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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  July 1, 2019 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. hong kong is our focus after parliament is stormed by protestors. today is the 22nd anniversary of britain handing hong kong back to china. but what started with peaceful protest turned violent. the bbc‘s nick beake got into the parliament not long after the protestors left. this is extraordinary — to think that normally, this is the bustling, beating heart of the democratic process here in hong kong. but now it's completely defaced. out on the streets, the security forces fired tear gas and baton charged some of the tens of thousands of protestors. it's 4am in the morning in hong kong, and in the next few minutes, chief executive carrie lam is going to speak.
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we'll bring you that, as well as reporting and analysis from here in the newsroom and from hong kong. it's 4am in hong kong, and the fallout from the storming of the parliament continues. we're expecting to hear from the chief executive carrie lam at any moment — and we'll bring you when she speaks. but first, we have the story of how these protests escalated so quickly from inside and outside the parliament. now, the protestors have left. at midnight local time this happened. riot police stormed the building — known as the legco, the legislative council.
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monday was the anniversary on hong kong's handover to chinese rule, there are demonstrations every year. but never before like this. nick beake has been covering the story all day, and in the past hour, he had this update. we are outside the legco building now. we've been to the main chamber and saw the destruction straight off that report, and let's listen to carrie lam. this is carrie lam, the chief executive of hong kong. what she
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would normally do in these situations is speak into languages. so we think she will make a short statement and another short statement and another short statement in english. so we will keep listening in, everyone is watching very closely to see what her response will be. the police tactics today have been highly unusual — they did nothing to stop the protesters attacking outside the building, nothing to stop those who made it inside, and more curiously, they did nothing to stop the protesters leaving before police went in. all highly unusual, now we will see what the political response will see what the political response will be. there will be decisions not just for hong kong's chief executive, carrie lam, who we can see here, but also for the government in beijing. carrie lam denies that this extradition bill, which began these latest series of protests, was ordered by beijing will stop the protesters very much see her, in their words, as being a
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public of beijing. there will be interesting to see what her response is and the response from beijing, and the degree to which they are coordinated. but there will be some very big decisions for carrie lam to take, as clearly there have been a number of illegal acts that took place today with the storming of parliament, and the authorities will have decisions about how to go about finding people who carried this out, and if they deem it necessary, punishing the people who carried this out. let's listen in a bit further to what carrie lam... hong kong this is standard for them to do hong kong this is standard for them todoa hong kong this is standard for them to do a bilingual press conference? she spoke both cantonese and
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english. it is interesting to know that carrie lam has been very much missing from the public eye. she has not been in the public for ten days now. and it is one of the reasons why there has been such a level of anger in hong kong. people have said that they've been taking to the streets in peaceful protest, including the largest protest in hong kong's history where 25% of the population of hong kong came out in protest, and still, carrie lam and the hong kong government has ignored them. she's kept out of the public eye, and today she's coming out to face the media at 4am. do you think of this ever happening before, a press c0 nfe re nce of this ever happening before, a press conference in the middle of the night? know, for everything that has happened in hong kong today has been unprecedented. storming the parliament is completely unprecedented. i've never seen anything like the level of violence we've seen today. so having carrie lam, come out at 4am must mean she feels the need to come out and face
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the media, because she's been hiding from the media for the last ten days at some point i was alluding earlier, it was unusual compared with previous police tactics that we've seen. who would've made the decision about how this was police? would be the head of police or carrie lam? how does this work? hong kong has a separate police system, pa rt kong has a separate police system, part of the two country systems. i imagine this would've come from the very top, and it seems to be a deliberate tactic because of the level of anger against policing in those classes we saw over two weeks ago, people were very angry about the police, what they saw as police brutality. so it seems deliberate on the police today to keep back, they've retreated until later this evening. in the police to start talking, let's bring the sound up. they're still speaking in cantonese, so we they're still speaking in cantonese, so we will keep listening to this because it just in so we will keep listening to this because itjust in case you are joining us, this is right in the
