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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  July 3, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at 9:00 with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines: the baby son of a woman who was murdered in south london when she was eight months pregnant has died. police have released cctv footage of a man seen walking towards kelly fauvrelle‘s home before running away from the scene minutes later. obesity causes more cases of bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancer than smoking, according to a leading charity. up to a0 migrants have been killed by an air strike which hit a detention centre on the outskirts of tripoli, according to the un backed government in libya. video sharing app tik tok promises to make changes to it's
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policies after a bbc investigation finds young people feeling pressurised over the purchase of digital gifts. england's lionesses miss out on a place in the final of the women's world cup — a missed penalty meant the usa won 2—1. 53,000 fans packed into the stadium here last night but england must now travel to nice and play for the third place play—off. good morning and welcome to the bbc news at 9:00. the baby son of a woman, who was murdered when she was eight—months pregnant, has died. kelly mary fauvrelle, who was 26, was stabbed to death at her home in south london in the early hours of saturday. detectives have released new cctv footage of a man they want to interview in connection
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with her murder. more on this with our correspondent jane—frances kelly. first of all, the very sad news coming this morning this baby boy, only four days old has died and are the police of the hospital saying anything more? they said baby riley, as the family called him died at 3:10am this morning in hospital. they are not identifying the hospital. riley was eight months old when he was delivered. his mother was stabbed to death in her own home in thornton heath early on saturday morning. paramedics were unable to save her, but they did deliver riley. he was taken to hospital in a critical condition. his family gathered around with him at hospital and very, very sadly, he died this
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morning. police now urgently needing to identify, as we mentioned in the introduction, a man seen in cctv footage? they have released this cctv footage and they say it shows a man about 3:10am early on saturday morning, walking towards the house and then about ten minutes later running away. they need to identify this man, even if it'sjust to eliminate him from their investigation. they say they don't know at this stage if kelly mary fauvrelle's attackers, if she knew them or not. two men were arrested on suspicion of murder. the 37—year—old has been released with no further action. a 29—year—old has been bailed until august. no further action. a 29—year—old has been bailed untilaugust. 0k, thank you for that update.
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officials in the united nations—backed government in libya say up to a0 african migrants have been killed by an air strike which hit a detention centre on the outskirts of the capital, tripoli. another 80 people are said to have been wounded. ramzan karmali reports. dozens dead and more injured. the majority of african migrants who we re majority of african migrants who were being held in a detention centre. since 2011 and the fall of colonel gaddafi, libya has experienced violence and division. based in tripoli is the national unity government led by the prime minister. he has urged militias to defend tripoli. in the east of the country, based in benghazi is the libyan national army. it's led by this general and backed by egypt and the united arab elements. since
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early april they have been advancing towards the capital. the government has blamed the libyan national army for the attack but it's spokesman denied theirforces hit for the attack but it's spokesman denied their forces hit the detention centre, despite announcing on monday it would start heavy air strikes on tripoli after different means of war have been exhausted. libya is the main departure point for migrants lip fleeing for italy. they flee by both often get picked up they flee by both often get picked up by they flee by both often get picked up by the libyan coast guard and get sent to detention centres like this one. often they are located close to the front line of the country's conflict. human rights groups and the un say conditions in the centres are the un say conditions in the centres a re often the un say conditions in the centres are often inhumane. many of the victims would have been escaping from war themselves, but have now been caught up in the bloody struggle over control of the oil—rich country. 0besity now causes more cases of four common cancers than tobacco, according to a charity.
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cancer research uk says that bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancers are more likely to have been caused by being overweight than by smoking. but the charity's new billboard campaign highlighting the link has been accused of "fat—shaming" by social media users. let's get some reaction to this from tam fry, chair of the national 0besity forum. good morning. you sat down and you said you were fuming, why? absolutely, we have known about this since the beginning of the century. it has been predicted that obesity started with diabetes and then it went to heart disease and now it is cancer. the link to those cancers you have just read cancer. the link to those cancers you havejust read out cancer. the link to those cancers you have just read out have also been known for about six or seven yea rs. been known for about six or seven years. nothing has been done about it and we are at such a state of chaos and crisis with the obesity epidemic, something has got to be done. nothing has been done by whom?
