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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 1, 2019 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 11:00: police regain control after hong kong's parliament is ransacked and stormed by hundreds of protestors. they smashed their way into parliament and remained there for almost eight hours, spraying graffiti. hong kong's leader said police had exercised restraint. this is something that we should seriously condemn because nothing is more important than the rule of law in hong kong. iran breaches the limit on its stockpile of low—enriched uranium, set under a 2015 nuclear deal with world powers. a public rebuke from the chancellor for the men vying to be prime minister, as he warns them to be honest about their tax and spending pledges.
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a suspected stowaway, believed to have fallen from the landing gear of a flight into heathrow, is found dead in a london garden. cheering and applause. and a sensational debut for a 15—year—old schoolgirl as she knocks venus williams, five—time wimbledon champion, out on day one. and at 11:30 we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers, kate andrews, associate director at the institute of economic affairs, and james rampton, features writer for the independent. good evening. the leader of hong kong, carrie lam, has condemned what she called the extremely violent storming
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of the territory's parliament today. hundreds of protestors smashed their way in and stayed there for almost eight hours, ra nsacking the building and spraying graffiti. the day started peacefully with a large march to mark the 22nd anniversary of the handover of power from the uk to china. but the violence began after activists broke away from the main demonstration and headed to parliament. it comes after weeks of unrest over a proposed law that would make it easier to extradite people to china to stand trial. our first report this evening is from rupert wingfield hayes, and does contain some flashing images. exactly 22 years after china took control here, use of hong kong invented the fury smashing their way
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into the parliament. —— the youth. they have just broken through the window and managed to smash through this tough and glass and they are 110w this tough and glass and they are now trying to get inside the building. you can see there are large numbers of riot police. so far they have held back. the destruction continued but the police stood by, it looks very much like they had been ordered not to intervene. meanwhile, across town, hundreds of thousands of other people from hong kong were in another march, in a second huge anti—government protests. this one was completely peaceful. but even here, there was sympathy for those besieging parliament. i understand what they are doing and i thank them to take the risk to go to jail and tried to stop the government from handing
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over all the lives of hong kong people to cpp. outside parliament, the flashing continued. the police 110w the flashing continued. the police now nowhere to be seen. now they are trying to smash their way through with steel shutters. the crowd every so with steel shutters. the crowd every so often start shouting, keep going, keep going. what is the point of this? we know peaceful protest is not useful at this moment. so you can say it is drawing attention or make some nice to let people know what happens here and let more people know the government is not listening to our peaceful protests. finally, the still shutters gave way and the protesters poured in. inside, the trashing continued. in the chamber they raised the old
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british colonial flag. what must the chinese communist government in beijing be thinking as they watch these images. how long till there are mainland chinese troops on the streets of hong kong? 0utside, are mainland chinese troops on the streets of hong kong? outside, the police had now finally massed their forces and, at midnight, they struck with a huge barrage of teargas. the police suddenly losing their earlier timidity. iam police suddenly losing their earlier timidity. i am now inside that legislative chamber and as you can see the places been cleared of protesters. the police in control. you can still taste and smell teargas into the air. as we come into the building, we have seen an enormous amount of damage. you can see the graffiti on the wall behind me. already, tonight, many in the opposition started to ask questions about the wisdom of these young protesters storming into this building, whether it was a victory
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of any sort or it has handed a victory to the government. in the last hour, hong kong chief executive carrie lam has held an emergency press co nfe re nce . carrie lam has held an emergency press conference. nothing is more important than the rule of law in hong kong so i hope the community at large will agree with us that, with these violent acts that we have seen, it is right for us to condemn it and hope society will return to normal. this graffiti because the government dogs, and other one says you forced us to do this. hong kong is now more polarised since at any time since the handover. many worry this is gone too far but others asking what has driven hong kong youth to such violence. so it's 22 years ago today hong kong was handed over from the uk to china. since 1997 the territory has been governed under the principle of
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"one country, two systems". so what do these protests mean for that system ? 0ur diplomatic correspondent, james landale reports. july 1997, the moment britain handed hong kong over to china. the last governor presiding over one final act of empire. i handover whose legacy is still being fought over on the streets of hong kong tonight stop it was back in 1984 that britain and china agreed a joint declaration that in future hong kong should retain some autonomy and freedom so, after the handover, hong kong became a special region of china into the one country to system policy. that meant that until 2047, hong kong should keep its free
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markets and independentjudges dash at least in theory. frankly, the chinese have been breaking they word, they claim it does not operate until 1997. the british government should make clear the eu that it does apply for 50 years after 1997 and we're going to be absolutely determined to make sure that china keeps inside the bargain. the protesters who packed the streets in recent weeks fear hong kong's independence is being threatened by a d raft independence is being threatened by a draft law making it easierfor people to be extradited to china and they are looking to britain for support. the joint declaration doesn't stand and i would urge the chinese government to make sure that it abides by the terms of that declaration. but as hong kong was make blanket government mark the anniversary of the handover, it was extremely dissatisfied with britain.
