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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 2, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: a stowaway falls to their death from a kenya airways flight bound for heathrow, into a garden in west london. hong kong's parliament protestors are evicted with tear gas as china warns britain not to interfere in its former colony. it's semi—final day for england's lionesses. they face the usa here in lyon as they bid to reach a women's world cup final for the first time. good luck, girls. really rooting for
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you for your semifinals, let's go, lionesses! we'll hear from johanna konta as she begins herwimbledon campaign, but it was 15—year—old cori gauff who made headlines on day one, beating five times champion venus williams. next stop northern ireland. where jeremy hunt and borisjohnson will put their latest pitch to be prime minister to conservative party members, but will businesses be happy with their plans for the border? good morning from wimbledon where the sun is beating down. it should stay dry here is with most of the uk. some showers in northern scotland. more in 15 minutes. it's tuesday the second ofjuly. our top story: a stowaway who's believed to have fallen from the landing gear of a passenger plane bound for heathrow, has been found dead in a garden in west london. the body was discovered in clapham. our correspondent keith doyle joins us from there now.
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what do we know so far? good morning. this street and clap and is directly under the flight but of heathrow stop hundreds of flight fly overhead every day. police believe he fell from the landing gear of believe he fell from the landing gearofa believe he fell from the landing gear of a kenyan airways flight on sunday. the kenya airways flight kqioo took off at 07:19 british time on sunday morning from the kenyan capital of nairobi. the flight landed ahead of schedule at heathrow airport, after almost nine hours in the air. police were called at 3:39pm to an address on offerton road in clapham, after the body landed in a residential garden. neighbours say the body felt three feet away from someone sunbathing in the back garden of one of these
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houses. police believe it was a stowaway hiding. food and water was found in the aircraft after it landed. police are saying they are carrying out an investigation to try and identify exactly who this man was who died in such tragic circumstances. police in hong kong have used tear gas to evict protesters who ransacked the territory's parliament building. the activists had broken away from a peaceful protest to mark the 22nd anniversary of hong kong's transfer of sovereignty from britain to china. beijing said that britain needed to "know its place and stop interfering" in what was a "purely internal affair". let's get more from our correspondent karishma vaswani. we were with you this time yesterday before protesters broke into that building. take us through events yesterday. the events of yesterday,
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after the initial demonstrations we saw out onto the streets of hong kong, a group of protesters made their way into this building. i told you how they were trying to break through the walls and you can see behind me, they were able to do that, using things like umbrellas, trolleys, anything they could get their hands on. even ripping down in slabs from the walls —— iron. wearing that unofficial black uniform, there trademark, with gas masks and helmets. they left a wake of destruction all around, destroying government property, furniture, tearing down photographs of government officials and eventually making their way to the inner part of the legislative chamber where they defaced the hong kong ambling, blackening out the
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people's republic of china and unfurling the old british colonial flag of hong kong. eventually, the police then made their way in and cleared the protesters using tear gas. in the early hours of this morning we heard from carrie lam, the hong kong chief executive, who condemned what she called extreme violent methods. the two men competing to become the next prime minister are expected to face tough questions today, when they appear at a hustings event in northern ireland. both borisjohnson and jeremy hunt have said they're opposed to what's known as the backstop, which is designed to guarantee there'll be no physical checks along the irish border after brexit. let's get more from our correspondent chris page, who's in newry. it is pretty easy to work out what the main topic of discussion will be
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today? no doubt about that at all. this may not look like an international border but that is exactly what it is and just about in northern ireland but behind me, that is the beginning of the irish republic. as you see traffic in this road is free—flowing, there are no checks, no passports to be shown. almost everyone involved in brexit agrees that they want things to stay just as they are but how to achieve thatis just as they are but how to achieve that is where there is disagreement. the could be different customs rules, different movements of goods, different systems of immigration. the question will be top of the political agenda here today. the border is almost invisible but it is looming large in the contest for number 10. but candidates claimed they will be able to ove i’co m e claimed they will be able to overcome the biggest obstacle on the road to brexit. the process has
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stalled over the backstop which would keep the border open if there is no trader between the uk and european union which would mean the uk would follow certain rules and northern ireland others. boris johnson thinks issue should be dealt with in trade talks after uk leaves. he spoke at a conference. it's mps keeping the party in power and strongly opposed to the backstop. jeremy hunt was to bring the dup into the negotiating team. the eu insists it is not going to reopen negotiations and the backstop must stay. the challenge is not getting any easier according to some. stay. the challenge is not getting any easier according to somem does not change the reality of
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brexit, a change in prime minister. the difficult choices that theresa may has had to face remain the same and the change in the political situation in westminster does not affect those difficult decisions at all. the board up brainteaser remains unsolved. finding a solution will be one of the toughest tasks for the new man in downing street. 500 or so conservative party members live in northern ireland and a number of them will get to hear borisjohnson number of them will get to hear boris johnson and jeremy hunt number of them will get to hear borisjohnson and jeremy hunt and ask questions. they have not had a huge amount of success in elections pulling a 0.5% of the vote. the topic of brexit really on people ‘s minds here. speaking to businesses here in the last few days, they have repeated their view that the one thing they do not want is an ideal
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brexit. they worry about how that would disrupt their supply chain. ——no deal brexit. all eyes now on october 31st. in this part of the world, a great deal of concern. 56% of people in northern ireland voted to remain in the european union in 2016's referendum. do let us know what you think about that. boys with asthma are twice as likely as girls to need a gp appointment during the first few weeks of the new school year. public health england analysed data from surgeries and hospitals and found that consultations for all children up to the age of four tripled during september, compared with the summer holidays. experts say being exposed to new viruses at school and a relaxed use of inhalers over the holidays could be to blame.
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we will speak to a gp about that later on in the programme. the bbc‘s annual report which shows the salaries of high paid on—air staff is published later this morning. the top ten earners now includes three women — zoe ball, claudia winkleman and vanessa feltz. here's our media editor, amol rajan. when salaries were first revealed two years ago, only a quarter of highly paid staff were women. that now stands at 45%. three women are now stands at 45%. three women are now in the top 10% as opposed to nonein now in the top 10% as opposed to none in 2017. the very top names are all top. the fallout in transparency has led to the departure of some big names such as chris evans, simon mayer and eddie mair and also to many outstanding grievance issues. the former china editor came to a settle m e nt the former china editor came to a settlement with the bbc last year.
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the bbc‘s facing criticism over its decision to means test licenses for the over 75 but critical successes are helping the corporation navigate are helping the corporation navigate a new media landscape in which streaming giants such as netflix and amazon are causing hyperinflation in the costs of drama in particular. they plan to keep programmes on the iplayer for a they plan to keep programmes on the iplayerfor a year hoping they plan to keep programmes on the iplayer for a year hoping to keep young audiences that are flocking to other services. the lionesses are gearing up to go head—to—head with the usa for a place in the women's world cup final later, after beating the odds for a 3—0 victory against norway last week. in a moment, sally will be bringing us all the excitement from lyon, but first take a look at the team's journey so far. (music playing). commentator:
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england has the perfect start! two minutes. they are in the lead. bronze! what a goal! what a goal! a chance here for england. yes, yes, yes!
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is tonight the game in leon. —— sallyjoins us now from lyon. we are on the banks of the river in lyon. it is already quite warm. we arrived late last night but very, very excited about two—day. england in the semi—final against the usa. —— today. a bit of scandal 1a usa, they went to check out the team hotel a couple of days ago in case they play in the final, which is a little bit cheeky that one because they are assuming to get into the final which means meeting england tonight. phil neville using that cleverly a nd tonight. phil neville using that cleverly and saying, that is not
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something we would ever do. whether 01’ something we would ever do. whether or not the usa were aware it would cause a much fuss, we're not sure. the top player in the us team will be marked by lucy bronze. phil neville says that is simply one of the best defenders in the world. we will be bringing you all the buildup from lyon and catching up with what happened yesterday, a dramatic day at wimbledon. thank you so much. we're so looking forward to it. i think we have the weather now. she is having an interesting 2a hours. wimbledon and now in lyon. com pletely wimbledon and now in lyon. completely random, bumped into my dad at the station. and an
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incredible day at wimbledon where cori gauf, 15 bit venus williams stop what we're doing at the age of 15? listening to the news. not only was she brilliant on cot by the postmatch interview was sort of compose. she almost thanked venus williams at the net for being an inspiration. incredible. the weather looked glorious in lyon and also i think it's glorious in wimbledon. the most stunning sunrise, but it is chilly across the board. you can see the fabulous view, it's so quiet right now. but through the day there are throngs of people just filling the cords, looking around, walking between the courts, we are
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overlooking court 1a at the movement. i can't imagine they will be using the roof, the forecast for wimbledon for today is another dry one. this morning we have the sunshine over the course of the day, a little more card will develop. at times it will be cloudy but we will have sunny intervals throughout the day. light breezes, has a 21, don't forget your sunscreen. that over most of us, we're looking at a dry day with sunny intervals, but there are some some showers in the forecast, a lot of them are through pa rt forecast, a lot of them are through part of the north and the country, there aren't a lot of them, they are well scouted, but there are a few. if we look at scotland at nine o'clock, you can see how well scouted the showers are. we've also got some showers across northern ireland, some in cumbria, and again we have variable amounts of cloud and some sunshine. as we come across the rest of england and wales, it's a similar story. some mist about
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this morning in cornwall and sunny intervals and we will see a bit more cloud develop throughout the day. as we move through the day, that is what is going to happen. cumulus clouds were developed, then flatten out. at this time of the year we can still expect sunny intervals coming through. bridger was we're looking at up to 21, maybe 22 in the south —— temperature wise, and in the north we're looking at roughly 12-14. and north we're looking at roughly 12—111. and through the afternoon, especially the later part of the afternoon, we should see most of the showers fade. through the evening and overnight there will be clear skies, so it will be chilly overnight, chilly first thing in the morning and there will be some cloudy here and they are. at the end of the night some cloud coming across the west highlands, thicker cloud wallowed by some rain. those other temperatures you can expect in terms of cities. in rural areas they will be lower than this as was this morning. so tomorrow we start off
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with a weather front in the north—west, that will produce some showers mostly across the northern half of scotland. the rest of the uk, it's another day of sunny intervals and dry weather as well. the best of the sunshine will be across wales and the south—west of england, but there will be sunny spells around, temperatures up to 22. as we head into wednesday, temperatures continue to rise, looking up to 25. as i mentioned at the top of the broadcast, as we go through this week anyway, in looks like the weather for wimbledon is going to stay dry. how lovely. thank you carol, we will see you shortly. delightful. i love summer. ijust love summer. i'm a summer person. do you find yourself in a worse mood in the winter months? we are waking up and it's light, it's nice. good morning. i had a spring in my step
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this morning. i had something on my ankle, so not much spring, but it's ankle, so not much spring, but it's a lovely day. she has a tear in her ankle. 0h, a lovely day. she has a tear in her ankle. oh, dear me. take care of yourself. it was a birth day celebration. it wasn't that it was running down snowden waterfall. anyway, good morning. too much information for everybody. we're going to go through the seen in a moment. the guardian's main story says police in london raise concerns about the welfare of children and vulnerable adults about 700 times a day on average. there's also a picture of cori gauff following her wimbledon victory over venus williams. she is 15 years old. the daily telegraph has a photo of protesters inside hong kong's parliament building, moments before spray—painting graffiti. it also reports that tory leadership contender borisjohnson could abolish or merge several government departments if he becomes
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prime minister. the daily express also focuses on the continuing battle number ten. it sasteremy hunt has gone "toe—to—toe" with his rival over his stance on a no—deal brexit. it's also looking ahead to the women's world cup semi—final declaring the "lionesses are ready to roar". and finally, the sun leads on the stowaway story which we're also reporting this morning. it says the man fell just three feet from a resident who had been sunbathing in the garden. an incredible story. sticking with that story for a moment — a similar scenario occurred back in 2012, when a man in his 20's was found dead on a residential street in west london, after also falling from a flight heading for heathrow airport. at the time, bbc world reporter rob walker explained how the stowaway could have climbed aboard. we don't know how the man got into the airport, but we do know this is how he travelled to london. and he would have had to have claimed as
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quickly as possible along this bit of metal and then into the realise, he would have done this at night so would have been pretty dark, i can't help wondering if by this point he would have had second thoughts and realise that he'd made a terrible mistake will stop now, the first major risk to stowaways comes after ta keoff major risk to stowaways comes after takeoff because at that point the wheels are tracked up and fill most of this space —— pull—up, the temperature would have fallen two -60, the temperature would have fallen two —60, the oxygen is would have thinned —— —16, hose they would have lost consciousness —— jose. these doors would have open here as they come back down along with the wheels. still unconscious, the man would have been unable to hold on. it gives you a sense of the danger that obviously they put themselves into. so cold! let's look at the inside pages as well. good morning.