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for prime ministers in this country have known about obesity and sat on their hands. what i do feel very much with brexit and whoever is the new, incoming prime minister is we will be stuck with this problem for the continuation of time. is it to say politicians have been sat on their hands, there have been numerous campaigns to make people aware of the dangers linked to being overweight? no, they have chickened out, they have failed to put in the measures necessary. the only measure which has had success is the sugary drinksa which has had success is the sugary drinks a levy which came in last year. that has had an outstanding success , year. that has had an outstanding su ccess , eve n year. that has had an outstanding success, even within one year. now borisjohnson is thinking of scrapping it, against the advice of his chief medical officer, who says these levies should be extended are not reduced. boris johnson talking about considering looking at this sugary drinks tax. it has been
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referred to as a sin tax, which is unhelpful. it is not a sin tax, it isa unhelpful. it is not a sin tax, it is a levy on industry to reduce the amount of sugar in their drinks. it has worked. out of all the sugary drinks available before 2016 when this levy was announced, only two now qualify for the levy at the highest level. all the others have stripped sugar from their drinks. whoever is the next prime minister, whether it is mrjohnson or mr hunt, you would urge them to keep this sugar tax going and to look in more detail at how obesity can be tackled ata detail at how obesity can be tackled at a policy level then? absolutely. and so be it i am at the department of health today and i will be making that very explicit to the chief medical officer's team. she is being required by matt hancock, the health
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secretary, to reduce a plan over the next three months to tackle obesity. dame sally herself has said we need more drastic measures and extend these levies. she is not doing it out of any spite, she is doing it because she knows our food is too high in salt, fat and sugar and something has got to be done to reduce it all. ijust something has got to be done to reduce it all. i just want to ask you about this campaign by cancer research uk, the billboards they are using, which have the word obesity on what looks like a cigarette packet. obviously people associate smoking with certain types of cancer and perhaps obesity less so. so they are trying to promote that idea. but theircampaign, are trying to promote that idea. but their campaign, some people have said, they are fat shaming, what do you make of that response?” said, they are fat shaming, what do you make of that response? i don't think they are fat shaming, cancer uk have taken the sensible decision to make that link as public as possible. and the visual image of
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linking obesity, cigarettes and cancer is, in my view, quite valid. a lot of people are very quick to say, this is fat shaming, this is fat shaming. it is not fat shaming, it is laying it on the line and if you cannot cope with it, so be it. but it is good, medical advice and i support them wholeheartedly. 0k, thank you very much. you are welcome. england's players left "their hearts and souls on the pitch" in their women's world cup semi—final defeat by the usa, according to their manager phil neville. the lionesses lost their third successive semi—final at a major football tournament. let's cross live to lyon and speak to the bbc‘s sally nugent. watching that game last night as so many of us wear, it had everything, drama, moments of hope in moments of despair? anita, you absolutely are
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right. it did have a little bit of everything. when you look at the gulf that has been the historically between england and the usa, the usa area between england and the usa, the usa are a very strong team. it is getting more narrow, they are getting more narrow, they are getting closer together, the margins are narrow now. it is only a matter of time, i imagine, untilsomebody can get past the usa. but a dramatic night. 53,000 people packed into the stadium just over there here in lyon. millions watched from home as all the drama unfolded. this is our report from katie gornall. there was drama, there was hope, but for england it was a familiar story, yet again the world cup dream has ended in tears. "defeat in a semifinal would be a failure," phil neville had said. in the end, england's manager couldn't ask for more. we've come to this tournament, we've done our very best. we've not left anything in that dressing room and i told them there, there should be no tears, tonight, we should be proud. we've touched the hearts
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of the nation back home and they've left their hearts on that football field so i'm happy. the usa had put england under pressure from the start. and afterjust nine minutes, they cracked, as christen press headed the defending champions in front. commentator: a dangerous cross here. and that's a free header. that's the opening goal of the world cup semi final! instead of wilting in the heat, england hit back. eleen white! it's 1-1. she's done it agian! this, ellen white's 6th goal of the tournament, things were looking up. but there is no keeping america quite for long. as another cross, another header brought another goalfor alex morgan. and a special goal scorer, alex morgan. england still had plenty of fight left in them. and white was at the heart of it all. with ten minutes to go, england were awarded a penalty and a lifeline. it was time for england's captain to step up but steph houghton failed to seize the moment. houghton. saved!
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it was a heartbreaking end to an impressive tournament. england's wait for a major trophy goes on. ijust thought we came so close and to thenjust have it gone in a missed penalty, i was gutted. did not seem they wanted it enough. i don't know, i'm absolutely gutted to be fair. just gutted. and that was definitely a goal by ellen white. a fantastic effort, still very proud of the girls. four years' time, come on girls. well, england came here to win but it is the usa who remain the standard bearers in women's football. phil neville's side have made progress, they've won plenty of friends here in france, but yet again they have failed to take that final step and provide that transformational moment that they, the women's game and england fans are so desperate for. katie gornall, bbc news in lyon. how true, the final step, how are they going to make the final step and get past a team like the usa? i am with someone who might be able to help me. rory smith, chief soccer
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correspondent for the new york times. you know this american team really well, they have been untouchable for a long time, but is the gap getting a little bit smaller? they are a dynasty, this is their third world cup final and they are one of the dominant teams in all sport, compared to their inner context. the gap is getting smaller, without a doubt. we saw that last night and we saw that when spain played them in the last 16 and when the french play them in the quarterfinals and with england. the european nations are getting closer. there is a mentality difference, the americans are supremely confident in their own abilities, the final step, those narrow margins you were talking about, tend to follow the american way. but they will become a point because of professionalism and because of the increased interest in the women's leagues in western europe and the expertise of the west has in producing plays, these
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players will certainly catch, if not ove rta ke players will certainly catch, if not overtake the american team. how many yea rs, overtake the american team. how many years, how many seasons is going to take? i think the next world cup may be interesting. it may be this world cup, we have the dutch and the swedes are defending european i imagine the americans will win, i think england was their biggest test. another four years of development, another four years of investment, we have seen teams like manchester city throw substantial sums of money at the women's game. lyon, the club is the powerhouse of women's football. they have one for champions leagues, and clubs like barcelona, real madrid, juventus will help push the european nations on. by 2023 it might be time for the empire to fall. do you think this world cup has improve things for the women's game generally and globally?