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a spokesman said britain has no right to interfere with what was an internal affair for china. this protest pose a challenge for the government. ministers want to support democracy but they also want to keep good relations with china, whose investments they may need after brexit. violence on the streets of hong kong makes both object is harder. downing street says it's "extremely concerning" that iran has breached the limit on its stockpile of low—enriched uranium set under the 2015 nuclear deal that was signed with major world powers. the international atomic energy agency said its inspectors had verified that the 300kg cap had been exceeded. iran stepped up production of enriched uranium in response to sanctions imposed by the us, in the last hour or so, president trump says iran
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is "playing with fire". henry rome is an iran analyst at eurasia group, a political risk consultancy firm. he joins us from washington. donald trump says that iran is playing with fire, is he right? well, iran's steps today was significant for what they mean although the actual nuclear steps we re although the actual nuclear steps were fairly minor. so they breached the special of 300 kilograms by only a handful of kilograms, single digits, but what it means more broadly is that iran is renouncing its commitments under the nuclear agreement which does start a slippery slope. iran is very good at handling these kind of nuclear escalations and been very careful about it but i think we are starting about it but i think we are starting a new time. here with regards to the nuclear programme. does all of this really m ea n nuclear programme. does all of this really mean that the deal is com pletely really mean that the deal is completely dead ? really mean that the deal is completely dead? no, not yet. i
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think it is significant that iran has said it will remain by all the other components of the deal as it violates one by one, let's say. i think the deal is taking place in theory for quite a while, probably, larger because europe is not interested in snapping back sanctions and formally killing it. so irani sanctions and formally killing it. so iran i will violate step by step and test the reactions of international powers. there are these real divisions between europe and the united states over this issue? absolutely. the european countries have been firmly in support of the nuclear agreement and are as upset with washington as they are as upset with washington as they are with tyrone today given that they/ iran. iran's main argument today was that europe needed to grow a backbone, essentially, and support its economy. how much support do you
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think around the united states does donald trump have for his very hard line on iran? well, i think quite a bit, given iran's history in the united states and i think donald trump has tapped into something in terms of opposing iran's regional activity although there is a countervailing force here and that is at this interest among the us for another war in the middle east and i think the president has himself in a fairly tight bind. if this turns into a ball, it certainly becomes a risk. in terms of the irradiance regime, how deeply do you think these sanctions are biting because obviously we know they are really hitting the economy into iran hard and if that testable anger on the streets in the run, more
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disaffection with the authorities, how dangerous that before the people in power in iran? i think the sanctions are biting. uranian oil experts have gone down to below 500,000. that is the most important expert in foreign exchange. the sanctions have been very significant. in terms of a threat to the regime i do not see that. most of the anger coming out of the uranian population has been towards the us and i think many iranians look to what is happening in libya, yemen and syria and realised that, if they were to rise up against the run government, there is a possibility that they will end up similarto possibility that they will end up similar to their neighbours. while the sanctions will cut deep, it is not necessarily one step away from some kind of challenge to the
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regime. good to talk to you. the chancellor, philip hammond, has rebuked the two men vying to become the next prime minister and warned them both to stop and think about making expensive campaign promises. borisjohnson and jeremy hunt have both vowed to cut taxes and increase spending. but philip hammond has told the bbc that the candidates need to be honest about spending promises and not squander the conservative's reputation for managing the economy. here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. what are they willing to say? good morning. what would they be willing to spend? this contest is getting hypothetically, at least, very expensive. and the man in charge for money is getting worried about the
