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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 3, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: heartache for england as the lionesses are knocked out of the world cup in a dramatic semi—final. commentator: houghton. save! cheering. their dreams of glory were dashed when captain steph houghton missed a penalty minutes from the end. heartbroken because we were so close but i am proud of all the staff and players because we gave it everything. elsewhere this morning: homes fit for heroes — a hundred years after the first council houses, what's the future of social housing in britain today?
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the boss of tesco talks to breakfast, as the uk's biggest retailer celebrates turning 100. dave lewis talks to me about pay, getting rid of plastics, brexit and dad dancing. it's tennis' dream team — andy murray will partner serena williams in wimbledon's mixed doubles. the sun is shining in wimbledon once again. another dry day with temperatures up to 23 degrees. sunny skies with some cloud but wet and windy at times across the north. i will have more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday, the third ofjuly. our top story: it's not coming home. after a dramatic semi—final against the usa, the lionesses were last night knocked out of the women's world cup. it just wasn't meant to be for england, who suffered a 2—1 defeat at the hands of the usa.
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there was drama, there was hope of england it was a familiar story, yet again the world cup dream has ended in tears. defeat in the semi—final would be a failure, phil neville would be a failure, phil neville would say. we have done our very best. we have not left anything in oui’ best. we have not left anything in our dressing room and i told them that be no tears, we should be proud. we touch the hearts of the nations back home and they have left everything on the foot field so i am happy. the usa put england under pressure from the start. christen press headed the defending champions in front after nine minutes. instead of wilting in the heat, england hit back. this ellen white's six goal of the tournament. things were looking up the tournament. things were looking up that there is no keeping america
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quite for long. another cross, another header another goal for alex morgan. england still had plenty of fight left in them. white in the heart of it all. england were awarded a penalty and a lifeline. it was time for the captain to step up but steph houghton failed to seize the moment. a heartbreaking and to an impressive tournament. england's weight for a major trophy goes on. an impressive tournament. england's weight for a major trophy goes onlj thought we came so close and to then haveit thought we came so close and to then have it gone on a miss penalty, i was gutted. did not seem they wanted it enough. absolutely gutted and that was definitely a gold by ellen white. a fantastic ever, still very proud of the girls. four years' time, come on girls. england came here to win but it is the usa remain at the stuff bearers in a women's football. they have made progress and one plenty of friends in france
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yet again they have failed to take that final step and provide that transformational moment that they, the women's game and england fans are so the women's game and england fans are so desperate for. more than 53,000 people packed the stade de lyon for the match, and millions more were watching on television. including both of us, obviously. the bbc‘s north of england correspondent, judith moritz, reports on the fans who were roaring them on back home. short of being in lyon itself, this was one of the best places to watch the action, battersea park in south london, where the crowd lived through every twist and turn of the game. it is just england, isn't it. it isjust england, isn't it. but look at the cloud here tonight, you would not have this year 4 years ago. devastated. that penalty. across the uk on sofas and in bars,
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more than 23 million people have followed the competition on tv, double the number who watched four years ago. here in liverpool, it is personal. four of the lionesses come from merseyside alone. in fact, more than half of the entire squad hail from the north of england. over the pennines, the sheffield united women's team watched at their training ground. in liverpool, the crowd despaired during the tough moments of the second half and after the final whistle, the loss sank in. they tried so hard and they almost won it, devastating. they're playing against the world's best team ever, a fantastic performance. i don't think the best team won, to be honest. i think they've done the country proud again. disappointment, then, as the lionesses lost out but pride, too, in the performance they put in. judith moritz, bbc news.
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that says it all, the sort of sigh. the lionesses have been receiving support, commiserations and congratulations from across the nation on social media. outgoing prime minister theresa may tweeted that the team has "inspired millions" with how they played on the pitch and conducted themselves off it. gary lineker said that, despite the heartbreak of another semi—final loss for an english side, the team "did us proud". and denise lewis tweeted that the lionesses "played their hearts out" and "inspired a generation of young girls to believe". we'll be live in lyon with sally. i think she is recovering from last night. tell us how you. some people we re night. tell us how you. some people were annoyed at me because i got so positive yesterday. i received a long e—mail explaining why i should not have done that. you were very positive and i am not normally a negative person but i felt... i had
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a bad feeling. obesity now causes more cases of four common cancers than tobacco, according to a charity. cancer research uk says that bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancers are more likely to have been caused by being overweight than by smoking. but the charity's new billboard campaign highlighting the link has been accused of "fat—shaming" by social media users. the government has been criticised for unfairly raising families' hopes over access to medicinal cannabis, despite approving it's use last year. the drug was given the green light for prescription in november but a report by mps found it still isn't readily available. lauren moss reports. ben griffiths is ten years old and has cerebral palsy. untiljust a couple of months ago he was having more than 100 epileptic seizures every day. now they've dramatically reduced after a doctor issued a private prescription for
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medical cannabis oil. but it costs £2000 a month to import from holland and ben's mother says she feels let down by the system. i'm disappointed because it's a lost opportunity for them to help us as a family and many other families that are taking this. and it is helping our children right now and we can't sustain paying the vast amounts of money that we are privately in the uk to keep our children on these medications. i'm a cheeky monkey! last yearjo and other parents, including the mother of alfie, who also has epilepsy, handed a petition into downing street which prompted the government to change the law and allow medical cannabis to be legally prescribed in certain circumstances. but enquiry has found that it's still too difficult to get hold of and there are major gaps in research, which means that many products are unlicensed. we are failing future generation of
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children who are living with epilepsy syndrome which are difficult to treat with existing medicine. if we do not properly research what the place cannabis can have in available treatment. the committee is calling for clinical trials to take place as a matter of urgency and for medicine not to be confiscated from families who get it abroad. the department of health is that it will consider any further action take to improve access to cannabis—based products for medicinal use. but for desperate parents likejo it offers little immediate help to them or their children who need support now. lauren moss, bbc news. boris johnson has promised to review so called "sin taxes" on foods high in salt, fat and sugar to see if they unfairly penalise the lowest earners, if he becomes prime minister. the tory leadership contender wants to examine whether the levies are effective in helping people lead healthier lifestyles. opponentjeremy hunt said he would rather target manufacturers when it comes to less healthy products.
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a clean—up is underway in hong kong after pro—democracy activists stormed parliament and ransacked the building. the chinese government has condemned monday's protests and called for a zero tolerance approach to future demonstrations. hong kong's parliament building remains cordoned off while the damage is repaired. european leaders have put forward their choices for the top jobs in the eu after days of negotiations. the german defence minister, ursula von de leyen, has been nominated to replace jean—claude juncker as the head of the european commission. she'd be the first woman to take on the role. belgian prime minister charles michel has been recommended to replace european council president donald tusk. hundreds of thousands of people in south america witnessed a rare sight last night — a total eclipse of the sun. the moon's great shadow, or umbra, plunged parts of chile into darkness for a few seconds, before passing over the andes and across to argentina. a solar eclipse occurs when the moon
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passes between the earth and the sun, blocking its light. south america is also expected to see the world's next total solar eclipse, which will take place on the 14th of december next year. amazing piece. i want to get to a plane and see that. top spot $2000 to get and stand alongside some top astronomers, actually to get in there just to watch it, in the prime spot. let's take a look at today's papers. many of the front pages feature images from last night's women's world cup semi—final. the reason why i was a bit relu cta nt. the times has a photo of team captain steph houghton being comforted by manager phil neville after she missed a late penalty.
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it was such a good match, what a shame. the front page leads on a study by cancer research uk which found that obesity causes more cases of cancer than smoking. the lionesses are the pride of england, according to the metro. its front page also reports on boris johnson's plans to cut "sin taxes." the daily mirror focuses on the agony of england's narrow defeat. the main story there says the bbc is using a loophole to conceal millions that it has paid to its presenters. cruel end to england's world cup dream is how the daily telegraph describes the result. the photo there is of ellen white, who had an equalising goal disallowed after a video assistant referee review. that was a painful two minutes. it was like a centimetre. the paper also features the bbc pay report. it says outgoing prime minster theresa may has demanded to know how it can justify wage rises. it took ages to sort out, the var.
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we had a minute of thinking it was all ok. we had a minute of thinking it was all 0k. it has to be quicker. i was busy running around and then everyone else said, no, it is disallowed. you cannot suck that joy out of football with technology. i love the fact it gets it right but it can't take that long.|j love the fact it gets it right but it can't take that long. i minute is a minute. it has helped us in other games. i am not saying it from england's perspective but from spot perspective. just hurry up. you can time your pork pie. it kept me up even later than normally so watch out for the mistakes in this show. anyway, steph. quite a lot of retail
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analysis at the minute. the honour of sports direct, a story in other times about one of his teams who he said runs sports direct, karen myers, has quit from herjob and a bit of speculation about why that might be. the exodus of the executives. another story, about tumble dryers and quite a revelation from whirlpool. it is a story going oi'i from whirlpool. it is a story going on for years. anyone who has had one of these tumble dryers that has got failure would know what a problem it is. the number of these potentially dangerous ones could total more than 800,000 but what will pull have admitted yesterday to a government select committee is that they do not
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know actually how many are dangerous and even some with modifications could be dangerous. it is worth if you have one of them going to their site and find out if it is one of them. i did have one. there are various things you can do. they can replace the part but i replaced the whole thing which they help me with. this seems to be a lack of consistency. scary, if you have one. my my mum replaces the drum every now and then, but she refuses to change it. i normally do good shark stories, i am always in defence of the shark. yes, you love sharks.
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this is a drone shot taken by a dad, and what he noticed is this is some of his family here, and just over here is a large shadow, but it is not a shadow in the water. he said quickly get out of the water, and don't worry, it is not anywhere near oui’ don't worry, it is not anywhere near our waters, it is in florida. they we re our waters, it is in florida. they were pretty scared when they realised how close they were to a shark. and are you willing to reveal... would you like to talk about how your husband proposed to you, louise mentioned 7 about how your husband proposed to you, louise mentioned? this is awkward if she says no. the reason i am talking about this is, in russia they like extreme proposals —— minchin. soa they like extreme proposals —— minchin. so a man and a woman in a car, and this guy had paid some russian special forces to essentially jump out of russian special forces to essentiallyjump out of the car in front, in balaclavas, ambush them, get her out of the car, pushed her head onto the bonnet, at gunpoint...
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do you know what the answer is to that question? no. then they said what's in here, what's in here? and out came a ring, and the guy who is pretending to be held up goes down on bended knee, asks her to marry him, she says yes. why would she say yes? maybe she was scared. and the other special forces guy gives her a bunch of flowers. extreme proposals. she fully believes that they are in trouble with somebody with a gun in theirface. trouble with somebody with a gun in their face. he must have known, though, because if anyone did that to me though, because if anyone did that tomel though, because if anyone did that to me i would have never wanted to see them again. he must have known she would like an adventurous proposal. you would say yes out of relief. and you, mr walker? park in sheffield. it was a magical moment
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for everyone involved. it is day three of wimbledon, and carol is there with the weather. not quite looking so lovely this morning. the weather, i mean. carol, you looked great on monday and tuesday, but average today. do you know what? i just tuesday, but average today. do you know what? ijust said to our cameraman, i know what? ijust said to our cameraman, lam know what? ijust said to our cameraman, i am not sure about this address. carol, no! i did not mean that. i think you look great, carol. louise, you are right off my christmas list. it is a lovely day here. the sun is beating down, we are standing in the shade at the moment and you can see the view straight ahead. if you look between those trees, that is caught 14 where the duchess of cambridge came to watch them play briefly yesterday before heading to the royal box. more or less empty apart from a few workers who are tidying it up ready
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for play later on. at 10:30am there will be throngs of people coming. all these beautiful flowers, and we have the infamous logo behind us for wimbledon, known throughout the whole world. the forecast for wimbledon today is once again set fair. it is going to be dry and sunny, and it is going to be warm. at times there will be a bit more cloud around, just like the last couple of days, but there will be ple nty of couple of days, but there will be plenty of sunshine. if you are coming down, make sure you slap on ple nty of coming down, make sure you slap on plenty of sunscreen. top temperature up plenty of sunscreen. top temperature up around 24 degrees with gentle breezes. the weather for most of us is dry, still some showers in our hmmfi is dry, still some showers in our forecast and also some rain. so the rain is coming in across scotland.
