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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 4, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: patients lives are being put at risk because of a failure to treat sepsis quickly enough. china warns the uk not to interfere in its domestic affairs as a diplomatic row continues over protests in hong kong. a volcano — known as the lighthouse of the mediterranean — has erupted on the italian island of stromboli, killing one person and injuring others. the uk's newest airport opens today. 28 flights a week will depart from carlisle lake district, or cax, but can it really succeed given how crowded our skies are already?
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the fairytale for coco gauff continues here at wimbledon. at the age of 15, she's now into the third round — and she says she can"beat anyone". the son will continue to shine in wimbledon all day. —— the sun. the further south you are, you will hang onto the sunny conditions but further north, cloud will build with heavy and persistent rain in the north—west of scotland. we will be back with more later. it's thursdayjuly the 4th. our top story: patients‘ lives are being put at risk because of delays in treatment for sepsis, referred to by experts as a hidden killer, because it is hard to spot. it's estimated 50,000 people in the uk die from sepsis every year. hospitals are meant to put patients on an antibiotic drip within an hour when it's suspected, but research by the bbc suggests
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a quarter of patients in england are waiting longer. lauren moss reports. a father remembering his son as a bright student with ambition of becoming an accountant and taking ca re of becoming an accountant and taking care of his family. but in may 2016, the man went to hospital in london after a bruise on his ankle left him struggling to walk. the 39—year—old was sent home with paracetamol and less tha n was sent home with paracetamol and less than 2a hours later, he suffered cardiac arrest and died. doctors had failed to spot that amir had stepped —— sepsis. doctors had failed to spot that amir had stepped -- sepsis. last time i saw him within the hospital, he shook my head and kissed me and said dad, i love you. i came home and i didn't realise that would be the last kiss, our last cuddle. sepsis is triggered by an infection and early symptoms can include a fast
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heartbeat, high or low temperature, chills and shivering. it makes the body does make immune system go into overdrive which can lead to septic shock, organ failure and sometimes death. figures from around three quarters of hospital trust in england suggest that one in four patients aren't being started on antibiotics within an hour when sepsis is suspected. sepsis is not a lwa ys sepsis is suspected. sepsis is not always easy to spot. it can arise in people of any age, it can arise as a consequence of any infection so it is difficult for health professionals to spot it first time, every time. what they do need to do his work in partnership with their patients, listen to their patients and look for sepsis. if they do that, most of the time, it can be spotted. all uk hospitals are meant to follow the same guidelines but performance in wales is similar to england and neither scotland nor northern ireland divided recent data. nhs england says huge improvements have been made and it is important not to automatically give antibiotics to everyone who is
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very u nwell give antibiotics to everyone who is very unwell but and their‘s father says he is being robbed of his son and his family is devastated. china is warning the uk not to interfere in its domestic affairs after the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt threatened "serious consequences" if freedoms in hong kong are watered down. tensions between the uk and china have been rising with beijing's ambassador in london accusing the uk of having a "colonial mindset". 0ur correspondent ben ando is outside the chinese embassy in london for us this morning. ben, what damage could this cause to britain's relationship with china? if there is damage being done diplomatically, it certainly already is because relations between britain and china are definitely cooler than they have been for a few years. of course, is unusual for the chinese
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to speak so directly. normally their languages very diplomatic, almost opaque. in this, they couldn't be clearer. effectively, they are telling britain to butt out. this is all about the fact that over 150 yea rs all about the fact that over 150 years hong kong was the british colony and was returned to chinese rule in 1997 and part of that was the agreement that people in hong kong would have more freedoms and rights than perhaps those on mainland china. the proposed introduction on the extradition treaty said people in hong kong would make it too easy to extradite political dissidents back to the mainland and that is whatjeremy hunt, the foreign secretary, says britain is supporting. we should stand firm and tell the chinese that any watering down of the rights of people in hong kong should not be tolerated stop the chinese are saying to britain it is effectively none of your business. where this goes is not clear. written is not softening its stance and it could mean china is hardening its addition as well. —— britain four double
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where there is so much, as between the uk and china, it will be causing some concern both in beijing and london. the laws on assisted dying will be debated in the house of commons today, for the first time since mps rejected changing the law four years ago. currently, anyone found guilty of helping someone to end their own life can face a long prison sentence — but some say the law needs updating. breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. vicki was 83 and had stage iv bone cancer when she ended her own life last year. she'd been in constant pain. she was not afraid of dying but the way she was going to waive —— die. she said she was going to do it when she was ready. her son and daughter, adam and kate, were both investigated by police for potentially assisting their mother's suicide. vicki had asked adam to contact the swiss clinic dignitas with a view to potentially ending her own life there.
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his phone was seized. vicki died in kate's house. kate found her after returning home one day last february. i then sat with her. didn't go in an ambulance. as the police took it, mum was a victim and i was a suspect. it was very, very stressful. after almost a year, the coroner returned a verdict of suicide. kate and adam were cleared of any involvement. i would like to see the law changed so i would like to see the law changed so that people who are terminally ill can be allowed to die with listed in the way that they die. —— assisted. in england, wales, and northern ireland, being found guilty of assisted suicide can lead to a jail term of up to 1a years. in scotland, it's not a specific crime, but helping someone take their own life can lead to a charge of culpable homicide. all these laws will be scrutinised today in parliament. kidney specialist, dr david randall,
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supports the view of care not killing, an alliance of organisations which oppose a change to the law. it can appear stern, but invariably it's interpreted with compassion. there's very clear guidance from the director of public prosecutions, which indicates that family members who act out of compassion to assist the suicide of a relative shouldn't be prosecuted. the danger, i think, if we change the law here is that we skew the balance. but for adam and kate, and many others, legal changes are long overdue. police investigating the disappearance of an estate agent in london more than 30 years ago are searching land in worcestershire. suzy lamplugh went missing in 1986 from fulham. her body has never been found. scotland yard said new information had been received as a result of publicity from a search in sutton coldfield last year. the two tory leadership candidates, boris johnson
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and jeremy hunt, have been challenged to urgently bring forward plans to tackle the social care crisis. a committee of peers has called for an immediate eight billion pound cash injection and a move to a free, nhs—based system. both men have pledged to make social care a priority if they become prime minister. a man's been killed in a volcanic eruption on the italian island of stromboli. the eruption was unexpected and started fires on the small mediterranean island, just north of sicily. rebecca hartmann reports. ash and smoke rising in the air, just moments after the volcanic explosion on stromboli. the mushroom shaped cloud grew larger until it soon filled the sky above the small island. witnesses say they heard a loud boom and saw streams of red, hot lava running towards the village of ginostra. 0ne male hiker died after being hit by a falling stone, while others were injured. many tourists threw themselves into the sea for safety.
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the volcano, nicknamed the lighthouse of the mediterranean, is one of the most active on the planet and has been under a regular state of eruption since 1932. but experts aren't entirely sure what caused this explosion. it's probably to do with the accumulation of a large amount of gas, deep in the volcanic system, which is then released in one great big bubble and that rises up and pushes all of the magma out in one go. rescue services say the eruption started fires on the western side of the island. firefighters even sent a plane to drop water on the flames below. just 500 people live on the island and it relies heavily on tourists, many of whom climb the 924 metre summit to peer into its crater — something volcano enthusiasts are likely to keep doing despite the obvious dangers. rebecca hartmann, bbc news.