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middle of the night, 4am in hong kong. but carrie lam has decided it appropriate to have a press conference now. it is not surprising to see the police there because there are so many questions about there are so many questions about the decisions they've made in the last 2a hours. the decisions they've made in the last 24 hours. yes, they've come out and called the police who stormed hong kong's parliament a mob. it is worth noting as well that if they characterize what happened today is a riot, people could get up to ten yea rs a riot, people could get up to ten years in prison. a lot of people have been saying that the young people in hong kong have been risking their futures by going into hong kong's parliament and for the way to get to such a massive extent. when did you get back, last week? did you meet anyone who had the ambition to use violence in this way to drive change in hong kong? there are pockets of what we call more radical protesters within the wider protest group who see that when
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there has been violence by the police, public opinion swells in support for these protests. but i think what we are seeing today is a bit of a turning point. because hong kong is known as the city of protest, it's the city of peaceful protests. and for people to storm the centre of hong kong and hong kong's parliament, you might start to see this deemed a mistake by some people. we are seeing some divisions within the opposition camp you are saying that support which has initially been up behind these protesters might be turned away because of the level of violence that we've seen today. and it will be interesting to see if that happens. i guess it's difficult to judge because people are unlikely to say out loud that they support violence, even if perhaps behind closed doors, they do. it's difficult to gauge. of course. let's bring in carrie adam who helps us
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with the coverage in chinese media. if you're watching, it will switch over to english and we will listen in. will it be broadcast anywhere in china? not at all, no. with mainland china, you always have a delete and the stories, and the communist party will decide its own take on these events. so they will be waiting a day, that normally happens, in order toissue day, that normally happens, in order to issue their own response. there will be an emphasis on these acts of hooliganism, of which are rioting and smashing the windows of parliament — these play into the communist party's hands because that's been the message they've been putting out that the protests are not peaceful, and they've been choosing certain elements where they show there are basically acts of vandalism in hong kong in they strongly condemn it. but then some of the more extraordinary video being widely shared, chopping trolleys and other abutments being
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used to smash the glass in the front of the building — will that be available? before you answer that, let me... still no english, now will those clips be available on social media in china? probably not, no. there may be images and hong kong papers seen as pro—beijing tomorrow that show acts of vandalism, but the idea of these people with umbrellas, the artwork that's been trending on platforms like twitter and instagram — people won't see these in mainland china at all, they'll be absolutely suppressed. but in hong kong, presumably this material could be widely shared without the state getting involved? but we are seeing that this press conference is being streamed live on twitter right now. one of the pictures that i saw tonight which really struck me was a picture of the police looking at a pillar with graffiti on it that said
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"you told me that peaceful protest does not work". and i think that was quite striking of an image, the images we've seen today, these young people feel ignored by the government and carrie lam, and what they want is for this bill to be withdrawn, and that has been ignored for weeks. the level of violence and frustration that we've seen today has reached a boiling point, and that's what we saw in those scenes today. for everyone listening in on you this press conference from cheap stomach or carrie lam at midnight. in terms of the extradition bill, it's been paused ? in terms of the extradition bill, it's been paused? so the protesters got something for their efforts? they got a major climb—down. up until quite a few years ago —— weeks ago, carrie lam was adamant she would push this bill through no
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matter what. then in a press conference, she said it was suspended. she said it's not coming back this term, so it's not coming back this term, so it's not coming back this term, so it's not coming back this year. the term ends in july next year, and she said it's very much been paused. but what people are saying, and this is what feeds into the heart of the issue here, this bill can come back. and if it comes back, it will effectively be the biggest challenge to the freedoms that hong kong enjoys under one country. and eve ryo ne enjoys under one country. and everyone i've spoken to has said they worry about how this bill could affect them personally will stop so while a lot of people will not support the violence we've seen today, there is support for the com plete today, there is support for the complete withdrawal of this bill. that will have some broader support from people in hong kong. we are told that carrie lam has condemned the extremely violent storming of parliament, we expected that, but we are looking for more detail on how
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she plans to respond, and also how she plans to respond, and also how she justifies the way this was policed. in terms of how this public, her story is being told in mainland china, the narrative around these protests have evolved in the english language chinese media? when these protests started in early july, there was no mention that it would go away. nearly a million people took to the streets, so it was a case of maybe acknowledging them in some shape or form. english language media were talking about a cts language media were talking about acts of hooliganism, but when carrie lam in the middle ofjune decided to suspend the bill, that is when it was blamed on the us. it almost came in on the us— china trade war. this isa in on the us— china trade war. this is a line that came up quite a bit, and today being a big deal, the