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it is in through the north—west, moving across northern scotland through the course of the day, and it is going to be accompanied by gusty winds, gusting 35, 40 mph. now, it is also going to be windy today through the english channel and the channel islands, around 35 mph. and we start off with that rain across the north, a lot of clear skies this morning, a fair bit of sunshine with some cloud across the western isles, low cloud at that, and cloud through east anglia and kent in central and southern england. some of this will break up, especially across central and southern england, and you will see some sunshine coming through. the suit some sunshine coming through. the sun of course is a strong at this time of year, and the temperatures will go up, top temperature is around 22, possibly 23 degrees in the south. we will be looking at about 11 to 13 in the north, so that isa about 11 to 13 in the north, so that is a bit disappointing, and will feel chilly. as we headed through the evening and overnight, our band of rain moves away across northern scotland, and we have another one coming in. it is still going to be quite easy across the far north. the re st of quite easy across the far north. the rest of us, there will be some clear skies, but equally there will be a fair bit of cloud across northern england, scotland and northern ireland, so as a result it is not going to be as cold at night as the one that hasjust gone. temperatures falling to between about nine and 12
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degrees. and then for tomorrow our weather front will bring heavy and persistent rain in across north—west scotland, slipping further south through the course of the day, and as it does so, ahead of it, we will see the cloud build. so the further south you travel, we will see the sunshine for the longest. and as a result, temperatures will be higher. we're looking at hires into the low 20s for most, but up to about 25 as we scoot down to the south—east. if you are coming to wimbledon this week, it looks like it is going to stay dry. pollen levels across england and wales, high or very high, moderate or high in any sunshine for most of scotland and northern ireland, but low in the far north. thank you very much for smiling at me nicely after what i said by mistake. see you later. you need a bit of work to recover that situation, i think. it is fair to say many of the uk's new meps arriving for work in strasbourg yesterday didn't want to be there.
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nigel farage's brexit party staged a protest during the opening ceremony of the new parliament. our brussels reporter adam fleming followed two members from both sides of the brexit divide to see how their first day went. for the brexit party, there is a vetera n for the brexit party, there is a veteran on hand to give some advice atan veteran on hand to give some advice at an early morning meeting. my suggestion is we will work with anybody if they are friendly. except there is somebody missing. the new mep from the brexit party we are meant to be following, belinda de lucy. what time do you call this?” know, we couldn't get our taxi end. on the other side of the building... stop brexit! the other side of the argument, the pro europe lib dems. luisa porritt, also a counsellor in london, is anti— brexit and pro— swearing. i don't know if you can show this on morning television. yes. might have to blow that word out. so your first act as an mep is to wear a t—shirt with a rude word
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on the back? in the chamber? yes, well, this was our slogan during the european election campaign, and that didn't seem to harm our electoral results, so we are going to own it. in the chamber, luisa ‘s and the others' t—shirts really stuck out, until the brexit party heard the eu anthem, and then this happened. music: ode to joy. if you are at an event with the french president and they played the french president and they played the french national anthem, you would still stand up and show respect, wouldn't you ? still stand up and show respect, wouldn't you? well, we're in a parliament we don't want to be in. we don't the eu should have a national anthem. we all have our own. so it's actually making a statement. of course we would be respectful if we were guests. we are not guests here. so what do you have to do for the rest of the day? truth was, there wasn't much work for the rest of the day, so time for the newbies to explore their new surroundings. now, be honest. you can't really stop brexit from here,
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can't really stop brexit from here, can you? we are here to persuade people that actually there is a pro—european voice, and it's very strong, within the uk at the moment. and just our presence here reinforces that. for belinda, the big worry is the long, long, long, long, long, long walk to her office. who needs the gym? which she thinks might have been done on purpose. who needs the gym? which she thinks might have been done on purposem feels very remote from the people i represent back in the south—east, and their concerns. and quite self—important, and their concerns. and quite self—importa nt, there and their concerns. and quite self—important, there is quite a bit of sort of pigeon testing around here. could you ever be friends with somebody from the brexit party? not friends. i have a cordial relationship with one of the brexit london meps. could you be friends with a lib dem mep? definitely, my mom voted lib dem. instead of who voted for him, the big question is whether the bits will be here until
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the brexit deadline at the end of october, orfor much longer than that. it is interesting to see things from two very different perspectives. coming up on breakfast this morning: 100 years after ‘slasher‘ jack cohen started selling groceries on a market stall in hackney, tesco has become britain's biggest retailer. steph has an exclusive interview with the current boss, ‘drastic‘ dave lewis, on the challenges facing the company in uncertain times. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a 16—year—old boy has been charged in connection with a series of assaults and robberies on women in south london. in the last two months, six women have been attacked in south norwood country park. the teenager has been charged with three counts of sexual assault, two counts of theft,
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and one count of robbery. a 29—year—old man is starting a two—year jail sentence after he drove into a cyclist in highgate and fled the scene. the court was shown cctv of the bmw hitting the cyclist and driving off. medical studentjosh dey was left with serious injuries and missed some of his university exams. sean fagan from crouch hill eventually handed himself into police. he will also face a three—year driving ban. pride this year marks 50 years of activism, protest and celebration since the stonewall riots in 1969, and one little book shop in london which has played a part in the story is celebrating its own anniversary. gay's the word opened in 1979 and was where some of london's first pride events were organised. 40 years on, the shop remains popular and is seeing more young londoners walk through the doors.
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you have people from, you know, 16 to 19 coming in. loads of young people come in. i love their confidence. sometimes they come in with their parents, and their pa rents a re with their parents, and their parents are buying books for them, and that shows a real change in social attitudes. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. onto the roads: traffic building on the a13 into town from the gorebrook interchange, dagenham. one lane closed in both directions on a205 chiswick high road between the chiswick roundabout and kew bridge, due to emergency waterworks. lane one is closed on tower hill northbound towards minories for gas mains work. in muswell hill, alexandra park road is closed eastbound between colney hatch lane and rosebery road due to watermain repairs. now the weather, with lucy martin. hello, good morning. the spell of settled weather continues, and today brings another dry, fine day, with some areas of cloud, but also some
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good spells of sunshine. which means, if you are heading to wimbledon, it is looking like a lovely day for it. temperatures getting into the low 20s. it will remain dry, with some good spells of sunshine and light wind. we start this morning, then, with those areas of cloud. away from that, though, there is some sunshine to be had. and as the day wears on we will see some lengthy spells of sunshine developing through the afternoon. temperatures at a maximum of 22 celsius, with a gentle breeze. through the evening, the cloud tends to melt away, so plenty of sunshine to melt away, so plenty of sunshine to finish the day. and then it will stay dry overnight, with generally clear skies. overnight lows around nine to 12 celsius. as we go into tomorrow, we start to import some warmer air, tomorrow, we start to import some warmerair, and tomorrow, we start to import some warmer air, and with plenty of sunshine expected, we are expecting the temperatures to pick up. highs around 26 celsius, picking up further still, though, as we move into friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now.
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hello this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning, heartbreak for the lionesses in lyon. they may be out of the world cup, but could england's heroic performances provide a long—term boost for women's football in the uk? we'll be in france all morning to get reaction. many of them didn't want to be there, but the uk's latest batch of meps arrived for work in strasbourg yesterday. we spent the day with members from both sides of the brexit divide. we'll find out what they thought of it later. (music playing). fresh from his cameo with the killers at glastonbury, guitar legend johnny marr will be here. 35 years after his first appearance at the festival with the smiths, he'll be telling about his future solo plans.
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good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: in case you haven't noticed, england have been knocked out of the women's world cup, narrowly missing out on a place in the finalfor the third tournament in a row. the lionesses lost 2—1 to the united states in the french city of lyon, after a second—half goal was disallowed and captain steph houghton missed a penalty. but it hasn't dampened fans' hopes of future success. ijust i just thought we came so close and to than just have it gone in a i just thought we came so close and to thanjust have it gone in a mr penalty i was just gutted. to thanjust have it gone in a mr penalty i wasjust gutted. didn't seem penalty i wasjust gutted. didn't seem like they wanted it enough. i'm absolutely gutted. and that was absolutely gutted. and that was absolutely a gold by ellen white. fantastic effort. still very proud of the girls, for years' time, come oi'i of the girls, for years' time, come on girls. obesity now causes more cases of four common cancers than tobacco, according to a charity. cancer research uk says that bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancers are more
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likely to have been caused by being overweight than by smoking. but the charity's new billboard campaign highlighting the link has been accused of "fat—shaming" by social media users. the government has been criticised for unfairly raising families' hopes over access to medicinal cannabis, despite approving it's use last year. a report by the health and social care committee found the drug isn't readily available despite being given the green light for prescription. the department of health says it will consider the report, and any further action it needs to take to improve the situation. boris johnson has promised to review so called "sin taxes" on foods high in salt, fat and sugar to see if they unfairly penalise the lowest earners, if he becomes prime minister. the tory leadership contender wants to examine whether the levies are effective in helping people lead healthier lifestyles. opponentjeremy hunt said he would rather target manufacturers when it comes to less healthy products. a clean—up is underway in hong kong after pro—democracy activists stormed parliament
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and ransacked the building. the chinese government has condemned monday's protests and called for a zero tolerance approach to future demonstrations. hong kong's parliament building remains cordoned off while the damage is repaired. it is kind of the morning after the night before except they were not many celebrations amongst england fans. talking of celebration, did you see when alex morgan scored the second goal, the little celebration poking fun at the english. sipping tea. i was annoyed at the time. you are still annoyed now. a pretty disappointing night for fans? you might not be able to hear it but we
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are on might not be able to hear it but we are on the river and the bells are tolling. it is a very mournful atmosphere. it looks very pretty and beautiful place but what a huge disappointing moment. iagree beautiful place but what a huge disappointing moment. i agree with you, i disappointing moment. i agree with you, lam disappointing moment. i agree with you, i am still annoyed about that celebration. i really did not like that. there is something about being a little bit more gracious in your victory, perhaps. anyway, they had thought about that celebration, that was planned. so england are out of the women's world cup, beaten 2—1 by the usa here in lyon. in dramatic style. the americans went ahead but england soon equalised through ellen white. the brilliant ellen white. she has had an amazing tournament. the us then regained the lead through alex morgan. ellen white had a goal dissallowed for the lionesses before steph houghton had a penalty saved.
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england will have to make do with a third place play—off on saturday. a really distressing and you have to feel for steph. there should be no tears. we should be proud. we have touched the hearts of the nation back home and they have left their hearts on the football back home. it is hard to put into words. we have played one of the best teams in the world. i am so of the best teams in the world. i am so proud of the girls. disappointed with the penalty, disappointed with the goals. the best team in the world had to play their very best to get past you. we could take them all the way and beat them so the aim was
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to win but we did not do that. you lead from the front. was it was a plane it would take it tonight? obviously i got told in the centrepieces today and i have been practising them a lot, as well as the other girls. i was confident to ta ke the other girls. i was confident to take it. obviously, i let the team down but we have two go and try and get a bronze medal now. is that how you feel, you let the team down?” hold myself to high standards with my technique and it is notjust about me but at the same time in those actions, it is. i was gutted and heartbroken as i said before but lam and heartbroken as i said before but i am proud of all the staff and am proud of the girls because we gave it everything. my goodness, i know that penalty was her finest moment
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but that was a captain ‘s interview. saying how much they want to go and win bronze. it's been confirmed that andy murray will play mixed doubles with serena williams at wimbledon this week. i cannot wait for that one. as for the singles, serena is aiming to match margaret court's record of 24 grand slams. yesterday she beat giulia gatto—monticone in straights sets. defending champion angelique kerber saw off fellow german tatjana maria. roger federer survived a scare to see off south african debutant lloyd harris and reach the second round. federer‘s aiming for a remarkable ninth men's title. he came from a set down to win by three sets to one on centre court. and federer will face britain's jay clarke in the second round. clarke beat the american noah rubin. there were also wins
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for dan evans and cameron norrie. british women's number one joanna konta is safely into the second round. she beat the romanian ana bogdan in straights sets. harriet dart is also through after overcoming christina mchale of the united states. neither of us felt quite comfortable and just try to find our feet. it definitely wasn't easy but it is these kind of battles you are bound to face, especially in the first round of tournaments and especially ina grand round of tournaments and especially in a grand slam. i'm pleased to find the best level on the day and come through that. the 15year—old sensationally knocked out venus williams in the first round on monday says here motto is to "just wing it". i love that. basically that is what we are all doing at the moment. the bbc hs been talking to cori's parents —
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here's her mum. one of the things we try to do is tell it to be grateful and humbled. we have a core group of people. family, friends, my parents and she just surrounded by a bunch of love and the one thing that we do have is she has the favour, the spirit that keeps her grounded. it is a great church family say she has a lot of support. england will qualify for the cricket world cup semi—finals if they beat new zealand in durham today. india made sure of their place in the semis yesterday. rohit sharma hit a century as they beat bangladesh by 28 runs at edgebaston. bangladesh go out. australia won the opening match of the women's ashes in leicester. set a target of 178 to win by england in the one dayer, they won by 2 wickets.