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more than 200 guests at a 90th birthday party for imelda marcos, the former first lady of the philippines, have fallen ill with suspected food poisoning. more than 2,000 people were attending the celebration at a sports stadium in manila, where mrs marcos is still revered despite her late husband being ousted from power more than 30 years ago. some of the guests had to be taken to hospital. that is not what you want to end a party. what we want is andy murray to do brilliantly well and all the other writs at wimbledon. he is making his way to court. the covers are on the excitement is building already. a huge day ahead. the covers are on because of the morning dew because of my papers got wet. —— the morning
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dew. my papers got wet. we have caught number nine and as well as the five brits involved in the singles, in the doubles, huge excitement, andy murray in the men's doubles today, makes his return to wimbledon. we don't know where he is going to be playing. it could be on one of the outside courts. a huge excitement with a clamour for seats. we know that he will be playing and it will be on the bbc sometime after five on thursday. what a finish we had today three yesterday and the sensation from america, 15—year—old coco gough continues. when she was born, serena welborn —— serena williams had already won two wimbledon titles
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british men's number one kyle edmund is out — he was three games from victory before losing in five sets to fernando verdasco — edmund says he needs to improve his fitness. a must win game, won. england reach the semi—finals of the cricket world cup for the first time in 27 years, with durham boy mark wood making a key contribution at chester le street. and european champions the netherlands squeeze past sweden at the women's world cup — they'll face world champions the usa in sunday's final. the lionesses now play sweden. refers the hawk is on here. —— rufus to stop we had to say goodbye, it was the end of the journey for kyle edmund and heather watson. the
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cricket was pretty dramatic yesterday because of this moment. they had a touch of world cup luck. this illustrates what happens. kane williamson batted away a mark would delivery and it just williamson batted away a mark would delivery and itjust brushed the fingers before hitting the stumps at the end. he was run out, very unlucky to do it like that. on the back page of another paper, finger licking michael wood. —— finger licking michael wood. —— finger licking wood stop back home, away from the women's world cup, it seems like a done deal. likely to be announced today. he won't have much budget. the final one is wet, i apologise. a mixed doubles, he will
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partner serena williams. judy murray, andy's mum, says it is the perfect match but she says the top tips for him is to keep the lady happy. that's what it is all about in mixed doubles, she says. that is tomorrow to look forward to. she said it is a bit like dating but we will hear more from judy later 0n brea kfast will hear more from judy later 0n breakfast but the question today is where is andy going to be playing the men's doubles. so much excitement. we will keep our ears and eyes peeled to find out first for you on breakfast. mike, there was obviously the agony after the england game, obviously awful. but good news in the papers today because we didn't know the viewing figures. 11.7 million tuning m, viewing figures. 11.7 million tuning in, a peak share of 50.8% of the
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audience. breaking new records in reaching a new watermark for english football. i was speaking to norwegian and swedish journalist and it has been the same across europe. more on that at 6:30 a.m.. an absolutely beautiful day. back with carol in absolutely beautiful day. back with carolina absolutely beautiful day. back with carol in a few minutes' time. let's take a look at today's papers. the two conservative leadership contenders continue to make their cases, with the daily mail reporting boris johnson's pledge to fund an extra 20,000 police officers, at a cost of £1 billion. and the telegraph hasjeremy hunt offering a vote on fox—hunting and saying he is best—placed to defeat labour in a general election. they show the england cricketers mark wood and eoin morgan celebrating their world cup win. they defeated new zealand in a match they had to win to be sure of a semi—final place. it is all kicking off in sport, isn't it? the times also marks that england win with a picture ofjonny bairstow
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celebrating his century. its main story claims that a poll shows support for labour at a record low of 18%. and the guardian reports on the massive burden of alcohol on the nhs, after a review found that one in ten patients in hospital beds were alcohol—dependent. the front page also carries an eye—catching picture of rufus the hawk, who is keeping pigeons away from wimbledon. i know carol has a very good relationship with rufus. i think it was yesterday she was with him, or the day before. you can check it out on social media. she does enjoy some time with rufus. a quick look inside, technology questions. the issues around ‘s smartphones. if you employ someone, do you expect them not to use their phone, of course, now smartphone, while they are working for you? unions warn there isa working for you? unions warn there is a new front line for friction between workers and organisations, as managers either tell people they can't use their mobiles while they are working, or they don't, and they
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use them all the time. france has banned it, you are not allowed to access banned it, you are not allowed to a ccess your banned it, you are not allowed to access your work e—mail outside work hours. no, this is while you are at work. say you are employed in a shop, and you are not told you can't have your smartphone, and you are not doing anything, there's no customers, and you are sending a couple of messages. is that 0k? no, it is like taking a personal phone call. do your bosses have a right to ta ke call. do your bosses have a right to take your phone off you? no, but they can tell you to stop using it. and these are netted, 60 life—size knitted figures including the queen at her coronation, someone mowing a lawn, and a shopkeeper. when you introduced this item you said it looks like pictures of real people.
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i don't think... at first glance, come on. she looks really quite knitted, if you can look knitted. i can't resist the picture of a big fish. i don't fish, can't resist the picture of a big fish. idon't fish, but look can't resist the picture of a big fish. i don't fish, but look at that. you have never finished? i have, actually, yes. this is a carpet like you have never seen before. 16 stone, eight pounds. it is caught by mr harvey, and on this picture, these other three people he enlisted, and i assume the man the middle caught the fish. it was so gigantic he had to enlist other people to help him. this chapter seems very happy. look closely at the face of this here. can ijust say that's his girlfriend? is it? 0k. does it say that? yes. forget that for a second, my apologies. can you see this chap's face? he finds
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himself holding a giant fish. you see this chap's face? he finds himself holding a giant fishm took 80 minutes to reel in. i'm not surprised. apologies to the girlfriend. carol is at wimbledon again for us this morning. i don't know if you are meeting up with mike at some point, but where are you? i amjust with mike at some point, but where are you? i am just a few yards away from mike at the moment, but look at that sky. you can expect blue skies if you are coming to wimbledon today, and as we come down and look at centre court in all its glory, then on some some of the outside courts, which are still covered, we will see the ground staff coming in later to take those covers off some time between 7:15am and 7:30 a.m., because they have to be off by 7:30 a.m.. it is lovely and quiet this morning. very tranquil, we haven't even seen a police dog just yet. the forecast for wimbledon today is a blue sky. lots of sunshine, little bit offair blue sky. lots of sunshine, little bit of fair weather cloud developing through the day but not much more
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than that and temperatures up to 25 degrees. so if you are coming down, do not forget your sunscreen or indeed your hat. now, the uk forecast is again a largely dry one. however, we have got some rain, and most of that rain is going to be in the north—west. through the day we will see some cloud build just ahead of that rain, as our weather front coming in sinks a little bit further south. so you can see where we have got the rain at 9am this morning, the heaviest and most assistant rain will be across north—west scotland. they will still be some rain in north—east scotland, but it won't be as heavy, and the cloud building so southern scotland seeing a little bit of brightness. early brightness across northern ireland and northern england. you will see some cloud building later on in the day, and has become further south, we do have some cloud around. not much, it has to be said, and a lot of sunshine. so through the course of the day, the rain advances a little bit
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further south. cloud builds across scotland, northern ireland and northern england. further south to central, southern england, east anglia, wales and all points south will hang onto the sunshine. as a result, this is where we will see the highest temperatures, up to 25 01’ the highest temperatures, up to 25 or 26 degrees, but fresher as we push further north. through this evening and overnight, we will still have the cloud across the northern half of the country. they will still be some rain across the north—west of scotland, and as we come south, there will be some clearer spells. temperature range tonight roughly falling to between nine and 1a degrees. and tomorrow, well, a weather front continues to push south, taking its cloud with it across england and wales. northern ireland and scotland could see a bit of patchy rain and drizzle coming out of that at times, but ahead of that, so again for southern parts of england, southern midlands, south wales, southwest, we're back into sunny skies. with some fair weather cloud developing. if anything, tomorrow could be a bit warmer than
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we are looking at today. 27 degrees, so another dry, sunny, hot day, if you like, in wimbledon. saturday the weather front continues to push all the way south, so wimbledon might, and it is might at this stage, see a little bit of drizzle. it will be coming out of that cloud. it will feel fresher as it clears, and next week it looks like the temperatures are on the rise, especially so in the south of england. thank you very much. it looks lovely down there. we will talk to you later. he has been described as the most important scientific thinker in the world, and his work has led to what we understand about climate change today. now, james lovelock is about to celebrate his 100th birthday. the bbc‘s mishal husain went to meet him. james lovelock is about to celebrate his 100th birthday. he is one of the world's most influential environmental thinkers. time is getting shorter, and if we go doing silly things like global
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warming, it gets even shorter still. i think that scientists are a bit like artists... in the 1960s, he was an eco—pioneer who invented supersensitive testing devices which detected atmospheric pollutants. nasa used his equipment to test for life on mars. when you put forward your views about what the search for life might look like, how was it received? it was received very roughly. in fact, the biologists complained to the management in nasa. said, what are you doing upsetting all these biologists? nasa's employing them at great expense, and here are you telling them that what they're doing is a lot of rubbish. and so — what would you do instead? his revolutionary gaia theory argues that life does more than adapt to the earth. it changes the earth to its own purposes. today, he calls himself an engineer first, and is very proud of his inventions. so what is this? that's a palladium transmodulator.