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handover of the anniversary, it's also the 90th anniversary of the communist party. there's a lot of emphasis in china on the strength of the communist government. and basically, the idea that hong kong isa basically, the idea that hong kong is a part of china, and that won't change, and chinese strength is shown in that way. before we start playing some of the material we have from earlier and what happened with these protests, in terms of what happens next, our protesters planning to turn up with the sun up in an hourortwo, planning to turn up with the sun up in an hour or two, are there plans for more protests? hold on, we think she's talking in english. let's listen. let me just repeat very briefly what i have said in cantonese. on one
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july, the 22nd anniversary of the establishment of the hong kong administration, we have seen two entirely different public scenes. one isa entirely different public scenes. one is a regular march on one july. regardless of the number of participants in a march, it was peaceful and generally orderly. and this fully reflects the inclusiveness of hong kong's society. in the core values we attached a piece in order. the second seeing that we have seen, which really saddens and shocks a lot of people, is the extreme use of violence and vandalism by protesters who stormed into the legislative council building over a period of time. so this is something that we should seriously condemn because nothing is more important than the rule of law and hong kong. sol
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nothing is more important than the rule of law and hong kong. so i hope the community at large will agree with us that with these violent acts that we've seen, it is right for us to condemn it and hope society will return to normal as soon as possible. can you tell us why there were no police officers inside the building? mrs lam, i have a second question for you. mrs lam, i have a second question foryou. ona mrs lam, i have a second question for you. on a positive response to the protester‘s demands? for you. on a positive response to the protester's demands? let me answer first. i totally disagree with what this gentleman has just said. we have officers inside the
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legco defending legco for nearly eight hours. during the period, we have been under siege of the protesters. they keep on using violent tactics to try to intrude into the legco. it is only until 9pm at night, there were several incidents happening that we had to doa incidents happening that we had to do a temporary retreat. first of all, there were many protesters outside the legco main entrance. and they started using violent tactics to charge the indoor of the legco. secondly, due to the local environment that we and able to use
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some of the force that we can use an open ground —— unable to use some of the force. and thirdly, we found that there were some protesters tampering with the electricity box. and we found that some of the lights have gone out. in fear of it total blackout that the protester while charging in, someone turned off the light - charging in, someone turned off the light — i'm afraid that there'll be people stepping people, or there will be a wrong move on either side, both the police in the protester. and last but not least, during the charging, they throw in some white smoke. as you know in the afternoon, there were already —— there was already a toxic powder attempt on my office this afternoon. without knowing whether this is an other toxic powder attack, we have no
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other choice but to temporarily retreat from legco. before we retreat, we have already in the afternoon at 4pm, asked the legco security to appeal to all working staff within the legco and to leave legco do to the incident. the charging by the protesters. and by 9pm, we have been told that all working staff have left. that means that we are sure there are no other civilians within the building. my office rs civilians within the building. my officers had no other choice but to temporarily retreat and do a regrouping, and try to do some redeployment to legco later on. regrouping, and try to do some redeployment to legco later onm is not true to say that the government has not responded. we
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have not responded to every demand asked because of good reasons. first of all, if the course of the social tensions that we have seen is a bill to amend the fugitive offenders ordinance, on 15june, i have announced the suspension of the bill. and subsequently we have explained and elaborated that by suspending the bill and this point of time with no timetable and no plan to resume the debate of the bill in the legislative council, the bill in the legislative council, the bill will expire or die onjuly 2020, when the current term expires. that is a very positive response, so the demands that we have heard. as for the other demands, let me come back to this very important principle of the rule of law — to
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demand the government to release without any investigation and checking with the law about whether offe nces checking with the law about whether offences have been made, that we should release everybody or take any follow—up action against some of the violent acts that we have seen or even grant them amnesty to all those involved in these protests. all these responses will not be in accordance with the rule of law. so the rule of law is exactly what i have been talking about tonight, so i hope we all agree that this is something of paramount importance to hong kong, and will continue to guide the government's reactions and responses to social issues into demands and aspirations of our people.
