelique kerber, serena williams, and maria sharapova. the highlight being the first round match between cori gauff and venus williams, two americans, 24 years apart.
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if we do see a nadal taking on nick fury is, it would be very interesting because it was nick ilyas who knocked out rafa nadal. let's talk about football, phil neville is sounding very enthusiastic about his team, so as of the audience which is building on tv? yes, it has been huge. we have seen an increase from the quarterfinals and before that. there was a peak tv audience on bbc1 of 7.6 million last night for england's 3—0 win over norway in the world cup quarterfinals. that's a record for a women's football match in the uk, several thousand were watching at on big screens at glastonbury — that came after a request from england's georgia stanway, who came on as a sub last night. her brother is at the festival and stanway made a plea on twitter for them to show the match
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so that he could see her play. the girls were giving me stick, saying there wasn't a chance i would get it on. it was shown yesterday, hundreds of thousands of people were watching. apparently, my brother was on someone's shoulders when i came on the pitch and he was loving league glory. it is unavailable that they even played it, it was the perfect time to get the game on at glastonbury. 0bviously, that is thousands and thousands of people watching so unbelievable. nottingham forest have sacked manager martin 0'neill, replacing him with former france international sabri lamouchi as their new head coach. forest were four points outside the championship play—offs when 0'neill took charge but he was unable to guide them to a top—six finish. lamouchi was recently in charge of rennes in the french top flight, taking them from the relgation places to the europa league. danny ciprinai has been added to the england squad for their world cup training camp. eddiejones is still
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without saracens and exeter players who are taking an enforced rest following their exploits in the premiership final. england's world cup training squad will be announced on thursday, 4july — there's a strong chance cipriani will still miss out with eddiejones expected to only take two fly halves to japan, 0wen farrell and george ford. england's cricketers will be hoping south africa beat sri lanka in today's world cup match — they're one of three teams that could deny england a semifinal spot. sri lanka were bowled out forjust 203, with no batsmen getting past 30. so south africa will fancy their chances of chalking up just their second win of the tournament. they are 126—1, in reply. defending champion geraint thomas and colombian egan bernal have been named joint leaders of team ineos for the tour de france which starts next month.
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thomas is the defending champion but had doubts about whether he could defend his title after a crash at the tour of switzerland. chris froome misses out as he recovers from fracturing his femur, elbow and ribs in a crash earlier this month. that's all the sport for now but there's more on the bbc sport website, including the latest from second practice for the austrian grand prix. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country, in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let's go to look north's peter levy in hull, who is talking about the future of british steel. and, in plymouth, spotlight‘s naomi dymond is talking about women making
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waves in the chimney—sweeping trade. so, peter — remind us of the history of british steel? that is lu works used to be called tata, it was bought in a 2016 for a pound by grable. the review means the company british steel, i think seem to be going well, they even announced a profit of 20 went within pounds. but the price of steel imports and the uncertainty of brexit took its toll earlier this year. a couple of months ago, they ran into problems. the official receiver who is overseeing the liquidation of british steel, they have carried on operating and wages have been paid since that happened. but now, the
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company is desperately looking for a buyer. this weekend is impotent because of what? and imac the deadline is on sunday. to clarify, 4000 people work at british steel in scunthorpe, 4000 people work at british steel in scu nthorpe, many more 4000 people work at british steel in scunthorpe, many more in the supply chain. scunthorpe scunthorpe, many more in the supply chain. scu nthorpe is scunthorpe, many more in the supply chain. scunthorpe is a huge supplier of steel, someone knows someone who works there in the town, it would be devastating for the town. the beds are on sunday, anybody interested in buying british steel. some potential buyers have emerged, some as far as away from france and russia. 0ne company, called gsw, one of india's leading steelmakers. british steel is important, one of their biggest customers is network rail. 95% of