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is this what you came up with at very short notice... yes. ..when nasa sort of set you a challenge? that's my life. the electron capture detector. it worked like a dream. it could analyse incredibly small quantities of certain compounds. his new book, novacene, argues that we are entering a new age, where artificial intelligence systems take over. artificial intelligence, i reckon, will be 10,000 times faster in thinking than we are. it's a new form of life that evolved. and a new form of life that you think will, in the fullness of time, be much more intelligent than we are, and supersede us? yes. if supersede is the right word. we are all necessary. so does all of this fit into the theory that you're best
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known for, the gaia hypothesis, that the earth is a self—regulating entity? is this the next stage of that, if you like? yes, the earth is in a really in a rather dodgy position, looked at astronomically. i think we should just stop burning fossil fuel. i think it's a crazy, daft, very dangerous thing to do, but we continue to do it, because there's so much money invested in it. they could have — use nuclear energy quite safely, without worrying the planet at all. james lovelock, happy 100th birthday. thank you very much. thank you. what an amazing story. 100 years old. he did not look 90. you could knock at least 20 or 30 years off it. the uk's newest airport opens today, after two failed ta keoffs. sarah corker is there
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for us this morning. there is going to be some fanfare around this, isn't there? yes, good morning from carlisle lake district airport. the very first passengers just making their way through security. and this will be the first departure. we've got the scottish airline logan airtaking departure. we've got the scottish airline logan air taking off at around 8am, heading to dublin city. iam around 8am, heading to dublin city. i am told it is fully booked, with 33 passengers, and initially they will be 23 flights a week going to dublin, city and south end. we are surrounded by beautiful countryside here. we are on the edge of the lake district, and they are going to be targeting tourists, but also business travellers as well. and in the next half—an—hour, the runway is actually going to be blessed by the
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archdeacon of carlisle. and we will be asking what this new airport, the uk's newest, will mean for the cumbrian economy. first the news, travel and weather wherever you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. the metropolitan police is being urged to stop using facial recognition technology, after researchers found it only identified one in five people in tests. a report commissioned by scotland yard also raises concerns about whether the techbology breaks human rights laws, and warns that it may be proved unlawful if challenged in court. the met says its own pilot was succesful and this report is unbalanced. the number of homophobic attacks in london has gone up by almost 15% in the last year. 2,600 incidents were reported between may 2018 and may this year, and according to the met‘s own figures, there was a spike during lastjuly of almost 300 attacks. one of those left with life—changing injuries after being punched and kicked at pride last year was tommy barwick.
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just felt that crack in the back, that kick. and i went down on the floor. it was really quick, a two second attack. it's ruined my life, really. really, completely ruined it. endangered european eels are being released into the river thames later today. the eel population has been plummeting for decades, and juvenile eels will be released into the thames at kingston to raise awareness of the issues facing the species. these include the impact of human infrastructure on their natural migration, as well as illegal trafficking. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0nto the roads, in battersea, latchmere road is closed in both directions between battersea park road and sheepcote lane due to a police investgation. in earls court, the traffic lights are not working on a4 west cromwell road at the junction with warwick road.
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and in chiswick, one lane is closed in both directions on a205 chiswick high road between the chiswick roundabout and kew bridge due to emergency water works. now the weather, with sara thornton. hello there, very good morning to you. a beautiful start to your thursday across london. plenty of sunshine out there, which we will keep right the way through the day to day. another find keep right the way through the day to day. anotherfind one keep right the way through the day to day. another find one for you. sunny, dry, and yes, it will be warm. after a slightly cool start this morning and some of our suburbs, it must be said. but plenty of sunshine right across the map. nothing to point out, and that means oui’ nothing to point out, and that means our temperatures were just zoom up very nicely into the mid— 20 celsius. 25, maybe 26 degrees. higher 70s and fahrenheit. a lovely end to the day, a fine evening, and we are dry and clear at first overnight. a little bit of cloud potentially just to think away from the north. it shouldn't spoil things, though. should be addressed at tomorrow morning, and a bit warmer than today. temperatures in the mid teens for some. cloud at first, yes, but it pulls away
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nicely. good sunshine for the rest of the day, and then actually it could be even a smidge warmer than today. 26, possibly 27 celsius on the cards. a lot of fine weather for the cards. a lot of fine weather for the coming days. watch out on saturday. a touch of rain in the middle of the day. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: terrence higgins was one of the first men with aids to die in the uk. but nearly a0 years after his death, the trust set up in his name says attitudes towards hiv have hardly changed. we'll find out why later in the programme. with just over a year to go until the start of the tokyo 0lympics, team gb is trying to get us
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all active ahead of the games. gold medal cyclist laura kenny will be here to tell us how she plans to inspire everyone to get moving. pop star, strictly winner, and britain's got talentjudge. now alesha dixon is a succesful children's author. she'll be here to tell us all about her latest super—hero story. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in treatment for sepsis, which can cause catastrophic complications such as organ failure. hospitals are advised to treat suspected sepsis quickly with an antibiotic drip, but research by the bbc suggests a quarter of patients in england are waiting longer than the target of one hour.