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government's ambition. this government's ambition. this government has built up a reputation for fiscal responsibility and the british people are working readily ha rd over british people are working readily hard over the last decade now to rebuild our public finances and i think it's very important that we don't throw that away. we have to live within our means and people have to be honest about the consequences of either spending more money, or of cutting taxes. are they being honest? ithink money, or of cutting taxes. are they being honest? i think they need to being honest? i think they need to be very careful about setting out these ambitions. will they listen? jeremy hunt wants to spend more on defence, cutting taxes, caring for the other d —— elderly, and the billions to protect from living without a deal, if we had to. we need a comprehensive nodal plan because brexit is about more than slogans, more than believe, more than positive thinking. we can't leave the european union on a wing and a prayer, you need a plan. but what if that plan cost billions? are
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you willing to jump the tories deposit reputation —— tories reputation regarding money?” haven't been able to guarantee anything until we were able to negotiate that extra money because we took those painful decisions and put the economy back on its feet and so we put the economy back on its feet and so we will never throw that for school responsibility away. having spent years telling the public money doesn't grow on trees or pot plants, the two tories, borisjohnson as well as jeremy hunt, are the two tories, borisjohnson as well asjeremy hunt, are making big vows to spend. the chancellor says we will need more borrowing, more tax elsewhere. we have a very carefully costed prog ra m me tax elsewhere. we have a very carefully costed programme and the key thing we want to be investing in
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is education, levelling up spending on education around the country, thatis on education around the country, that is something that is at very widely supported. for their rivals and critics, these spending plans will stoke opposition. conservatives who reach for the cheque book, only when they want to win. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. the headlines on bbc news: police in hong kong regain control of the territory's parliament after it had been ransacked and occupied for several hours by protestors. international inspectors confirmed that iran has broken the terms of the 2015 nuclear deal. its stockpile of enriched uranium has exceeded the agreed limit. a public rebuke from the chancellor for the men trying to be prime minister as he warns them to be honest about their tax
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and spending pledges. several high—profile figures including sir cliff richard, have launched a parliamentary petition, calling for a change in the law, to protect the anonymity of suspected sex offenders, before they're charged. the singer says he could have avoided some of the damage and distress his reputation has suffered if he hadn't been named when he was falsely accused in 2014. our legal correspondent clive coleman gave us some historical context to this law. this is not a new issue for the criminal justice system. this is not a new issue for the criminaljustice system. we had this problem for rape suspect between 1976, 1988. problem for rape suspect between 1976,1988. sir problem for rape suspect between 1976, 1988. sir cliff problem for rape suspect between 1976,1988. sir cliff richard, problem for rape suspect between 1976, 1988. sir cliff richard, you will remember he was the subject of a raid in 2014 of his works your home, the bbc were tipped off about that raid, they feel that using a helicopter and they named him ——
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home. he was never charged, he wasn't even arrested, but he was named and following that, eventually of course nothing came of that and no further action was taken against sir cliff, he had been falsely accused. he then sued the bbc for his previously and he wondered. the court found there had been a serious breach of his privacy. 0ff court found there had been a serious breach of his privacy. off the back of that, a campaign has grown, this petition which has been launched today by a group called fair, what they are seeking is anonymity for not just rape they are seeking is anonymity for notjust rape suspects but suspects in old sexual offence cases unless they are charged —— all. sir cliff spoke about his dreadful experience and that his life was in tatters, his reputation was in tatters and he became physically yields a result of all of this. paul gamba jeannie, the