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well, we've said good morning to you about three times. i am going to be talking about boris johnson and jeremy hunt and what they are going to be pitching to northern ireland today. that continues in the business pages as well and inside papers lots of people questioning theirspending papers lots of people questioning their spending plans. so the chancellor is the latest person today, bidding war on spending hurts the party reputation. philip hammond saying these promises, he says the money isn't there to do everything they want to do, particularly if we live with no deal. i'll be talking more about the northern ireland border a little later as well. do you want a bit of environmental friendliness or not? nice... double, double spread. it sounds like we don't have a choice. it depends on what you want to go with. an interesting picture of glastonbury for a start, that's the number of
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cans left over —— tents. look at all of that leftover stuff. barbecue emissions as bad as a 90 mile car trip. so there's been some calculations done, if you are going to barbecue some stuff this weekend, a 100 to barbecue some stuff this weekend, a100g to barbecue some stuff this weekend, a 100 g burger is the equivalent of driving 6.6 miles when it comes to emissions, whereas a veggie sausage isjust 0.8. hold on a minute, hold ona minute, isjust 0.8. hold on a minute, hold on a minute, how did they work that out? i think it takes less time to cook a burger than a sausage? i don't agree... i think... you think the sausage should be a different shape? he doesn't agree. i should
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clarify. these emissions aren't based on the toast in your burger, it's because of the meat. and the manufacturing process. don't, don't. do you want me to give you a spade? it's ok to cook a bit of meat, right? and you have a normal sausage and a vegetarian sausage, sometimes you don't want to get involved in a vegetarian sausage. make it a jungle. get a triangle and then everything's fine. well, of course it is. it's what you put in it that makes it a sausage? it's not all about the cooking, is it? no. what do you have louise? an amazing 15—year—old who beat venus williams yesterday, she is a brilliant young girl, she is this is what she said to venus when she won. "she so inspiring, i was wanted to tell her that." i was wanted to tell her
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that, i had to tell myself, you distracted me! she went up to venus williams and said" i've never cried after a match, i've never been brave enough to tell her how inspiring she was, but that's what i did." well done her. did you see straightaway afterwards? they pulled the makes down, you heard her say at the end, lovely to meet you. oh, that is nice. a touch of class. the parents must have been proud. the parents must have been proud. the parents must of thought, i brought that child up in the right way. school lessons about relationships will be compulsory in england from next year — but as we've been reporting, the inclusion of lgbt+ topics has already proved controversial — resulting in protests and head teachers being threatened. to find out what some of these lessons may look like, we've been to visit one school that's teaching children how to celebrate our differences.
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i would have been pretending that was long hair, i didn't think there was long hair, i didn't think there was slightly wrong with me. that little green dress, i had one like that. i was ashamed of who i was, a little bit. and... you just felt a little bit. and... you just felt a little bit. and... you just felt a little bit lonely. ollie pike is an author and illustrator, his stories, normalising gay relationships, are used in schools across the country. i wish to marry thomas. what? said the king. at this primary school in kent, ollie's story prince henry is being used in a lesson about equality. they watched a young couple celebrate their love by wetting each other, they put off long enough —— wedding. wetting each other, they put off long enough -- wedding. we have the words lesbian, gay, lesbian, transgender though and words lesbian, gay, lesbian, tra nsgender though and heterosexual. the students are having a workshop
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about different types of relationships and prejudice.“ you've heard that phrase, that cosmic so gay, here at oakfield primary, i want you to put your hand up. that was marked so gay —— that is so gay. i think they say that for an insult. what's with this? everyone's family is different, you have to treat them with the quality, it doesn't matter if they are lesbian or gay. and then crack, out came theirvery lesbian or gay. and then crack, out came their very own baby. the five and six —year—olds in year! are using a story about a penguin to learn about different types of families. tango was the very first penguin in the zoo to have two daddies. it doesn't matter if it's a quy daddies. it doesn't matter if it's a guy and a guy or a girl and a girl and they get married, and, yeah. some politicians have said parents should be able to remove their child
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from classes like this, and in birmingham there have been angry protests. the head teacher here, mr radcliffe, is a married gay man with four adopted children. radcliffe, is a married gay man with four adopted childrenlj radcliffe, is a married gay man with four adopted children. i think it's about five —year—olds understanding that within their class there are going to be 30 children with all sorts of different families. my own daughter goes to a school, she has two dads. i wouldn't be having this discussion about teaching your child to swim. i don't think we should be having this discussion about teaching every child about differences within our society. olly pyke's convinced if these glasses had —— classes had happened when he was at school, his life would have been different. the number of children and young people who attempted to take their own life because they have been bullied for being lgbt, this isn't about teaching, it's about saving lives as well, and outweighed is crucial.
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age—appropriate lgbt relationship classes already routine in scotland, -- it is classes already routine in scotland, —— it is crucial. graham satchell, bbc news. and we will be talking about that a little bit more later, about that a little bit more later, about ten past 7am. you can send us an e—mail or tweet us or reach us on facebook. and we have some interesting sport news coming up and we are across wimbledon with carol. i was going to say sally, but sally is in lyon because the alliances are taking on usa. —— lioness is. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm charlotte. detectives investigating a series of
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assaults and robberies on women in south london have arrested a man, there have been six separate attacks in country park during may and june, four of the victims were sexually assaulted. the women wearing their 305— 60s were walking orjogging, four of them had dogs with them. all of the incidents happened in broad daylight. good south building homes be part of the answer to the london housing crisis? in amsterdam, the city has been actively encouraging self builders since the financial crisis and developers were building fewer homes in the city. it set aside 70% of the site just for self builders. sometimes the process can ta ke yea rs builders. sometimes the process can take years and a lot of patience, this man has been planning on building his home for seven years. in the beginning it was really jolly, in the beginning it was really jolly, jolly, we're going to do this in it will be beautiful. and it ta kes you in it will be beautiful. and it takes you of money and energy. i had
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to sit down for two months. i am all for the self building and have your own control of your life. i think most building should be like this. let's have a look at the travel situation now. let's have a look at the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning. plenty of dry and settled
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weather to come over the next few days with increasing amounts of sunshine. today we will stay dry with some sunny spells, i think we will see increasing amounts of cloud to the afternoon. so we start this morning with some sunny spells as the day wears on the cloud will tend to increase. feeling pleasant with sunshine and temperatures at a maximum of around 21 celsius, not sitting too far away from the average for this time of year, which is around 22 celsius. as we go through this evening there will be some mates because of sunshine and overnight it will stay dry, there will be some cloud but also some clear spells. temperatures fall into an overnight low of 10— 1a celsius. tomorrow, then, starts off with a fairamount of warm tomorrow, then, starts off with a fair amount of warm spells of sunshine. cloud will tend to bubble up sunshine. cloud will tend to bubble up to the middle parts of the day but remaining dry with temperatures again in the low 20s. increasing amounts of sunshine by thursday with the temperate is picking up. that's it for now. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom soon.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. it's 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning, british number one johanna konta tells us about what keeps her grounded as she prepares to compete in this years' wimbledon championships. sticking with the sport, england face the usa in the semi finals of the women's world cup tonight. we'll discuss their chances just after eight. and after 9:00, singer songwriter chelcee grimes will be here. after writing for the likes of dua lipa and little mix, she's about to release an album of her own. of course, she plays foot tall and
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she will be talking to us about the women world cup. big night tonight. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. a stowaway who's believed to have fallen from a passenger plane bound for heathrow has been found dead in a garden in west london. police say the body, believed to be that of a man, fell from a flight originating from nairobi. a bag, water and some food were found in the plane's landing gear compartment when it arrived at the airport. police in hong kong have used tear gas to evict protesters who ransacked the territory's parliament building. the activists had broken away from a peaceful protest to mark the 22nd anniversary of hong kong's transfer of power from britain to china. beijing said that britain needed to "know its place and stop interfering" in what was a "purely internal affair". the two men competing to become the next prime minister are expected to face tough questions today, when they appear at a hustings event in northern ireland. both boris johnson and jeremy hunt have said they're opposed to what's known as the "backstop",
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which is designed to guarantee there'll be no physical checks along the irish border after brexit. the result of the leadership election will be announced on the 23rd ofjuly. the bbc‘s annual report which shows the salaries of high paid on—air staff is published later this morning. the top 10 earners now include three women, radio 2's zoe ball and vanessa feltz and the presenter of strictly come dancing, claudia winkleman. the gender pay gap across the bbc has fallen to 6.7% — 1% less than last year. we hear a lot on breakfast about how spending time around dogs can be relaxing but now scientists at a university in america have proved it. psychologists at washington state university found that 300 students said that they had better concentration and could retain more information after weekly hour—long sessions with therapy dogs. look at that lovely dog. cambridge, swansea and nottingham
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trent university are among some of the universities in the uk that already use this practice. there is something about stroking a dog, ora there is something about stroking a dog, or a cat. don't... there is something about stroking a dog, ora cat. don't... he there is something about stroking a dog, or a cat. don't... he upset all lovers across the uk. i got some mail... through the post? it takes a lot. did you really? an angry cat person. that was specifically about dogs. today is the day for the lionesses. they could make it first time in the finals. sally is in lyon. wimbledon yesterday, lyon today. a huge number of sports. what a brilliant few days of spot.
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wimbledon yesterday was great. we're going to talk about incredible stories of day one in justice act. we are on the banks of the river here in lyon. it is very warm and i know the players are preparing for it. today is the day for england's lionesses as they look to make it into a women's world cup final for the first time. their brilliant campaign so far has seen them win all five of their matches here in france, including that convincing 3—0 victory against norway in the quarter finals on thursday. england have only conceded one goal in the whole tournament. there is a realfeeling here that england's campaign is building to something special, but they face a tough task against the usa in lyon today, who are the world champions after winning this tournament in canada four years ago. i think we are all born winners,
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thatis i think we are all born winners, that is our mentality. we came here to win the world cup and that is still ouraim. we to win the world cup and that is still our aim. we will bring the ultimate energy, 100% going out there and when the physical battle. and we can be clinical. that is what we have done so far. we have created a lot but we have also finished and we are hundred % believe we are going to do it. they are the best team in the world, without a shadow of a doubt. the re cord without a shadow of a doubt. the record is wonderful. but you never worry about the opposition. we concentrate a lot on what we can do, how we are going to try and win a game and our strengths and our values and the style of play we want to play is the most important thing. doesn't he seem very calm. this was the usa's final preparations in training nearby
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here yesterday afternoon. they beat the hosts france 2—1 in the last eight to get here, and are the dominant force in the women's game. ican i can tell you lots of french people will be supporting england tonight. but it wasn't long ago that england came very close to beating the world champions on their own turf. back in march, nikita parris did give england a 2—1 lead against the usa at the shebelieves cup in nashville, but the usa came back to equalise late on. england will be hoping they can go one better this time here in lyon. lots of french people saying they are going to support england because of course usa knocked out the host nation. i promised you some wimbledon news and an incredible day yesterday. kyle edmund made it through. plenty more of british players to be in action. they'll all be looking to join
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heather watson and kyle edmund who both made it through to round two safely, but the opening day belonged to the incredible 15—year—old american cori gauff. she is the youngest player to qualify for the main draw in the modern era, but beat the five—time wimbledon champion venus williams. joe lynskey reports. this is how it feels to play your rival at 15 years old and when. she was never meant to beat a player 2a yea rs was never meant to beat a player 2a years her senior. when cori gauf was born, venus williams had a ready one four majors but here the youngster to the match to the champion. right now she is outside the world top 300 this remarkable when means that will surely change. and the hero she says has gotta this far is her opponent. after the match i told thank you for everything she did and that i would not be here if it wasn't for her and i was telling her she was so inspiring. like, i always wanted to tell her that. but williams was not
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the only grand slam winner to fall. naomi osaka, isabel number two but goes home after round one. she lost yulia putintseva to. how different are feeling to heather watson, a player who has battle on cot struggles and on line abuse. she hoped this winter brings more happy times. eight more britons will follow what watson and kyle edmund den. leading the way in the men's game is novak djokovic. this kind of geometry makes it so hard to catch. he opened the tournament in straight sets and without any dramas. but this unique day in wimbledon will go down for different reasons, there is a new staff with the world at their feet. among those starting their wimbledon campaign today is johanna konta.
