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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 3, 2019 6:50pm-7:01pm BST

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whit: ‘ur w.:itit'u15 wnucur w— a hotel in lyon, so putting a brave face on things. we know there was a feeling of emptiness in that camp after that result, huge disappointment. you can understand why, their world cup has ended any familiarfashion. going why, their world cup has ended any familiar fashion. going out why, their world cup has ended any familiarfashion. going out at why, their world cup has ended any familiar fashion. going out at the semifinals, the third major tournament in a row that they have exited at the last four, although they did not have enough to beat the usa at this time, there will still bea usa at this time, there will still be a sand that progress has been made. this world cup has seen more people interested in the sport, a record tv audience for their semifinal against the usa, more people watched and have watched any other programme this year. that is something i was speaking to baroness sue campbell about, she is the director within's football, as she believes there is world cup has already seen a transformation in the women's game. i think we have seen 11.7 million people watching, the text and the messages from people
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who i've not spoken to for hundreds of years, my local pub having a chat about women's football. we have changed things. our job about women's football. we have changed things. ourjob is to capitalise on that and drive that home. i do not think the players need shouldered the responsibility that they somehow let us all down, they did anything but. they wear pink dataset. just like a strange situation, you lose at the semifinals which hurts more than anything else, but you have to play anything else, but you have to play a fourth place play—off which is on the minds of the lionesses. that's right, when you come to win a tournament, the worst place to be any third fourth—place play—off, but thatis any third fourth—place play—off, but that is where they are, playing the loser of the other semifinal between sweden and the netherlands, and phil neville will have to pick his players up at they are to match that achievement from canada four years ago when they won the bronze medal. he says he has all day looking beyond that because his next major tournament will be the tokyo olympics. he is leading team gb
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there, it is contract runs until 2021 which also covers the european championships which are being held and eglin, the final is at wembley. even more of an incentive if it were needed for england and phil neville defied the extra two or 3% to raise the level to get the edge over the best teams in the world and build on this progress. lets pick up isle of wight sue campbell was saying, success is not measured simply by what happens on the pitch. i have been speaking to kate dale who heads up sport england, this girl can campaign. the way they have inspired so many girls to talk about football and think about it, it has normalised it. it seems normal for about it, it has normalised it. it seems normalfor women to play football. it is no logger seen as something the boys do or something for the blokes. it is coupling on the four girls of all ages to go out
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there and feel that if they do well and if they are talented at what ca rd and if they are talented at what card they have a future in it. but also even at they do not want to do that, they just want to also even at they do not want to do that, theyjust want to have also even at they do not want to do that, they just want to have fun, that, they just want to have fun, thatis that, they just want to have fun, that is ok. seeing amazing women go out there and achieving, it will have a huge impact. they would have been watching and going team losing to the usa who are themselves a team which are very much based on that tradition of having football or soccer in their lives from a young age. the game is ubiquitous amongst young girls in the states, is there a little look ofjealousy across other programme that they have at the effect that it has on their professional team's doing so well?|j wouldn't professional team's doing so well?” wouldn't say jealousy, but we can learn and i think the fa are learning, and we need to make sure that girls have the opportunity to play football from an early age, just like the boys. if they have the same opportunities and if it is done at the right way, there's no reason to think we will not go on and build from this in terms of success and
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one step better, two steps better by lifting the trophy, but also in terms of the number of girls who feel they can go out there and play. we need to look across the atlantic and learn from that. the eglin team is filling raw today, but if you could speak on behalf of some of those young girls that were watching oui’ those young girls that were watching our comrade that enjoyed that game asa our comrade that enjoyed that game as a whole journey, what would you say to them today? —— england. as a whole journey, what would you say to them today? -- england. thank you, iam an say to them today? -- england. thank you, i am an old girl and i say to them today? -- england. thank you, i am an old girland i have say to them today? -- england. thank you, i am an old girl and i have had an amazing time as you have inspired an amazing time as you have inspired a generation of girls who will grow up a generation of girls who will grow up feeling that they can achieve their dreams and really put that work in and get out there, because you have direct, they can as well, so you have direct, they can as well, so thank you. sweden and the netherlands, eight o'clock kick—off, williton on bbc two. that is ed from sportsday, but now that to the newsroom.