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speaking cantonese. as you can hear, the press conference with carrie lam has switched back over to cantonese. we will continue to listen to what's being said. as for when they go back to english, we will bring it to you live. first of all, let's go through a number of important statements we've heard from kerry lam, the chief executive of hong kong, as well as from the police chief. it's also worth pausing for a moment to think that we've just heard the chief of police in hong kong talk about reclaiming the providentially building. laura, you have to listen
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to that a couple times to realise he sang it out loud, they lost control? he also gave an indication of why they did not move in until later. he said that they were not sure that there were civilians who were with there were civilians who were with the protesters, so they wanted to make sure before they cleared the building. but he also called it a siege, and the most important thing is that these protesters are rioters. and the characterisation of this is a right means people could be prosecuted for up to ten years in prison. and kerry lam just emphasised the idea that everyone getting amnesty is not in aligned with the rule of law and hong kong, and dismiss this idea dash to. people have been released to make her arrested and released, and to not characterize the protest on wednesday as of right, she dug into night. she already has said that
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this bill has been suspended, it won't come back this year, but she is refusing to use that word which is refusing to use that word which is what protesters want, which is "withdrawn" which would be a major step down. and what she is saying is it's not coming back this year, but that doesn't mean it won't come back and 1—3 years, and that's what people are worried about. you've just got back after two weeks of reporting and hong kong. carrie a lwa ys reporting and hong kong. carrie always helps us with the hong kong media, what did you make of this press conference? a lot of the language she uses is in line with what the communist party would show. she basically wasn't making any concessions for protesters whatsoever. the emphasis more than anything was on the condemnation of people using violent methods to attack the building and such like this. even if back on the 15th, that behaviour might be overlooked after
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the extradition bill pulled through ‘ one the extradition bill pulled through — one thing i was also conscious of it is the fact that the press co nfe re nce it is the fact that the press conference was given and not surrounded by graffiti showing the effects, meaning the communist media in mainland china can use this as a statement about how she will not tolerate violent attacks within hong kong and how this is looked down upon. this will be used to tie into the dialogue within mainland china thatis the dialogue within mainland china that is basically cool hooliganism, not protest. one of the accusations the protesters had is that the government doesn't listen to the protesters. and that is what you are very much seeing, carrie lam talking to beijing, and not listening — again, which is the accusation for the protesters, saying she's not listening to them. and that's what
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you are seeing listening to them. and that's what you are seeing now. listening to them. and that's what you are seeing now. we will be with you are seeing now. we will be with you for the next 30 minutes as we continue to bring you ongoing coverage of the situation in hong kong. lots of fine weather for us in the week ahead. many of us will see skies like these at times, however the cloud looking like it will thicken up, that's highly unlikely because of the pressure holding things steady. it did so last week and we had that very hard pressure. this week we are back to average temperatures. what's the difference? last week the high was of the continent, we are on the west of it, fielding whether our way from northern africa. our air is coming in from the atlantic, hence that return to more average temperatures. into the small hours of tuesday, actually turning quite fresh in some
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spots. showers coming from northern scotland, loose between 9—i2dc, but perhaps giving as low as 5—6dc in some rural parts of wales. tuesday sta rts some rural parts of wales. tuesday starts dry with plenty of sunshine in the main, scotland could see a few more of those on and off throughout the day. elsewhere, sunny spells with a lighter breeze that dead we've had on monday. temperatures will peak in the mid to high teens across scotland, up to 21-22dc high teens across scotland, up to 21—22dc further south. a great—looking forecast for the first weeks play at wimbledon, certainly on tuesday, perhaps some patchy cloud developing is the day goes on, but a dry story with temperatures of 20-21dc. but a dry story with temperatures of 20—2idc. wednesday high pressure still with us, a bit of a case of spot the difference with dry weather and patchy cloud developing, the cloud a little more solid through scotla nd cloud a little more solid through scotland in the breeze a bit lighter. temperatures to the south taking upa lighter. temperatures to the south taking up a degree or so up to 23 celsius in london. it's for the
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latter pa rt celsius in london. it's for the latter part of the week that the forecast changes for the northern half of the uk, the high hangs in on the south. thursday we pull in some rain to scotland. this front seeks out through and friday, switching into a more northerly breeze. high—pressure meaning there will be fine weather for the latter part of the week, but it will feel cooler as that northerly breeze returns. across england and wales, we will see very little in the way of rainfall, more sunshine come, cool oi’ rainfall, more sunshine come, cool or feeling rainfall, more sunshine come, cool orfeeling on rainfall, more sunshine come, cool or feeling on friday.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. hong kong is our focus after parliament is stormed by protestors. the territory's chief executive carrie lam hasjust spoken, and she's not given any ground. this is something that we should seriously condemn. because nothing is more important than the rule of law in hong kong. today is the 22nd anniversary of britain handing hong kong back to china. but what started with peaceful protest — turned violent. out on the streets, the security forces fired tear gas and baton charged some of the tens of thousands of protestors. we'll hear more from
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what carrie lam has had to say — and bring you reporting and analysis from here in the newsroom and from hong kong. i will also show you the reporting of nick from through the day. the chief executive of hong kong, carrie lam, hasjust been speaking. here she is. nothing is more important than the rule of law in hong kong. so i hope the community at large will agree with us that with these violent acts that we have seen, it is right for us that we have seen, it is right for us to condemn it and hope society will return to normal as soon as
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possible. kris cheng is from hong kong free press. with me is kerry allen — the bbc‘s china media analyst — and laura westbrook, a bbc reporter who hasjust returned from hong kong. the relationship between beijing's aunt hong kong is always a difficult one to pin down kerry? it is. beijing's make the point again and again that hong kong is an area that belongs to china and no more so than the anniversary of handover today, the anniversary of handover today, the idea that basically, well also it is also the communist party's name don't like anniversary as well.