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i would like to think so, it depends on what the legacy is and how it is used. it needs to be built upon, it is not enough to kind of pay attention every four years. the media have to be better at telling the stories, engaging fans, telling people this is something you should be watching, you should be interested in. that is how it works with men's football and other sports. maybe we don't do that enough with women's football. it is incumbent on us to an extent. hopefully the fans have been engaged and they fall in love, not just with the players, the stories and that is what it is about, identifying players like steph houghton, and hopefully when the wsl kicks off in september it translates into crowds and tv audiences. being free to air might help and expand the audience as much as possible and make it something people can access. the viewing figures have been amazing and that is because everyone can
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watch. that is how sport used to work and if women's football wants to grow as much as it can do, maybe thatis to grow as much as it can do, maybe that is an avenue it needs to go down. rory smith, thank you from the new york times. i need to come back to you. just a quick word, england will play for the third place in the world cup, this is going to be a test of their mettle as a team, how they recover, not physically but mentally? yes, it is the game nobody wa nts to mentally? yes, it is the game nobody wants to play, isn't it? if you hear phil neville and steph houghton talking last night, theyjust basically said it was like another game. they were talking in positive terms about the third—place play—off. but mentally, it is incredibly tough, they have physically had a tough time in france over the last few weeks. it has been boiling hot. the americans train in miami, they are used to this, they train, train and train. the european teams are less used to
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these conditions so they have got to pick themselves up and go for it because they don't want to finish fourth. let's hope they don't finish fourth. let's hope they don't finish fourth. sally nugent, thank you very much from lyon. the headlines on bbc news: the baby son of a woman who was murdered in south london when she was eight months pregnant has died. police have released cctv footage of a man seen walking towards kelly fauvrelle's home before running away from the scene minutes later. obesity causes more cases of bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancer than smoking, according to a leading charity. in sport, as you have been hearing, more semifinal heartache for an england football side as they are knocked out of the world cup final by the usa. it has been confirmed andy murray will play mixed doubles with serena williams at wimbledon. and england will reach the cricket
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world cup finals if they win today. i will be back with more on those stories at 9:40am. join us then. the contenders for the tory leadership, and the keys to 10 downing street, continue campaigning today. borisjohnson has promised to review so called "sin taxes" on foods high in salt, fat and sugar — we've just been hearing about that in our earlier report — to see if they unfairly penalise the lowest earners, if he becomes prime minister. his opponentjeremy hunt has said he would rather target manufacturers when it comes to less healthy products. our assistant political editor norman smith joins us now from westminster. this line from borisjohnson, these
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so—called syntaxes, contradict some of the work the health secretary matt hancock is doing? it seems to be government policy to step towards imposing taxes on sugary foods, foods high in salt and fat because of the health risks and the obesity crisis we appear to be facing. indeed, matt hancock, the health secretary, input supporter of boris johnson, is on the cusp of publishing a green paper on precisely this and at that moment, borisjohnson has stepped in and said actually, i want to draw a halt to this. i want to take a look at whether these taxes work or whether they just penalised whether these taxes work or whether theyjust penalised for a who perhaps are more reliant on such food. so it is clearly at odds with what the health department and what matthew hancock thinks, but also it is slightly at odds with what boris johnson seems to think because when
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he was mayor of london, he actually introduced a sugar tax on drinks for sale in city hall. he also spoke about the need to tackle obesity and whether london could be at the forefront of so—called salt taxes. so he is slightly at odds with himself and it will raise questions, i have no doubt, about the sort of policy agenda of borisjohnson. we have had quite a few hiccups on the road. we had at the start of the week, his promise for pay rises for public sector workers, they have now you've turned on that and it is just ambition. the announcement of tax brea ks ambition. the announcement of tax breaks for higher rate payers and thatis breaks for higher rate payers and that is also an ambition. i suspect there will be considerable criticism of mrjohnson's announcement today, not just because it of mrjohnson's announcement today, notjust because it flies in the face of medical advice, establish department of health thinking, but it is not the first time he is in political controversy over his
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political controversy over his political agenda. jeremy hunt in his campaigning will be trying not to contradict himself, presumably? that would be a major achievement. we are beginning to see both men trying to sketch out a slightly broader, non—brexit agenda, quite simply because this is becoming a narrowly focused campaign it seems to be this one issue of brexit and the single issue of the deadline of october the 3ist. issue of the deadline of october the 31st. both men trying to reach out a little bit beyond that. norman, thank you very much. european leaders have put forward their choices for the top jobs in the eu after days of negotiations. the german defence minister, ursula von de leyen has been nominated to replace jean—claude juncker as the head of the european commission. she'd be the first woman to take on the role. belgian prime minister charles michel has been recommended to replace european council president donald tusk.