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china is warning the uk not to interfere in its domestic affairs after the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt threatened "serious consequences" if freedoms in hong kong are watered down. tensions between the uk and china have been rising — with beijing's ambassador in london accusing the uk of having a "colonial mindset". 0ur china correspondent robin brant is in hong kong. good morning. this is escalating in terms of the language being used and it is even setting aside from what's actually happening in hong kong. is pretty quiet here after that we saw the storming of the legislative council here on monday. it has been a diplomatic row tween the uk which of course used to run hong kong, and china, which of the last 2a two yea rs has china, which of the last 2a two years has been in charge once again. "22 years has been in charge once again. ——22 years. what really annoyed china was his reference to china needing to understand drove, what motivated the protested. ——
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protesters to stop china sees it as interference in internal matters. essentially yesterday, chinese ambassador, told the uk to keep its nose out. it is pretty calm here. some arrests yesterday. events around monday leading up to the occupation. we don't know what is going to come next, may be more protests, no hint that they will be anywhere near like what scale they are on now. one in 10 people admitted to hospital in the uk is dependent on alcohol according to a new study. researchers at king's college london are calling for universal screening for alcohol—related problems and more trained staff to offer support. last year the nhs announced plans to put care teams into the worst affected hospitals. police investigating the disappearance of an estate agent in london more than 30 years ago are searching land in worcestershire. suzy lamplugh went missing in 1986 from fulham when she was 25. her body has never been found. scotland yard said new information had been received as a result
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of publicity from a search in sutton coldfield last year. a volcanic eruption on the italian island of stromboli has killed a hiker and caused fires. the volcano is one of the most active in the world but last night's eruption was particularly powerful and unexpected. some people are reported to have thrown themselves into the sea for safety. the italian navy is on standby for a possible evacuation of residents and tourists. the winner of britain's got talent colin thackery has signed his first record deal at the grand old age of 89. music make love, love changes everything. how you live and how you die. # love
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#. that was the chelsea pensioner‘s winning performance, singing "love changes everything", in the final of the itv series in june. his label, decca, says he's the oldest person in the world to sign a solo album deal. he's in good company because decca also has dame vera lynn on its books. iam not i am not great at predicting things but i imagine that would be a very popular album. itjust but i imagine that would be a very popular album. it just seems but i imagine that would be a very popular album. itjust seems wrong to interrupt. it just popular album. itjust seems wrong to interrupt. itjust seems wrong. lovely. mike is at wimbledon this morning, carol is at wimbledon this morning, carol is at wimbledon this morning but there is a lot going on at wimbledon today. that looks stunning. the light looks beautiful, wimbledon looks great, already for action later. carol can put her feet up action later. carol can put her feet up because there's not a cloud in the sky. more in the weather later. the scene is set for what could be
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as “— the scene is set for what could be as —— historic day with five brits in the singles the return of andy murray to action in the doubles. just to have him cement so much after what he went through in the hip operation was not to remember backin hip operation was not to remember back in january it hip operation was not to remember back injanuary it could be the end of his career but not at all, he is back today. just take in this scene, looking over caught number 12, —— court 12. the floral wonder that is a centre court. looking out for those brute in the singles and —— those brute in the singles and —— those brits. kyle edmund was knocked out yesterday. he looked in control for a lot of the time against fernando verdasco. a knee injury hampered him and he ended up losing to the 35—year—old spaniard. kyle
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edmund is saying he needs to be fitter because he got tired was up as well as your —— johanna konta,. and heather watson is also out — she said she made too many errors, in her straight—sets defeat to the 20th seed anett kontaveit of estonia. i'm not playing as well as i could have played. i started off well and created opportunities but... didn't ta ke created opportunities but... didn't take them, didn't step up and play aggressive tennis, i sort of did the opposite and backed off. if i could go back, i would do that definitely for sure. coco gauff‘s fairytale continued with victory over the semi—finalist here two years ago, magdalena rybarikova. the 15—year—old american beat five—time wimbledon champion venus williams on monday. yesterday she needed just over an hour to beat her slovakian opponent in straight sets under court one's new roof. gauff will also play in the mixed doubles partnering britain's jay clarke.
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i played well especially on the pressure points. she was serving amazing so it was just kind of hard to return sometimes. shejust hit for good service in a row. you have caroline wozniacki up next. this reputation and experience actually mattered to you? element not at all, i think mattered to you? element not at all, ithinkl mattered to you? element not at all, i think i can beat anybody. if i don't think i can win the match, i won't even step on the court. the youngest player into the third round in the open era. more onj clark, from derby. what about this mixed doubles partnership tomorrow? andy murray and serena williams. andy murray's mum, judy, says his mixed doubles partnership with serena williams could be the "perfect match". she's excited to see murray team up with williams,
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who's won seven wimbledon doubles titles, later in the week — but today, he starts his men's doubles campaign — and judy murray is not thrilled at the prospect of he and jamie potentially facing each other in the third round. i have been fortunate that andy's career is ingles and jamie's was doubles because they haven't competed against each other for a cup — make a long time was up —— singles. if it happens, i will go to the pub and wait for a text. you won't be watching courtside? no chance! i can't handle the torture. england have reached the semi—finals of a cricket world cup for the first time in 27 years, thanks to victory over new zealand at chester le street. jonny bairstow‘s second consecutive century helped set a target of 306. and new zealand might have reached it had they not lost key batsman kane williamson to an unlucky run out. england went on to win by 119 runs. they'll meet india or australia
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for a place in the final. england women's head coach phil neville has thanked the nation for the support given to his side during the world cup. a peak audience of 11.7 million watched their semi—final defeat to the usa on bbc1. that's a new record for women's football in the uk and now neville said it had really made a difference. i'd like to say on behalf of myself, the players and the whole of the fa of the support you have been playing that makes ending, the messages, the coverage back home, has been absolutely incredible. the support have been incredible. we have been inspired, we have been
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motivated, you have given us energy and the love and care and support you have given us has been amazing. there is another chance to get behind the line esses when they will behind the line esses when they will be playing third place against sweden. after the swedes lost their semi—final against the netherlands 1—0 in lyon. manchester united midfielder jackie groenen's goal in extra time saw the european champions through to sunday's final, where they'll face holders the usa. and finally time for some more tennis before i go. we love showing you footage of sports stars when they were young. this is britain's jay clarke when he was just 12 years old back in 2010. showing some incredible skills. look at this — the hot dog shot! what i like about tennis is no two days are the same, even if you play the same opponent and you've got to
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prepare mentally and physically and you've got to have different strategies for different opponents every time you play them. rafael nadal is an inspiration because he never gives up and even when he is down, he will still keep hitting the balls. i'm just excited to play. what a mature 12—year—old and even better now that he is 20! and jay could play rafa nadal in the semi—finals, but he'll have to find a way past roger federer first. a tough challenge for any 20—year—old. he has had some training with the one and only andy murray. i don't want to leave. ijust i don't want to leave. i just want to hear more and more about it. in 1982, terrence higgins was one of the first men with aids to die in the uk, but today, on the anniversary of his death, the trust set up in his name says the stigma surrounding hiv still exists. for example, it says eight out of 10 people don't understand that if you're receiving
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effective treatment you cannot pass on the virus. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been speaking to two families living with hiv. this woman was 19 when she was diagnosed with hiv positive.|j this woman was 19 when she was diagnosed with hiv positive. i never thought it would happen to me. the only thing you hear on the television and the news, it was like prostitutes, drug addict. i couldn't tell my family. i couldn't tell my friends. i was so scared. butjust a few months after she was diagnosed, she met alberto. when i met her, i was. . . she met alberto. when i met her, i was... 19. it was kind of love at first sight. in a time of fear and stigma, alberto saw the person, not the virus. love is possible and love is amazing. it is healing everything, i think. this is the day
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of my wedding and that's just amazing. two lovebirds on a dream. medical advances made to the virus was never passed on to alberto. the picture when my son was born. not to the child they never thought they would have. these are my boys, my husband and my son. this is living proof of just husband and my son. this is living proof ofjust how far we have come in the battle against hiv but have attitudes kept up? our findings showed that despite there being unequivocal scientific evidence that people on hiv treatment can't pass it on, only 90% of the british —— 19% of the public are aware of that. it is an important message, the hiv diagnosis is not the death sentence is want it once was was not lj is
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also living of that. --lj is also living proof of that. tell us about your mum. element she is nice, she's fair. -- your mum. element she is nice, she's fair. —— she is nice. your mum. element she is nice, she's fair. -- she is nice. sasha was five when doctors realised she had contracted it from her own mother. modern medicine eliminated the risk of history repeating itself. what do you want to tell people? that we need to move forward if people have diabetes or cancer. people are very sympathetic. it is not about sympathy. about, oh, 0k, sympathetic. it is not about sympathy. about, oh, ok, if you take your pills, everything is going to be fine. look at this. and it is, everything is going to be fine. jayne mccubbin, bbc news