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the british number one faces the unseeded romanian ana bogdan on court one. i spoke to her about staying grounded, her summer so far wimbledon is so unique, it's sodifferent. wimbledon is so unique, it's so different. it is full of tradition. it is the grandest stage we have in the sport. i love that it is home. for me, i feel incredibly lucky and blessed that this is my home slam. the last time we saw you was over in paris. that match — we followed you through the french open, you just seemed so focused and cool and calm. what happened ? i felt really good the whole fortnight. i really enjoyed it. i was really immersed in the tennis that i was playing. i was immersed injust being there and wanting to be there till the very end and unfortunately i did not to stay
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till the very, very end. to be in another grand slam semi—final, especially my first one since wimbledon here in 2017, i was just really pleased to be back in that position. you are so good at staying positive and it is a mentally tough game, isn't it? i know i've harped on about perspective quite a few times but it very important to me and it really enables me to stay grounded and to just really stay true to my values which ultimately make up who i am and why i play the sport, and why i compete and why i train, why i do all of it. i will either come away with the win or i won't but either way life goes on. really important question now — tell me about the dog? well, bono is brilliant. all he really cares about is that he can come lie on my lap when he wants to, he can get a belly rub, or he can get like a neck scratch, and someone throws the tennis ball for him. i mean, that's basically, you know, that's priorities right there.
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i mean he's got a good life. i want his life. i kind of have his life, i play with tennis balls too. sounds like all of us, really. it was lovely to see you. thank you. andy murray is due on court tomorrow, when he plays in the first round of the men's doubles. a remark going around that he might perhaps start playing in the mixed doubles with the one and only serena williams and, when he was training yesterday, it was a rumour he did not dismiss out of hand. as he was leaving he said, might possibly happen. i do not want to say too much now until things are definitely confirmed. my goodness me, wouldn't that be incredible. sri lanka beat the west indies in the cricket world cup — both sides knowing they couldn't qualify for the semi finals of the tournament. but the fans in durham got their moneys worth as the game went to the wire. chris gayle can be worth the admission alone, but he was unable to lead the chase
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much to the disappointment of the postar rhianna who was watching on. the windies eventually fell 23 runs short. and it's a huge day for england's women today as they start their ashes series against australia. their series is decided on points, across three one day internationals, three twenty20 matches and one test. england haven't held the ashes since 2014. that is just about it from me. how are we going to make it to the end of the day without getting too nervous and overwhelmed ? of the day without getting too nervous and overwhelmed? i know that eve ryo ne nervous and overwhelmed? i know that everyone back at home is going to be watching. tonight england pay the usa, the usa are definitely the toughest opponent england have faced in this world cup so far, but there is something building here. you are just making it worse. but thank you, very exciting. we will see you later. sorry! there is so much to talk about. cricket world cup... and
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netball. and. history was made when the england women's netball team won gold at the commonwealth games last year, beating the favourites and hosts australia 52—51. that has got to be one of the best finishes in recent years. now, the netball world cup is much closer to home, beginning on the 12th of july in liverpool. defender geva mentor is here with us now to tell us how the squad are preparing to chase another win. and you are watching the football as well, is that right? we will be watching it as a team.“ could be an amazing summer, couldn't it, really? for women could be an amazing summer, couldn't it, really? forwomen sport, it's just an amazing few months ahead. it's a great summer of sport had and the girls, we played in a couple of weeks data play in a couple of weeks time and it's just weeks data play in a couple of weeks time and it'sjust great for women's sport. there are also so many more
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role models for girls to look up to. you said things were very different when you were a girl, you didn't even know there was an england netball team. so many people play netball, participation wise, and that's why i wanted to write a book, netball has gone under the radar for so netball has gone under the radar for so long, but it's great to actually see are doing so well on the success we we re see are doing so well on the success we were able to have last year at the commonwealth games. we were able to publicise it a bit more, just create that motivation behind people getting along and watching it and playing it. notjust at getting along and watching it and playing it. not just at the getting along and watching it and playing it. notjust at the elite level, people getting active, it's a great social sport as well. as you notice the difference in people talking to you about it, people saying i've joined up. yeah, i think it's an exciting place to netball and it's important that we keep that momentum going forward. it's been great for me in terms of not just, personally, being able to have that organisation and mail night and
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keeping fit and healthy, but it's been great to meet different people. i think that's the beauty of what sport can bring in what netball can bring as well. tell us about preparations, how are they going? yeah, really well. i arrived preparations, how are they going? yeah, really well. iarrived back from australia a few days ago, prepaying the from australia a few days ago, pre paying the mark from australia a few days ago, prepaying the mark playing in a professional league,, the vibe is great. we are really looking forward to playing in this home world cup for us. you have a bit of an aussie twain, haven't you? i know! i've been playing there bargained for the la st been playing there bargained for the last years —— back and forth, so, yeah, it's an exciting time for netball and particularly the english roses after the success we had last year. now we should build a legacy, notjust the year. now we should build a legacy, not just the i—off success. year. now we should build a legacy, not just the 1-off success. you took sometimes you find that this was the sport for you. i grew up on the
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south coast of england, i played a lot of sports. my mum and dad were heavily as a sport and i played a lot of basketball at school. i was in the boys team at school. we didn't have a girls basketball team, but eventually, when i got older, they didn't want me to play with them anymore. i had to find a new sport. my mum has been my number one supporter. i think that is it, the team has evolved over the years, you can see tracy and neville, that is the first netball is e—mails involved in. now she is my codes. the other loosening of netball has ke pt the other loosening of netball has kept me going. tracy neville has already announced this is going to be her going out on a high, i think she was worried it might affect things in this squad. has it made it better in that we are going to make sure we finish her coaching career
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in this way? how has it affected things? i think tracy has done a fantasticjob things? i think tracy has done a fantastic job and she things? i think tracy has done a fantasticjob and she has worked well enough now that we know the same tojust well enough now that we know the same to just train well enough now that we know the same tojust train hard and win. it would be wonderful dissenter this campaign with real success —— to end this campaign. you go into quite a bit of personal stuff as well, during the commonwealth games in your personal life, things were really falling apart? that's the important thing for me, it's not just about netball, it's about overcoming everything in life. there are highs and lows and it's about recognising it, owning it and moving on. i hope there are take—home messages throughout it and i think i we nt messages throughout it and i think i went through one of the highest highs, winning a gold medal at the commonwealth games while my personal life was breaking down around me. i'm hoping there are a few people out there that are able to resonate
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with what i've written in the book. i'm sure there will. it's one of the worst rules in netball that intimidation is against the rules. just looking men. what is the name of the book? leap. thank you for having me. let's catch up with the weather. carol is in a sporting place, but the weather is looking so beautiful. good morning. good morning everyone, the sun is beating down here and you often take it for granted. you don't think about the preparation that has gone in beforehand. izzy and rosie have been working here since last night. good morning girls. everything here is pristine. we are overlooking court 18, the co—is still inflated —— court, they have been here since 1971. there are 161
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ground staff that pulled the covers over and back, it takes 22—28 seconds to do so and have been trained to do it so quickly and efficiently two weeks in advance. sally is in france. when the kick—off happens tonight at 8pm, the temperature is very much going to be 27 degrees with a 20% risk of thunderstorms. wimbledon's forecast todayis thunderstorms. wimbledon's forecast today is dry with a high of 21 degrees and that will be our maximum afternoon temperature. so that shows you the difference. and talking of wimbledon, we are starting off on a sunny note with blue skies, similar cloud will develop to out the day and there will be times when it is cloudy stop but it isjuly and there will be times when it is cloudy stop but it is july so and there will be times when it is cloudy stop but it isjuly so we will see sunny intervals nonetheless. and gentle breezes. if you are coming, don't forget your sunscreen. for all of us today we are looking at sunny spells and also still a few showers. showers largely across scotland, northern ireland
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and cumbria. if we zoom into scotland, you can see where they are. they are fairly well scouted. in between there will be some sunshine. we'll see some sunshine in between the showers as well is in cumbria. for much of england and wales, there is a fair bit of cloud to start the day, clear skies by night. it's a cool start but we got the sunshine and the mist and fog patches across the south—west of england. through the course of the day, where we have the sunny skies, you will start to notice a bit more cloud coming in on the north—westerly breeze. it's not going to completely ruin the day if it's sunshine you're after, but it will be noticeable. still, we will see some breaks even through the course of the afternoon. so as to the afternoon will start to ease across the afternoon will start to ease a cross m ost the afternoon will start to ease across most areas. temperatures ranging from 14—21, maybe 22 in the south—east. through this evening and overnight, once again we will have clear spells, variable amounts of cloud, just one or two showers, but by the end of the night a weather
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front from the north—west will introduce thicker cloud and some rain into the north—west highlands. we've got clear skies and lowest temperatures, but we aren't expecting frost issues. tomorrow we start off with the weather front in the north—west of scotland, it will continue to produce some salary outbreaks of rain. as it moves across, accompanied by gusty winds. for the rest of the uk, once again it's going to be a dry day with variable amounts of cloud and some sunny skies. the sunshine lasting the longest across wales and south—west england with top temperatures of up to 22. by the time we get to thursday, we see temperatures get to 25 in the south. ijust temperatures get to 25 in the south. i just love that. breakfast at wimbledon would be amazing today, wouldn't it? eight we aren't, carol is, though. the two candidates competing to be
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the next leader of the conservative party are in northern ireland today to lay out their plans. with both borisjohnson and jeremy hunt preparing for a no—deal brexit, what does that mean for the business community there? what happens there is crucial. there is no resolution to what might happen yet, so that's why we keep talking about it. trade is pretty big. if we look at exports that go from northern ireland to the republic of ireland, the third of northern ireland's trade is exports do the republic of ireland, so would bea do the republic of ireland, so would be a huge change —— it would be. for northern ireland, it's a bigger proportion. looking at trade going the other way, import into northern ireland, you're looking at more than a quarter of trade of northern ireland's imports from the republic of ireland. all of that is pretty crucial. therefore, as to what happens, where those three little
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arrows are and where chris pages this morning, at the minute there are no checks. we are part of the european union. there is one trade agreement between that whole area and things can float freely, but thatis and things can float freely, but that is what is in question. that is why today is such a big day for jeremy hunt and borisjohnson as well. the question has always been for members of parliament, now it's for members of parliament, now it's for these two, what is your plan, then? because it's about, we've heard the mentioned a lot about planning for no deal, but what every once “— planning for no deal, but what every once ‘ ‘ everyone planning for no deal, but what every once “ everyone wants planning for no deal, but what every once —— everyone wants is a deal. what they've got to deal with is this october 31 deadline, that is when we are due to leave the european union. there is a's plan was for this backstop, as chris was explaining earlier. an insurance policy to keep this open with no customsjacks. policy to keep this open with no customs jacks. they aren't so policy to keep this open with no customsjacks. they aren't so keen on the backstop. —— customsjacks. they would like other arrangements in place to do that. it means that there is no backstop and relive the
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european union on october 31 without a deal, somewhere, there needs to be damp there —— checks. a deal, somewhere, there needs to be damp there -- checks. quite simply, a no—deal brexit is the biggest threat to northern ireland's economy since the troubles. the cost to business here simply won't be able to be handled. it will make products less competitive and also make it harderfor northern less competitive and also make it harder for northern ireland less competitive and also make it harderfor northern ireland bosman consumers. we are half the discretionary income of british households so it's the most vulnerable they will feel it first and hardest. what happens next then? what happens today is this hustings where these two put there appeared to conservative party members in northern ireland, a lot of it will be about, ok, what is your plan? what are —— if you people here are happy with no deal, but the idea for the border, if the deal isn't on by october 31, or if there is a deal, what is the future going to look
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like? is it going to involve technology, that is what we might here today. that is the case, there will be a lot of questions about how the technology might work. that was going to be my question. thank you sean. time now to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are. we'll have the headlines at seven a.m.. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sally franks. detectives investigating a series of assaults and robberies on women in south london have arrested a man. there have been six separate attacks in south norwood country park during may andjune, south norwood country park during may and june, four of the victims we re may and june, four of the victims were sexually assaulted. women were in their 30s to 60s and were walking or jogging. in their 30s to 60s and were walking orjogging. five of them had dogs with them. all of the incidents happened in broad daylight. good surf building homes be part of the a nswer to surf building homes be part of the answer to the london housing crisis? asked mark self loading. —— self
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building. since the financial crisis, self building has been encouraged. sometimes the process can take years and a lot of patience. wim has been building and planning his home for seven years. in the beginning it was very frivolous, it was a veryjoyfuljob, it was going to be beautiful, then comes the money. i blew marnie out for once, i had to sit down for two months. i'm all for the self tilting and having own control of your life —— wooding. i want the whole city to be like that. —— building. —— wooding. i want the whole city to be like that. -- building. let's have a look at the travel situation.