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i know it is a disappointing morning for england fans but we will have plenty more from lyon. we will be talking to some of the england team from the 1971 world cup later on and plenty more to look forward to as well. disappointment but, you know, they have had a great performance. this morning ifeel really they have had a great performance. this morning i feel really sorry for steph houghton. the atmosphere that was something else. those fans. it sounded incredible. it was but can i tell you something now, and this could mean into a little bit of trouble. you know about the cockiness in the usa celebration. a little bit of cockiness in the fans. huge numbers of us fans, huge, many more than i expected. the english fans felt completely outnumbered.
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but they brought the game. fans felt completely outnumbered. but they brought the gamem fans felt completely outnumbered. but they brought the game. it is a valid point. they are the best team into the world and, even though you had steph houghton say we felt we could have competed with them, but thatis could have competed with them, but that is where the incremental changes are needed stop they need to get better if they are going to challenge for the major honours. yes, and this is one of the things that we sometimes get caught up in european football, we look to the home nation in particular. the american system has been going for years. the women who play soccer in the us, between 18 and 21, they train like professional footballers so train like professional footballers so they have years and years of these women coming through who are, let's face it, incredibly fit. did you hear alex scott talking about the level of fitness she had to go up the level of fitness she had to go up to when she went to play in america. it is a whole other level
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and they have a heritage in that the women gave here still building. good to talk to you. we will be speaking to talk to you. we will be speaking to some fans to both sides of last night matches. tesco is the uk's biggest supermarket. a quarter of all the money we shell out on groceries is spent in one of its stores. yesterday, steph went to meet the boss. it is really interesting. i always love hearing about how some of these great names started. it was founded in 1919, so it is 100 years old this year. it started with one store and now it is the biggest supermarket in the uk. today, it has almost 3,500 stores and employs 300,000 people. they serve something like 45 million
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people every week. it is an interesting company because it has had its ups and downs as well. a few years ago, i was talking about the accounting scandal that happened that and that was a big drama. also the overexpansion. a lot of people saying they had grown too quickly. calling it the tescopoly. and also some of the pressure from competition. yesterday i went to talk today lewis and started by asking him where it all started. 100 yea rs asking him where it all started. 100 years is quite a birthday to celebrate. one man, 1919. start a market stall and 100 is later, we have a business which is tesco. throughout that, it is interesting from someone who studied a bit of
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history, he was very focus from day one on how to give customers affordable food. everything he did was about putting the customer first and that was everything from self—service, introduction of labels, he was very pioneering all the way through. there are still people in the business who knew him. 50 yea rs of people in the business who knew him. 50 years of service for some people who talk about uncle jack. do you see yourself as uncle dave? nobody has called me uncle dave yet. one newspaper did once, when we changed some things but it is not a name people use with me. when we spoke to you, much brexit potential, you are preparing. are you still preparing? yes, in march we did take some stock depending on what the outcome was we
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could at least help our customers through that time of turbulence. it will be more difficult to do that in october because all the network will be full of things getting ready for christmas so that will be less capacity but we will do what is a practical depending on how things develop between now and then. ideally what do you want to see? no deal is still on the table. whether it isa deal is still on the table. whether it is a deal or no deal, the devil is in the detail. what will it mean for the movement of produce. will there be tariffs? wejust for the movement of produce. will there be tariffs? we just have to wait and see. i do not think you can worry about it. it is not directly in your control so we prepare for it and do the best. whatever the changes are, we will do whatever we can to help our customers through it and safeguard the business as we go through that change. since the referendum, there has been a few scary headlines, talking about empty
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shelves and food not being able to come in, prices rocketing. do you think any of that is true? where the stories come from is we import 50% of our food and we do not know what the trade arrangements will be so there are many scenarios. if we leave with a no deal in october, will ourselves still be full in december? unfortunately it depends on what it means. the could be interruption if there are problems at the border or tariffs but we could also be absolutely fine. moving onto dancing, i this is something you will be doing a lot of $0011. something you will be doing a lot of soon. you're going to try to break a world record for the amount of time you can dance with a certain amount of people. are you actually going to be dancing for 30 hours? it depends
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what you mean and your definition of dancing. thank you for talking to us. i wasn't expecting that. no, they are doing a huge dance for charity. they are hoping to have 30,000 people at wembley who will be dancing for 30 hours. when you sit down with somebody like that, what was it, a quarter of every pound we spend is spent at tesco, what is your overriding takeaway? so powerful in the business world.” think what was interesting is, you will see later on we will show other parts of the interview as well. what is really interesting is i talked to them a lot about technology and things like plastic waste, as well,
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and how long is it going to be before we go into a supermarket where there aren't any tills at all, so where there aren't any tills at all, so artificial intelligence will know what we have in our basket and charge our card and we just walk out. and why can't we be faster with getting rid of plastics? what he was saying his customers are not demanding it as much as we think they are. so yes, there is a movement towards reducing plastic waste, they are doing that and they admitted they could do more. but if tomorrow you took all plastic out of shops and simply made them really technological, a lot of people would not like that. and so they have got to do what their customers are saying, as well. ifound to do what their customers are saying, as well. i found that really interesting, because i thought, we think sometimes these movements, because everyone is saying i don't wa nt because everyone is saying i don't want plastic, and it is not the case. it might last longer, or whatever it is. for example, on the technology, i would always choose to go to technology, i would always choose to gotoa technology, i would always choose to go to a person rather than until where you check everything through. and there are lots of people like you who would do that. it is why they often trail things in one store ora they often trail things in one store or a couple of stores. and we have more on that later. obviously we
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talked about brexit a lot, later we will be talking about more of the plastic side of things. it is day three of wimbledon, and carol has the weather for us from there this morning. it was gorgeous, wasn't it, the weather on monday and tuesday. it still looks nice. that's absolutely right, yes, on all counts. we are standing right in front of court number one. a couple of new features about that this year. there is the retra cta ble about that this year. there is the retractable roof, so if it rains the roof will close like in centre court, but also the living wall, made of plants. it is the length of a tennis court, and it is five metres high. it takes inspiration from physics imagery and what it does is reflect the movement of a wave pattern. i think the camera is just pointing that out to you now. it is similarto just pointing that out to you now. it is similar to a tennis ball being hit, and the flowers are in the wimbledon colours. it is made up of 900 panels with over 14,000 plants.
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now, these plants won't get a drink today because the weather forecast for wimbledon is a dry one. notjust today, but also for the rest of this week. today, we are looking at sunny spells. we are also looking at areas of cloud at times and then we will see sunny of cloud at times and then we will see sunny spells once again, gentle breezes and hires up to about 22 celsius. so if you are coming down, do not forget to put on your sunscreen. for all of us, today will bea sunscreen. for all of us, today will be a sunnier day than it was yesterday, and we're looking at a dry day for most. i say for most because in the north we do still have some showery outbreaks of rain. if we start the forecast in scotland at 9am, you can see the rain coming in. winds, 40 to 45 mph, and to the south of scotland we have some brighter skies. south of scotland we have some brighterskies. northern south of scotland we have some brighter skies. northern ireland are off toa brighter skies. northern ireland are off to a brighter start as well, sunny intervals through the course of the day with cloud coming and going, because you are not! million miles from that weather front. and the same for northern england, a
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bright start but some cloud at times. the cloud will tend to break up, you will have sunny spells developing and we will also have some cloud across east anglia and kent. for most of southern england it will be dry and sunny, through the english channel, around the channel islands as well, gusty winds. 30—35 mph for you. we have more sunshine than we had yesterday. in the sunshine, temperatures getting up to about 22 degrees in the south—east, but in the north, a disappointing 11—13. as we head through the evening and overnight, we lose the showery rain from the north only to be replaced by the end of the night by another weather front coming in, introducing heavier and more persistent rain. many of us are having a milder night on the one just gone. it won't feel as cold, and we will start tomorrow without rain coming in across north—west of scotland. easy once again, gusty winds in the far north. again, 35—40
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mph. ahead of that weather front there will always be more cloud, for scotland, northern ireland and northern england, as the front continues to sink south, weakening as it does so. so the further south you come, the likelihood is you will have the sunshine for a lot longer and temperatures could get up to 25 degrees at best. cooler in the north, under the cloud in the rain, but luckily some in the london area could hit 26. for all the sunshine for england and wales in particular, it means the pollen levels are high or very high. in the sunshine across most of scotland and northern ireland, they will be moderate to high, but the far north of scotland will be low. when soldiers came back from the first world war, they were promised homes fit for heroes, so 100 years ago this month, a nationwide network of council houses was announced. it lasted for most of the 20th century, and today, we are looking at the impact this revolutionary social housing scheme had. our reporter dan johnson
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is in sheffield. yes, good morning. this is the flower estate on the edge of sheffield, and it is cold that because of the road names here. this is foxglove road, there is primrose avenue, rhodes like that. lovely and peaceful, quiet and sunny this morning. some of these houses are more than 100 years old. these were in1907, more than 100 years old. these were in 1907, because this was a test bed for different council designs. sheffield was pioneering council houses even before the 1919 housing act, but that really set the trend for council housing, social housing, taking off right across the country. this is the council house marian and john call home. hello. they have built a life here and a family over more than half a century. thank you. there was a back porch here. in this
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corner is to be the toilet. these are solid homes, with proper facilities, that replaced overcrowded victorian slums. we we we re overcrowded victorian slums. we we were moving to a palace. —— felt we we re were moving to a palace. —— felt we were moving to a palace. —— felt we were moving to a palace. —— felt we were moving to a palace. i could have a bath. how the children used to call their neighbours their aunties and uncles. it was easy to get to parks, so it was very nice. we loved it. sheffield is a typical frontline city... homes fit for heroes was the slogan when social housing originally sheltered those returning from the first world war. the terraces of back—to—back houses are being cleared away to create a completely new landscape. vast new neighbourhoods were laid out. sheffield's flower estate, green and leafy, was an early experiment in council house design. largely free of the anti—social behaviour that has dogged some other areas. of the anti—social behaviour that has dogged some other areasm of the anti—social behaviour that has dogged some other areas. it is lovely. i wouldn't live anywhere else. i evenjoked that
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lovely. i wouldn't live anywhere else. i even joked that if i won the lottery i would just build an extension. and lifelong residents still value its safety net. a lot of people do, you know, consider council houses a good house, a good home to have, compared to some of the private landlords. you know, they can't afford to buy a house. so there is still a need for them? definitely. so who are these estates are supposed to be for? who deserves to live in these homes? should this bea to live in these homes? should this be a mixed community made up of people from a variety of backgrounds, or should council houses be reserved just for the most needy, the most vulnerable, people who can't afford anything else? this is the dilemma that has driven social housing policy in different directions. council housing is for anybody. whether you can, you know, whether you can afford to buy your house. to me, anybody should be able to be entitled to a council house. te na nts' to be entitled to a council house. tenants' entitlement to buy their home helped build—up a long waiting
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lists for what remains. councils have struggled to build more, leaving over 1 have struggled to build more, leaving over1 million people dreaming ofa leaving over1 million people dreaming of a sort of stable home marian and john have enjoyed for 53 yea rs marian and john have enjoyed for 53 years and counting. were you never attempted to move away? no. no. people do say to us, when right to buy comes, you know, will you be in it? no, i am a council tenant, and buy comes, you know, will you be in it? no, iam a counciltenant, and i will stay a council tenant. are proud of it. so you are staying. oh yes, definitely. for as proud of it. so you are staying. oh yes, definitely. foras long proud of it. so you are staying. oh yes, definitely. for as long as we can. this is a family resource centre on the estate here on the edge of sheffield. let me take you inside. we have heard from the housing minister who has pointed out that the government is investing in affordable homes, but we know they have struggled to replace the council houses that have been sold off stop here this morning we have leslie, marian and john, with us again. there are huge waiting list,
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more than! again. there are huge waiting list, more than 1 million again. there are huge waiting list, more than! million people again. there are huge waiting list, more than 1 million people across england waiting for a council house. why do you think that is? because everybody wants a decent home, and it is the responsibility of councils to provide decent homes. i strongly believe that. and being part of a housing estate, yes, i have bought mine, but! housing estate, yes, i have bought mine, but i think it is good to have a mix of owner occupiers and those who are renting. to build a community. everybody wants, you know, somewhere to come when they need a helping hand. dies, you have lived here for more than 50 years. why did you stay here so long? because we like the estate. it is welcoming, it is a nice community, nice environment, and it is... you know, i wouldn't want to live anywhere else. what do you say to those people who might have an image ofa those people who might have an image of a council estate being somewhere where there might be crime or anti—social behaviour? do you have issues like that here? well, we have issues. every estate has them issues, but you sort them out and you get them dealt with. leslie, what is your solution to the housing
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crisis? —— lesley. what is your solution to the housing crisis? -- lesley. all school leavers straight into an apprenticeship, build affordable housing, and also for renting, provide community hopes like ours to do adult learning, places to come. not everybody has got family support, so somebody walking past can pop in, can you give me a hand, can pop in, can you give me a hand, can you help me? thanks a lot, guys. good to talk to you this morning. i think everyone would agree we need more housing, and everyone says that social housing needs to be more of a pa rt social housing needs to be more of a part of that in the future. thank you very much, and good to hearfrom them as well. we have johny marsden coming up later, playing at glastonbury, alongside the killers time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london news, i'm tolu adeoye. detectives investigating the murder ofa detectives investigating the murder of a woman have released cctv footage of a man they want to speak to. she was killed on saturday. her son was delivered at the scene and remains in critical condition. cctv shows a man walking towards her home at around 3:15 a.m.. he is seen running back around ten minutes later. police say he must be traced urgently, and asking anyone with information to come forward. a 16—year—old boy has been charged in connection with a series of assaults and robberies on women in south london. in the last two months, six women have been attacked in south norwood country park. the teenager has been charged with three counts of sexual assault, two of theft, and one of robbery. he will appear at croydon youth court today. pride this year marks 50 years of protest and celebration since the stonewall riots, and one little bookshop in london
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which has played a key part is celebrating its own anniversary. gay's the word opened in 1979 and was where some of london's first pride events were organised. 40 years on, the shop remains popular, and is seeing more young londoners walk through the doors. you have people from, you know, 16—90 coming in. loads of young people come in. i love their confidence, coming in. sometimes they come in with their parents, and their parents are buying books for them, and that shows a real change in social attitudes. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. traffic on the tubes this morning. building across putney bridge traffic building across putney bridge in both directions. one lane closed in both directions on a205 chiswick high road between the chiswick roundabout and kew bridge, due to emergency waterworks. lane one is closed on tower hill northbound towards minories for gas mains work. in muswell hill, alexandra park road is closed eastbound between colney hatch lane
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and rosebery road due to watermain repairs. now the weather, with lucy martin. hello, good morning. the spell of settled weather continues, and today brings another dry, fine day, with some areas of cloud, but also some good spells of sunshine. which means, if you're heading to wimbledon, it's looking like a lovely day for it. temperatures getting into the low 20s. it will remain dry, with some good spells of sunshine and light wind. we start this morning, then, with those areas of cloud. away from that, though, there is some sunshine to be had, and as the day wears on, we'll see some lengthy spells of sunshine developing through the afternoon. temperatures at a maximum of 22 degrees celsius, with a gentle breeze. through the evening, the cloud tends to melt away, so plenty of sunshine to finish the day, and then it will stay dry overnight, with generally clear skies. overnight lows around 9—12 degrees celsius. as we go into tomorrow, we start to import some warmer air, and with plenty of sunshine expected, we're expecting the temperatures to pick up.