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—— communist party's anniversary. there is very like little mention because mainland china sees hong kong as basically a small region so its politics are regional politics and they will never be given a lot of attention. about a skill as they get really so there is not a lot of coverage if at all. interesting to hear you say that because a lot of the walls of the legislative council it says that hong kong is not china. and so the view in hong kong is that we are one of the one countries principles we want to keep the freedoms we have in hong kong that is separate to the mainland and they wa nt is separate to the mainland and they want to do everything we can to defend those freedoms for as long as possible. what do you make of what we heard from carrie lam and the police chief? to things, first is that she is very dug in. she has not used that crucial word withdraw
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which is what all the protesters, it is what the protesters want, this bill with don. she said it is not to come back this year. they say that doesn't mean it can't come back later. she has refused to give into a key demand. the key thing is, and i think this council indication is she was emphasising the rule of law. hong kong is a lawful society, hong kong has rule of law. and i think that gives us an indication as to what could happen, because if this process is characterised a riot and it has, it could carry up to ten years in prison. a lot of these protesters they might be facing serious jail time protesters they might be facing seriousjail time and protesters they might be facing serious jail time and when we protesters they might be facing seriousjail time and when we think about how young we are, this is the future of many of their futures, could be injeopardy. thank you future of many of their futures, could be in jeopardy. thank you very much for the moment. if you have got questions about what is happening in hong kong, send them our way, you can see the e—mail and hashtag on
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screen and law and kerry will stay with us later. now the bbc nick beake has with us later. now the bbc nick bea ke has been with us later. now the bbc nick beake has been across the story for the last 24. in the past hour nick he give me this update. ssource sot we have been in the main chamber and seen we have been in the main chamber and seen the destruction and debris that was left behind. police have been asking people to come to this point and you can see some of the graffiti behind us. the smashed glass as far as the eye can see and this gives you an indication of how these protesters were able to make their way indoors and were able to occupy this building. in an incredible fashion. of course, they were able to do that because the police did not stop them. you can see some officers now, they have taken off the right gear and no more shields, no more battles, no more spray. some people may say too little too late, why did they not better protect this building, buti why did they not better protect this building, but i think it might have been a decision that they stood back
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and can now say, look at what the protesters have done. look what they have done to the parliament, what they have done to the assembly of they have done to the assembly of the people of hong kong. and behind you i can see some graffiti saying hong kong is not china. i guess that cuts to the heart of the motivation of these protesters? absolutely right, this was initially a deep—rooted anger about a specific law which might see people sent to mainland china to face trial. but talking to people today, there is a real anti—beijing sentiment. many other people are teenagers in their early 20s, they don't want a future which is dictated to by beijing. they don't want the lives that they lead in the future to be the same as on mainland china. and so that has been powering this protest, powering this movement and i think it has become a movement. pulled through social media, fascinating to see how people are not reacted to someone with loudspeakers but to a message to get on the phone, in particular
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the telegram social media app is people have been sent instructions. hundreds of people look at the phone, see where they are instructed to go and just leave like that. of course it is really difficult for the police who are here now to try and cope with that. predictably people will go and it will be interesting also to see how they react in the coming days. as a trying track down the people who burst through the barricade here today and caused such embarrassment for the authorities here in hong kong. and of course embarrassment for beijing to. can you give as idea of the geography of how far these protesters had to go from the street to actually get into the chamber, into the assembly? let's try and give you that indication. just over there, beyond some of the officers, you can see the lights of a few vehicles. so it wasn't particularly far, but the tactic that they picked up far, but the tactic that they picked up from about midday was to try and
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broach lots of different entrances, try and get through a number of different places. eventually they did that, but they waited. they bided their time and you saw a huge number of people channelled themselves through this particular entrance so the crowds build up and they had a real body of numbers who we re they had a real body of numbers who were then able en masse to push through this particular spot. and even though this is the main entrance to the assembly, which you would have thought would have been really well protected, they were able to smash through and they made their way up the stairs, up the escalators which have been turned off, and went into that chamber we saw earlier when it is now like a bomb site. food all over the place, water, umbrellas, all the detritus, and debris that the protesters brought with them. this is the legacy of an extraordinary day here in hong kong. let's take you through how we went from peaceful protests to graffiti on the walls of parliament.