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let's cross live to strasbourg and our correspondent adam fleming. bring us up today as to where we are with these top european post? there is an appointment process happening right now in the european parliament in strasbourg. meps are electing a new president of the european parliament for two and a half years. they are called a president but they are more like a chairperson or a speaker. they have had the first round of voting and it could be up to three more rounds today. but we should get a name by the end of today. then at lunchtime we are expecting a visit from ursula von de leyen, the german defence minister, who has been nominated to take over from jean—claude juncker who is the president of the european commission. the reason she is coming here to strasbourg is because she can only take up the job if a majority of meps support her in a vote in two weeks. quite a lot of senior meps are quite critical
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either of her, all the way she was selected in a backroom deal at the last minute. the european parliament would much prefer if thejob had gone to somebody who had put themselves forward explicitly for themselves forward explicitly for the role, perhaps during the european parliament election campaign in april, may time. in terms of the other top jobs, the belgian prime minister is confirmed as the next president of the european council who will chair the summit. he will take over from donald tusk at the end of the year. that decision is one for eu leaders exclusively. in terms of christine lagarde, the current boss of the international monetary fund who has been lined over to take over the european central bank, she will have to be officially approved by eu leaders after they have had consultations with the european parliament and they have spoken to the board of the european central bank. in terms of the spanish foreign minister, who is stepping up
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to be effectively edu's foreign minister, he has got to be approved bya minister, he has got to be approved by a vote of the eu leaders after they have discussed it with the president—elect of the european commission. so a complicated jigsaw of things, everyone's focus is on ursula von de leyen, and can she get through the european parliament in two weeks' time to become the president—elect of european commission? the cast list is changing. thank you very much, adams fleming. the government has been criticised for unfairly raising families' hopes over access to medicinal cannabis, despite approving it's use last year. the drug was given the green light for prescription in november but a report by mps found it still isn't readily available. lauren moss reports. ben griffiths is ten years old and has cerebral palsy. untiljust a couple of months ago he was having more than 100 epileptic seizures every day. now they've dramatically reduced after a doctor issued a private prescription
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for medical cannabis oil. but it costs £2,000 a month to import from holland and ben's mother says she feels let down by the system. i'm disappointed because it's a lost opportunity for them to help us as a family and many other families that are taking this. and it is helping our children right now and we can't sustain paying the vast amounts of money that we are privately in the uk to keep our children on these medications. i'm a cheeky monkey! last yearjo and other parents, including the mother of alfie, who also has epilepsy, handed a petition into downing street which prompted the government to change the law and allow medical cannabis to be legally prescribed in certain circumstances. but enquiry has found that it's still too difficult to get hold of and there are major gaps in research, which means that many products are unlicensed. we are failing future generations of children who are living with epilepsy syndromes which are very difficult to treat
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with existing medicines. if we do not properly research what the place cannabis products might hold in among all the other available treatments. the committee is calling for clinical trials to take place as a matter of urgency and for medicine not to be confiscated from families who get it abroad. the department of health says it will consider any further action it could take to improve access to cannabis—based products for medicinal use. but for desperate parents like jo, it offers little immediate help to them or their children who need support now. lauren moss, bbc news. we can talk now to the mp from that report, dr sarah wollaston, who's the chair of the health and socia care committee. thank you forjoining us this morning to talk about this. at the heart of this problem seems to be the fact that most forms of medicinal cannabis still are not licensed, so why exactly is that happening? that is because you need
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to have undertaken the research and prefera bly to have undertaken the research and preferably the gold standard of double buying randomised controlled trials, in order to have the evidence to put forward to have these products licensed. once they have been licensed, they need to be approved by a body called nice which makes decisions about the cost effectiveness of these medicines. at that point they can go on and be available on prescription. the trouble is, hopes were raised that after the rescheduling, they could simply go to their gp and pick up a prescription. but there are a number of hurdles in the way and so what are report looks at is all those hurdles and first and foremost, you have to prioritise getting on with the research these products can be licensed and then of course we know what their place is in treatment and families and individuals who want to use it for other type, for treating other types of illnesses, can weigh up other types of illnesses, can weigh up the benefits for themselves and eventually see where cannabis sits
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in among all the other treatments for a range of conditions. he said of the department should name and shame companies who are not making their products available for research? yes, there are several companies trying to bypass this process and saying our products are so good, we don't need to conduct research. we don't think that's the case because the history of medicine is littered with examples of where people thought something was a fantastic treatment and didn't actually carry out the research, which showed the risks and the benefits were so people could make up benefits were so people could make up their own minds. we shouldn't bypass research, but we cannot conduct the research if companies don't make those products available. but it is more than that, the other barrier to research is it is difficult to paint and cannabis, so there has to be some state support for this research to take place because normally you would expect a company carrying out medical
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research itself to be able to then profit through having a paintings on those drugs for a certain period of time and that wouldn't apply here. so the research does need state support and we are glad the national institute and health research has bid is open for people to carry out this research which they will then support but this cannot take place if companies don't provide their products. in our report we look at all the barriers to research and prescribing. barrier as well, specifically going back to the issue of childhood epilepsy, and using cannabis products to treat that, you we re cannabis products to treat that, you were saying that funds should urgently be made available, by the government for clinical trials focusing on the treatment of childhood epilepsy, and perhaps funds from pharmaceutical companies and others, as well. that's right, needs to be a partnership approach but the research cannot take place if companies are not providing products, there is a number of