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highs around 26 degrees celsius, picking up further still, though, as we move into friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: heartache for england as the lionesses are knocked out of the world cup in a dramatic semi—final. commentator: houghton. save! cheering. their dreams of glory were dashed when captain steph houghton missed a penalty minutes from the end. absolutely gutted and heartbroken because we were so close but, like i said before, i'm proud of all the staff, i'm proud of all the players because we gave it everything. huge disappointment for the fans and
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the millions who watched it on television. elsewhere this morning: homes fit for heroes — a hundred years after the first council houses, what's the future of social housing in britain today? the boss of tesco talks to breakfast, as the uk's biggest retailer celebrates turning 100. dave lewis talks to me about pay, getting rid of plastics, brexit and dad dancing. it's tennis' dream team — andy murray will partner serena williams in wimbledon's mixed doubles. good morning from wimbledon in front of the rose garden where the plans have just had a of the rose garden where the plans havejust had a dream. it is sunny and dryfor havejust had a dream. it is sunny and dry for today. for many of us dry sunny spells except for the far north of scotland with showery outbreaks of rain and pretty breezy. more in 15 minutes. it's wednesday, the third ofjuly. our top story: it's not coming home. after a dramatic semi—final
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against the usa, the lionesses were last night knocked out of the women's world cup. it just wasn't meant to be for england, who suffered a 2—1 defeat at the hands of the usa. but the team can still hold their head high, a disappointing night for fans? morning everyone. a huge disappointing night for fans. watching the game last night, there we re watching the game last night, there were times he thought things would not go england's way. they were playing a fantastically strong usa and they did not make it to their first ever women's world cup final but they go home with their heads held high as katie gornall reports. there was drama, there was hope, but for england it was a familiar story, yet again the world cup dream has ended in tears. "defeat in a semi—final would be afailure," phil neville had said. in the end, england's manager couldn't ask for more.
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we've come to this tournament, we've done our very best. we've not left anything in that dressing room and i told them there, there should be no tears, tonight, we should be proud. we've touched the hearts of the nations back home we've touched the hearts of the nation back home and they've left their hearts on that football field so i'm happy. the usa have put england under pressure from the start. and afterjust nine minutes, they cracked, as christen press headed the defending champions in front. commentator: a dangerous cross here. and that's a free header. that's the opening goal of the world cup semi final! instead of wilting in the heat, england hit back. eleen white! it's 1-1. she's done it agian! this ellen white's 6th goal of the tournament. things were looking up. but there is no keeping america quite for long. as another cross, another header brought another goal for alex morgan. and a special goal scorer, alex morgan. england still had plenty of fight left in them. and white was at the heart of it all. with ten minutes to go, england were awarded a penalty and a lifeline. it was time for england's
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captain to step up but steph houghton failed to seize the moment. houghton. save! saved! it was a heartbreaking end to an impressive tournament. england's wait for a major trophy goes on. i just thought we came so close and to then just have it gone in a miss penalty, i was gutted. did not seem they wanted it enough. i don't know, i'm absolutely gutted to be fair. and that was definitely a goal by ellen white. a fantastic effort, still very proud of the girls. four years' time, come on girls. well, england came here to win but it is the usa who remain at the standard bearers in a women's football. the standard bearers in a women's football. phil neville's side have made progress, they've won plenty of friends here in france, but yet again they have failed to take that final step and provide that transformational moment that they, the women's game and england fans are so desperate for. katie gornall, bbc news in lyon. but they were so disappointed last
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night, those fans. more than 53,000 people packed the stade de lyon for the match, and millions more were watching on television. the bbc‘s north of england correspondent, judith moritz, reports on the fans who were roaring them on back home. short of being in lyon itself, this was one of the best places to watch the action, battersea park in south london, where the crowd lived through every twist and turn of the game. it's just england, isn't it. positives to take from it though. look at the crowd here tonight, you would not have this four years ago. devastated. that penalty. just lazy. across the uk on sofas and in bars, more than 23 million people have followed the competition on tv, double the number who watched four years ago. here in liverpool, it is personal. four of the lionesses come from merseyside alone. in fact, more than half of the entire squad hail from the north of england.
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over the pennines, the sheffield united women's team watched at their training ground. in liverpool, the crowd despaired during the tough moments of the second half and after the final whistle, the loss sank in. they tried so hard and they failed and that's devastating. competing against the world's best team ever, i think it was a fantastic performance. i don't think the best team won, to be honest. i think they've done the country proud again. disappointment, then, as the lionesses lost out but pride, too, in the performance they put in. judith moritz, bbc news. of course, the team have been receiving messages of support and commiseration this morning. let me share some of them with you. here is a someone who knows about going out
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the competition playing full england, david beckham. he posted an emotional message. he said... david baddiel said a strange sense of deja vu, adding it was a great tournament. and denise lewis tweeted that the lionesses played their hearts out and inspired a generation of young girls to believe. i absolutely think that is right. we we re absolutely think that is right. we were lucky enough to spend a bit of time with some of the players before they came out here to france for the world cup and they all talk about that, inspiring the next generation. it genuinely means the world to them andl it genuinely means the world to them and i think it is something they have achieved, even though they were disappointed with the result from
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la st disappointed with the result from last night. thank you very much. i am sure lots of young people were watching last night and they would be inspired. i know lots of cricket fa ns be inspired. i know lots of cricket fans talking about england and new zealand today. england need to win that to guarantee their place in the semi—final. the summer of sport continues. it is not stop. it is great. obesity now causes more cases of four common cancers than tobacco, according to a charity. cancer research uk says that bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancers are more likely to have been caused by being overweight than by smoking. but the charity's new billboard campaign highlighting the link has been accused of "fat—shaming" by social media users. boris johnson has promised to review so called "sin taxes" on foods high in salt, fat and sugar to see if they unfairly penalise the lowest earners, if he becomes prime minister. the tory leadership contender wants to examine whether the levies are effective in helping people lead healthier lifestyles. opponentjeremy hunt said
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he would rather target manufacturers when it comes to less healthy products. a clean—up is underway in hong kong after pro—democracy activists stormed parliament and ransacked the building. the chinese government has condemned monday's protests and called for a zero tolerance approach to future demonstrations. hong kong's parliament building remains cordoned off while the damage is repaired. hundreds of thousands of people in south america witnessed a rare sight last night — a total eclipse of the sun. amazing pictures this. the moon's great shadow, or umbra, plunged parts of chile into darkness for a few seconds, before passing over the andes and across to argentina. a solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the earth and the sun, blocking its light. south america is also expected to see the world's next total solar eclipse, which will take place on the 14th of december next year.
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it is mesmerising. as long as you have your special sunglasses. remember that box? despite generally doing better in education, women are still more than three times more likely to work part time, with less chance of seeing their wages grow. the fight for gender equality still faces major hurdles in society, but today the minister for women and equalities penny mordaunt will outline how how she plans to tackle the barriers women face throughout life. she joins us from westminster. thank you indeed forjoining us. so many people watching would have been up many people watching would have been up quite late watching the world cup. what do you think the world cup has done for spot? i think it is absolutely fantastic and i think particularly getting more women involved in the game, the national
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game, has been wonderful. i have seen game, has been wonderful. i have seen it in my constituency, particularly amongst schoolchildren, the excitement, the interest in the sport and we want people to get physically active and take part in sport but i think the team have done a fantasticjob sport but i think the team have done a fantastic job and sport but i think the team have done a fantasticjob and we are all incredibly proud of them. you are talking about gender equality at all stages, a roadmap for change. what is the most pressing issue for women? there are about 48 pressing issues and what this does is actually track a woman through the course of her life and each stage, the hit that she takes, usually economically, which means she is more likely to end up financially fragile with fewer choices. women are 50% more likely to be in lope and trapped in low—paid for decades. —— low—paid work. we have carers.