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on the roads there are the usual queues on blackwall lane approaching the blackwall tunnel. in town, eversholt street remains closed in both directions between the euston road and grafton place. at east smithfield, elaine has closed the gasworks. now let's get a check on the weather with lucy martin. hello. good morning. plenty of dry and settled weather to come over the next few days with increasing amounts of sunshine. today we will stay dry with some sunny spells, i think we will see increasing amounts of cloud through the afternoon. so we start this morning with some sunny spells as the day wears on the cloud will tend to increase. feeling pleasant with sunshine and temperatures at a maximum of around 21 celsius, not sitting too far away from the average for this time
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of year, which is around 22 celsius. as we go through this evening there will be some mates —— late spells of sunshine and overnight it will stay dry, there will be some cloud but also some clear spells. temperatures fall into an overnight low of 10—14 celsius. tomorrow, then, starts off with a fair amount of warm spells of sunshine. cloud will tend to bubble up through the middle parts of the day but remaining dry with temperatures again in the low 20s. increasing amounts of sunshine for thursday with the temperates picking up. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: a stowaway falls to their death from a kenya airways flight bound for heathrow, into a garden in west london. protestors are evicted with tear gas
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from hong kong's parliament as china warns britain not to interfere in its former colony. it's semi—final day for england's lionesses. they face the usa here in lyon as they bid to reach a women's world cup final for the first time. good luck, girls. really rooting for you for your semi—final. let's go, lionesses! we'll hear from johanna konta as she begins her wimbledon campaign but it was 15—year—old cori gauff who made headlines on day one beating 5 times champion, venus williams. the cost of cyber crime. as new figures show one in five british businesses has lost money in a recent cyber attack. i'll be speaking to a professional hacker to find out what companies can do to protect themselves. good morning from wimbledon where the sun is beating down. it should stay driver here today. the uk as a
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whole are largely dry day. sunny intervals but showers across the north of scotland. i will have more in15 north of scotland. i will have more in 15 minutes. it's tuesday the 2nd ofjuly. our top story: a stowaway who's believed to have fallen from the landing gear of a passenger plane bound for heathrow has been found dead in a garden in london. the body was discovered in clapham. our correspondent keith doyle joins us from there now. what do we know so far? this part of london on under the flight this part of london on under the flight path with hundreds of aircraft flying directly overhead. police believe this man fell from one of them. a canyon airways flight. one of them. a canyon airways flight. they believe he fell from the landing gear as it was deployed as it made its descent into heathrow. the kenya airways flight kqioo took off at 07:19 british time on sunday morning from the kenyan capital of nairobi. the flight landed ahead of schedule at heathrow airport,
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after almost nine hours in the air. it landed at 3:50 a.m.. police were called at 3.39pm to an address on offerton road in clapham, after the body landed in a residential garden. police believe it was a stowaway as a bag, food and water was found after the plane landed. this man would have experienced not only a lack of oxygen but temperatures as low as —60 degrees celsius during that nine—hour flight from kenya. now, this is not the first time this has happened. in recent years, two bodies have been found in west london of people who are believed to be stowaway 's dying under similar circumstances. they are trying to identify this man in this yet other
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tragic circumstance. i really tragic death. police in hong kong have used tear gas to evict protesters who ransacked the territory's parliament building. the activists had broken away from a peaceful protest to mark the 22nd anniversary of hong kong's transfer of power from britain to china. beijing said that britain needed to "know its place and stop interfering" in what was a "purely internal affair". let's get more from our correspondent karishma vaswani. they came in as a hundreds, smashing windows and ramming doors, using whatever they could find, i am fences, shopping carts, even umbrellas. once inside, they spray—painted the hong kong emblem black and covering the words the people's republic of china, trying to raise any sign of beijing's influence. photos widely shared social media appear to show signs
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written by the protesters, saying believe these are relics. money left in the canteen, with posted saying we are not thieves. carrie lam condemned their action. nothing is more important than the rule of law in hong kong. i hope the community at large will agree with us that, with these violent acts that we have seen, it is right for us to condemn it and hope society will return to normal as soon as possible. her defence for not sending in the police to break up the protesters earlier inside legco is that she did not want anyone to be heard but questions are asked to see if this isa questions are asked to see if this is a tactic to change the narrative in her favour. meanwhile, is a tactic to change the narrative in herfavour. meanwhile, the protesters may believe the actions get them closer to the goal but for
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many here in hong kong they are now wondering whether those actions hurt more than help their objectives. the new european parliament sits for the first time today in strasbourg. among the meps will be 73 from the uk, who were elected in may, but their parliamentary careers could be short—lived. let's get more from our political correspondent adam fleming, who is in strasbourg this morning. the flags resplendent in the background. how short—lived is short—lived? background. how short—lived is short-lived? well, if the uk leaves the eu on the new accent deadline, the eu on the new accent deadline, the 31st of october, then the 73 british meps will only be meps for four months. today is the first official day because they only become meps when they go into the chamber and gets on in. although they have spent the last few weeks in brussels in their offices getting their laptops and ideas. 73. the
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guest book is 29 from the brexit party. i think they may have a little stu nt party. i think they may have a little stunt plan. but they do not wa nt to little stunt plan. but they do not want to muck up or disrupt the functioning, they just want to want to muck up or disrupt the functioning, theyjust want to get brexit done and get the uk out of the eu. next biggest group is the liberal democrats, 16 of them and they are also planning stunt of their own, they will wear a t—shirt with a particularly... strange word about brexit because they do not wa nt to about brexit because they do not want to leave the eu. i think we can all guess what the word is. a medieval chess piece bought forjust £5 could sell for £1 million at an auction at sotheby‘s today. it's one of the lewis chessmen pieces, which date back to late 12th century scandinavia. the edinburgh family who bought it in 1964,
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had kept it in a drawer without realising its significance. that is a proper bit of history.“ is very beautiful, actually. you know, that moment when you find something in the attic with an absolute fortune. i know for a fact ido absolute fortune. i know for a fact i do not have anything in my house. i also know because i get rid of everything. school lessons about relationships will be compulsory in england from next year but as we've been reporting, the inclusion of lgbt plus topics has already proved controversial — resulting in protests and head teachers being threatened. to find out what some of these lessons may look like, we've been to visit one school that's teaching children how to celebrate our differences. graham satchell has this report. i would have been pretending that was just long hair, i didn't think there was anything slightly wrong with me. that little green dress,
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i had one like that. i was ashamed of who i was, a little bit. and... you just felt a little bit lonely. olly pyke is an author and illustrator. his stories, normalising gay relationships, are used in schools across the country. "i wish to marry thomas." "what?", said the king. at this primary school in kent, olly‘s story prince henry is being used in a lesson about equality. they watched a young couple celebrate their love by wedding each other, they put it off long enough. we have the words lesbian, gay, lesbian, transgender and heterosexual. these students are having a workshop about different types of relationships and prejudice. if you've heard that phrase, ‘that‘s so gay', here at oakfield primary, i want you to put your hand up.
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i've heard it, but i think they say that as an insult. everyone's family is different, you have to treat them with equality, it doesn't matter if they are lesbian or gay. "and then crack, out came their very own baby." the five and 6—year—olds in year! are using a story about a penguin to learn about different types of families. tango was the very first penguin in the zoo to have two daddies. it doesn't matter if it's a guy and a guy or a girl and a girl and they get married, and, yeah. some politicians have said parents should be able to remove their child from classes like this, and in birmingham there have been angry protests. the head teacher here, mr radcliffe, is a married gay man with four adopted children. i think it's about 5—year—olds
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understanding that within their class there are going to be 30 children with all sorts of different families. my own daughter goes to a school, she has two dads. i wouldn't be having this discussion about teaching your child to swim. i don't think we should be having this discussion about teaching every child about differences within our society. olly pyke's convinced if these classes had happened when he was at school, his life would have been different. the number of children and young people who attempted to take their own life because they have been bullied for being lgbt, this isn't just about teaching, it's about saving lives as well, and it's crucial. age—appropriate lgbt relationship classes already routine in scotland. they will start in wales in 2000 22 and in england from next year. ——
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2022. graham satchell, bbc news. joining us now is tim ramsey, founder of schools diversity week and young people's charity ‘just like us'. it is interesting watching that peace and children and how they engage. how much difference would have made to you if this was their new whent? it would have been totally transformational. if i had somebody come to school when i was five, ten, 15, tell me that being 95v five, ten, 15, tell me that being gay was not something to be ashamed of but something positive, i would have saved years of madness and worry and the belief that who i was was wrong and disgusting. what was it like for you then? i knew i was 95v it like for you then? i knew i was gay when i started secondary school. an all boys school. an environment where being gay was the worst thing. and so initially i thought i would just get out of this by turning myself straight so i would go to
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town and meet girls and if i dated i might become straight. i prayed to god, i wasn't even religions, but i prayed to god because maybe he could help me. very disturbing? yes, i had no role models, no belief that who i was was ok. i believed it would stop me from doing anything i wanted to do even later in my life. we know they have been protests, particularly in birmingham, people protesting for the children to be taught this kind of education. like it or not, no parent can change the sexual orientation or gender identity of their children, no withdrawing them from their classroom, any installation will change that but one of those parents can do is decide whether they wanted their children grow can do is decide whether they wanted theirchildren grow up
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can do is decide whether they wanted their children grow up discovering that sexuality positively with the shame and discuss. —— isolation. what is the message in school diversity? i kept hearing from teachers they did not have resources or the confidence to talk about it. 0r or the confidence to talk about it. or they were worried about doing it alone. i set it up to provide teachers with the resources they needed and to provide a national week that would give them the confidence to engage and so this week we have 1.2 million young getting involved to implied festivals et cetera. i imagine lots of people have different thoughts on that. if you want to get in touch please do but in the meantime please do. if you have a question, we can ask him he will come back at 8:50
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a.m.. let us know your thoughts using the hashtag #bbcbreakfast or email bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk. often, while we're on air, there is a healthy discussion, so if you want tojoin that, you can. a healthy discussion, so if you want to join that, you can. it's seven 15 a.m.. we arejust loving the to join that, you can. it's seven 15 a.m.. we are just loving the late mornings as well, the sunshine, carol, good morning. you are absolutely right. good morning. let me show you around wimbledon. see the glass windows, that is the studio, that is where sue barker will bring you all the latest news about wimbledon. this is where the crowd get in if they don't have seeded tickets. —— seated. they'll rush up here to find the best spot to watch the tennis through the day.