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he has got some nifty moves, hasn't he? i like the comment, what is your mum like? mum is nice and fair. he? i like the comment, what is your mum like? mum is nice and fairlj wonder how long he will be saying that. you are watching breakfast. thank you forjoining us. carol is here with the weather, and we are looking at some rather beautiful blue skies. how lovely. isn't it just, good morning to you both. good morning to you as well. for much of today that is exactly how it will remain. we might see a little bit of fair weather cloud building, but thatis fair weather cloud building, but that is all. talking of the wimbledon forecast, it has been dry all week. on saturday we mightjust see a little bit in the way of patchy, light rain and drizzle, and a bit more cloud. thejury is patchy, light rain and drizzle, and a bit more cloud. the jury is still out on that, but even into the start of next week, if you are coming to wimbledon, it will be dry. it will be warmer after the temperature comes down on saturday, to about 22. so the forecast for wimbledon today
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isa dry so the forecast for wimbledon today is a dry one. from the word go we will have blue skies, right through the day, blue skies. highs up to 25 degrees and light breezes. if you are coming down, it does get very hot, especially if you are sitting in the courts, so make sure you have your sunscreen and also your hat with you. drink plenty of water, as well. uk forecasters again mostly dry, but a bit cloud for some of us today, with some rain. the rain is courtesy of a weather front coming in across the far north of scotland. this morning we have that rain in the north of scotland. the heaviest in the north—west, not as heavy on the north and east, and through the day the cloud will continue to build as our weather front sinks a little bit further south. for northern ireland and northern england, you are off to a bright start. some of us are off to a bright start. some of us seeing more cloud than others, but through the day the cloud will build as our weather front continues to sink southwards. ahead of that, for the midlands, through the ——
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wales, the southern counties in east anglia, sunny skies. some fair weather cloud building, and pressure as we push further north. a fairly breezy day in the north as well. that breeze continuing in the evening and overnight period. so the northern half of the country tonight will be cloudier, with rain in the north—west of scotland. in the south we will see some clear skies and temperatures falling to between about nine and 1a degrees. so for tomorrow, where we have the clear skies by night, it is once again where we will hang onto the sunshine tomorrow. southern parts of england, southern wales, parts of the midlands, east anglia, sunny and warm. as we push further north, weather front is sinking southwards. so it will bring more cloud across scotland, northern ireland, northern england and parts of north wales. and it will be thick enough here and therefore the odd spot of drizzle. still some rain across north—west scotland, so fresher in the north,
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warmer in the south. as i mentioned, as we head into saturday, that front makes it into the south before clearing. behind it, fresher conditions coming our way, and from the front itself, some patchy, light rain and drizzle. thank you very much, and your weather forecast will be good news for this new airport. this is carlisle, in the lake district, where there is a new airport opening officially today. carlisle lake district airport, or cax for short, will operate flights for tourists and local workers. it will be like lax. you would quite like to get that mixed up, wouldn't you? i must make clear that carlisle is lovely and the lake district is fantastic, as well. let's find out what the impact of this new airport is going to be. sarah corker is there for us. good morning. the cabin crew are doing theirfinal checks good morning. the cabin crew are doing their final checks on this first flight out of carlisle airport
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for more than 25 years. the last passenger services were back in 1993. so this is indeed a really big day for cumbria, and it is being promoted as the gateway to the lake district. as you can see, we are surrounded by countryside here. we are surrounded by countryside here. we a re close surrounded by countryside here. we are close to carlisle. nearby are the scottish borders. 15 miles away is hadrian ‘s wall, so they are really targeting the tourist trade, but also business passengers. this is the first flight, it will be going to dublin at around eight a.m.. initially there will be 28 flights a week going to dublin, belfast city and london south end. it has been a long journey, really, for the airport. there have been a few false starts, it was supposed to open a year ago. but there were delays because of a struggle to recruit air traffic control staff. and we can grab a quick word now with kate willard from the stobart group, and gillfrom
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with kate willard from the stobart group, and gill from cumbria tourism. it has been quite a long and difficult journey to tourism. it has been quite a long and difficultjourney to get here, hasn't it? it has been a very long journey, but a greatjourney. sto ba rt ha d journey, but a greatjourney. stobart had the tenacity to hold onto this project, but also we need to say a huge thanks to our colleagues, who have held our hands through this. it is a major day for the northern powerhouse. this is a significant piece of new transport infrastructure in the north—west, andi infrastructure in the north—west, and i am so proud and pleased to be here today. is there a need for an airport here at the lake district? there is intense competition, isn't there, for airports in newcastle, manchester. train links are very good to this area. is there the demand? there absolutely is. there are two things. one is practically, this economy in this county needs to be better connected, to the south, to london and to other markets. but also airports are important symbols of confidence, aren't they, for regions and economies. this airport is already having an extraordinary effect on the confidence of the
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cou nty effect on the confidence of the county and our ability to grow the economy, to growjobs, to grow training and to be better connected. in all sorts of ways it is a good development. you are also partnering with the scottish airline loganair. how have sales been so far? what are the most popular routes? it is fair to say dublin is a popular route, a lot of people wanting to go out there. but equally there are things we are learning. from london southend we fly to about 50 different destinations. we are already finding people who are planning on coming to carlisle, parking for free, taking a planning on coming to carlisle, parking forfree, taking a quick hop down to london southend and flying on their holidays from out there. so lots of things we are learning already about customers and people who are booking with us. and let's pick up on that, then. what will be the wider impact for the economy here and for tourism? is for the economy in cumbria is significant. it is worth £3 billion to this cou nty it is worth £3 billion to this county and employs 60,000 people, so thatis county and employs 60,000 people, so that is about 20% of the jobs. we have two world heritage sites. we have two world heritage sites. we have a real opportunity to grow the
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tourism notjust for the lake district, but for the whole of the cou nty district, but for the whole of the county and the wider region, including borderlands. so it is massively important. and we know that 47 million people visit the la ke that 47 million people visit the lake district every year already. is there room for even more? we have to think of the environmental concerns, as well, haven't we? absolutely, people really think about the lake district, and the lake district is beautiful and it has a good volume of visitors during the summer period. but we are here all year round, and we have a massive county and loads of areas that have yet to be discovered by visitors. so from cumbria tourism's perspective it is about growing and extending the season, growing the value of tourism all year round. and it is a really great opportunity here. we know the irish market and the south—east market are really looking for this airport to transform theirjourneys and get them here. you can be in the city of london at 5pm and you can be dipping your toes city of london at 5pm and you can be dipping yourtoes in city of london at 5pm and you can be dipping your toes in the lake a few hours later. what's better than that? environmental campaigners have
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pointed out that, do we actually need more domestic flights at a time when the uk is trying to reduce the impact of climate change? they have a point, haven't they?” impact of climate change? they have a point, haven't they? i think what you will find its people always choose to travel by different routes, and there are options for how people choose to get here. but what we are very good at in cumbria is really green, sustainable onward travel, and i think that is a really important factor we have to bear in mind. thank you for having a chat with us. i know you have an extremely busy day, so i will let you get on. one of the markets the airport is targeting as american tourism. they are hoping they will fly to dublin and then connect on to the lake district. thereby avoiding, i suppose, the busy international hubs in london and manchester. so thatis hubs in london and manchester. so that is a key market, and this flight, that is a key market, and this flight, they are getting ready to leave in the next hour or so, when they will be heading to dublin. the first of many flights out of carlisle lake first of many flights out of ca rlisle lake district first of many flights out of carlisle lake district airport. thank you very much, and as we stay on that image, we are told that a little later on, i didn't know this,
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but when airports open, apparently the ceremony you do is the aircraft is in the middle and it is sprayed with water by hosepipes. that a p pa re ntly with water by hosepipes. that apparently is what they traditionally do. is at fire engines? fire engines. so instead of bashing a bottle of champagne against a bashing a bottle of champagne againsta ship, bashing a bottle of champagne against a ship, i suppose it is that kind of thing. if it happens, we will see it. there is so much sport going on at the moment. it kind of feels weird to look ahead to the 0lympics. feels weird to look ahead to the olympics. but they are getting closer. this time next year, effectively, tokyo 0lympics closer. this time next year, effectively, tokyo olympics will be under way. it is just over a year's time. team gb is trying to get us all active ahead of the games. gold medal cyclist laura kenny will be here to tell us how she plans to inspire everyone to get moving. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. the metropolitan police is being urged to stop using facial recognition technology, after researchers found it only identified one in five people in tests. a report commissioned by scotland yard also raises concerns about whether the techbology breaks human rights laws, and warns that it may be proved unlawful if challenged in court. the met says its own pilot was succesful and this report is unbalanced. the number of homophobic attacks in london has gone up by almost 15% in the last year. 2,600 incidents were reported between may 2018 and may this year, and according to the met‘s own figures, there was a spike during lastjuly of almost 300 incidents. one of those left with life—changing injuries after being punched and kicked at pride last year was tommy barwick. i just felt that crack in the back, like, that kick.