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90% of people in active due to care are women. this sets out things that we need to focus on to change that and a raft of activities and potential legislation that we may bring forward to help women at every stage of their life. let's deal with some of the issues. women enter the labour market with higher qualifications but earn less per hour from the start. why and what are you going to do about that? there are a whole raft of reasons for that. women tend to be carers, they care for children but also... not at the start of their career? we are starting right back in school, the choices that schoolchildren make about what courses to do. the gender stereotypes that are played upon them. we're going to doing some work
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around that because we have identified that as a major factor. it does not set people up to make the best career choices but we are also looking at support and making better childcare offer. the childcare system is massively complicated and needs to be simplified and made easierfor people to understand what support they can access. we are looking to introduce measures which will actually help us have more equal pa rental leave actually help us have more equal parental leave when caring for children. looking at employment rights for carers, including leave for carers and then, at other stages, when they get divorced, for example, making sure that people ‘s pension pots are in included and ensuring women are more financially resilient, including looking at the benefit system. benefits are one of the reason why they have attracted
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low—paid. the reason why they have attracted low-paid. let's look at another statistic which is striking. girls are more likely to get a top grade in maths gcse but boys are more likely to take maps at a level. what is going on with perception and choices? well, we want to do some study into why those things happened. i think for some of the things in the roadmap, we already know what the a nswer roadmap, we already know what the answer is. for others we are not sure. so we're going to be doing a number of studies on pilots schools to really look at why girls make certain choices, and we do have some evidence that, very subconsciously, and obviously teachers don't set out to do this, but people are nudged in particular directions as to what career path to take, what subjects to take. and that i think we do need to take. and that i think we do need to really understand better and address, so that is one of the
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things we are going to do.” address, so that is one of the things we are going to do. i also note that in december 2018 there was a carer ‘s' action plan, with lots of things announced on various things mentioned today have already been mentioned before. how much of this is a rehash and what has been mentioned before? there's a lot of things that i knew, but critically, for example, carers uk have been asking for some of these things for asking for some of these things for a long time. question is why haven't we got further? why aren't we focused on a woman and everything she needs in life to thrive? so in addition to these policies that we are setting out, we have created a hub in the cabinet office, the cabinet office is the bit of government that prods all the other government that prods all the other government departments into action, and we have moved women and equalities into that, with this roadmap, and some really critical metrics. i know that sounds a bit dry, but this is really important, to actually ensure that government departments but also people we work with like local government,
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understand the consequences of doing something. if we don't look after carers, if we don't value unpaid, cared work, if we don't value those people because we don't have the services for them to remain economically active, there is a cost to business and to society as well. and indeed to that individual‘s health. so we got to do these things. and the roadmap, plus the new metrics, plus what we are giving this in the cabinet office, will allow us to get these things done. thank you for your time this morning. we were talking to penny mordaunt there about the football. it is also day three of wimbledon, carol is there all week with the weather. and also doing a spot of gardening and watering this morning, as well. good morning, everyone, from wimbledon. there is some watering going on. the irrigation system around the entire site at
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wimbledon is so clever that if any pa rt wimbledon is so clever that if any part of it doesn't work, for example the part that water is the plans automatically, then the head gardener is alerted straightaway through the use of sensors, and an automatic messages sent to him. but as you can see, martin is busily watering the plants with a hose so the old—fashioned watering the plants with a hose so the old —fashioned system watering the plants with a hose so the old—fashioned system is also employed here. you can see the lovely hydrangeas, some petunias, and that is our limit of what is in that particular flowerbed. there are over 50,000 plants and flowers here on site. it is a beautiful start to the day. the temperatures have picked up quite nicely through the day, the sun is shining and the forecast is a dry one. once again we will see sunny skies. at times there will see sunny skies. at times there will be cloud coming over, and then we will see the sun coming out once again. so we are looking at sunny intervals. gentle breezes from the north—east and temperatures up to 22 degrees. don't forget your sunscreen if you are coming down. i mostly dry
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forecast. there are sunny skies, where we had the cloud there will be more sunshine, but we also got some showers. and the showers and showery outbreaks of rain are courtesy of a weather front coming across the north of scotland. here as well, it will be gusty, gust of wind 35 or 40 mph. as we come south across scotland, brighter skies and some sunshine to start with. for northern ireland in northern england, a similar story. some cloud around for you, but equally some sunshine. starting off on a sunny note, and then coming south across the rest of england and wales. a fair bit of sunshine around. central and southern england seeing more cloud just now, but that will break up. some sunny intervals in the same across east anglia stopped quite a bit of cloud, especially close to the coast. through the day, many of us the coast. through the day, many of us dry, seeing some sunny intervals, the showery outbreaks of rain crossing the far north of scotland, with gusty winds. and across the english channel we are also looking at gusty winds, 25—30 mph. temperatures disappointing in the far north, 11—13, but warmerfurther
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south, with a top temperature of 22 or maybe 23 in the south—east. through the evening and overnight, we lose the rain first of all across the west of scotland, only to be replaced overnight i think it cloud and more rain coming our way, bringing more persistent rain. ahead of that in scotland, northern england and northern ireland, more cloud around it will not be as cold night as the one just gone. falling roughly two between nine and 13. tomorrow, that rain across scotland will be persistent. it will be heavy at times as it pushes south—east words, with a lot of that cloud building just ahead of it. as the cloud thinks south it will start to wea ken cloud thinks south it will start to weaken a touch, and ahead of it for most of england and wales, we're in for another and sunny day, and a warm day. tomorrow's temperatures could be 25, for example, in the south—east. locally possibly 26, but cooler as you push progressively northwards. pollen levels in the sunshine high or very high. do you
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know what, i was wondering how those flowers look so amazing, and we have had a little insight into how they look after them. thank you very much. thank you. let's take a look at today's papers. many of the front pages feature images from last night's women's world cup semi—final. the times has a photo of team captain steph houghton being comforted by manager phil neville after she missed a late penalty. the front page leads on a study by cancer research uk which found that obesity causes more cases of cancer than smoking. the lionesses are the pride of england, according to the metro. its front page also reports on boris johnson's plans to cut "sin taxes". the daily mirror focuses on the agony of england's narrow defeat. the main story there says the bbc is using a loophole to conceal millions that it has paid to its presenters. cruel end to england's world cup dream is how the daily telegraph
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describes the result. the photo there is of ellen white, who had an equalising goal disallowed after a video assistant referee review. the paper also features the bbc pay report. it says outgoing prime minster theresa may has demanded to know how it can justify wage rises. it is fair to say many of the uk's new meps arriving for work in strasbourg yesterday didn't want to be there. nigel farage's brexit party staged a protest during the opening ceremony of the new parliament. our brussels reporter adam fleming followed two members from both sides of the divide to see how their first day went. hejoins us now to tell us how it went. it was a really interesting day yesterday, wasn't it, to see not only how some of our meps reacted,
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but how others around them, watching them, felt about it as well. yes, so it was all a bit weird, because remember the uk was meant to have left the eu at the end of march this year. but we have stayed for a bit longer than people expected. and if you are in the eu, then your country has to send members of the european parliament here to strasbourg, no matter what. except the british meps might only be here for four months. so you would think maybe they would sit quietly in the back and not make too much fuss and keep a low profile. oh no. not the two meps we followed yesterday. here is what they got up to. for the brexit party, there is a veteran on hand to give some advice at an early morning meeting. my suggestion is, we're friendly to everybody, if they're friendly. except there is somebody missing — the new mep from the brexit party we're meant to be following, belinda de lucy. what time do you call this? i know, we couldn't get ourtaxi, and... on the other side of the building...
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chanting: stop brexit! ..the other side of the argument, the pro—europe lib dems. luisa porritt, also a councillor in london, is anti—brexit and pro—swearing. i don't know if you can show this on morning television. yeah... you might have to blur that word out. so yourfirst act as an mep is to wear a t—shirt with a rude word on the back, in the chamber? yeah, well, this was our slogan during the european election campaign, and that didn't seem to harm our electoral results, so we're going to own it. in the chamber, luisa and the others' t—shirts really stuck out, until the brexit party heard the eu anthem, and then this happened. music: ode to joy. if you were at an event with the french president and they played the french national anthem, you would still stand up and show respect, wouldn't you? well, we're in a parliament we don't want to be in.
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we don't believe that the eu should have a national anthem. we all have our own. so it's actually making a statement. of course i'd be respectful if we were guests. we're not guests here. and so what have you got to do for the rest of the day? truth was, there wasn't much work for the rest of the day, so time for the newbies to explore their new surroundings. now, be honest. you can't really stop brexit from here, can you? we're here to persuade people that actually there is a pro—european voice, and it's very strong, within the uk at the moment, and just our presence here reinforces that. for belinda, the big worry is the long, long, long, long, long, long walk to her office... who needs the gym? ..which she thinks might have been done on purpose. it feels very remote from the people i represent back in the south—east, and their concerns. quite self—importa nt — there's quite a bit of sort of pigeon—chesting around here. could you ever be friends with somebody from the brexit party?
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probably not friends. i have a cordial relationship with one of the brexit party london meps. could you be friends with a lib dem mep? definitely, my mum voted lib dem. instead of who is friends with whom, the big question is whether the brits will be here until the brexit deadline at the end of october, or for much longer than that. now, i should say lots of mad things happen in the european parliament chamber. it can be quite rowdy, so people were not actually that annoyed by the turning the backs or the swear words on the backs of the t—shirts, and there were lots of other things happening in strasbourg yesterday. there were hundreds of people from catalonia angry at the spanish government over their meps, and there was even someone dressed asa giant and there was even someone dressed as a giant milkshake making a comment about that trend of milkshakes being thrown at controversial politicians these days. and the other big topic today
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from the eu point of view is negotiations about who is going to have some of the top jobs available. yes, so eu leaders spent three days talking in brussels about who to fill the topjobs with. talking in brussels about who to fill the top jobs with. one of the things they were looking at was replacing the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, which writes new eu laws and make sure countries are sticking to them. the nominee to replace him is the german defence minister, ursula von der leyen, who was a bit ofa ursula von der leyen, who was a bit of a surprise choice, but the eu is very proud they managed to get a woman in there, although she has to be approved by the european parliament. another high—profile woman, as well, christine lagarde, she is being lined up to run the european central bank. so not exactly a household name, but i really, really important bit of the wiring that keeps the eu running. the prime minister of belgium,
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charles michel, will be leaving the eu summit as president of the european council, and the spanish foreign minister will be in charge of eu foreign policy. so lots of new names for us to get used to. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm tolu adeoye. detectives investigating the murder of a pregnant woman in thornton heath have released cctv footage of a man they want to speak to. kelly mary fauvrelle was killed on saturday. her son was delivered at the scene and remains in a critical condition in hospital. the cctv shows a man walking towards her home at around 3:15am. he is seen running back around ten minutes later. police say he must be traced urgently, and are asking anyone with information to come forward. a 16—year—old boy has been charged in connection with a series of assaults and robberies on women in south london. in the last two months, six women have been attacked in south norwood country park.
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the teenager has been charged with three counts of sexual assault, two of theft, and one of robbery. he will appear at croydon youth court today. pride this year marks 50 years of protest and celebration since the stonewall riots, and one little bookshop in london which has played a key part is celebrating its own anniversary. gay's the word opened in bloomsbury in 1979, and was where some of london's first pride events were organised. 40 years on, the shop remains popular, and is seeing more young londoners walk through the doors. you have people from, you know, 16—90 coming in. loads of young people come in. i love their confidence, coming in. sometimes they come in with their parents, and their parents are buying books for them, and that shows a real change in social attitudes. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. traffic building across
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putney bridge in both directions. one lane closed in both directions on a205 chiswick high road between the chiswick roundabout and kew bridge, due to emergency waterworks. lane one is closed on tower hill northbound towards minories for gas mains work. in muswell hill, alexandra park road is closed eastbound between colney hatch lane and rosebery road due to watermain repairs. now the weather, with lucy martin. hello, good morning. the spell of settled weather continues, and today brings another dry, fine day, with some areas of cloud, but also some good spells of sunshine. which means, if you're heading to wimbledon, it's looking like a lovely day for it. temperatures getting into the low 20s. it will remain dry, with some good spells of sunshine and light winds. we start this morning, then, with those areas of cloud. away from that, though, there is some sunshine to be had, and as the day wears on, we'll see some lengthy spells of sunshine developing through the afternoon. temperatures at a maximum of 22 degrees celsius,
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with a gentle breeze. through the evening, the cloud tends to melt away, so plenty of sunshine to finish the day, and then it will stay dry overnight, with generally clear skies. overnight lows around 9—12 degrees celsius. as we go into tomorrow, we start to import some warmer air, and with plenty of sunshine expected, we're expecting the temperatures to pick up. highs around 26 degrees celsius, picking up further still, though, as we move into friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. now, though, it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's 7:30. so england are out of the women's world cup ,
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beaten 2—1 by the usa here in lyon. the americans went ahead but england soon equalised through ellen white. i thought we came so close and to haveit i thought we came so close and to have it gone with a missed penalty i was just gutted. didn't seem like they wanted it enough. it wasjust...| don't know, i'm absolutely gutted, to be fair, just gutted. and that was absolutely a goal by ellen white. fantastic effort. still very proud of the girls, and four years' time, come on girls. obesity now causes more cases of four common cancers than tobacco, according to a charity. cancer research uk says that bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancers are more likely to have been caused by being overweight than by smoking. but the charity's new billboard campaign highlighting the link has been accused of "fat—shaming" by social media users. the government has been criticised for unfairly raising families' hopes over access to medicinal cannabis, despite approving it's use last year. a report by the health and social care committee found
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the drug isn't readily available despite being given the green light for prescription. the department of health says it will consider the report, and any further action it needs to take to improve the situation. borisjohnson has promised to review so called "sin taxes" on foods high in salt, fat and sugar to see if they unfairly penalise the lowest earners — if he becomes prime minister. the tory leadership contender wants to examine whether the levies are effective in helping people lead healthier lifestyles. his opponentjeremy hunt said he would rather target manufacturers when it comes to less healthy products. a clean—up is under way in hong kong after pro—democracy activists stormed the legislative council and ransacked the building. the chinese government has condemned monday's protests and called for a zero tolerance approach to future demonstrations. hong kong's parliament building remains cordoned off while the damage is repaired.