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i'll take you to court 18 once again. you can see how the grass has been exposed here, the covers have in deflated. there are events as well. i was talking to the ground staff a few minutes ago, there are six ground staff that will take this cover will stop it takes them between 22—28 seconds. that very much depends on which court you are in. on court number one, it's faster. the outside courts are a little bit slower because they have special ribbons to pull, it is a bit harderand special ribbons to pull, it is a bit harder and takes special ribbons to pull, it is a bit harderand takesa special ribbons to pull, it is a bit harder and takes a bit longer, to a minute. now the sun is beating down here at wimbledon this morning, the hmmfi here at wimbledon this morning, the forecast today is actually a dry one. once again it is likely to stay like that this week. we have really on, blue skies and kyle develop drought today. some of that will flatten out like yesterday so at times it will be cloudy. sunny intervals as well. a gentle breeze
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and 21. the forecast for the uk as a whole is one of sunny intervals but there are some showers. we have showers across parts of scotland, northern ireland and cumbria. that they are well scattered again, not all of us will see them. around scotland at 9am, bright spells, sunny spells and some showers. chilly in the glans. the northern ireland and cumbria, here is where we are going to get some showers. some sunshine in north—east england, then as we come further south, it is a mixture of clear skies. where we've got the clear skies, it's a chilly start to the day. some of us seeing patchy mist and fog across parts of the south—west of england. that will lift as we go through the next couple of hours. through the day we see a bit more cloud coming in on the north—westerly breeze, some of the cloud flattening out to give us sunny intervals rather than wall—to—wall blue skies, and the showers will also fade through the afternoon. 14 in the north to 21—22
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in the south. then it's that mixture of clear spells, areas of cloud, one or two showers, and overnight will have a weather front coming through the north—west highlands. thicker cloud and some rain. wind strength increasing as well. we pick up that weather front, it's going to move across scotland, bringing areas of rain, because the winds, 30—35 mild an hour —— gusty winds. it will remain dry forthe an hour —— gusty winds. it will remain dry for the rest of the uk, sunny intervals and sunshine lasting longest across wales and the south—west. tomorrow's temperature about 22 degrees. back to you. oh, that will be lovely, carol! we have a new, special guest in half—an—hour? a new, special guest in half-an-hour? i have rufus the hog, back by popular demand. half-an-hour? i have rufus the hog, back by popular demandlj half-an-hour? i have rufus the hog, back by popular demand. i always love seeing him. thank you, carol.l
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year without carol and the hawk would be a huge thing. unthinkable! it's officially the start of summer. carol gets the hawk out. the hawk will be with us at 7:45 a.m.. the two men becoming the next prime minister expected to face tough questions today when they're buried a hustings event in northern ireland. both boris johnson and jeremy hunt have said they are opposed to the backstop, which is designed to guarantee there will be no physicaljacks along the irish border after brexit —— checks. let's get more from our correspondence chris page. a significant spot? yes, that's right, dan. this might not look like an international border, but that is indeed what it is. just about in northern ireland, just down the road there, you can see those signs, that is where the irish republic gens. this whole question of how you keep the irish border in
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its present state has dominated in recent times the brexit negotiations. it's been a difficult question as you see, traffic is free—flowing. no checks, no passports to be shown, no barriers. everyone agrees they wanted to stay this way. there agreement to see how to do that once we leave the european union. that is going to be dominating the agenda today. the border is almost invisible but it is looming large in the contest for number 10. both candidates claim they will be able to overcome the biggest obstacle on the road to brexit. the process has stalled over the backstop, which would keep the border open if there is no big free trade deal between the uk and the european union. it would mean the whole of the uk would share customs arrengements with the eu and northern ireland would follow a number of european rules on trading goods. borisjohnson thinks issue should be dealt with in trade talks
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after the uk leaves. he visited northern ireland last year to spoke at the democratic unionist party conference. it's kept the government in power and are strongly opposed to the backstop. good to see you guys, thanks for coming out. jeremy hunt says he wants to bring the dup onto his negotiating team. both he and mrjohnson have suggested technology could help to avoid checks on the frontier. but the eu insists it is not going to reopen negotiations and the backstop must stay. this expert warns that the challenge is not getting any easier. the change of prime minister does not change the reality of brexit. so the choices that are difficult, that the primie minister, theresa may, has had to face remain the same and the change in politics and the political situation in westminster does not affect those difficult decisions at all. the border brainteaser remains unsolved. finding a solution will be one of the toughest tasks for the new man in downing street.
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just over 500 members of the conservative party live in northern ireland, a number of them had a chance today to question boris johnson and jeremy hunt. speaking to businesses, particularly in this area that we have been in over the last couple of days, what they don't wa nt to last couple of days, what they don't want to say no deal situation. they really worry that a situation where you have different customs arrangements, and rules on the movements of goods between the two countries, that would be incredibly disruptive to them. but there is another aspect of this as well besides implications for business, this area, like so many along the border saw lots of violence during 30 years of the trouble —— trouble in northern ireland, it's become a very powerful symbol of peace and that's why nobody wants to go back toa that's why nobody wants to go back to a situation where you have any infrastructure, any physical jacks on the border between northern ireland and the irish republic —— physical checks. chris, very good to
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talk to you. so we have a look at the papers this morning? —— shall we? the guardian's main story says police in london raise concerns about the welfare of children and vulnerable adults about 700 times a day on average. there's also a picture of cori gauff following her wimbledon victory over venus williams. she is 15 years old. amazing. the daily telegraph has a photo of protesters inside hong kong's parliament building, moments before spray—painting graffiti. it also reports that tory leadership contender borisjohnson could abolish or merge several government departments if he becomes prime minister. the daily express also focuses on the continuing battle for number 10. it sasteremy hunt has gone "toe—to—toe" with his rival over his stance on a no—deal brexit. it's also looking ahead to the women's world cup semi—final declaring the "lionesses are ready to roar". as we are. we all are. and finally, the sun leads on the stowaway story which we're also reporting this morning. it says the man fell just three feet
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from a resident who had been sunbathing in the garden. sticking with that story for a moment, a similar scenario occurred back in 2012, when a man in his 20's was found dead on a residential street in west london, after also falling from a flight heading for heathrow airport. at the time, bbc world reporter rob walker explained how the stowaway could have climbed aboard. we don't know how the man got into the airport, but we do know this is how he travelled to london. and he would have had to have claimed as quickly as possible along this bit of metal and then into the wheel arch, he would have done this at night so would have been pretty dark, and i can't help wondering if by this point he would have had second thoughts and realised that he'd made a terrible mistake. now, the first major risk to stowaways comes after takeoff because at that point
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the wheels pull up and fill most of this space. the temperature would have fallen to —60, the oxygen would have thinned. jose would have lost consciousness. these doors would have open here as they come back down along with the wheels. still unconscious, the man would have been unable to hold on. so that gives you a sense of what could have happened. we are all over the place, in a good way. we are at wimbledon, online, loads to cover. right now it's time for the news, travel and weather. we'll have the headlines at 7:30 a.m.. good morning from bbc london news, i'm good morning from bbc london news, i' m charlotte good morning from bbc london news,
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i'm charlotte franks. detectives investigating a series of assaults and robberies on women in south london have arrested a man. there have been six separate attacks in south norwood country park during may and june, four of the victims were sexually assaulted. women were in their 30s to 60s and were walking or jogging. five of them had dogs with them. all of the incidents happened in broad daylight. could self building homes be part of the answer to the london housing crisis? since the financial crisis, self building has been encouraged. it's at 70% of side of this site just for self builders. —— site. sometimes the process can take years and a lot of patience. wim has been building and planning his home for seven years. in the beginning it was very frivolous, it was a veryjoyfuljob, it was going to be beautiful, then comes the money. i blew money out for once,
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i had to sit down for two months. i'm all for the self building and having own control of your life. i want the whole city to be like that. let's have a look at the travel situation. lets get a look at the weather now with lucy martin. hello, good morning.
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plenty of dry and settled weather to come over the next few days with increasing amounts of sunshine. today we will stay dry with some sunny spells, i think we will see increasing amounts of cloud through the afternoon. so we start this morning with some sunny spells. as the day wears on, the cloud will tend to increase. feeling pleasant with sunshine and temperatures at a maximum of around 21 celsius, not sitting too far away from the average for this time of year, which is around 22 celsius. as we go through this evening there will be some late spells of sunshine and overnight it will stay dry, there will be some cloud but also some clear spells. temperatures fall into an overnight low of 10—14 celsius. tomorrow, then, starts off with a fair amount of warm spells of sunshine. cloud will tend to bubble up through the middle part of the day but remaining dry with temperatures again in the low 20s. increasing amounts of sunshine, though, for thursday with the temperates picking up. that's it for now. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom soon.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. now back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: a stowaway who's believed to have fallen from a passenger plane bound for heathrow has been found dead in a garden in west london. police say the body, believed to be that of a man, fell from a flight originating from nairobi. a bag, water and some food were found in the plane's landing gear compartment when it arrived at the airport. police in hong kong have used tear gas to evict protesters who ransacked the territory's parliament building. the activists had broken away from a peaceful protest to mark the 22nd anniversary of hong kong's transfer of power from britain to china. beijing said that britain needed to "know its place and stop interfering" in what was a "purely internal affair". the two men competing to become the next prime minister
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are expected to face tough questions today, when they appear at a hustings event in northern ireland. both borisjohnson and jeremy hunt have said they're opposed to what's known as the backstop, which is designed to guarantee there'll be no physical checks along the irish border after brexit. the result of the leadership election will be announced on the 23rd ofjuly. the bbc‘s annual report which shows the salaries of high paid on—air staff is published later this morning. the top 10 earners now include three women — radio 2's zoe ball and vanessa feltz and the presenter of strictly come dancing, claudia winkleman. the gender pay gap across the bbc has fallen to 6.7%. 1% less than last year. do you ever sing to your plants? no, ican do you ever sing to your plants? no, i can confirm that, absolutely not. what about serenading cattle? have a
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look at this. this is a vet that serenades to cows, singing opera. you've probably heard that singing to your plants could make them grow bigger, but what about serenading cattle? known as the singing vet, alfonso camassa has brought a taste of italy to the hampshire countryside. he believes his music has a calming effect on the animals. on bended knees as well. and he takes his unique approach to veterinary treatment seriously, training with a professional opera coach every week. i love this. local farmers say they are both impressed and amused, but the verdict is still out on what the patients think. it is quite an anchor chief as well. it is quite an anchor chief as well. it is quite an anchor chief as well. it is almost like he is calling them. like an italian doctor doolittle. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather.