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for the past month, there have protests against a bill that would allow people in hong kong to be extradited to mainland china. they have been huge, and largely peaceful. today's rallies started off peacefully. organisers say half a million turned out. this drone footage gives you a better sense of the scale of it. protesters blocked main roads — and that led to these clashes. police used pepper spray and batons. and some officers were injured after protesters threw an unknown liquid at them. after that protesters broke away and moved to the legco — the parliament. they used a shopping trolley to smash through reinforced glass. there was no police resistance. and some got inside.
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the legislative council was put on red alert and evacuated — that's never happened before. nick beake was there. you can see once again this hardcore of demonstrators are going once again at the window. there is a project earlier, a power that they wa nt to project earlier, a power that they want to smash the glass and if you ta ke want to smash the glass and if you take a quick look, they have made quite a bit of damage. they are coming time and again. so far, the riot police have not moved in. you can see someone riot police have not moved in. you can see someone taking matters into his own hands. this is something which will be seen around the world. deeply embarrassing for the hong kong authorities, embarrassing the 22nd anniversary of the british rule to china and yet this is
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happening on their doorstep. a city with the anger is palpable. authorities thought it would go away. it hasn't. once again, people have come onto the streets. in terms of the wider public sympathy, what will the older generation think? these are mainly students here today. we asked why are they here? they said we are faithful fearful forfeiture. i think we may back now because once again they are going to because once again they are going to be trying to make their way through the store. protesters put out a statement attacking hong kong's chief executive carrie lam who supported the extradition bill. and this is one local legislator
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with a similar message. it is very dangerous here. both are protesters and for the security to guard and police. so i urge carrie lam to come out to speak to the people. to have a communication to stop this chaotic situation now this is very urgent. i thought the police we re is very urgent. i thought the police were all inside the building trying to defend. they are not coming out, i don't know why. they are not here to control the situation. while those initial efforts to get inside the parliament were going on — very nearby ceremonies marking the handover from british to chinese rule were happening at hong kong's convention centre. inside, carrie lam was in attendance. and she had this message for the demonstrators.
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what has happened in recent months has led to controversy and disputes between the country and the government. this has made me realise that i come as a politician, have to need to grasp public sentiments accurately. where we had good intentions, we still need to be open and accommodating. well the government has to ensure efficiency, it still needs to listen patiently. later in the day — and there was a fresh storming of the parliament building. this time with many more people involved. here's how it happened. this was the moment protesters smashed their way into the legco. iron poles and guard rails from nearby building sites were used to break in. they vandalised the building inside. you can see the graffiti on the walls. they sprayed black paint across the hong kong emblem on the rear wall. one protester raised a former british colonial flag, bearing the union jack.