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all railtrack v travel on in this country supplied and made in scunthorpe. a country supplied and made in scu nthorpe. a lot country supplied and made in scunthorpe. a lot ofjobs rest on finding new buyer. one steel expert has said today, i don't see a saviour on the horizon. let's hope he's wrong. lets hope indeed. we'll be thinking of everybody in scunthorpe over weekend. so, naomi, why have chimney sweeps been making the news? for many, they might conjure up images of dick van dijk in the classic film mary poppins. but the business of chimney sweeping has changed somewhat. in a 2019, it's far more high—tech than just poking brushes up chimneys and it is not just men doing it. according to the guild of chimney sweeps, there are around 18 female chimney sweeps. that may not sound a lot but in
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2010, there were just three registered chimney sweeps in britain. so what is attracting women to this traditionally male—dominated trade? won the female sweep we have been talking to is in the leaf from devin. she set up her chimney sweeping business in 2016. having previously what has a you worker for more than 15 years, it was quite a change for her. she said the change was a great one. this she is loving it now, she says she does get the odd remark from people who spot a women working up on the wrist but, generally, people are very encouraging and positive. most people are quite intrigued how i got into it so it often starts a conversation, in that respect. i think that there's a novelty aspect to it — i think women, generally, in trades is quite unusual. so, certainly, a chimney sweep
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is a good conversation starter. is she hoping that others will follow in her footsteps? absolutely, emily is so passionate about women being able to train in whatever trade they like, whether it is traditionally done by men or not. she has a message for anyone who might be thinking about their future career. my advice to any women who wants to do a practical job in any trade —— go out and do it. because it's not as difficult as you think it is, ijust think you have to get over that initial fear of going into a male dominated world. but i would encourage any female to take up a similar trade, or even chimney sweeping. well done to you emily. i'm not sure ifi well done to you emily. i'm not sure if i can deal with climbing up on a roof. we will let you think of another one. naomi and peter, thank you so much to you twomack for giving nationwide with us this afternoon.
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now some breaking news: chief coroner mark lucraft qc has concluded victims of the london bridge and borough market terror attacks were unlawfully killed. daniel sandford reports on the background to the the london bridge attacks. that is the news from the old bailey. the deaths of eight people on london bridge, the injury to 48. the questions we have heard over the quest of an eight week inquiries about intelligence gaps, the absence of barriers on the bridge, and some of barriers on the bridge, and some of the relationships between the colours involved. as well, in fact,
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as the question of how fast emergency services got to the victims on the night, the risk management on the night, the communications between intelligence services and other security agencies beforehand, because, of course, they had knowing about the dangers presented by the attackers for a couple of years before the london bridge attack but they had failed to do wasjoin up bridge attack but they had failed to do was join up the dots between those three colours. 0bviously, do was join up the dots between those three colours. obviously, the families over the course of the eight week inquest, the families of victims, they believed, have expressed concern about some of those intelligence gaps. people were out mowing down on london bridge before that hired van crashed into railings, the three men then came
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out of the van with their knives and set upon bystanders. many of you will remember the harrowing stories of the days and weeks of the inquest of the days and weeks of the inquest of what happened to the victims and the enormous courage shown by some of the victims by going to the assistance of others. those few minutes of the beginning of the attack. a nurse was stabbed after she went to the aid of somebody else who had been stabbed. this so, colours then set upon another pair