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those are some of the main stories. we have ca role those are some of the main stories. we have carole at wimbledon. we have the cricket at durham, taking on new zealand are england. but many england fans were hoping sally would be talking about the team being on the way to the final but sadly it was not to be? i love your optimism yesterday morning. i loved it. i know i was a little bit more negative but we have to have a little bit of hope going into that match last night but it wasn't to be. england put in a brave performance against assembly outstanding usa team. they were beaten 2— one. the americans went ahead but england soon equalised through ellen white. the brilliant ellen white.
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the us then regained the lead through alex morgan. ellen white had a goal dissallowed for the lionesses before steph houghton had a penalty saved. england will have to make do with a third place play—off on saturday. that is the game they didn't want to play but they have been very optimistic about that. 55,000 people watched here at the "sin taxes" i am with two people now who can beat that because they played in the 1971 world cup in front of 90,000 fans in mexico city. lovely to see it this morning. you are brought over because you are part of that historic team, the 1971 team. what did you make of the game? historic team, the 1971 team. what did you make of the game7m historic team, the 1971 team. what did you make of the game? it was an amazing game and the girls played so well and they did us proud and they matched the usa every step of the
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way and we were unlucky not to win that game. there was some decisive moments. what was the key turning point for you? i think... the off side. we were there in the ground so we didn't get a replay of it but the var is good in one way but if that would have stood who knows where we would have stood who knows where we would have stood who knows where we would have been. var is great because you can see so would have been. var is great because you can see so clearly but sometimes you just shake your head at the rules. it was frustrating at times and it worked both ways follows. steph houghton this man penalty. she was training to take penalties, expecting to take a penalty but that was a moment when you luck was not going to go with england. definitely. she has been an amazing captain and to step up as
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she did, again, we should just be very proud of her. how far has the game come from when you are playing in1971. game come from when you are playing in 1971. how old were you?” game come from when you are playing in 1971. how old were you? i was 13. i was 14. that is bonkers. crazy and such a surreal experience. the noise in the stands last night was deafening. we were outnumbered by the americans but in aztec stadium we could not even hear each other think. that must've been terrifying. absolutely. it gives you goosebumps thinking about it. how far has the game come? seeing how england have played, especially the last three yea rs played, especially the last three years and i think for us, we came with we played strong and i think it
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is showing through the game. it is a fantastic campaign and england are really stepping up to the plate. they matched the usa last night and we can do better. up to a point. do you think the usa had more sharpness, maybe they were fitter? possibly. they have had many years of scholarships, academies. we need to follow suit with our girls and we will win this world cup at some point. save that clip, everyone. say it again. we will win this world cup at some point. lovely to talk to you. thank you very much indeed. we are talking about the foot a lot but it isa are talking about the foot a lot but it is a good name for english cricket as playing in new zealand. they might qualify for the semifinals of the mockup if they win. india made sure of their
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place in the semifinals. india made sure of their place in the semis yesterday. rohit sharma hit a century as they beat bangladesh by 28 runs at edgebaston. bangladesh go out. australia won the opening match of the women's ashes in leicester. set a target of 178 to win by england in the one dayer, they won by 2 wickets. it's been confirmed that andy murray will play mixed doubles with serena williams at wimbledon this week. i cannot wait for that one. as for the singles, serena is aiming to match margaret court's record of 24 grand slams. yesterday she beat giulia gatto—monticone in straights sets. defending champion angelique kerber saw off fellow german tatjana maria. roger federer survived a scare to see off south african debutant lloyd harris and reach the second round. federer‘s aiming for a remarkable ninth men's title. he came from a set down to win by three sets to one on centre court. and federer will face britain's jay clarke in the second round. british women's number one joanna konta is safely into the second round.
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the 15year—old sensationally knocked out venus williams in the first round on monday says here motto is to "just wing it". cool as you like. she has been talking about life and playing tennis. the bbc hs been talking to cori's parents — here's her mum. one of the things that we just try to do is tell her to be grateful, to be humble. we have a core group of people. we have family, we have friends, we have my parents and she's just surrounded by a bunch of love and the one thing that we do have she has the favour, the spirit that keeps her grounded. it is a great church family so she has a lot of support.
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i love the fact that she is winging it, a bit like us. we have to do after that game last night.” it, a bit like us. we have to do after that game last night. i love that comment that we will win the mockup at some point. when, really? vague is fine. we have to be very careful, they can do it. if you didn't watch last night, well done. tesco is the uk's biggest supermarket. a quarter of all the money we shell out on groceries is spent in one of its stores. yesterday steph went to meet the boss. it was the chief executive, dave lewis, he came into the business when tesco was struggling at the time. still the biggest supermarket and making a lot of money and there had been various scandals, an accounting scandal, a view that they had over expanded and people were
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using the term tescopoly to describe them. you saw the rise of algae and others to threaten their place. —— aldi. he got a nickname he does not like. but it is interesting, the reason why he was talking to us is because of tesco's hundred years old andl because of tesco's hundred years old and i love the history of some of our biggest companies like that. they employ over 300,000 people by i asked him about where it started. they employ over 300,000 people by i asked him about where it startedm is quite a birthdate to celebrate, 100 years. one man, 1919, £30 worth of money start a market stall and 100 years later you have a business which is tesco. throughout that, he
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was very, very focused from day one on how to give customers affordable food. everything he did was about putting the customer first and that was everything from the introduction of our label, self—service started after a visit to the us so he was very pioneering and there were people in the business who knew him. we still have some colleagues with 50 yea rs of we still have some colleagues with 50 years of service who remember him. they talk about uncle jack. are you uncle dave? no-one has called me that yet. they call you drastic dave? actually, they don't. i think one newspaper did once but it is not a name people use with me at all. does it sit comfortably with you knowing you get paid what you do and we have seen knowing you get paid what you do and we have seen your knowing you get paid what you do and we have seen your pay increase over that time and you have had to restructure the business and jobs
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have been lost? we have a policy to be open and transparent and a policy on criteria which is the same for me which is about relationship to the marketplace. we want everybody, whatever job they do, marketplace. we want everybody, whateverjob they do, to be able to earnif whateverjob they do, to be able to earn if we are successful, at the top 25% of the market rate. so you are all right with that? i think we have to respect the market and the skills that command a certain amount of return in the marketplace and we are happy with market forces driving the way we think about renumeration. on the point of plastics, that is something that has taken hold of the nation. do you think you are doing enough? i do not think you are ever doing enough. we made a commitment to re m ove doing enough. we made a commitment to remove hard to recycle and nonrecyclable plastics. by the end of this year there will be none of that. the point of recycled plastic
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is it can be recycled but it is still putting plastic into the system. is there no way of using less plastic? there is. the way we talk about it and the development is we re m ove talk about it and the development is we remove it where you can. take out as much as you possibly can and start with anything that is not recycla ble start with anything that is not recyclable and that is what we are doing. still, loose vegetables are more expensive than the wrapped vegetables. it is not as simple as that. why not? some things we sell as loose different grades and quality levels. they are not comparable in terms of being the same produce. do you agree there needs to be less plastic in the system overall. completely. do you agree you have an important part to
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play in that. we do. moving on to dancing. you're going to be trying to break a world record for the amount of time you can dance with a certain number of people. are you going to be dancing for 30 hours? certain number of people. are you going to be dancing for 30 hours7m depends on your definition of dancing. if dad dancing council then i will. slim chance of you getting to dance? very slim. they do a charity event at wembley and they are trying to get as many people to dance for 30 hours. it is interesting that you talk to him about plastic because it sounds like change is going to be slow. and it was interesting what he said about this idea that the infrastructure wasn't there for everything to be recyclable, but equally my point was why can't we
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just use less plastic generally, and he made this point which i also made when he was chatting about technology and why don't we see more technology and why don't we see more technology used in stores, because we have the capability now to have stores where they would not be tills. you could just walk in and it would know what you have got in your shopping basket, and you could walk out and it would charge your card without ever facing a queue at the till. he was saying that yes there is that capability, and there is a lot we can do with plastic, but people don't necessarily want all that changed to happen.” people don't necessarily want all that changed to happen. i like humans, ilike that changed to happen. i like humans, i like chats. i am glad you like chats, you are in the right job, which is good to hear. but even though we might think personally we wa nt though we might think personally we want these things, it doesn't mean every customer does. they have 45 million people per week who are shopping with them, and it might not be as many as we think who want to get rid of plastic entirely. so they are battling with that, and they have been criticised in the past for not being customer focused have been criticised in the past for not being customerfocused enough, and they lost their way with
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customers. and every third word practically was customer, customer, customer. it is what they want, it is what they want. is that what you said in yourjob interview? i like humans, ilike said in yourjob interview? i like humans, i like chat? i am in this job because i am nosy. and you have linkedin beautifully, wearing wimbledon green today. and that is where the duchess of cambridge was having a nose, yesterday. on the outside court. that's right, she was furtherup on outside court. that's right, she was further up on court 14. we are overlooking court date. overlooking a lot of the outside courts. it is really interesting what happens at wimbledon before all the crowds get in at 10:30 a.m.. so much work goes into comparing the courts and the grounds, and here on the outside courts at 7:15am on days like today they start taking off all the cove rs, they start taking off all the covers, and they should all be done by 7:30am to allow preparation, so you can see somebody mowing the
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lawn. you see them also with mops out, just sweeping the grass, and also putting down more light lines. and also you see them out there with blowers, making sure the light lines are exact, measuring the blades of grass. because of course, so many things affect the bounce of the ball, including the weather. talking of such things, if you are coming to wimbledon today, it is going to stay dry, rather like the last couple of days. the forecast is one of sunny intervals, at times you will have areas of cloud going over, but that will break in the sun will come out again with gentle north—easterly breezes. temperatures here today getting up to 22 celsius, so don't forget your sunscreen. the forecast forget your sunscreen. the forecast for all of us today, we're looking at again are largely dry day. a bit more sunshine around today compared with yesterday, but there are some showery outbreaks of rain in the forecast. high—pressure is dominating our weather we have a weather front moving in over the top
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of it, so some showery outbreaks of rain across northern scotland. we will have gusty winds, 35—40 mph. so thatis will have gusty winds, 35—40 mph. so that is the scenario this morning, and you can see for southern scotland you've got brighter skies. for northern ireland, a bit of cloud, but through the day we will also see sunny skies. the same across northern england. a fine start to the day, a lot of sunshine around, and coming south across the re st of around, and coming south across the rest of england and wales, there are pockets of cloud, for example in central and southern england. that will tend to break up around the midlands, sunny spells developing, and east anglia and kent have also got some of that cloud. gusty winds through the english channel, not as strong as in the north of scotland, but we're still looking at 25—30 mph. through the day, a lot of the cloud breaks up. a lot of us will have a dry and sunny day, but we continue with the showers moving we st continue with the showers moving west to east across scotland. here it be cooler, with temperatures 12 to 13, but generally in the high teens and low 20s, top temperatures
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22 to 23 in london. we lose the rain overnight across northern scotland, but by the end of the night or active weather front is coming our way active weather front is coming our way across active weather front is coming our way across the north—west. that will bring in thick cloud, more persistent rain and stronger winds. but it won't be as cold night, because ahead of that weather front there will be more cloud temperatures falling to between roughly nine to 13. tomorrow that cloud and rain across scotland will start to push southwards. some of that will be heavy, and ahead of that will be heavy, and ahead of that weather front the cloud will build. through the day the weather front starts to weaken. ahead of it, for southern england, the midlands, southern wales, the south—west, east anglia, we will be in the sunshine. tomorrow's temperatures could be higher than today, getting up to 25 or 26 higher than today, getting up to 25 or26 in the higher than today, getting up to 25 or 26 in the south—east. but cooler and fresher as we push further north. if you are in the sunshine, expect the pollen levels to be high or very high. and it is grass pollen thatis or very high. and it is grass pollen that is prevalent at the moment. i
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am off to be nosy again and have a gander at the other courts. am off to be nosy again and have a gander at the other courtsm am off to be nosy again and have a gander at the other courts. it is a really lovely view there, and i understand those courts are busy much of the time. the weather is getting better by the minute at wimbledon. when soldiers came back from the first world war, they were promised homes fit for heroes, so 100 years ago this month, a nationwide network of council houses was announced. today we are looking at the impact this revolutionary social housing scheme had. our reporter dan johnson is in sheffield. good morning. it certainly is, yes. suitably sunny here this morning, and a peaceful morning on sheffield's flower estate. this is foxglove road, there is clover gardens and primrose avenue, all the roads named after flowers. these are pioneering council houses, some of them more than 100 years old, because sheffield council use this as an experiment to find the best
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design of council housing. it was one of the councils that pioneered this model. the act of 1919 was what really repelled the council housing surge right across the country. this is the council house marian and john call home. hello. they have built a life here, and a family, over more than half a century. come on in. thank you. there was a back porch here. in this corner used to be the toilet. these are solid homes, with proper facilities, that replaced overcrowded victorian slums. we felt we were moving to a palace. we had a bathtub — i could have a bath! how the children used to call their neighbours their aunties and uncles. it was easy to get to parks, so it was very nice. we loved it. archive: sheffield is a typical frontline city... "homes fit for heroes" was the slogan when social housing originally sheltered those returning from the first world war. the terraces of back—to—back houses are being cleared away to create
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a completely new landscape. vast new neighbourhoods were laid out. sheffield's flower estate, green and leafy, was an early experiment in council house design, largely free of the anti—social behaviour that has dogged some other areas. it's lovely. i wouldn't live anywhere else. i even joked that if i won the lottery, i would just build an extension. and lifelong residents still value its safety net. a lot of people do, you know, consider council houses a good house, a good home to have, compared to some of the private landlords. you know, they can't afford to buy a house. so there is still a need for them. definitely. so who are these estates supposed to be for? who deserves to live in these homes? should this be a mixed community, made up of people from a variety
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of backgrounds, or should council houses be reserved just for the most needy, the most vulnerable, people who can't afford anything else? this is the dilemma that has driven social housing policy in different directions. council housing is for anybody. whether you can, you know, whether you can afford to buy your house, to me, anybody should be able to be entitled to a council house. tenants' entitlement to buy their home helped build up a long waiting list for what remains. councils have struggled to build more, leaving over1 million people dreaming of the sort of stable home marian and john have enjoyed for 53 years and counting. were you never tempted to move away? no. people do say to us, when right—to—buy comes, you know, will you be in it? no, i'm a council tenant, and i'll stay a council tenant. and proud of it. so you are staying. oh, yes, definitely. for as long as we can.