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and i went down on the floor. it was really quick, a two—second attack. it's ruined my life, really — really completely ruined it. endangered european eels are being released into the river thames later today. the eel population has been plummeting for decades, and juvenile eels will be released into the thames at kingston to raise awareness of the issues facing the species. these include the impact of human infrastructure on their natural migration, as well as illegal trafficking. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0nto the roads: lane 2 is blocked by two lorries on the m25 clockwise at junction 31 for lakeside. in earls court, the traffic lights are not working on a4 west cromwell road at the junction with warwick road. and in chiswick, one lane is closed in both directions on a205 chiswick high road, between the chiswick roundabout and kew bridge, due to emergency waterworks. now the weather, with sara thornton.
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hello there, very good morning to you. a beautiful start to your thursday across london. plenty of sunshine out there, which we'll keep right the way through the day today. another fine one for you — sunny, dry, and yes, it will be warm. after a slightly cool start this morning in some of our suburbs, it must be said, but plenty of sunshine right across the map. nothing to point out, and that means our temperatures willjust zoom up very nicely into the mid 20s celsius. 25, maybe 26 degrees, high 70s in fahrenheit. a lovely end to the day, a fine evening, and we're dry and clear at first overnight. a little bit of cloud potentially just to shrink away from the north. it shouldn't spoil things, though. should be a dry start tomorrow morning, and a bit warmer than today, temperatures in the mid teens for some. cloud at first, yes, but it pulls away nicely. good sunshine for the rest of the day, and then, actually, it could be even a smidge warmer than today —
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26, possibly 27 celsius on the cards. a lot of fine weather for the coming days. watch out on saturday — a touch of rain in the middle of the day. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: thousands of lives are being put at risk because of a failure to treat sepsis patients quickly enough. china warns the uk not to interfere in its domestic affairs as a diplomatic row continues over protests in hong kong. a man is killed after a volcano erupts on the italian island of stromboli. the uk's newest airport opens today. 28 flights a week will depart from carlisle lake district, or cax, but can it really succeed given how crowded our skies are already? the fairytale for coco gauff continues here at wimbledon. at the age of 15, she's now into the third round — and she says she can"beat anyone". she will be playing in the sunshine as well because it is sunny, warm and dry. for the northern half, cloud will build and we have rain
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across northern scotland. we will be back with more later. it's thursdayjuly the 4th. our top story: patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in treatment for sepsis, referred to by experts as a hidden killer, because it is hard to spot. it's estimated 50,000 people in the uk die from sepsis every year. hospitals are meant to put patients on an antibiotic drip within an hour when it's suspected, but research by the bbc suggests a quarter of patients in england are waiting longer. lauren moss reports. there's in his house, my friend's house. a father remembering his son as a bright student with ambition of becoming an accountant and taking care of his family. but in may 2016, amir halling went to hospital in london after a bruise on his ankle left him struggling to walk. the 39—year—old was sent home with paracetamol, less than 2a hours later,
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he suffered cardiac arrest and died. doctors had failed to spot that amir had sepsis. his last words when i left him in the hospital, he shook my hand and said, "dad, i love you". he gave me his hand, i kissed him on the cheek, i kissed his forehead and i came home. i didn't realise that was the really last kiss, our last cuddle i would ever give to my son. sepsis is triggered by an infection and early symptoms can include a fast heartbeat, high or low temperature, chills and shivering. it makes the body's immune system go into overdrive which can lead to septic shock, organ failure and sometimes death. figures from around three quarters of hospital trusts in england suggest that one in four patients aren't being started on antibiotics within an hour when sepsis is suspected. sepsis is not always easy to spot. it can arise in someone of any age, it can arise as a consequence of any infection, so it's difficult for health professionals to spot it first time, every time. what they do need to do is to work
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in partnership with their patients, listen to their patients and look for sepsis. and if they do that, most of the time, it can be spotted. all uk hospitals are meant to follow the same guidelines, but performance in wales is similar to england and neither scotland nor northern ireland provided recent data. nhs england says huge improvements have been made and it's important not to automatically give antibiotics to everyone who's very unwell, but amir halling's father says he's been robbed of his son and his family is devastated. lauren moss, bbc news. china is warning the uk not to interfere in its domestic affairs after the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt threatened "serious consequences" if freedoms in hong kong are watered down. tensions between the uk and china have been rising — with beijing's ambassador in london accusing the uk of having a "colonial mindset". 0ur correspondent ben ando is outside the chinese embassy
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in london for us this morning. ben, what damage could this cause to britain's relationship with china? it does seem that the relationship is rather fragile at the moment. it does seem that the relationship is rather fragile at the momentlj is rather fragile at the moment.” think you're right was not what is interesting is we are all used to m essa g es interesting is we are all used to messages from china being very diplomatic, almost as circumspect, possibly even opaque. but they couldn't be clearer here. what they are telling the uk to do, quite simply, is to butt out. they see hong kong as being an entirely domestic matter that no other foreign government, as they see it, has any right to be involved in. of course, that is not how the foreign 0ffice course, that is not how the foreign office or the foreign secretary sees it. for over 150 years, office or the foreign secretary sees it. for over150 years, hong kong was a british colony, it was
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returned to the chinese in 1997 with the caveat that people they would continue to enjoy possibly greater freedoms and civil liberties than on the mainland of china. that has been behind all these demonstrations. the government here is trying to say that these civil liberties are trying to be —— should be preserved. the messages on both sides are hardening or whether there are conciliar tree tones creeping in given the importance of the relationship between these two countries where trade has been growing over the last two decades. then, thank you for taking us through that. the laws on assisted dying will be debated in the house of commons today, for the first time since mps rejected changing the law four years ago. currently, anyone found guilty of helping someone to end their own life can face a long prison sentence — but some say the law needs updating. breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. vicki was 83 and had stage iv bone cancer when she ended her own life last year. she'd been in constant pain. she was not afraid of dying