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police then issued this ultimatum. this is the police response that many were waiting for and it hadn't arrived. let's see if we can press a little bit further on because this is the place where thousands of protesters today to seize. they put up protesters today to seize. they put up barricades, you can see the graffiti. on the walls. they were here trying to break into different entrances, let see we can take you
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just inside. let's go through here, danny. this is one of the government buildings, hack this would be a highly secure area. you can see it has been completely trashed. for instance, they are. the whole place has been ripped apart. let's go to one of the other entrances. this is where the politicians, the people who make the decisions in this city, would be coming to work every day. and if wejust would be coming to work every day. and if we just take you inside. this is where some of the protesters went through today. there is an eerie silence, the smell in the air of the tear gas at was fired. as you can see, these are other members of the media probably having the same idea of us, trying to get through. listening to the police. you imagine at some point they will be making their way inside here. more graffiti. on the wall. we are very much at the bottom of the building here. i would assume the fact we got so here. i would assume the fact we got so many officers here, there remains
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protesters nearby. it is unclear at this point how many people remain in the chamber. clearly the police are lining up. you can see, this is their training coming into operation now. they are making columns, this is normally from experience of other riots, a pro used to action. so you haven't got the elite squad all dressed in black but you have officers who would normally be walking the streets of hong kong. dealing with crime. today, it looks as if they are about to go in this way. we'll see if they can try and get a sense of where the operation will take us. i wonder at this point whether they will be bringing out protesters through this exit. they're protesters through this exit. they‘ re clearly protesters through this exit. they're clearly trying to keep some sort of entrance open. and now, this extremely fast moving, the police are being moved to one side, i think we wa nt are being moved to one side, i think we want is to witness and see what
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happens but a lot of people were amazed that this hadn't happened earlier today. fernando chung is a legislator who was inside. he called it a trap laid by the authorities. police could have dispersed these demonstrators much earlier when they we re demonstrators much earlier when they were trying to storm the building. on the contrary they did nothing except guarding from within. now the entire building is vacant. no security guards, no police, they purposefully allowed the demonstrators to break in to this building. to vandalise it. and i think this is a trap in that they wa nt think this is a trap in that they want this type of scene to be seen by the public. by doing so, they would earn back some of the public
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support which has been overwhelmingly siding towards the demonstrators. in the last half hour there has been press conference by carrie lam and the police commissioner. he said i disagree this was a trap. we had officers in legco for nearly half. we were in flare of a blackout. also went on to say they were in fear of being attacked. lots of people have been suggesting this was a deliberate tactic, a trap being set for the protesters. the police have pushed back against that idea. that was the scene inside the building when word got out that police were arriving. you can see the protesters stream out together. you can see some of the protesters start to funnel out this way. when they had gone, all of them cleared out, none of them arrested, nick then got inside. the scenes speak
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for themselves. there is an eerie silence now you can see the complete mess. barriers which were used to ultimately get through the glass. also umbrellas were used to shield protesters from the pepper spray that the police had deployed but also used it as a way of hiding their identities. they were worried about the repercussions of coming on here. this is extraordinary, to think this is normally the bustling beating heart of democratic process here in hong kong. but it is com pletely here in hong kong. but it is completely defaced. wires falling from walls, graffiti, all across the place. the protesters made their way m, place. the protesters made their way in, they occupied here and those are the steps that they went up. to head to the chamber where what followed, people could not believe. they sprayed graffiti on the walls, the also defaced some of the portraits of the politicians who ruled this
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place. for so long. and if we go over here, you can see more of the barricades. this explain is how they we re barricades. this explain is how they were able to get in. we saw these human conveyor belts, this chain of people, moving these barriers forward. and they were using these tapes, to take them together and it made a really effective battering ram. crucially, the police did not stop them. i think in the coming hours and days people will say why did the police get it get to this? they regret if size a few weeks ago for not doing enough —— they were criticised a few weeks ago for not being more peaceful and effective and today the pendulum has swung. we have stood back and frankly we have seen have stood back and frankly we have seen protesters run amok on the streets of hong kong. some members of hong kong's legislative council — who aren't in the government — have released this statement about the protesters. their ruthless and destructive behaviour amount
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to a complete disregard of the law and has seriously undermined hong kong's fine tradition of the rule of law." let's hear one last report from nick, again talking through the next steps of this story. we were asked to leave the building about half—an—hour ago and the police have been moving through, trying to assess the extent of the damage here. it is pretty obvious in broad terms the to see the destruction but they are looking at individual rooms and looking at what has been done. we can try and wander a bit further on, i think we might well get stopped, is it possible to go further in? ok, i think that is pretty clear indication. we can't go any further but you can see a few officers wading through the broken glass there. trying to pick up some of the debris. it will take months, i'm sorry, it will take a long time to try and clear this away. it could be months or even years when you talk about the impact this may have. on