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barriers in the way, but we absolutely recognise there needs to be state funding as well for this form of research. and more clarity and direction from the government. yes, what we would like the government to do is be much clearer with people in their communication, at the moment, just rescheduling the drug did not mean that everyone could automatically get a prescription for cannabis, a lot of hopes were raised, unfairly, following the rescheduling... we are absolutely welcomed the rescheduling, because that was one of many barriers to carrying out research, and on the path to having this more widely available. 0k, thank you very much. when soldiers came back from the first world war they were promised "homes fit for heroes". so 100 years ago this month a nationwide network of council houses was announced. the scheme had a massive impact and was seen as revolutionary.
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the bbc has been looking at its significance over the years and what the future holds. our correspondent dan johnson is in sheffield. this is the flower estate in sheffield, called that because all the road names are named after flowers, this is foxglove road, there is primrose avenue, clover gardens, some of these houses are the first council houses in the country, some of them are even more than 100 years old because sheffield council was one of those that pioneered council house design and was trying to find the right model to build on a big scale, so they use this as a bit of an experiment, even before the 1919 act was enacted, but thatis before the 1919 act was enacted, but that is what really propelled council housing to be provided right across the country. this is the council house marian and john call home. hello. they have built a life here, and a family, over more than half a century. there was a back porch here.
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in this corner used to be the toilet. these are solid homes, with proper facilities, that replaced overcrowded victorian slums. we felt we were moving to a palace. we had a bathtub — i could have a bath! how the children used to call their neighbours their aunties and uncles. it was easy to get to parks, so it was very nice. we loved it. archive: sheffield is a typical frontline city... "homes fit for heroes" was the slogan when social housing originally sheltered those returning from the first world war. the terraces of back—to—back houses are being cleared away to create a completely new landscape. vast new neighbourhoods were laid out. sheffield's flower estate, green and leafy, was an early experiment in council house design, largely free of the anti—social behaviour that has dogged some other areas.
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it's lovely. i wouldn't live anywhere else. i even joked that if i won the lottery, i would just build an extension. and lifelong residents still value its safety net. a lot of people do, you know, consider council houses a good house, a good home to have, compared to some of the private landlords. you know, they can't afford to buy a house. so there is still a need for them? definitely. so, who are these estates supposed to be for? who deserves to live in these homes? should this be a mixed community, made up of people from a variety of backgrounds, or should council houses be reserved just for the most needy, the most vulnerable, people who can't afford anything else? this is the dilemma that has driven social housing policy in different directions. council housing is for anybody. whether you can, you know, whether you can afford to buy your house, to me, anybody should be able to be entitled to a council house. tenants' entitlement
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to buy their home helped build up a long waiting list for what remains. councils have struggled to build more, leaving over one million people dreaming of the sort of stable home marian and john have enjoyed for 53 years and counting. were you never tempted to move away? no. people do say to us, when right—to—buy comes, you know, will you be in it? no, i'm a council tenant, and i'll stay a council tenant. and proud of it. so you are staying. oh, yes, definitely. for as long as we can. 0f of course, some states have had their issues with anti—social behaviour, some tower blocks became places people did not want to live but this estate seems to be a success , but this estate seems to be a success, people say they like living here, this is the family action resource centre which is the hub of the community. there are huge
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waiting list in this city and across the country, more than 1 waiting list in this city and across the country, more than1 million families waiting for social housing. the government says it is investing more and the number of houses has increased in the last decade after having hit an all—time low. still, only one in five of the council houses that is sold off actually gets replaced, that is a huge problem for the future. now, it's time for a look at the weather with simon. a lovely start to the day for many of us, more sunshine in the forecast, it will stay dry, foremost, there is a little bit of rain to be found, that is in the far north of scotland. that will continue into the afternoon, mainly across the north west, and later into the northern isles. or all of us, dry day, and with that, some sunshine, bit of cloud is developing into the afternoon, more cloud for
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scotland and northern ireland. maximum temperatures getting up to 8222 degrees. now, through this evening, some rain across the far north, otherwise, clear spells, mist developing by the early part of thursday morning, and temperatures down to 11 degrees. fresh start to thursday, sunshine from start to finish. more cloud further north and it will be a warmer day. the headlines: the baby son of a woman who was murdered in south london when she was eight months pregnant has died. police have released cctv footage of a man seen walking towards kelly fauvrelle's home before running away
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from the scene minutes later obesity causes more cases of bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancer than smoking, according to a leading charity up to a0 migrants have been killed by an airstrike which hit a detention centre on the outskirts of tripoli, according to the un backed government in libya video sharing app tik tok promises to make changes to its policies after a bbc investigation finds young people feeling pressurised over the purchase of digital gifts. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. first, reaction to last night's defeat for the lionesses in the semi—finals of the women's world cup is high in many people's minds. england lost 2—1 to tournament favourites the usa, with ellen white having a goal ruled out by the var for offside and captain steph houghton having a late penalty saved. manager phil neville said they left "their hearts and souls on the pitch" and that he "couldn't ask for more". here's the chief executive of the fa, martin glenn, on what happens next.