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she was at wimbledon yesterday but today she is in lyon because, sally, the drop trend on twitter is england usa. -- the drop trend on twitter is england usa. —— top trend. it is a huge opportunity for phil neville's england to make it to the final of the world cup. all ready and it is only early. how are we getting through the day? this is a date we have been looking forward to. i saw a piece on phil neville whose said he isa a piece on phil neville whose said he is a coach who has fallen in love with the women's game and you can see that. he is so relaxed and i really like the tone he is setting at press conferences and i think that really spreads through the rest of the camp you can see in the squad. you said it, tonight is the big night. today is the day for
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england's lionesses as they look to make it into a women's world cup final for the first time. their brilliant campaign so far has seen them win all five of their matches here in france, including that convincing 3—0 victory against norway in the quarter finals on thursday. england have only conceded one goal in the whole tournament. everything is pointing towards a good performance tonight. there is a realfeeling here that england's campaign is building to something special, but they face a tough task against the usa in lyon today, who are the world champions after winning this tournament in canada four years ago. i think we are all born winners, that is our mentality. we came here to win the world cup and that is still our aim. ijust think we're going to bring the ultimate energy, we're going to be 100% going out there and win the physical battle. and make sure that we are clinical. i think that's something that we've done really well in the tournament so far. we have created a lot but we have also finished and so i think that's
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something that we're obviously going to g oout ther and try and do. 100% believe we are going to do it. they are the best team in the world, without a shadow of a doubt. their record is phenomenal. the culture's record is phenomenal. you know, jill. but i'm not worried about anything. never do. never worry about the opposition. we concentrate a lot on what we can do, how we are going to try and win a game and our strengths and our values and the style of play that we want to play is the most important thing. eight more british singles players are in action at wimbledon today. they'll all be looking to join heather watson and kyle edmund who both made it through to round two safely, but the opening day belonged to the incredible 15—year—old american cori gauff. what an incredible performance. she is the youngest player to qualify for the main draw in the modern era, but beat the five—time wimbledon champion venus williams. joe lynskey reports. this is how it feels
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to play your rival at 15 years old and win. for cori gauf and her parentsjust making it to wimbledon was the dream. she was never meant to beat a player 24 years her senior. when gauf was born, venus williams had already won four majors but here the youngster took this match to the champion. right now she is outside the world's top 300 but this remarkable win means that will surely change. and the hero she says has got her this far is her opponent. after the match i told thatjust thank you for everything she did and i would not be here if it wasn't for her and i was just telling her that she's so inspiring. like, i always wanted to tell her that. but williams was not the only grand slam winner to fall on the first day. japan's naomi osaka's the world number two but goes home in round one. she said losing to yulia putintseva made her want to cry. how different a feeling for britain's heather watson. on court 12, this the release of a player who has battle on—court struggles
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and on—line abuse. she'll hoped beating the qualifier, caty mcnally, brings more happy times. today, eight more britons will try and follow what watson and kyle edmund did, enter round two. the men's number one made the perfect start in straight sets, on centre. leading the way in the men's game now is novak djokovic. this kind of geometry makes him so hard to catch. the defending champion opened the tournament in straight sets and with few dramas. but this unique day at wimbledon will go down for different reasons, there is a new star with the world at their feet. joe lynskey, bbc news. among those starting their wimbledon campaign today is johanna konta. the british number one faces the unseeded romanian ana bogdan on court one. she reached the semi finals at this year's french open. i spoke to her about staying grounded, her summer so far and what makes this tournament so special.
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wimbledon is so unique, it's so different. it is full of tradition. it is the grandest stage we have in the sport. i love that its home. for me, i feel incredibly lucky and blessed that this is my home slam. the last time we saw you was over in paris. that match — we followed you through the french open, you just seemed so focused and cool and calm. what happened ? i felt really good the whole fortnight. i really enjoyed it. i was really immersed in the tennis that i was playing. i was immersed injust being there and wanting to be there till the very end and unfortunately i did not to stay till the very, very end. to be in another grand slam semi—final, especially my first one since wimbledon here in 2017, i was just really pleased to be back in that position. you are so good at staying positive and it is a mentally tough game, isn't it?
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i know i've harped on about perspective quite a few times but it very important to me and it really enables me to stay grounded and to just really stay true to my values which ultimately make up who i am and why i play the sport, and why i compete and why i train, why i do all of it. i will either come away with the win or i won't but either way life goes on. really important question now — tell me about the dog? well, bono is brilliant. all he really cares about is that he can come lie on my lap when he wants to, he can get a belly rub, or he can get like a neck scratch, and someone throws the tennis ball for him. i mean, that's basically, you know, that's priorities right there. i mean he's got a good life. i want his life. i kind of have his life, i play with tennis balls too. sounds like all of us, really. it was lovely to see you. thank you. sri lanka beat the west indies in the cricket world cup — both sides knowing they couldn't
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qualify for the semi finals of the tournament. but the fans in durham got their moneys worth as the game went to the wire. chris gayle can be worth the admission alone, but he was unable to lead the chase much to the disappointment of the postar rhianna who was watching on. the windies eventually fell 23 runs short. and it's a huge day for england's women today as they start their ashes series against australia. their series is decided on points, across 3 one day internationals, three twenty20 matches and one test. england haven't held the ashes since 2014. i have been looking for omens for you. how the game here in lyon is going to go, playing usa for the final. when i arrived at the hotel, the door handle is alliance had. i know that's because we are in lyon but surely that is a sign. that is a
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good sign, just keep looking out for them. that could be crucial. did it have a main honoured? yes, a big man. i will send you a picture of it later. i will post a picture of it. i think it is a sign. thank you very much. you are about to be usurped by ca role much. you are about to be usurped by carole because you talk about a door handle that is animal shape but she has a real one. do your business, there it is. rufus is in town. isn't he beautiful. good morning everyone. tell us a bit about him. how old is the best make his coming to 11 years old and he grew up here, it has been his playground forever
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and he works to scare away the pigeons to prevent them causing any trouble. does he work with other colleagues? he does but during this time of year it is his domain and he rules the roost. how does he work with the retractable roof at number one? he is having a great time and he keeps disappearing, finding new looks and crannies. how do you train a harris hawk to do as he does? he is essentially a while bird so he will do what he does. but it is intensive, and it is all food motivated. if you came along with a bigger piece of food he would more likely go to you than me. a pleasure talking to you. there he goes. look
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at that, oh, my goodness, he is gorgeous. we are now in a centre court and the sun is beating down. we have blue skies and the forecast for wimbledon is a dry one. through the course of today, you will find more far developing but the sun will come out once again and temperatures up come out once again and temperatures up to about 21 degrees with a gentle breeze. sunny spells for the uk as a whole. some rain in scotland and northern ireland but they are well scattered. nine o'clock this morning, scotland will have those showers. in between some rights guys or indeed some sunny skies. chilli where we have had the skies by night. brighter
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skies as we push into north—east england. then it becomes time for the rest of england and wales. where we had the clear skies, where we had the sunshine, it would be a chilly start. temperatures picking up now but areas of cloud and patchy mist and fog across parts. cloud coming ina and fog across parts. cloud coming in a north—westerly breeze, drifting further east was. at times, lots of cloud but then it will thin and break and we will see sunny skies. temperatures up to 21—22 in the south—east and 13, a bit below par, across a far north of scotland. through this evening and overnight, clear skies, the temperature dropping particularly in rural areas but where we have the cloud, temperatures holding up a bit more. whether front coming up
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temperatures holding up a bit more. whetherfront coming up introducing spots of rain. the wind will also start to strengthen as well. overnight, between eight and 13 in towns and cities. tomorrow we start off with some clear skies, sunshine. after that silly start. we will carry on with showery outbreaks of rain and 45 miles per hour winds. the best of the sunshine tomorrow will be in wales and south—west england and the top temperature up to about 22. temperatures rise a little bit more after that on wednesday. isn't rufus just gorgeous! he's off doing is way? he is, he is up on the roof. he is gone. causing havoc some angst opinions. it's hisjob. it's what causing havoc some angst opinions. it's his job. it's what is there for. it's 7:45am, some interesting news for you.
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one in five british businesses have had a recent cyberattack that's cost their business financially. sean's got a professional hacker with him. good morning. who better to have with us, one of the good guys. good morning everybody. clearly a big issue for businesses. we have been asking bosses in a survey about how vulnerable their businesses have been. —— a survey has been. people are often tight—lipped about admitting this kind of thing, but this was done anonymously. one in five british businesses have had a recent cyberattack that's cost their business financially, according to an anonymous survey. and it cost some of them a lot, in some cases as much as £500,000. it can add up to quite a lot. i'm joined now by rob shapland who is paid by big companies to break into their systems. it is not a good way of putting it, rob? i get paid by companies to break into their companies through cyber attacks, but also physically enter the cyber attacks, but also physically enterthe building, cyber attacks, but also physically enter the building, perhaps cyber attacks, but also physically enterthe building, perhaps dressing up enterthe building, perhaps dressing up as enterthe building, perhaps dressing upasa enterthe building, perhaps dressing up as a security guard and hacking
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into their systems. let's start with the idea of companies losing a lot of money, and hacking taking place. who is it that is trying to get into these companies to get information? quite a lot of people might want to do it. organised personal groups used to rob banks, they are now moving into cybercrime, it's less risky for them. they may try to influence someone who is working for the company. it might be easier to bribe a cleaner, perhaps put in a usb to log the keystrokes, then you could login as someone who works there and steal the information on there and steal the information on the network. if that was a large pharmaceutical company, you could steal plans for drugs, and i would be worth millions, potentially. so instead of robbing a jewellery store, they might not necessarily have the coding capabilities that, you see something like this, it's all about computers and hacking,
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like you see in the movies, that is it not really that high—tech? like you see in the movies, that is it not really that high-tech? we often it not really that high-tech? we ofte n target it not really that high-tech? we often target the staff. it movies you see a hacker in a basement listening to metal music and tapping away. but it's easier to target the people who work at the company. send a fishing e—mail, like sending a link oran a fishing e—mail, like sending a link or an attachment —— phishing, pretend to be from a hotel they have been to recently and say they have left some valuables, click on the photos. now they've opened an attachment in an e—mail, you can potentially access their computer and steal information from that computer. even for you, dressing up asa computer. even for you, dressing up as a security guard, is this something that you've gone and done that you never thought you would be able to get away with? loads and loads of times. people are very trusting, which is nice, it often makes it easy for me to just a and get into their building. once i'm
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inside, i'm normally trusted. especially in a big company with thousands of people, if you are co mforta ble, thousands of people, if you are comfortable, you make yourself a cup of coffee, you sit down at the desk area and you just hack away from the inside. for anybody tuned in, this is all legal. i am hired by the company, i have a form saying it is all legally allowed and afterwards we help them defend against the things we used against them, which is why in the survey a lot of companies are saying they are affected by real—life parks because it's quite easy to do, to be honest. so we make sure we are helping small businesses defend through doing the type of testing i'm talking about but also having cyber insurance to help if they are attacked. and with those staff, sort of, i might be going into work today thinking, hang on, is that a real security guard, a real cleaner? are they one of us or are they working for some organised crime group? how big a deal is this?