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but afraid of the way she was going to die. she said when she feels ready, she will do it, not when the cancer takes her. her son and daughter, adam and kate, were both investigated by police for potentially assisting their mother's suicide. vicki had asked adam to contact the swiss clinic dignitas with a view to potentially ending her own life there. his phone was seized. vicki died in kate's house. kate found her after returning home one day last february. i then sat with her. didn't go in an ambulance. as the police took it, mum was a victim and i was a suspect. it was very, very stressful. after almost a year, the coroner returned a verdict of suicide. kate and adam were cleared of any involvement. i would like to see the law changed so that people that are terminally ill can be allowed to die
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with dignity and to be assisted in the way they die. in england, wales, and northern ireland, being found guilty of assisted suicide can lead to a jail term of up to 1a years. in scotland, it's not a specific crime, but helping someone take their own life can lead to a charge of culpable homicide. all these laws will be scrutinised today in parliament. kidney specialist, dr david randall, supports the view of care not killing, an alliance of organisations which oppose a change to the law. it can appear stern, but invariably it's interpreted with compassion. there's very clear guidance from the director of public prosecutions, which indicates that family members who act out of compassion to assist the suicide of a relative shouldn't be prosecuted. the danger, i think, if we change the law here is that we skew the balance. but for adam and kate, and many others, legal changes are long overdue. one in 10 people admitted
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to hospital in the uk is dependent on alcohol according to a new study. researchers at king's college london are calling for universal screening for alcohol—related problems and more trained staff to offer support. last year the nhs announced plans to put care teams into the hospitals with the highest alcohol—related admissions. police investigating the disappearance of the estate agent suzy lamplugh in london more than 30 years ago are searching land in worcestershire. she went missing in 1986 from fulham when she was 25. her body has never been found. scotland yard said new information had been received as a result of publicity from a search in sutton coldfield last year. a man's been killed in a volcanic eruption on the italian island of stromboli. he was out hiking and was hit by a falling stone. the eruption was unexpected and started fires on the small mediterranean island, just north of sicily. rebecca hartmann reports. ash and smoke rising in the air, just moments after the volcanic explosion on stromboli.
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the mushroom shaped cloud grew larger until it soon filled the sky above the small island. witnesses say they heard a loud boom and saw streams of red, hot lava running towards the village of ginostra. 0ne male hiker died after being hit by a falling stone, while others were injured. many tourists threw themselves into the sea for safety. the volcano, nicknamed the lighthouse of the mediterranean, is one of the most active on the planet and has been under a regular state of eruption since 1932. but experts aren't entirely sure what caused this explosion. it's probably to do with the accumulation of a large amount of gas, deep in the volcanic system, which is then released in one great big bubble and that rises up and pushes all of the magma out in one go. rescue services say the eruption started fires on the western side of the island. firefighters even sent a plane
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to drop water on the flames below. just 500 people live on the island and it relies heavily on tourists, many of whom climb the 924 metre summit to peer into its crater — something volcano enthusiasts are likely to keep doing despite the obvious dangers. rebecca hartmann, bbc news. a museum which explores welsh history has won britain's largest arts prize. st fagans national museum of history, near to cardiff, includes more than 40 historic buildings within100 acres of parkland. it's been crowned the art fund's museum of the year — beating off competition from hms caroline in belfast and the v&a dundee to secure the 100,000 pound prize.
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is looking good out there today. in the last decade, almost 8,500 rhinos have been lost to poaching in africa alone. but now one british man thinks he has the solution to the creatures being killed for their horns. mike kendrick, founder of the charity rhino's last stand, has developed an injectible liquid which turns the horns pink — and also helps track them. hejoins us now. to start with the basic stuff, what is the scale of the problem that you are facing, just in terms of the problem for rhinos and poaching and what is happening. how bad is the problem? is massive. we are losing three orfour a problem? is massive. we are losing three or four a day. problem? is massive. we are losing three orfour a day. there problem? is massive. we are losing three or four a day. there are only about 10— three or four a day. there are only about 10- 12,000 three or four a day. there are only about 10— 12,000 african rhinos left. we have seen the extinction of a few already. these animals are iconic, they are the soul of africa and they will be extinct in a few
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yea rs. and they will be extinct in a few years. there have been many attempts to try and stop the numbers going down. tell us about your idea. how will it work in practice? the attem pts will it work in practice? the attempts so far have been trying to catch the poachers and they are killing each other and of course it is too late then. we looked at it from another point of view. why do these poachers steal these horns? is because they are worth more than gold. it is important to point out to people that the images we are showing are of rhinos that have been tranquilized. so this is part of the procedure. carry on. yes, we tranquilized them because catching poachers just doesn't work, they never get convicted so if you look at why they steal, it is because the horns are so expensive, so valuable and the risk is low. these guys want to get risk —— reach but they don't wa nt to to get risk —— reach but they don't want to get caught. we have devalued the rhino horn and turned it into a
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useless piece of junk. the rhino horn and turned it into a useless piece ofjunk. that is what we do from that point of view and we have introduced dna unique to every single rhino, unique to every single one so once it is being removed, the dna is in the horn and its irrefutable evidence that it is stolen and poached. is the rider aware that something has been injected into its horn? does it cause any pain. —— rhino 400 it is invasive but its better than dead. we anaesthetised them with expect teams in the traditional way. and then we inject them with these solutions which is and is it a and is ita die, is and is it a die, is that right?m is, and it is a toxin. —— lord daniel —— dye.
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is, and it is a toxin. —— lord daniel -- dye. and the whole point of that is that rhino horn is used as an aphrodisiac and a cure for hangovers, and all sorts of... and it is only keratin, you might as well chew your fingernails. and the next stage is every rhino is injected with this. say that rhino is poached and that horn gets into the system in some way. what happens with the authorities? which authorities are on board with your idea to identify this? this is a far eastern thing, really. they use it for, as you have said... we are talking to them, we are educating people. we're also the locals. they come on all of our treatment plans, as well. so the big messages to get that over, that this is not medical. who will identify, what systems be in place, to identify these horns?