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i think you have to take football in a holistic way, we decided after the world cup in 15 that we wanted to double the participation base of women's football because we did not have enough women and girls playing football, we started late on this journey, doubling the number of players between 2015 and 2020 is something that we set ourselves the target of and we are on track to do that. getting more girls playing. and then giving them equal opportunities with boys to make sure they are trained in the same way, getting the same access to clubs, and atan getting the same access to clubs, and at an elite level, get the same training that they are successful international counterparts like the us get. it's a journey, making really good progress, but we have started late and there is more to do. well, the lionesses may have equalled the england men's team's most recent world cup achievement of reaching the semi—finals, but there's still a long way to go
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for gender equality as a whole. today the minister for women and equalities penny mordaunt is outlining how she plans to tackle the barriers women face throughout life — here's what she had to say a little earlier on this morning. we are starting right back in school, the choices that schoolchildren make about what courses to do, the gender stereotypes that are played upon them, we are going to be doing some work around that because we have identified that as a major factor, it does not set people up to make the best career choices. but, we are also looking at support and making a better childcare offer, the childcare system is massively complicated and needs to be simplified and made it easierfor people to understand what support they can access. we are looking at introducing measures which will actually help us have more equal pa rental leave, actually help us have more equal parental leave, when caring for children. we are looking at employment rights for carers
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including leave for carers. and at other stages in live smack about peoples lives, when they get divorced, making sure that pension pots are included in that and lots of other policies to ensure that women are going to be more financially resilient, including looking at the benefits system, legacy benefits are one of the reasons women are trapped in low—pay. spanish is booming, but french and german are struggling — and according to a new report, it could be because of brexit. the british council has been looking at the state of gcse language teaching in our schools, and says the parents of some children are telling them they won't need to speak a foreign language after brexit. here's peter wittig, is the german ambassador to the uk, speaking on the today programme earlier. i think it is important to learn languages, and the findings of the report are concerning, regarding language learning in general, but in particular the german language. in a way, it is saddening, as the german
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language is economically speaking a huge asset. german is the most sought after language among employers, according to... really? among who, i don't know of an employer who says you must have german. the employability of young people enhances with german language skills. that is a statistic recently found out, and it offers opportunities. german is for the more really a smart choice beyond just the economy, keep in mind that speaking german enables you to study ata speaking german enables you to study at a top german universities, that are tuition free. there are huge opportunities here. it's bigger than snapchat,
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twitter and linked in but if you're not a teenager, you may never heard of tiktok. it's the fastest growing social media app in the world but has now promised to make changes to it's policies after a bbc investigation found young people and children feeling exploited into sending popular creators money. the so called "gift—baiting" is happening during live broadcasts and some fans are sending hundreds of pounds in digital gifts in exchange for promises or attention from their favourite stars. joe tidy reports. tick—tock is the fastest growing social media app in the world, a viral video machine, hugely popular with teenagers. —— tiktok. there is another side to this platform, which is less well known. this is an excuse for a lot of people to get closer to their audience but also a place where creators are asking for money. the next person to click will get a follow. some of these animated stickers cost pennies but the most
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expensive and most sought after cost users £49. reactions to videos, collaborations and shout outs are routinely up for grabs. but some fa ns routinely up for grabs. but some fans feel exploited, by the more extreme and persuasive sales techniques being used. thank you so much for the drama queen, give me one more and you get my number.‘ 12—year—old girl in the north west of england did not want to appear on camera. she was promised his phone number but says that he has only replied to a few messages and has never answered her phone calls. sebastien did not response to our request for comments, and she is not the only one who has given big gifts to these users. about 400 when it was all said and done. she blames these people for getting money from
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her 11—year—old daughter. these people for getting money from her 11-year-old daughter. even other teenagers should know that you do not ask children for money. these brothers have 2.5 million fans, they earn £250 from the average live stream. we don't like it when our gifters are young, so we ask if the pa rents gifters are young, so we ask if the parents know about it but we cannot stop them. the chinese company behind tiktok says it is sorry to hear about some of the experiences we documented, in light of the investigation, a spokesperson said: the most—read and most—watched stories on the website aren't updating this morning due to technical issues — but high up is the news that obesity causes more cases of some cancers than smoking. we'll have more on that story throughout the morning. that's it for today's