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so there is clearly demand for council housing, because across england there are more than 1 million names on the waiting list. so how did we get into that sort of situation? let's talk to the man in charge of housing policy on sheffield, counsellor paul wood. charge of housing policy on sheffield, counsellor paulwood. how big is your wedding list? we have 40,000 approximately on the waiting list, and we have 12,000 regular bidders for properties. how have things got to that stage where there are so many people waiting for a house? because we weren't allowed to build for many years, and when right to buy went to the government, it didn't need to be reinvested back into big enough scale in any way around the city. so we just went down in our housing stock, continuously. has that change? are you building more houses now? yes, so we have the biggest increase in social housing plan for the last 30 yea rs. we social housing plan for the last 30 years. we are looking at getting
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3000 new social housing properties built over the next cycle. the first 70 started in a couple of months' time. sounds like small numbers for a big waiting list. it is, but we also have them coming in from other areas as well, so we can buy properties off plan from developers under the 106 agreements. we can also look at what we can do with housing associations, as well. so there is a number of other options besides what we actually build that can increase the housing stock. ok. thank you very much, counsellor. we will have to leave it there. many people would say there is a housing crisis, because there are so many people waiting that more homes need to be built. the government says it is investing millions in affordable homes. we will be live in lyon, reflecting on the world cup semi—final, and we have a guest who first played glastonbury 35 years ago, and was also a big hit this
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weekend. find out who after eight a.m.. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm tolu adeoye. the baby of a pregnant woman who was killed on saturday in thornton heath has died. kelly mary fauvrelle's son riley was delivered at the scene. he died in hospital in the early hours of this morning. police have released cctv of a man walking towards her home ataround 3:15am. he is seen running back around ten minutes later. police say he must be traced urgently, and are asking anyone with information to come forward. a 16—year—old boy has been charged in connection with a series of assaults and robberies on women in south london. in the last two months, six women have been attacked in south norwood country park. the teenager has been charged with three counts of sexual assault, two of theft, and one of robbery. he will appear at croydon youth court today.
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pride this year marks 50 years of protest and celebration since the stonewall riots, and one little book shop in london which has played a key part is celebrating its own anniversary. gay's the word opened in bloomsbury in 1979, and was where some of london's first pride events were organised. 40 years on, the shop remains popular, and is seeing more young londoners walk through the doors. you have people from, you know, 16—90 coming in. loads of young people come in. i love their confidence, coming in. sometimes they come in with their parents, and their parents are buying books for them, and that shows a real change in social attitudes. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. but on the trains, there is disruption on southeastern services between barnehurst and blackheath, due to urgent repairs to a bridge at kidbrooke. turning to the roads, there are the usual queues on old street approaching the roundabout.
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one lane is closed in both directions on chiswick high road between the roundabout and kew bridge. that is due to emergency waterworks. lane one is closed on tower hill northbound towards minories for gas mains work. now the weather, with lucy martin. hello, good morning. the spell of settled weather continues, and today brings another dry, fine day, with some areas of cloud, but also some good spells of sunshine. which means, if you're heading to wimbledon, it's looking like a lovely day for it. temperatures getting into the low 20s. it will remain dry, with some good spells of sunshine and light winds. we start this morning, then, with those areas of cloud. away from that, though, there is some sunshine to be had, and as the day wears on, we'll see some lengthy spells of sunshine developing through the afternoon. temperatures at a maximum of 22 degrees celsius, with a gentle breeze. through the evening, the cloud tends to melt away, so plenty of sunshine to finish the day, and then it will stay dry overnight, with generally clear skies. overnight lows around 9—12 degrees celsius. as we go into tomorrow, we start to import some warmer air, and with plenty of sunshine
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expected, we're expecting the temperatures to pick up. highs around 26 degrees celsius, picking up further still, though, as we move into friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. plenty more over on bbc radio london. bye for now. good morning welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: heartache for england as the lionesses are knocked out of the world cup in a dramatic semi—final. commentator: steph houghton. .. saved! their dreams of glory were dashed when captain steph houghton's penalty was saved just minutes from the end. obviously gutted and heartbroken because we were so close. but i'm proud of all the staff and i'm proud of all the players because we gave it everything.
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53,000 people packed into the stadium here last night, but england must now make the journey south to nice for the third place play—off. elsewhere this morning... homes fit for heroes — 100 years after the first council houses, what's the future for social housing in britain today? also turning 100 — tesco. i talk to the boss of the uk's biggest retailer about pay, getting rid of plastics, brexit and dad dancing. it's a tennis dream team — andy murray will partner serena williams in wimbledon's mixed doubles. and at wimbledon this morning, we have blue skies and the sun is beating down and it should stay dry at wimbledon. for the uk as a whole, looking at more sunshine today, more than yesterday but across the north of scotla nd than yesterday but across the north of scotland we have outbreaks of showery rain and gusty winds. i will have more in 15 minutes.
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good morning. it's wednesday, the 3rd ofjuly. our top story. after a dramatic semi—final against the usa, the lionesses were last night knocked out of the women's world cup. it just wasn't meant to be for england, who suffered a 2—1 defeat at the hands of the world champions. sally is in lyon. for england fans it was a distressing night? it really was, on many distressing night? it really was, on ma ny levels distressing night? it really was, on many levels actually because there we re many levels actually because there were moments in the game where you thought england could do it especially when you saw ellen white's goal ruled as offside. that would have changed things for england. but it simply wasn't to be. but the england team, the players, the staff and the coaching team say they are going home with their heads held high, as katie gornall reports. there was drama, there was hope, but for england it was a familiar story, yet again the world cup dream has ended in tears. "defeat in a semifinal would be a failure," phil neville had said. in the end, england's manager couldn't ask for more.
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we've come to this tournament, we've done our very best. we've not left anything in that dressing room and i told them there, there should be no tears, tonight, we should be proud. we've touched the hearts of the nation back home and they've left their hearts on that football field so i'm happy. the usa have put england under pressure from the start. and afterjust nine minutes, they cracked, as christen press headed the defending champions in front. commentator: a dangerous cross here. and that's a free header. that's the opening goal of the world cup semi final! instead of wilting in the heat, england hit back. eleen white! it's 1-1. she's done it agian! this ellen white's 6th goal of the tournament. things were looking up. but there is no keeping america quite for long. as another cross, another header brought another goalfor alex morgan. and a special goal scorer, alex morgan. england still had plenty of fight left in them. and white in the heart of it all. with ten minutes to go, england were awarded
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a penalty and a lifeline. it was time for england's captain to step up but steph houghton failed to seize the moment. houghton. saved! it was a heartbreaking end to an impressive tournament. england's wait for a major trophy goes on. ijust thought we came so close and to thenjust have it gone in a missed penalty, i was gutted. did not seem they wanted it enough. i don't know, i'm absolutely gutted to be fair. and that was definitely a goal by ellen white. a fantastic effort, still very proud of the girls. four years' time, come on girls. well, england came here to win but it is the usa who remain the standard bearers in a women's football. phil neville's side have made progress, they've won plenty of friends here in france, but yet again they have failed to take that final step and provide that transformational moment that they, the women's game and england fans are so desperate for. katie gornall, bbc news in lyon. the lionesses have been receiving
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support, commiserations and congratulations from across the nation on social media. prime minister theresa may tweeted that the team has "inspired millions" with how they played on the pitch and conducted themselves off it. gary lineker said that, despite the heartbreak of another semifinal loss for an english side, the team "did us proud". and david beckham posted an emotional message on instagram. speaking from plenty of experience, he said: "what you as a team have achieved is more than a game, a result — it's all about pride and passion. yes we are hurting now but at some point you will all sit back and think ‘we could not have given anymore'. you made us proud." i know david beckham and his daughter made a trip to the team hotel and that is what they love.
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what theresa may said has been reflected a lot this morning, they have inspired many, many young boys and girls perhaps to take up the game, may that is the legacy they will have from this world cup. david becker makes a very good point. there is no doubt, it is human nature to feel sore, upset this morning i imagine, but we will talk about that later in the studio as well. sally, thank you very much. sally has the rest of the sport from lyon at about 8:30am this morning. some breaking news in the last few minutes, the baby of a heavily pregnant woman, who was stabbed to death in south london on saturday, has died in hospital. kelly mary fauvrelle was eight months pregnant when she was attacked in croydon. doctors had to deliver her son in an emergency procedure, but police have announced this morning that he has lost his fight for life. two men, aged 37 and 29, were arrested over the weekend on suspicion of murder and later released while further investigations take place.
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obesity now causes more cases of four common cancers than tobacco, according to a charity. cancer research uk says that bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancers are more likely to have been caused by being overweight than by smoking. but the charity's new billboard campaign highlighting the link has been accused of "fat—shaming" by social media users. the government has been criticised for "unfairly raising families' hopes" over access to medicinal cannabis, despite approving it's use last year. a report by the health and social care committee found the drug isn't readily available despite being given the green light for prescription. the department of health says it will consider the report, and any further action it needs to take to improve the situation. borisjohnson has promised to review so called "sin taxes" on foods high in salt, fat and sugar to see if they unfairly penalise the lowest earners — if he becomes prime minister. the tory leadership contender wants to examine whether the levies are effective in helping people lead healthier lifestyles. opponentjeremy hunt said
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he would rather target manufacturers when it comes to less healthy products. let's take a look at today's papers. two stories dominating. this is the metro. the lionesses are "the pride of england" according to the metro. its front page also reports on boris johnson's plans to cut "sin taxes". the daily mirror focuses on the "agony" of england's narrow defeat. the main story there says the bbc is using a "loophole to conceal millions" that it has paid to its presenters. "cruel end to england's world cup dream" is how the daily telegraph describes the result. the photo there is of ellen white, who had an equalising goal disallowed after a ‘video assistant referee' review. the paper also features the bbc pay report — it says outgoing prime minster theresa may has "demanded" to know how it can justify wage rises.