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of bystanders who were fatally injured fending off attackers, one with a skateboard, he went to help and he was killed as he tried to protect another victim. the three colours were shot dead by police marksmen fewer than ten minutes after their rampage had begun. 0ver the course of the eight weeks, the old bailey had heard the acts of bravery, much as bite members of the public by white police officers who rushed to help in spite of dangers to themselves. —— by the police officers. the gaps have been told in for some of the families of the victims with the chief coroner is
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conclusion. we have the verdict of unlawful killings but we do not yet have the details on the issues surrounding the deaths on that night on london bridge. we are hoping to get to our reporter, which is why i am going through some of the detail because i am really hoping to talk to one of our reporters at the old bailey. while we wait for that, we should look at a report by daniel sa ndford should look at a report by daniel sandford into the background of the attack. the last images captured on cctv cameras of some of those who are to die on a summer attack on london bridge on the popular bars and busy streets clustered around by the market. in all, 80 people were killed, from britain, france, spain, australia and canada. —— eight people were killed. in a white van,
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the three killers turned on to london bridge and drove deliberately and at speed onto the wide pavement. a couple were head first. xavier was not of the bridge and into the times. the van then crashed and the colours got out, each carrying a victim for the next stage of their attack. with
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a12 the next stage of their attack. with a 12 inch lies strapped to their race, living swiftly and as a pack, the main core and attacked their victims. two of them at the top of the stairs, plenty of them further down the stairs. and a fifth at the entrance to the butter bistro. in less tha n entrance to the butter bistro. in less than a minute, they had fatally injured five of their victims just in the small area. on a night of heroes, people died trying to kill each other. bus advise and police officers desperately tried to keep victims alive while the attackers moved on, still my thing anyone came across. a police officer took them on an armed in himself the george medal. i remember them thrusting towards me with their lives, getting out of the way, obviously, this
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happened within seconds. i remember getting stabbed in the back, i docked to the floor, he stands above me and he stabs me three times in the head. the last person that the men killed were stabbed outside the restau ra nt men killed were stabbed outside the restaurant two men killed were stabbed outside the restau ra nt two a nd men killed were stabbed outside the restaurant two and a half minutes after the attack had started. just inside the restaurant was a genuine doctor who told me that a man at the to stop him leaving for his own safety. i said, you have to let me out, i'm a doctor, i can't watch them die. we were having this argument, iwas them die. we were having this argument, i was getting very frustrated, i understood him but i just had to get out. i said, let me out then you can close the door and lock it afterwards. he was able to save another victim who had been stabbed 18 times. the collision rampage for another seven minutes, still attacking people but failing to kill any more. they were in the
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process of stabbing another when armed officers arrived and shot them dead. within hours, it became clear that one of the attackers was being actively investigated by m15 i had been for two years. he had first came to their attention as someone who had been planning an attack. his own brother in law had warned police of his extremism but no one called back. amazingly, he had still been allowed to work at westminster on the grounds they station. but when the grounds they station. but when the men were plotting their attack, no one was watching. how cute are they missing? —— how could they miss him? the mi5 they missing? —— how could they miss him? the m15 did they missing? —— how could they miss him? the mi5 did not stop the guy despite all the signs that he was really ready for the worst. as they
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hired a van and drove it into central london, no one was there to stop them. despite the westminster attack less than three months earlier, there were no barriers on the bridge. lawyers for the buddy family say that the police and m15 had failed to do the job, to protect the public. —— for the bereaved families. we are expecting state m e nts families. we are expecting statements from the london ambulance service at the london city police. we will go back as soon as anyone appeared. right now, we will talk to our correspondent, said campbell, who has been at the old bailey throughout these eight weeks. —— sarah campbell. so grilling to watch the report there on all the victims and all the things that happened that night. you have had to sit through them in at the old bailey?