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grace more now on the news of two real workers being killed on a line. let's speak now to idly trot out, cheap cars of british transport police. thank you for being wet eyes this evening. yourfirst police. thank you for being wet eyes this evening. your first reaction to what you have learned so far.l terrible tragedy, really awful event. they are very rare, these days do not happen very often. we have not had an accident like this for some considerable time. it happens with near messes, the realising barge investigates all of those. they had been investigating all day. it is very rare but desperately sad today for people. you measured the investigation, we will talk more broadly in a moment, but first of all on this tickly
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incident, two of the three workers killed, one traumatised by what he saw, when you hear that the two men we re saw, when you hear that the two men were wearing ear defenders i could not hear the train approaching, does that surprise you? i doe that has been released already, but i am aware a thorough investigation ongoing, i would aware a thorough investigation ongoing, iwould not aware a thorough investigation ongoing, i would not want to pass judgment on that. there should be a safe method of working, adherence to that, and safety is a major issue for network rail. and then made these things work very well. it is very rare that this happens, so something has gone very badly wrong. these people were not protected and looked after while they were working on the tracks. the rail accident investigation branch, which you refer to, has investigated 17 near misses in the last two years involving real workers and contractors. i take on board what you say about safety and thank goodness there have been only six
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death after 2017, now up to eight, but it is eight to many. 17 near messes. that would suggest that there are issues that need to be looked at more generally. there are, and if you look at those reports they invariably talk about failure to adhere to safe practice. i am not casting any, giving any view, but if you look at the past investigations, almost invariably it has been a failure to adhere to the practices that she would have been stated at the time. those investigators are thorough, they passed on their findings to everybody involved, and in certain cases if you go back to the case in 2004, people were prosecuted until people were jailed. does make two people were jailed. they will be a very thorough investigation, british transport despoiled do the forensic recovery alongside the rail accident investigation branch and they will work together on finding out exacting what happened. as you say,
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there have been quite a view near misses in the last few years, and we don't want decent happen again. it isi don't want decent happen again. it is i dangerous place to work and we need to make it a safe as possible. they used to always be covered by the factory act and recognise the level of safety, so high. what might surprise people is not some icy issue about the air defenders, if you have a lookout that that kind of thing can be dealt with, but one might assume any 21st century there would be quite sophisticated mechanisms for protecting rail workers in terms of apps and signalling. i get the impression and some of the background in other cases like the ones you are referring to is that actually it is very human, very simple and basic. it is human, it is thinking through safe methods of working, and during those are properly adhered to, ensuring there is proper supervision, and looking at those near miss reports, it is often when
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people have not adhered to them, human failures along the line. it is only day one of those dreadful investigation and i am not casting any views whatsoever about what happened there today, but in the past those have been the case. i do not pretend to be an expert on the rail safety itself, british transport police help to investigate, and whether there is a criminal investigation to be taken, thatis criminal investigation to be taken, that is property transport police will do. this is an extreme approach, every real ice and gets a thorough investigation, and we'll find out what has happened, but people are quite rightly worried about the near misses and densely saddened by what has happened today. thank you very much for being with us on thank you very much for being with us on bbc news. coming up next, beyond 100 days.
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you're watching beyond 100 days. it took four summits and 50 hours of negotiations but the eu finally concludes its choices for the bloc‘s top jobs. the nominated candidates were every bit a compromise and the chances are you won't have heard of most of them. italian socialist david—maria sassoli is picked as the new president of the european parliament, joining german defence minister ursula von der leyen who'll lead the commission. president trump prepares to put on a made—for—tv set ofjuly 4th celebrations, with fighter jets, tanks and fireworks to mark the day. also on the programme:

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