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the headline says the bbc gives stars £11 million pay rise as it cuts a free tv licences. the daily mail also leads with that story. it calls the pay rise for bbc talent a "kick in the teeth" for those who will lose their free tv licence. lots of you commenting on that and other stories. thank you for your feedback. we always look through it. so e—mail us and you can contact us on social media this morning as well. 50 years of hurt nearly came to an end last night — but not quite, as england failed to reach the final of another football world cup. it might not have been a penalty shoot—out this time — but captain steph houghton, did fail to score a spot—kick in open play. cannot say she missed it because it was saved. let's take a look at her post—match interview, with the bbc'sjo currie. it's obviously hard to put into words. i think we've played one
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of the best teams in the world. we've took them all the way and i'm so proud of the girls. just, yeah, disappointed with the pen, disappointed with the goals that we conceded. other than that we had a good game. america really had to bring their a—game tonight. do you take any comfornt from the fact that the best team in the world had to play at their very best to get past you? you do and you don't because ultimately, we know that having a go against them and take the mall against them and take them all the way and we could beat them so for us the aim was to win we didn't do that. you personally stepped up tonight. we've seen you're keen to take them the rest of the tournament. was it always the plan that you would take it tonight if england were awarded a penalty? yeah, obviously i got told
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in the set pieces today and i've been practicing them a lot and as well as the other girls and i was confident enough to take it, ijust didn't have a good connection and i've done the whole of this tournament so obviously gutted, i've let the team down but we've got to go and try and get a bronze medal now. is that really how you feel, you let the team down? yeah, i mean, look, i hold myself with high standards and with my technique and, look, it's notjust about me but, at the same time, in them actions it is so i was gutted and heartbroken because we were so close but, like i said before, i'm proud of all the staff, i'm proud of all the players because we gave it everything. that was steph houghton, you have got to feel for her. rachel unitt is a former england player. she won more than 100 caps. rachel joins us now. it is hard watching that in some ways, so many people feel for her, how long does that play on your mind? she probably didn't sleep last night. she will be replaying that penalty over and over in her mind. probably thinking, should have gone that way, but it is one of those things. the same thing happened to laura bassett four years ago. she scored an own goal in the last few minutes of the semifinal in the
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world cup. steph houghton is a fantastic player and she will eventually get over it, but fair play to her for eventually get over it, but fair play to herfor stepping up in the first place to take the penalty. she said she backed her technique but she didn't hit the ball as cleanly as she wanted to. lots of people asking last night, why ellen white wasn't taking the penalty?” asking last night, why ellen white wasn't taking the penalty? i thought she was going to step up, she is flying in this tournament, she is joint top goal—scorer alongside alex morgan. she has been amazing? she has been phenomenal, probably one of inge's best players withjill scott. if she would have stood up and take a penalty, it might have been a different story. but whoever took the penalty, you know what, fair play. that pressure is horrendous. for about two minutes, it was 22 and
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then var. var, it is one of those things, it went in our favour against cameroon. unfortunately, she was about a centimetre offside. it would have been a different game had she put that away. it is one of them things, you have to get up and move on. there is an ongoing debate around var, we can see the two big decisions, the disallowed goal and then the penalty which seem to take ages to decide whether it was a penalty or not. whether this penalty is looked at again and again by the referee, whether you agree with var or not, it does seem it takes an age to make decisions and also, it seems to make decisions and also, it seems to be over complicated. steph is saying yesterday she was dancing round the room thinking it was a goal, but then it is denying
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football fa ns goal, but then it is denying football fans of the joy you get from watching? yes, you score and it is like you cannot celebrate because you don't know if it is going to be a goal. there are some positives, but also negatives. after the cameroon game, a lot of decisions came down to var. another semifinal defeat, where does that leave the future of what happens now? so much more pressure? they have got the euros 2020 next year in the uk and the olympics and then i know they have a few fixtures at the end of the year. the girls will enjoy the moment, have a few weeks off, maybe holiday and straight back into pre—season and preparing for the next game. sally was talking about it earlier and phil neville said as well, usa are the best team in the world, how do england and also
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scotla nd world, how do england and also scotland and other teams, how do they make the difference, where is it? what is the change that can be made somewhere that coming england and other teams compete against the best in the world? looking at the game yesterday, fitness. the americans are slightly more fitter andi americans are slightly more fitter and i think experience. like you say, they have won world cups, olympics, that experience will bring success. england over the last 18 months have grown. they have competed against the best sides in the world. they drew with america backin the world. they drew with america back in another cup earlier this year, 22 so they can compete with the americans. it is just about being on that day. yesterday, the first 20 minutes and i think the whole occasion got the better of us. good to speak to you, thank you for coming to speak to us. there will be loads of boys and girls watching this, kicking a ball about and enjoying it because what they have seen enjoying it because what they have seenin enjoying it because what they have seen in france enjoying it because what they have seen in france over enjoying it because what they have seen in france over the last couple of weeks and that is great. they
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have inspired a nation and boys and girls going to school thinking they wa nt to girls going to school thinking they want to be a footballer now. it has done football in this country the world of good. thank you so much. ultimately, it ended without a trophy, but there you go. it's day three of wimbledon, and carol is there with the weather. you are inside again, carol. good morning. iam in centre good morning. i am in centre court. i wanted to show you the umpire's chair. it is tethered, so the computers are fed, the camera is fed and the fridge of course is also part. lewis coming here putting dues in the fridge for the players and the umpire later. the other thing is, there are lots of microphones on
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this chair, the green fluffy ones are called fx mics. they also called argument mics because if a player approaches, what they say is picked up approaches, what they say is picked up on them. the white lines are not paint, they are transferred using a wheel market and what it does is apply a white compound containing titanium dioxide to make it durable. the lines are very precise, 50 millimetres wide except the bass lines, they are 100 millimetres wide. nothing stops at wimbledon. the lawn mower will go regardless of what else is going on. forecast for wimbledon is a dry one and a sunny one. like the last couple of days, there will be areas of cloud moving across but the sunshine will prevail and with light, north—easterly winds, we have highs of 22 celsius,
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so feeling very warm. again, especially if you're sitting in the courts. for all of us, especially if you're sitting in the courts. forall of us, more especially if you're sitting in the courts. for all of us, more sunshine around than there was yesterday but also showery outbreaks of rain in the forecast. courtesy of a weather front moving west to east across northern scotland. this morning we have the showers already, not all of us seeing them at the convening the showers we have gusty winds in the north, 35 to 40 miles an hour. in southern scotland, northern ireland and northern england, brighter skies but at times it will be areas of cloud crossing as well. cloud breaking up across parts of the midlands, east anglia, the southeast and also the south—west. the temperature is picking up quite quickly, much warmer now than it was when we arrived this morning just after 4am. temperatures today up to about 22 degrees in the sunshine but in the north of the country, under the cloud and the showery outbreaks of rain, temperatures disappointing for the stage injuly, 11 to 13. but
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widely in the high teens of the low 20s. through this evening and overnight, while we lose the first front in the north of scotland and another one by the end of the night comes into the north—west. that will introduce heavier and more persistent rain coming our way through the course of tomorrow. as a result of this weather front coming our way, more cloud will be around tonight so it will not feel as cold as it did last night, particularly if you are out early doors tomorrow morning. temperatures falling between nine and 13 degrees. tomorrow, we start off on a dry note for many, a fair bit of sunshine across england and wales but a weather front coming in across north—west scotland with its persistent rain, will have a lot of cloud building had a bit so for scotland, northern ireland and northern england you will have a cloudier date as the weather front goes south it will start a week and said the rain will not be as heavy. then temperatures further south, 25 and locally 26 in the south east
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corner but in the north it will feel cooler under the cloud and also the rain. glad to see they are still mowing. sally has very loud motorbikes in lyon. very quiet in the studio. 35 years after the first performed at glastonbury with the smiths, legendary guitarist johnny marr stole the show again at the weekend with a solo set and a cameo with the killers. he's certainly been no stranger to collaborations over the years, but he's got some big solo plans in the pipeline too. he'll tell us about them in a moment, but first let's take a listen to his latest single ‘armatopia'. music: ‘armatopia'.
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johnny marrjoins us now. lovely to see you. nice to be here. first thing i noticed was the drink in your hand, but it is nonalcoholic? yes, kohler. trying to make it look authentic. —— coca—cola. make it look authentic. —— coca-cola. first time you played glastonbury was 35 years ago? yes, it was a different prospect, nothing like it is now. it wasjust it was a different prospect, nothing like it is now. it was just three very muddy half empty fields with people well over 30 dancing around like they were at woodstock. nothing
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like they were at woodstock. nothing like it is now. no cash machines and there is 70 stages or something, different culture now. do they still manage to, even though it is commercialised and very modern, do they still hold on to some of those earlier plans? i guess, if you know about it, because michael eavis and was still involved then. it has grown and it is its own thing now, an institution, a national treasure in its own right. what is it like backstage? we see those lovely shots, it looks incredible, iwant to know what it is like backstage. it depends what the weather is like obviously. amazingly, every time i have done it, the son has been out. so may a coincidence. they should invite you every year. i like festivals anyway because i like
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seeing other bands and other musicians and running into other musicians and running into other musicians i haven't seen for awhile. that is my experience it backstage. you get visitors and guests. as soon as you announce it, you get text m essa g es as you announce it, you get text messages from people coming out of the woodwork, gardeners and builders you have had, can i have five tickets for glastonbury. so it is also a lot of gas. i try to look after musicians and people i like. —— guests. we talked about brandon flowers a nd —— guests. we talked about brandon flowers and the killers, let's talk about your collaboration with them. this isjohnny about your collaboration with them. this is johnny playing about your collaboration with them. this isjohnny playing with the killer at glastonbury over the weekend. # i will go out tonight... # i will go out tonight... # but # i will go out tonight... #but| # i will go out tonight... # but i haven't got a stitch to wear. # ijumped up country boy...
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so something like that, headline set, how long do you get to plan for that, when the call come in, how did it work? brendan contacted me about five days of the week before and asked me to do it. charming man is 0k asked me to do it. charming man is ok because i wrote it. and i played their big song, mr bright so we met up their big song, mr bright so we met up shortly before we went on and i said ok, show me how it goes. and then i said, ok, got it. then you have got to perform it.” then i said, ok, got it. then you have got to perform it. i was going to say cross my fingers, but it wouldn't be a good idea. you concentrate and hope for the best.”
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suppose that is why you do the job he do, you are good at that kind of thing. yes, i like the unpredictability of it. it is a big event, so you hope you get swept along on the sort of euphoria. at something like that, do you get nervous or is it part of the adrenaline you love. you say mr brightside but everybody watching will be asking, when are they going to play mr brightside? much more nervous doing this, because i go out and sing in front of people, that is what i do so i don't get nervous about that at all. we have a big announcement? yes, we thought to finish off the tour i would play a hometown gig in manchester. they play the albert hall on september
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the 4th. it is just to wrap things up. iam the 4th. it is just to wrap things i 9 the 4th. it is just to wrap things up. i am going to stop touring for a little bit to make some more records and doa little bit to make some more records and do a couple of other projects. so we thought a nice way to end the year would be playing in manchester. the tickets are going on sale tomorrow i think. more records, more collaborations? i did some work with maxine peake collaborations? i did some work with maxine pea ke last collaborations? i did some work with maxine peake last year and she is so busy and i have been so busy and we wa nted busy and i have been so busy and we wanted to finish off what we started, we have a few things on the go. is that music? it is like a spoken word thing, where i do the music and she writes things over the top of it. it is great because it is different from writing regular songs. i like working hands—on with the film composer because it is away from the first chorus, usual chorus thing. collaboration is always
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interesting. manchester, you love being on stage and the interaction with fans, is there something special about a gig in your hometown? yes, it is a bit like glastonbury really, your text m essa g es glastonbury really, your text messages coming as soon as you announce it. all these people you know, get in touch and that is a really lovely thing. he do see people in the audience, did i go to school with her? who is that, is that a cousin. it has a really great feeling of an event. it's not the norm, so i love it. it is lovely to see you. the new single and the toe is ongoing in september the 4th in manchester? i do the meltdown in august the 8th with nile rodgers. you are a busy man. you are watching brea kfast, you are a busy man. you are watching breakfast, let's get the news and travel wherever you are.
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this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and sally bundock. trade wars and trade deficits, in a few hours from now we'll see if president's trump's policies have boosted the us economy. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday the 3rd ofjuly. official figures will show if washington has managed to narrow the gap and reduce its trade imbalance with the rest of the world. also in the programme: no tick for nike, as the sportswear giant is accused of being too "politically correct" in arizona. we have the latest from the global
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