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dj and radio presenter was also there, he's strongly supporting this, he himself was accused of historical sexual abuse and placed on police bailfor a year before historical sexual abuse and placed on police bail for a year before the case against him was dropped —— paul gambicini. i asked case against him was dropped —— paul gambicini. iasked him case against him was dropped —— paul gambicini. i asked him about the effect this has on suspects. everyone you know becomes aware of it instantly. i was still being interviewed in the police station, every relative in the world that i have was contacted by a member of the media. my brother in new york, my cousins in connecticut, my brother in switzerland, my in—laws ina brother in switzerland, my in—laws in a norfolk village... they all we re in a norfolk village... they all were visited or e—mailed while i was still in the police station, now thatis still in the police station, now that is what i call a revelation of identity. it's an unfair burden is a place on them and indeed the people of my building because they had to put up with a press court for a week
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and couldn't leave. a suspected stowaway who's believed to have fallen from the landing gear of a flight into heathrow airport has been found dead in a london garden. the body — thought to be that of a man — was discovered in clapham yesterday afternoon. the plane was travelling from nairobi in kenya. kim kardashian west is to change the brand name for her latest fashion line following accusations of cultural appropriation. somejapanese people on social media complained that the trademarked brand, kimono intimates disrespected traditional clothing. after initially defending the brand, mrs kardashian west now says she'll be announcing a new name in due course. a third of councils in england fear they could run out of money for key services such as adult social care, protecting children, and preventing homelessness
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within the next three years. that's according to a survey by the local government association, which wants central government to help councils cope with a rise in demand for such services. from hampshire, our political correspondent alex forsyth reports. they are famous for their haunting, magical songs which can be heard from over 20 miles away. it's not a lwa ys from over 20 miles away. it's not always obvious, but some children need a little extra support. rosie, 0llie and riley are all deaf. they get help from the specialist unit within their school in new hampshire. all three seeds invaluable. if we are stuck, you can just ask them and then they will help us so you can understand because it's a bit harder for deaf children like us to understand. it's noisy in the classroom so, like, going there we can hear what the teacher is saying. i didn't really get anything, but now me, 0llie and
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riley have so much so much support, it's really helped. these support services were deaf and visually impaired children are changing and there is some concern. the programme is really good. is it? it's crucial and it needs to continue. hampshire cou nty and it needs to continue. hampshire county council says the changes it is making to the services some children get is about using its budget in the most cost—effective way. making your supporters tailored and targeted, so those who needed get it, but there is no doubt across the country council budgets are under enormous pressure “— the country council budgets are under enormous pressure —— need it. with vital services squeeze, it's kind one and three councils was in struggle to make the sums add up. some councils, but in the next two yea rs, some councils, but in the next two years, you are going to start seeing reductions in this stuff, adult
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social care, children's services, there are outcomes in peoples lives that will be worse because that money is missing. have a good day. families like cvs, it is a worry. at 14 she is keen to be independent despite being severely visually impaired —— phoebe's, the support teams help her stay in school and use vital skills like using a cane. iam in use vital skills like using a cane. i am in the middle of my gcses, so that would not be good to have the support during that and also for the children who are younger than me, who haven't actually started school yet, however they going to manage in the future? the government says it's up the future? the government says it's up to councils to manage their resources and it's given them access to more funds this year than last, including extra for the most vulnerable. but it hasn't stopped many from worrying about the services they depend on. alex forsyth, bbc news, hampshire. the mexican city of guadalajara has been hit by a severe hail storm, which dumped more than a metre of ice in the subtropical region.