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it gives us a sense of what it must‘ve been like on the night if you can possibly imagine that sort of detail. the fact that eight people were killed altogether, 48 people were killed altogether, 48 people injured, all in the space of about ten minutes. in the first minutes, the attack was largely under way, no one else was killed. that gives you an idea, ten people killed in the space of three minutes. the chief coroner has been giving his conclusions over the last two days at the end of this eight week inquest. he isjust finishing going through each of the eight victims. no surprise that the the addict is unlawful killing in each case because they were murdered in a terrorist atrocity. —— leave their deckis
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terrorist atrocity. —— leave their deck is unlawful killing. —— the verdict. there were no barriers on london bridge, this was two and a half months after the westminster attack where people had been targeted by vehicles. what the coroner said in relation this, referring to two of the eight victims, they were the ones struck and killed by the van on london bridge, the coroner adds the extra line to do with their death. at the time of the attacks, there was no form of physical barrier despite london bridge being particularly vulnerable to an attack with an e vehicle as a weapon. he said there we re
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vehicle as a weapon. he said there were gaps in the system for assessing such a need for protection on the bridge. that is the key element with regards to those two deaths. perhaps, if there had been barriers in place, the implication being that two lives could have been saved. the other key point the coroner mentioned when putting together this conclusion was that he said very strongly, the ringleader of the free attackers, they very strongly criticised his family, four of whom spoke during the inquest. they said his family were aware of his extremist views and in the main, they did not report those views was up they did not report those views was up in the months and years before the attack, the new of the extremist views but did not report them to the authorities. so very strong criticism from the coroner of the
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attackers family. we know he was a person of interest for m15 and intelligence services. the coroner said that he did not consider that mi5 said that he did not consider that m15 should be criticised, there shouldn't be criticism of missed opportunities. they were dead to put together a vigorous investigation. —— the dead put together a vigorous 0ne one question about the emergency services, that have been questions about risk manage, whether paramedics were kept out too long, did the chief coroner have anything to say about that? not in his final conclusions. he stuck to the criticisms i've told you about. really to do with the barriers and to the fact that the concerns that the families of the attackers had not been registered to the
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authorities. this has been a wide—ranging inquest. they have been concerns raised by some of the families about the lack of ambulance, angela has been much debate within the inquest about the delay when ambulance services were able to get in and treat people on the ground but this has not formed pa rt the ground but this has not formed part of the coroners conclusions. he has stuck to the point that the barrier is, in two of the cases, it is about the barriers and about the family not reporting their concerns to the authorities. in a moment, we expect the london ambulance service and the city of london police to see if you words so we will come back from that. the bbc news at five, with jane hill, is coming up. first, time for a look at the weather — here's chris fawkes. hello again. scotland and wales are both enjoying the hottest day of the year so far. we have seen temperatures in
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the highlands of scotland up to 27 celsius, it could get up to about 28 today with clear, blue, sunny weather. as we head into the weekend, the focus of the really hot weather will move more into england, with temperatures potentially reaching 33—34 celsius, before falling back during the second half of the weekend as fresher air begins to move in from the west. through the rest of today, scotland has already recorded its hottest day of the year, and same with wales, certainly pretty hot weather across these northern and western areas, temperatures in cardiff — 28 celsius. after such a warm day, despite the clear skies and light winds, temperatures will be slow to fall overnight. now if you're thinking of heading off to bed at 11 o'clock temperatures will still be up to the low 20s in cardiff, and the high teens across parts of scotland and northern ireland as well. a little too warm for sleeping for some. into the weekend, we still have warm air coming up from france into england and parts of wales, elsewhere, the wind is coming in more off the atlantic for northern ireland, scotland, and westermost fringes of wales and south—west england.
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so temperatures easing back a little bit here. during saturday, we are expecting some thundery showers to break out across north—western areas. with that, there is slightly cooler air working in off the atlantic, so temperatures in the highlands will be more around 22 celsius for the warmest weather. the hotspots are really focused around england, with a number of areas getting to around 30, and the hottest places could see 34 celsius. through the night time, temperatures fall back no lower than around 26 celsius by the time we get to 11 o'clock at night, that is saturday night, pencil that on in for a very uncomfortable night of sleep ahead. improvements in some respect as we go into sunday, fresher air moves in off the atlantic and that will drop the temperatures. it will turn increasingly unsettled across north—western areas with some heavy and thundery objects of rain. should stay dry to the south—east, with temperatures easing back to a more
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comfortable 25 celsius.
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today at five. the conclusions to the london bridge inquests are due shortly the coroner concludes the victims we re the coroner concludes the victims were unlawfully killed. eight people died in the van and knife attacks injune 2017. 48 were injured. the family of one of the attackers has been criticised for not doing more to report his extremist behaviour. we will be live with the latest at the old bailey. i'll also be talking to a security expert. at the g20 summit itjapan, a stern faced theresa may tells the russian president the salisbury nerve agent attack was a despicable act. as a heatwave continues to grip parts of europe, france registers its highest
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temperatures since records began.

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