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morning briefing. in a moment a full sports bulletin here on bbc news but first, let's hear from riz lateef who's standing in for victoria derbyshire with what she's got coming up in her programme at ten. a bbc investigation finds children using the popular video sharing app tiktok are feeling exploited into sending money to their favourite stars in exchange for promises or attention. if you drop in with me, i will speak with you on instagram for a week. thanks so much for the drama queen, send one more and you get my number. drama queens are digital gifts which cost up to £50 each and some children end up spending hundreds of pounds. get in touch with us if your children use the app andjoin us at10am with us if your children use the app and join us at 10am on bbc two, bbc news channel and online. the headlines on bbc news:
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the baby son of a woman who was murdered in south london when she was eight months pregnant has died. police have released cctv footage of a man seen walking towards kelly fauvrelle's home before running away from the scene minutes later. obesity causes more cases of bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancer than smoking, according to a leading charity. time for sport, let's get a full round—up. lots to talk about with football and with tennis. only one place to start this morning. england fans waking up to yet more semi—final heartache after the women lost 2—1 to the the holders the usa in the last 4 of the world cup. sally nugent's in lyon for us.
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sally, the game had everything, including a heartbreaking var decison and penalty miss for phil neville's side. what's the mood like there this morning after the semi—final hoo—doo continues? easy to sum up the mood, the mood is american, the mood in the fan zone was usa, the mood certainly coming out of the stadium was very much usa. the english fans here were hugely outnumbered by americans who had made the journey, that gives you some indicationjust had made the journey, that gives you some indication just what a big had made the journey, that gives you some indicationjust what a big deal this women's team is. the england team played brilliantly, as you said, the ball could have gone another way and it could have been england's night. margins are getting closer and closer and smaller and smaller. let's you of what happened, the usa went ahead first, they were 1-0 the usa went ahead first, they were 1—0 up, but then ellen white, brilliant tournament, equalised, for england, and barack obama the us regained the lead through alex morgan, one of their big star players. and then ellen white again had her goal disallowed for offside after a var decision before the
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captain, steph houghton, took a penalty she will not want to see again, she had it saved, and england must make do with the third—place play—off. after the match, steph houghton, who has had a captains tournament, spoke to us and explained how terribly bad she felt about the result. i hold myself with high standards, and with my technique, and it is notjust about me but at the same time, in them actions it is, so, obviously, i am gutted and heartbroken because we are so close, but i am proud of staff and players because we gave it everything. so many positives to ta ke everything. so many positives to take from this campaign from an england point of view. in the build—up to this one phil neville said, it is not an achievement to get to the semifinal, only winning the tournament can be considered that. looking back at it, he will be
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immensely proud of his team, which is going places. a real sense there was a momentum about england in this tournament, they played very well, what a tournament team has to do is kind of what the usa have done, up until this point, many positives to look at, phil neville is one of them. he has produced a proper, proper coaches performance here, he has falle n coaches performance here, he has fallen in love with women's football, you can see that on his face. —— proper coach's performance. we will continue in that role, he will coach the british team at the olympics next year. all that continuity can only be good for women's football in great britain. looking further ahead, some rumblings about england do not have the heritage of the usa have got, because the american women have the couege because the american women have the college system, which basically is like being a professional footballer from the age of 18 to 21, you train and get paid, it is incredible.
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england are getting there, it will ta ke england are getting there, it will take longer. england are closing the gap, that is what we saw last night. thank you very much forjoining us. live in lyon. some of the reaction on social media following the game, david beckham posted an emotional message on instagram. and gary lineker has tweeted. let's have a look at some of this morning's back pages.
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record—breaking signing for totte n ha m record—breaking signing for tottenham hotspur, who have secured a deal that could be worth up to £63 million. in the bottom corner there. tanguy ndombele. more on the cricket world cup shortly, but even if england get to the final, it will not be free to airfor the final, it will not be free to air for everyone the final, it will not be free to airfor everyone to the final, it will not be free to air for everyone to watch. turning to tennis now. it's been confirmed that andy murray will play mixed doubles with serena williams at wimbledon this week.