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those things are quite rare. it is normally done by temp remark attacks, that is why not clicking on e—mails is important to us mark phishing attacks. —— phishing. but if you do get hit, if you have cyber insurance, that can help you be covered. if you've got protection and follow—up as well, you've got the best of both worlds. rob shapland, personal hacker with a few ideas there stop its not all about coding and the biggest computer technology out there. simply dressing up as a security guard, it seems like a joke, but it's costing businesses a lot of money. thank you. tonight, the lionesses take on the usa as they battle for a place in the women's world cup final, and as anyone familiar with the team will know, no fewer than seven of the squad come from the north east of england. are you going to college? —— call
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it's? anyone who knows about the team, knows most of the team comes from the north—east of england. team, knows most of the team comes from the north-east of england. such a hotbed of talent. the first elite football academies for school girls are going to be launched there. john maguire is at one of them for us this morning. we are up at the north—east, with one of the schools involved in the new academies that are going to be setting up in september. the girls are being —— have been trained this morning, lots of skill involved, dedication and enthusiasm as well. they have really enjoyed playing. they've been out here for an hour already, having a fantastic time. good morning to you, you may recognise stephen and peter. peter,
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what's it going to mean for the girl's future —— girls' future? what's it going to mean for the girl's future -- girls' future? the hope is the international profile of football as it is now, it gives them a real footpath and football as it is now, it gives them a realfootpath and projects football as it is now, it gives them a real footpath and projects them hopefully towards professional football for some of the girls. it's an exciting opportunity. incredible ambition. francesco, so much pressure on schools. will it be difficult to balance it? how will you make sure you keep all the plates spinning? in terms of the school we aim to give children the best possible educational outcomes as well, so that's why the programme is built around excellence for academic potential for children, but also excellence for their sporting potential too, so we see it as a blend of both things and yes, it does pose some of the distal
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challenges for us, but we think of on what terms it offers for up—and—coming, talented potential footballers, that is what we want to see. stephen, we were talking earlier before we went on air, the women because my game has changed dramatically, —— women's game, the lionesses' game is inspiring the girls. now you want to put the foundation since to give them a pathway? it's a great opportunity, we are speaking about every age group, they are all talking about the women's game, and the competition so far, for these young girls, coming into the academy with the inspiration, is great. some of these girls have never had an opportunity like this so who knows, maybe these girls will surpass them, thatis maybe these girls will surpass them, that is the aim. that's the aim of five years of really good coaching alongside their education. it can only mean good things for the
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women's game. if they can get to a world cup final without this infrastructure behind them, the sky's limit? it's only going to get bigger and better. ten years ago you wouldn't have heard of something like this or even the women's world cup, but now it is on prime tv. these girls, the more they see that, the more they are going to want to come out and join the academy. even some girls who wouldn't normally be too into it, having a girls only academy, you might see some better players come along that we might not have seen in the past. all the best with this, let's talk to some stars of the future. i actually mean stars of the future. i actually mean stars of the future. i actually mean stars of the present, because look at theirs. this is the efl girls cup. tell us all about that. it was an amazing experience. who did you beat? bristol. what was the score?
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3-1. wembley is huge, it's an incredible place. were you nervous before the game? one of our team is was sick the night before, so nervous. but when we got out it was like playing on the school field, just amazing. good for you. are you watching the game tonight? i think england will win and we will get to the finals. eight that would be amazing. wouldn't that be absolutely amazing? i've been watching you play this morning, would you like to be professional players? would you like to follow in the footsteps of all of these incredible women from the north—east? these incredible women from the north-east? yeah. was your favourite player? steph horton. thank you very much indeed. it's been great to see you this morning. thanks to everybody here and as we've been staying all morning, the north—east isa staying all morning, the north—east is a real hotbed for football talent as we've seen so far in the women and men's game. have a look at these
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youngsters here, could they be the ones in the future? could they be future english lionesses? they could be. i love their optimism as well about tonight's game shared by dan here in the studio. i love the optimism. we've got a viral video, if you social media champions over the year. what is this one cold? the bottle top challenge. you've got to try and get box that around and then knock it off. it looks great when he does it extremely dangerous when other people do it. the aim is to see if you can do it. this is conor mcgregor having a go and... is it successful? oh, look at that. it looks quite snazzy when it's done properly. i've got a bottle. no, you are not. get off my side of the
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sofa! (bottle falls over) the good news is he hasn't broken the bottle, or the studio, all his food. oh, my goodness. more on that later. next, news, traveland weather. you're right. detectives investigating a series of assaults and robberies on women in south london have arrested a man. there have been six separate attacks in south norwood country park during may and june. four of the victims were sexually assaulted. the women were in their 30s to 60s and were walking orjogging — five of them had dogs with them. all the incidents happened in broad daylight.
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could self—building homes be part of the answer to the london housing crisis? in amsterdam, the city has been actively encouraging self builders since the financial crisis meant developers, were building fewer homes in the city. it's set aside 70% of this site just for self builders. but sometimes the process can take years and a lot of patience. wim has been planning and building his home for seven yea rs. in the beginning it was really jolly, jolly, we're going to do this and it will be beautiful. and it takes money and energy. i had to sit down for two months. i am all for the self building and have your own control of your life. i think the whole city should be like this.
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and there is disruption on southeastern services through london bridge due to urgent track repairs. on the roads, traffic is slow as you can see in both directions. in town eversholt street remains closed in both directions between the euston road and grafton place. now let's get a check on the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. plenty of dry and settled weather to come over the next few days with increasing amounts of sunshine. today we will stay dry with some sunny spells, i think we will see increasing amounts of cloud through the afternoon. so we start this morning with some sunny spells. as the day wears on, the cloud will tend to increase. feeling pleasant with sunshine and temperatures at a maximum of around 21 celsius, not sitting too far away from the average for this time
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of year, which is around 22 celsius. as we go through this evening there will be some late spells of sunshine and overnight it will stay dry, there will be some cloud but also some clear spells. temperatures fall into an overnight low of 10—14 celsius. tomorrow, then, starts off with a fair amount of warm spells of sunshine. cloud will tend to bubble up through the middle part of the day but remaining dry with temperatures again in the low 20s. increasing amounts of sunshine, though, for thursday with the temperates picking up. that's it for now. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: a stowaway falls to their death from a kenya airways flight bound for heathrow into a garden in west london.
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protestors are evicted with tear gas from hong kong's parliament as china warns britain not to interfere in its former colony. it's semifinal day for england's lionesses. they face the usa here in lyon as they bid to reach a women's world cup final for the first time. good luck, girls. really rooting for you before your semifinal and, yeah, let's go, lionesses! whoo! we'll hear from johanna konta as she begins her wimbledon campaign, but it was 15—year—old cori gauff who made headlines on day one, beating five times champion venus williams. dealing with problem gambling. five of the uk's biggest betting firms pledge more cash to tackle the issue — but is it too little too late? good morning from wimbledon. the sun
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is beating down, the focus for wimbledon should stay dry, for the uk as wimbledon should stay dry, for the ukasa wimbledon should stay dry, for the uk as a whole, lots of dry weather, some sunshine and a few showers across the north of scotland. i will have more in 15 minutes. it's tuesday the 2nd ofjuly. our top story: a stowaway who's believed to have fallen from the landing gear of a passenger plane bound for heathrow has been found dead in a garden in london. the body was discovered in clapham. our correspondent keith doyle joins us from there now. people are turning on their tvs all the this morning, it is an amazing story, what do we know? this part of london is on the heathrow flight path, hundreds of achraf flight directly overhead everyday. let hundreds of achraf. police believe this man fell from a kenya airways flight this man fell from a kenya airways flight and sent afternoon, they
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believe he fell when the landing gear was deployed as the aeroplane made descent into heathrow airport. the kenya airways flight kq100 took off at 7:19am uk time on sunday morning from the kenya capital nairobi. it landed at around 3:50pm in london, nine hours in the air. police were called shortly after 3:30pm on sunday, where a body landed. neighbours say that the body landed. neighbours say that the body landed just feet away from where somebody was sunbathing in a garden. police believe it was a stowaway, a bag, food and water was found in the fuselage of the aeroplane at heathrow airport. this person would have experienced horrendous conditions, not only a lack of oxygen but temperatures as low as -60
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oxygen but temperatures as low as —60 celsius in the fuselage of the plane during most of that nine—hour flight. this plane during most of that nine—hour flight. this isn't the first time this has happened in west london. in recent yea rs this has happened in west london. in recent years two bodies have been found on the streets of west london, believed to be from stowaways who had died in the similar circumstances. a metropolitan police this morning saying they are doing everything to try to identify who this man is. —— the metropolitan police this morning saying. police in hong kong have used tear gas to evict protesters who ransacked the territory's parliament building. the activists had broken away from a peaceful protest to mark the 22nd anniversary of hong kong's transfer of power from britain to china. beijing said that britain needed to "know its place and stop interfering" in what was a "purely internal affair." our correspondent karishma vaswani has more. they came in their hundreds, smashing windows and ramming doors, using whatever they could find, iron fences, shopping carts, even umbrellas. once inside, they spray—painted the hong kong emblem black, covering the words "the people's republic of china", trying to erase any sign
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of beijing's influence here. but even as they left a trail of distruction in their wake, some signs that this wasn't simply about ramsacking the place. photos widely shared on social media appear to show signs written by the protesters, posted on some of the historical items in the building, saying "leave these alone, these are relics". money left in the canteen fridge for drinks, with post—its saying "we are not thieves". in a press conference, in the early hours of the morning, chief executive carrie lam condemned their actions. nothing is more important than the rule of law in hong kong. so i hope the community at large will agree with us that, with these violent acts that we have seen, it is right for us to condemn it and hope society will return to normal as soon as possible. ms lam's defence for not sending in the police to break up the protesters earlier inside legco is that she did not want anyone
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to get hurt, but questions are asked about whether this was a tactic to change the narrative in her favour. meanwhile, for the protesters, they may believe that their actions last night will get them closer to their goal, but for many here in hong kong, they are now wondering whether those actions hurt more than helped their objectives. karishma vaswani, bbc news, hong kong. the two men competing to become the next prime minister are expected to face tough questions today, when they appear at a hustings event in northern ireland. both boris johnson and jeremy hunt have said they're opposed to what's known as the backstop, which is designed to guarantee there'll be no physical checks along the irish border after brexit. the result of the leadership election will be announced on the 23rd ofjuly. the bbc‘s annual report which shows the salaries of high paid on—air staff is published later this morning. the top ten earners now includes three women — zoe ball, claudia winkleman and vanessa feltz. our media editor, amol rajan joins us now.
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all the figures are released at 11am, what can you tell? this is the first year this list has been published, it includes me, it includes us, are now broadcasters who earn over £150,000. there was a big outcry when it was first released about the inequality in pay between men and women. there are two separate issues, one is the overall gender pay gap across the bbc, where the bbc has made some progress, the other is the issue of equal pay. the overall gender pay gap is down from 7.6% to 6.7%. when the list was first published, 75% of the top earners were men, now it is 55%. there are three women in the top ten, three years ago there were none in the top 12. but there is a separate issue of equal pay act, lots of female members of staff at the bbc in particularfeel the lots of female members of staff at the bbc in particular feel the whole process of trying to get the same pay as men for doing the same job, a
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legal requirement, has been bogged down in an unfair culture. there is an independent investigation by the equalities and human rights commission looking at that. those issues will dominate headlines again. there is a separate issue that the free licence fee for people aged over 75, the bbc announced it will change that so it will be means tested from next year, tied to people who get pension credit, meaning and effect 3 million people who have been quite accustomed to this benefit will lose that, and i think that context will make some of the salaries today, with gary lineker close to £2 million at the top, look pretty i watering. the full report will be published at 11:00 this morning, and you can see coverage of it on the bbc news channel and bbc news website. a medieval chess piece bought forjust five pounds could sell for one million at an auction at sotheby‘s today. it's one of the lewis chessmen pieces,
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which date back to late 12th century scandinavia. the edinburgh family who bought it in 1964, had kept it in a drawer without realising its significance. 1 million p! it is very beautiful. but you would pass it on for £1 million. fingers crossed we will have good news tomorrow morning, big smiles on the faces. just imagine it for a moment. the lionesses are into the world cup final for the first time, phil neville's team beat the usa 8-0! time, phil neville's team beat the usa 8—0! hopefully we will be saying that to sally nugent tomorrow. stop! you can't say that! you cannot say that yet! good morning. please,
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someone keep mr walker quiet for another 24—hour is! that could be what we are saying, standing here in 24 others after this crunch match against the usa. it is beautiful in lyon, the sun is shining, it is glorious, it is a fantastic city, the stadium is about 12 miles away. i have seen lots of american fans are not quite so many english fans yet. there is plenty of time. let's see how the lionesses have been doing so far. lucy bronze is going for it. it is in, england have a perfect start! england's fastest ever world cup goal, two minutes! they are in the lead! here is lucy
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bronze! what a goal! a chance for ellen white for england! yes, yes, yes! isn't that great to see? we are joined by jan o'neill from isn't that great to see? we are joined byjan o'neill from she kicks magazine. it is safe to say that those players are the calmest people in lyon this morning? it is such a
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massive game and what could happen if they were to win this and get to match 52, that is what we are calling it, we are not illogical at the final. we don't say the words world cup final, it is match 52. for us watching these focused, confident young women, we are the one who had to keep it under wraps. i'll be getting a bit carried away with ourselves? they face a usa team who are formidable. —— are we getting a bit carried away with ourselves? about they are ranked number one, they have been there, done that. they are the current champions, they are so strong physically. if people saw the game against france in a stadium with awesome atmosphere, they controlled the game, the management was superb, they score early, england need to watch for
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that. lots of women's european teams have a way to catch up with the us, historically, just because us women's soccer has been, for years, streets ahead ? a women's soccer has been, for years, streets ahead? a bloke and the couege streets ahead? a bloke and the college game hasn't set them up for that. from 18 to 21 or 22 they are almost professional athletes. but now we have professional athletes in europe and seven of the eight quarters finalists were european, now we hope to get two european teams in the final. match 52, sorry! everyone talks about the difference in fitness between the american players and european players, is that still the case. are the us team fitter than anyone? as i alluded to with the strength and conditioning from the college system, it has given them a head start but the gap has closed. they are supreme athletes, but if you look at the other teams in the semifinals, they
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are up there with them. the rotation of the squads that have made the la st of the squads that have made the last four has been key. you can almost look at team sheets in the quarterfinals and see who had played the most understand work out who would win. phil neville's rotation has been successful. lovely to talk to you. you are a bag of nerves. tired but excited. sits down and have a nice cup of tea with a sugar in. coffee with sugar! there is definitely a real sense of tension, but there are lots and lots of american fans wondering about, we are still looking for some england fans. yes, they make a difference, don't they? absolutely. the interesting thing is that the usa knocked at the host nation, france, so lots of french people will be cheering on england tonight because
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of that, i think. iam growing i am growing in confidence as the programme continues. this is the night, louise. isaid programme continues. this is the night, louise. i said that earlier you are a true football fan, but you just have a patch in your heart which is full of hope. i had this argument regularly with people who are not english. it's coming home, it is said with a huge degree of irony, and understanding that it probably isn't coming home, but it is the belief that it might at some stage come home. in the next 50 yea rs! stage come home. in the next 50 years! it is not a guarantee, you do not believe you are better than anybody else. by this time tomorrow we will know the answer, hopefully it is positive. the hope guilty sometimes, but it is there and it is beautiful while it lasts. —— the hope kills you at times. tune into bbc one or the iplayer from 7:30 tonight for all of the build up.