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society here in hong kong. i very strongly this worded statement that was read out there by the powers that be, and we expect the chief executive carrie lam, someone who has faced so much criticism over the past month or so, she is expected to give a press conference in about 40 minutes or so. 4am here. what she will say here we do not know, there has been huge call for her to resign but she could come out with this very strong message that the scenes that played out today on the streets of hong kong were simply unacceptable. so it will be interesting to see what is set at that press conference. nick did you manage to have many conversations with the protesters and asked them whether they feel they have the support of the many thousands of people who protested peacefully?” did and it was interesting, it was a bizarre conversation. one man was trying to smash as we enter this building, he was holding a poll,
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surrounded by about 20 people, and i said look surely you are losing wider support this sort of activity? he said no, it has worked before because when the protests turned violent back in june because when the protests turned violent back injune and the carrie lam came out and made a concession. she said that this bill would be suspended. so lots of people we spoke to today said they felt very emboldened because violence had worked. whether or not that is the case, that will certainly be a sentiment. so in terms of how they protest next, that is hard to tell. will it be more of the same? you can't imagine that the police would allow that to happen. or will it be sort of phantom movements. where people pop up, occupied buildings as they have done over the past few weeks and will be try and continue what has been a very fluid protest movement? kerry were just commenting on the graffiti there? you could see the same words repeated, dog. a dog official, dog government members
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basically, a lot of anger in hong kong about this law still being suspended. and the question as to what will happen next. basically it is going to be a big clean—up operation to get rid of this graffiti now. so everyone is watching this space! any thoughts on you to finish? on what carrie lam missing, one of the biggest criticisms of her is her tone in press conferences. the fact she is out of touch with people. listening to that press conference, she very much was digging in, not giving an inch. it will be interesting to see how people in hong kong react to that. we are indebted to help. getting us this programme. of course the story is not going anywhere and you will get ongoing coverage of it via world news if you're outside the uk and also at bbc news channel s you're watching in the uk. there is also back and information on the bbc
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news app and the website. but that's all, we will see you tomorrow at the same time. last week, our weather was top of high building heat and humidity. this week, more talk of high pressure. but the high has moved. last week it was up across the continent pulling one air in from northern africa, this week it sat across the atlantic and the flow goes around the top of the high, we are still bringing in relatively warm air, but the heat has locked down in the core of europe. our temperatures will be closer to average values in the days ahead. but a north—west clip on the wings as well to the far north. through the early part of the week. the high will be staying with us through the week ahead, perhaps just some changes to the north by thursday and friday but a lot of dry weather to
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come and some sunshine. we reflect that in choosing's forecast. some scattered showers, for scotland on tuesday. patrick out elsewhere but a lot of dry weather. temperatures around we to see them at this time of year. 16 or 17 in aberdeen, 22 to the south—east for london. for tuesday into wednesday a case of spot the difference. the height is still with us, if anything perhaps the bars opening further so the winds will be somewhat later. certainly a lot of fine weather to come on wednesday, if anything, perhaps more extensive sunshine, thicker cloud to fight north—west. wednesday could see the temperatures in the south creeping up a little. perhaps edging down on the far north with a bit more cloud. remember i said there were some changes to come for thursday and friday. that is this area of low pressure trying to inject its fronts into the north other area of high pressure. thursday looks like it will introduce some quite heavy and
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persistent rain into the north of scotla nd persistent rain into the north of scotland through the day. it will gradually work its way south as the hours go by. further south, with the high and place we could get up to 26 degrees in the south—east perhaps the most widespread of our sunshine to come for england and wales. thursday into friday, the front dips its way south and pulls away eastward at the same time leaving scattered showers but does switches into a more northerly air stream. it will feel cooler and fresher on friday. a few showers to the south on the tail end of the front, some patchy cloud around but eventually on friday, most of us seeing a dry day with some sunshine just 13 degrees though in aberdeen. and then for the weekend ahead, again it is all about the area of high pressure. definitely cooler than the weekend just gone. especially through the first—half of the weekend. as it looks like the high will be northerly airstream. pushing across from the west on sunday so the wind direction becomes more north—westerly and temperatures
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meanwhile rise accordingly. cloudy for some naughty coasts, certainly during saturday, brighter skies —— north sea coast. looking at the capitals, not a bad week end to come. into next week, it is all about the high. the uncertainty as well at say to the west keeping us in the cool northerly airstream or will it build in, kill off the rain and bring us largely dry weather and see things heating up? at the moment, the favoured regime is for us moment, the favoured regime is for us to move into a more unsettled scenario with some showers feeling its way south across the uk. and perhaps a cooler north airstream. as ever, we will keep you updated.
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this programme contains scenes of repetitive flashing images. hong kong's parliament is ransacked after it's stormed by hundreds of protesters. police have finally regained control, after activists broke away from a demonstration marking the 22nd anniversary of hong kong's transfer of sovereignty from britain to china. they smashed their way into parliament and remained there for almost eight hours spraying graffiti. defacing the emblem of hong kong in the central chamber and raising the old british colonial flag. hong kong's leader said police had exercised restraint. this is something that we should seriously condemn, because nothing is more important than the rule of law in hong kong. it comes after weeks of unrest over a controversial extradition law. also tonight. a public rebuke from the chancellor for the men vying to be

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