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as for the singles, serena's aiming to match margaret court's record of 24 grand slams. yesterday she beat the italian jiulia gatto—monticone in straights sets. defending champion angelique kerber saw off fellow german tatjana maria. elsewhere, roger federer is thorugh to the second round and will face briatin's jay clarke. british women's number one joanna konta is safely into the second round as is harriet dart, who was watched by the duchess of cambridge. a p pa re ntly apparently only three rows there, and the duchess of cambridge and her security detail were taking up all of them. it's a huge day for england's cricketers. they'll england qualify for the world cup semi—finals if they beat new zealand in durham today. india made sure of their place
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in the semis yesterday. rohit sharma hit a century as they beat bangladesh by 28 runs at edgebaston. bangladesh go out of the tournament coverage of england new zealand is underway with tms over on bbc radio 5live extra, play starts at 10.30 with in play clips and highlights available on the bbc sport website and app. australia won the opening match of the women's ashes in leicester. set a target of 178 to win by england in the first one dayer, they won by 2 wickets which means england go 2—0 down in the multi—format series. that's all the sport for now. more from the bbc sport centre at 11.15. planning for the new brexit deadline is "more difficult" because the supply network will be full of christmas stock, tesco's boss has warned. dave lewis told the bbc that the new deadline of the end
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of october meant there would be "less capacity" for stockpiling longer—life items. but mr lewis also told steph mcgovern that leaving the eu could also provide opportunities for the uk. whether it is a deal or no deal, the devil is in the detail, what will it mean for the movement of produce, will there be tariffs, will there be hold—ups at the border. we will have to wait and see. is it something that worries you, as a business. edge —— whether it is a deal or no deal. we will do whatever we can to help customers through it and we will try to safeguard the business as we go through the change. since the referendum there has been scary headlines talking about empty shelves, and, food not being able to come in at the borders and prices rocketing, do you think any of that is true? where those stories come from is, we import 50% of ourfood and we don't know what the border arrangements would be, we don't know
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what the trade arrangements would be and therefore you can imagine one of many scenarios. hundreds of thousands of people in south america witnessed a rare sight last night — a total eclipse of the sun. the moon's great shadow, or "umbra", plunged parts of chile into darkness for a few seconds, before passing over the andes and across to argentina. a solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the earth and the sun, blocking its light. south america is also expected to see the world's next total solar eclipse — which will take place on the 14th of december next year. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon. nothing blocking the sun today, we have had lots of sunshine, glorious start for many of us, here is the satellite imagery, loud in north wales, down to the south—east, thicker cloud, certainly, across the north—east, a few spots of rain. for
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most of us, a case of blue skies, thatis most of us, a case of blue skies, that is the same for county durham. lovely weather watcher photo. for the rest of the day, little change, cloud building up in the sky across eastern and south—eastern areas this afternoon, still the crowd across scotland, edging south, into northern ireland, the south of scotland, still outbreaks of rain in the far north—west. 15 to 18 degrees, up to 22,20 the far north—west. 15 to 18 degrees, up to 22, 20 three celsius in the south—east today, feeling quite warm and pleasant across many parts of england and wales. throughout tonight, thicker cloud in the far north, still some rain in the far north, still some rain in the northern isles, clear spells, could be the odd mist patch, temperatures getting down to seven to 12 celsius. thursday morning, starting off on a rather fresh note again. throughout thursday, more sunshine for england and wales, bit of cloud in the far north of england, scotland, northern ireland more persistent rain moving into the
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far north—west and that will continue. an inch or so of rain, towards the east, some protection from the grampians, things a little dry, still patchy rain. temperatures 14 to 16, warmer day for england and wales, temperatures up to 23 to 25 celsius. rain in the far north, continuing, all linked in with this weather system here, further south, ridge of high pressure still in charge of conditions. during friday, sunny spells for much of england and wales. more cloud further north across scotland, a few spots of rain in the final. temperatures higher in the south—east, 27 degrees on friday, mid teens further north. cool air moving south, that where the front as we go into the weekend will continue to push into southern areas. that will bring fresh conditions for many of us over the weekend, temperatures dropping down to 22 celsius in the london area,
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lots of dry weather over the weekend, a bit more cloud around, still bright or sunny spells to be enjoyed. fine weather continues for most of us over the next few days.
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hello it's wednesday, it's 10:00am, i'm riz lateef. a bbc investigation finds children using the popular video—sharing app tik tok are feeling exploited into sending money to their favourite stars in exchange for promises or attention. yo, if you drop another drama queen yeah, i'll speak to you on instagram for a week straight. a drama queen, promotion and my number to follow everything. thanks so much for the drama queen. one more and you get my number, ok? "drama queens" are digital gifts which cost nearly £50 each — and some children end up spending hundreds of pounds. the dad of a 26 year—old british woman, killed fighting against is in syria has been to the country to meet the people she fought alongside. dirk campbell is here.

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