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there'll also be commentary on bbc radio 5 live and on the bbc sport website and app. basically, you can find it pretty much wherever you want. will you just be watching the telly or will it be lots of phones? i am calling at the lioness zone. i have snacks. imight wearan at the lioness zone. i have snacks. i might wear an outfit. i am fully ready for it. sally will be in lyon tomorrow, hopefully celebrating england's getting to the final. it's going to happen! it's almost infectious. let's get the weather from carol who's at wimbledon again for us this morning. iam i am still in centre court and the blue sky above us, not a cloud in the sky. wimbledon are looking at how environmentally friendly they have been in the past, they had made some amazing changes this year. if there is a player who needs a tennis racket restrung, one of the ball boys or girls will take it to be restrung. in the past, on its turn
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that tennis racket would have been wrapped in plastic, that will not happen anymore, it will come back without the plastic to the court that the player needs it on. if you are coming to wimbledon you can water with you yourself and put it in an opaque or metal or transparent bottle, and there are lots of places, 100 water banks around wimbledon, to fill your bottle of water again. you will need it today because it will be hot again. the forecast is dry for wimbledon, temperatures up to around 21. starting up sunny, may be more cloud developing through the day like yesterday, at times it will feel cloudy but it will not last, it is july anderson will break through so we will see further sunny intervals. the forecast for us all is largely dry with sunny skies, there are some skies and the forecast but we will not all see them. the likelihood of seeing showers in scotland, northern
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ireland and cumbria. zooming into scotla nd ireland and cumbria. zooming into scotland at 9am, we have bright spells, meaning their areas of cloud, sunny spells, clear skies at night, a chilly start on some showers across northern ireland with sunny spells in between, across cumbria with sunny spells in between. with showers we do not all see them. a brighter start for north—east england, coming south across the rest of england and wales, chasing cloud and sunshine but some patchy mist and fog across the south—west lifting readily in the south—west lifting readily in the next couple of hours. through the next couple of hours. through the day, a bit more cloud coming in from the west on the north—westerly, flattening out. that is what we mean by saying there will be areas of cloud at times but then city intervals, and the showers will fade particularly in the latter part of the afternoon. temperatures raining from 14 in the north to highs of around 22 or 23 in the south—east, don't forget your sunscreen, pollen levels in england and wales are high
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or very high. for most of scotland and northern ireland they are moderate, for the north of scotland they are low. a quiet night tonight, showers fading, clearerskies. they are low. a quiet night tonight, showers fading, clearer skies. a new weather front coming into the north—west introducing rain and the wind will strengthen. the weather front will cross the far north of scotland, bringing showery outbreaks of rain and gusty winds, gusting 35 to 45 mph. lengthy sunny skies tomorrow. sunny is for the long scots wales and south—west england, the top temperature tomorrow up to 22. -- the top temperature tomorrow up to 22. —— sunniest. studio: i love they still have orange squash on the umpire's chair. robinson's. other squash is available! this time yesterday we brought you live pictures of
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protesters in hong kong trying to break into the parliament building. the activists had broken away from a peaceful protest to mark the 22nd anniversary of hong kong's transfer of power from britain to china. they were evicted by police using tear gas last night. let's discuss this with the former chair of the hong kong democratic party, emily lau. thank you for coming onto the programme and giving us more detail. what did you make of the scenes inside and outside the building?” was not inside the building or in the vicinity but i saw many pictures on television, we were alarmed and disturbed, of course. but i guess we have to understand the sense of frustration and disillusionment and anger of the young people who saw several marchers with a million or more than a million people taking part. what did the chief executive, carrie lam, do? nothing. she would not respond to the reasonable
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demands that the extradition bill should be withdrawn. many people think it is very reasonable, she thinks it will die nextjuly but we wa nt thinks it will die nextjuly but we want that bill withdrawn. and to set up want that bill withdrawn. and to set upa want that bill withdrawn. and to set up a commission of inquiry to see the police violence last week. so these are very reasonable demands but carrie lam brush them all aside and the young people feel very, very frustrated and angry. can i put some of carrie lam's comment to you? she said the ra nsacking of carrie lam's comment to you? she said the ransacking and some of the damage to the main chamber shocks a lot of people. of course, it is the first time it has happened in hong kong. but i think the big marchers, so many young people taking part, also shocked a lot of people not just in hong kong but all over the world, that young people care so much about their future and also apprehensive. i am
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much about their future and also apprehensive. iam not much about their future and also apprehensive. i am not condoning violence but i am saying that these young people and at the hong kong people have spoken very loudly and clearly with these huge marchers so the next thing we would like to see is for carrie lam and her administration to address those demands and engage with the public, particularly the young people. are you and some of the other pro—democracy campaigners worried or concerned about the possible chinese reaction? of course i am very concerned. we know about the chinese communist government, it is not the red cross. another present xi jingping has finished with his meeting with president donald trump in osaka he is back in beijing and would be spending more time on the hong kong problem caused by carrie lam. but we don't want any harsh crackdown on hong kong. my dear front, we are hong kong. we are not
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tournament square. hong kong is still one of the freest and safest cities in the people's republic of china and in the world. and so we wa nt to china and in the world. and so we want to have our freedoms, our rule of law, our personal safety preserved under the promise by britain and china. so make sure the promise will not be broken. can i ask about the demonstrations, you are making requests of carrie lam and others in charge, do you think the demonstrations will continue until there is a break in this?” think people will continue to protest a nd think people will continue to protest and we still have the freedom to protest, my dear. but of course i urge the protesters, young and old, to exercise self—control and old, to exercise self—control and be reasonable. we all know the world is watching and we do not want
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people to start losing support for us. we thank the international community which has given us wall—to—wall coverage for the last two weeks and we don't want them to say oh, wow, you arejust two weeks and we don't want them to say oh, wow, you are just a two weeks and we don't want them to say oh, wow, you arejust a bunch two weeks and we don't want them to say oh, wow, you are just a bunch of people in other countries. we are civilised people. we urge the authorities to listen to the voices of the people which have been expressed so loudly and clearly. very good to talk to you, the former chair of the hong kong democratic party, emily lau. clearly passionate about hong kong. and making a clear point to the authorities in hong kong and the is and concerns about what might happen, repercussions from the chinese. we shall continue to watch very closely. we have been called everything, guys, my gear.”
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enjoy it. it is nice. frankly, my dear, i don't give a damn. the betting industry will give more support to problem gamblers? gulp and the next question is whether it is enough. there is already a volu nta ry levy is enough. there is already a voluntary levy of 0.1% other gambling money that comes in, they say they are a thing that from 0.1% to 1%, which means it will be £60 million of contributions again. —— they say they are increasing about. the gambling industry use phrases like a step change, unprecedented level of commitment, but that probably says a lot about whether levels of commitment have been in yea rs levels of commitment have been in years gone by. we have already had the nhs england chief executive saying that they need to be paying way more towards this kind of stuff, the gambling companies, compared to their marketing budgets it pales into insignificance. a couple of
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numbers to put it in perspective, william hill, ladbrokes, paddy power, sky bet, bet 365, the big companies, but 365j the co—founder and boss £265 million last year. —— paid their co—founder and boss. the whole industry makes billions of pounds because of people betting on fixed odds betting terminals like the things behind us, horse racing, betting on the football. £60 million contribution by 2023, there will be lots of questions about whether that is enough. thank you very much. in the next half—hour we will be speaking to footballer and singer—songwriter chelsey grimes. she has written for the likes of little mix and dua lipa. will she be
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as optimistic as you? i hope so. we will be back with sally in lyon and carolyn wimbledon. now your regional travel and weather. good morning. it has been a cool start to the day and temperatures got into single figures this morning. for many it is a dry start and they will be varying amounts of cloud with sunshine. high pressure in charge of the weather at the moment. it is situated towards the west but extending its influence across the uk. we have this north—westerly wind, particularly across scotland and northern ireland where it will continue to bring in a few showers this morning. those become fewer and further between this afternoon. elsewhere, if you
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started with sunshine this morning you will notice the clouds building up. if you had cloud this morning, it will disappear. looking at sunny spells this afternoon and temperatures getting up to 17 to 21 degrees. but a bit cooler than that on the coasts of the far north and west. through tonight, not a great deal of change, there will be clear spells that will allow temperatures to fall down into single figures, particularly in the countryside. temperature is perhaps no lower than 14 degrees in london. throughout wednesday, a dry and bright start for many of us. a bit more cloud across scotland and northern ireland. that will bring in more persistent showers to the far north of scotla nd persistent showers to the far north of scotland during wednesday. otherwise temperatures are fairly similarto otherwise temperatures are fairly similar to the next couple of days with some sunny spells, temperatures getting into the low 20s in the south. high pressure is there on thursday but notices weather front extending its way southwards and put into scotland so during thursday,
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there will be outbreaks of rain in there will be outbreaks of rain in the far north of scotland. we could see about 25 to 30 millimetres in the west of scotland by the end of the west of scotland by the end of the day. further south, the west of scotland by the end of the day. furthersouth, plenty the west of scotland by the end of the day. further south, plenty of sunshine throughout thursday. temperatures creeping up in the south so up to 24, maybe 25 celsius in the capital. further north, 15 to 17 degrees. that is it from me, have a good day. goodbye.
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this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and maryam moshiri. trump's escalating trade wars. the us threatens the eu with tariffs on another $4 billion of goods — including italian cheese and scotch whisky. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 2nd ofjuly. president trump's new tariff threat comes as european leaders struggle to break the deadlock over who will take on the eu's topjobs. also in the programme...

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