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cars had to be abandoned half—buried, with their drivers trapped inside, and around 500 homes have been damaged. troops have now been deployed to help residents, as sangita myska reports. breaking through eyes parked to macro metres deep, industrial diggers leave the operation —— ice. every hailstorm has left parts of the city, one of mexico's most populous, paralysed. from the sky, a white sheet appears to have settled across the landscape, encasing hundreds of cars. there are drivers use garden spades to prise themselves out. meanwhile, families bring children to clamber over the temporary terrain that has caused curiosity and frustration in equal measure. the city had until now, been expecting temperatures of 30 celsius, so what caused the
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hailstorm? hale in mexico is not unusual, hail and hot parts of the world is not unusual, in fact it's one of the ingredients you need to develop huge cumulonimbus clouds —— heat is one of the ingredients for, but obviously this much alienation or space of time is unusual. —— this much hail. it could be days before the city of 5 million people is entirely back on the move, in the meantime, authorities say it is a miracle that nobody has been injured. sangita myska, bbc news. an extraordinary match on the opening day of wimbledon, a 15—year—old american schoolgirl has knocked out venus williams — the seven—times grand slam winner — in straight sets. cori gough, who's coached
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by her dad, is the youngest player ever to qualify for the main draw at wimbledon. natalie pirks reports. the first cork popped marks the start of a quintessential british fortnight and this time the weather is playing ball. so it was 15—year—old cori gough, and how! a kiss from dad and cocoa, as she is known was out for her grand slam to view, facing off against venus williams, she can be forgiven for pinching herself. instead, she was the very picture of composure, 39—year—old venus may well have taken a moment to contemplate her own stratospheric rise of the same age, the baton was being handed over. commentator: is a dream debut for the 15—year—old! commentator: is a dream debut for the 15-year-old! the joy edged on the 15-year-old! the joy edged on the faces of her parents caused her own is a crumble, a reminder she is just 15. are we witnessing a future champion in the making? everything
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she did, i wouldn't be here if it wasn't for her, telling her that she is so inspiring, i always wanted to tell her that and i never met her before, i never had the guts to do. but it was a different story for naomi 0saka, the us and australian 0pen champion was one of the pretournament favourites, today it looked as if expectation was weighing heavily on her shoulders as she became the first shock of the tournament, losing to a jubilant world number 39 yulia putintseva in straight sets. no such worries been about documents as is customary, defending champion got a great start on centre court, breezing past his opponent in straight sets —— novak joke of its —— jock of its. eight
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other britons get their chance tomorrow. natalie pirks, bbc news, wimbledon. and we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers kate andrews, associate director at the institute of economic affairs and james rampton, features writer for the independent. now it's time for the weather with susan powell. hello. last week our weather was all talk of high—pressure, building heat and humidity. this more talk of high pressure, but the high has moved. last week that i was across the continent, pulling warm air across from northern africa, this week as i crossed the atlantic and the low around the top of the high. we are still bringing in relatively warm air but the heat has locked down in the core of europe and our temperatures will be closer to average during the days ahead. a north—westerly clip on the winds as well to the far north of the uk, to
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the north of the high do the early parts of the week. and i will be staying with us through the week ahead, perhaps just some changes to the north in wednesday and friday, but some sunshine ahead. we reflect that in tuesday's forecast with some scattered showers for scotland and patchy cloud around elsewhere, but a lot of dry weather. 0ur temperatures will be what we expect them to be at this time of year, 16—17 in aberdeen, 22 for london. and tuesday into wednesday, it's a bit of a case of spot the difference, the high is still with us. the isobars open further so the winds will be somewhat lighter, certainly there is a lot of fine weather to come on wednesday. if anything, a lot of fine weather to come on wednesday. ifanything, perhaps a lot of fine weather to come on wednesday. if anything, perhaps the sunshine more extensive as cloud moves in the far north of the uk. temperatures in the south creeping up temperatures in the south creeping upa temperatures in the south creeping up a little, that's edging down to the far north with a little bit more cloud filling in. remember i said there were some changes to come on
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thursday and

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