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the south african government can issue permits to develop every process. i suppose in a way, one of the risks is the poachers willjust ta ke the risks is the poachers willjust take the chance anyway and think they will be able to kill one that hasn't. .. you know, they will be able to kill one that hasn't... you know, they willjust try. they will, and that is very true. it is a very good point, charlie. and we must understand that we have to do a lot of these animals. to make sure enough of them, so... 2500 is needed to protect the species. that's what we need to do. as soon as they know they are treated, they will not go near them, because they are going to poison their customers. and they will look for money elsewhere. thank you very much. good to see you. carol is back at wimbledon for us today. good morning, carol. who are you
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with? this is harry richards. good morning, harry. how are you doing? harry, tell us, what do you do here? i supervised some of the southern courts at wimbledon, and every morning we have to make sure all the cove rs a re u ncove red morning we have to make sure all the covers are uncovered and ready for play every day. we know this has to be done, so for goodness's sake, do not let us hold you up. right, let's do it. so how many of these guys, the ground staff, actually do this? so we've got a team of about 120 of us, 130 of us, and we are all dotted across the courts, the practice courts, centre, number one, three, two and 12. and every day these boys come in and make sure they are uncovered. and you can see the ribbons on the outside. how are they different to centre court? on number one they have a sort of tent structure that gets pulled by the
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groundsman, whereas out here, it is pure strength that gets these courts all uncovered in the morning. you can see how heavy the cover is. they do it pretty quickly, though. what kind of timeline are we talking about? so it takes about four minutes, ona about? so it takes about four minutes, on a good day. and the final bit is probably the hardest hit, because obviously a lot of dew gets on the courts overnight, so they have to pull the hardest and make sure it is rolling in and not sliding in. thank you so much for filling us in. so you can actually see just how heavy that is. but the sun is beating down, the dew will be off, and indeed, the sun is going to be here at wimbledon all day. hardly a cloud in sight. if anything, it will be fair weather cloud we are looking at. temperatures at wimbledon today should be getting up to 25 degrees. gentle breezes, so don't forget your hat, your suncream , don't forget your hat, your suncream, and don't forget your hat, your suncream , and your don't forget your hat, your
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suncream, and your water. the forecast for the uk as a whole today is mixed. we almost have a north—south split. in the south, we're looking at a sunny, dry and warm day. in the north, there is a bit more cloud and also some rain. a weather front coming in across the north of is currently producing rain. the heaviest and most persistent of that is in the north—west. if we zoom into scotland at 9am, we have the rain across the north. ahead of it there is more cloud building, but for southern scotla nd cloud building, but for southern scotland at the moment we have got some brighter skies. across northern ireland and northern england, some of us seeing some sunshine first thing, but the cloud will build for you during the day. and as we come further south, again we have a lot of clear skies around. a chilly
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start, but the temperature is already romping up. through the course of the day, the rain will continue. the weather front slips a little bit further south, so the cloud is going to build across southern scotland, northern england, and also northern ireland. the rain continuing in the north, with the sun continuing in the south. breezy, especially across the northern half of scotland. temperature—wise today, disappointing where we have the cloud and rain across the far north. generally we are looking at about 19 to about 22, but in the south—east we could reach 25 or 26. through the evening and overnight, a weather front still with us, slipping a little bit further south. the rain in it weakening, but we could see some drizzle coming out of it, and still some rain across the north and west of scotland, whereas we have clear skies in the south itself. temperatures falling to between nine and 14 degrees. tomorrow, weather front continuing to slip southwards could produce a little bit of drizzle, for example across parts of northern ireland, maybe northern england, still some rain across the far north of scotland. but if anything, tomorrow across southern parts of england and wales, it is to be hotter than today, with highs up to about 27 somewhere around the london area. so wimbledon set fair tomorrow as well, but by the time we get to saturday, our front begins to
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sink south, bringing a band of cloud and possibly some patchy rain across southern england, and it will feel fresher. pollen levels high or very high across england and wales. high in northern ireland and low or moderate across scotland. did you have a try pulling that sheet? no, you have to be trained for two weeks. two weeks for pulling a rope? well, it is more thanjust weeks. two weeks for pulling a rope? well, it is more than just pulling a rope. can you imagine if one was faster than the other and it went wonky? you should have given it a 90, wonky? you should have given it a go, carol. ithink wonky? you should have given it a go, carol. i think you would been fine! ballot papers are due to be sent out in the conservative party leadership election this week,and by the end of the month, a new prime minister will have moved into downing street. boris johnson and jeremy hunt are the contenders, but where do
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they stand on key issues? over the next couple of days, we are going to be taking a closer look at both men, starting with the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt. here is our political correspondent ian watson. he has been an mp for 14 years, a government minister 49, but number ten is wherejeremy hunt wants to be. and now, only borisjohnson stands on his way. i'm saying i am trustworthy, and i do believe that can be trusted. but, to trust someone, you need to know a little more about them. jeremy hunt first got involved in conservative politics when he was at oxford, before becoming an mp, he started a public relations agency, then a publishing company, and he is keen to brandish his business credentials. as an entrepreneur... i am an entrepreneur. . . credentials. as an entrepreneur... i am an entrepreneur... entrepreneur by background. he was close to david cameron and was made 0lympics minister ina cameron and was made 0lympics minister in a coalition government, where he got to see a lot of his future leadership rival. not everything has gone smoothly for jeremy hunt. he was the longest
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serving health secretary since the nhs was created, and he was embroiled in a conflict with junior doctors, leading to their first strike in 40 years. under theresa may, jeremy hunt took on extra responsibility for social care. hello, it's jeremy. and his strategy in the contest seems to be to admit m ista kes in the contest seems to be to admit mistakes and try to move on. some of the cuts in social care did go too far. it's so easy to say, of course i was right. but you stand back think could i have done it a little bit better? and jeremy has not been afraid of saying exactly that. hello, i'mjeremy. afraid of saying exactly that. hello, i'm jeremy. jeremy hunt campaigned for remain in the referendum, but now says he wants to leave the eu with a new brexit deal. jeremy hunt's critics accused him of being the winsock candidate, blowing this way and that on brexit. not long after the referendum, he said he would consider having another one. then he made it clear he was a leaver, but did not want to exit the eu without a deal. now, he says he is prepared to leave without a deal
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if need be. the big thing that jeremy hunt has to offer on brexit is his ability to negotiate. and his credibility as a negotiator. the downside is, because he voted remain, will the people in parliament trust him to deliver brexit? thank you all very much indeed. jeremy hunt's supporters say his opponent is gath prone, but the foreign secretary, despite spending two years teaching injapan, managed to misplace his wife's nationality. also, my wife is japanese... my wife is chinese, sorry. critics of jeremy hunt say he has less name recognition than his opponent, but is this really true? because he has had to contend with embarrassing mispronunciations of his four letter surname. ijust think mispronunciations of his four letter surname. i just think you possibly find it slightly amusing, and sometimes things happen in one's life, these things sort of take
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hold. iam life, these things sort of take hold. i am sure he will remember the nationality of his wife in future. he says he is a serious candidate for serious times. jeremy hunt — remember the name, and how to pronounce it. and tomorrow on breakfast, we will be focussing on boris johnson. the uk's newest airport opens today, after two failed ta keoffs. sarah corker is there for us this morning. good morning. yes, good morning. this is the departure lounge at carlisle lake this is the departure lounge at ca rlisle lake district this is the departure lounge at carlisle lake district airport. it is the one and only gate here, small but perfectly formed. the first passengers are just going through security now, and they will be boarding the 8am flight run by the scottish airline loganair. it will be taking off at eight a.m.. and this is significant because it will be the first passenger service to ta ke be the first passenger service to take off here for more than 25 yea rs. take off here for more than 25 years. and it seems there is quite a
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ceremony when it comes to opening a new airport. in the last half—an—hour, we saw the runway, all the way out over there, being blessed by the archdeacon of carlisle. and we have some fire engines here. that is because there will be a water salute. so they will be spraying a water park over the plane here —— arc. it will then taxi through, and that will signify the very first departure. apparently it is tradition. who knew? and additionally there will be 28 flights a week from this airport. they will be going to dublin, belfast city and london south end. and throughout the morning, we will be asking what this, the uk's us airport, will mean for the tourism industry here in cumbria, and also looking at whether there is demand for another airport, the uk's 41st passenger airport. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news,
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i'm victoria hollins. the metropolitan police is being urged to stop using facial recognition technology after researchers found it only identified one in five people in tests. a report commissioned by scotland yard also raises concerns about whether the techbology breaks human rights laws, and warns that it may be proved unlawful if challenged in court. the met says its own pilot was succesful, and this report is unbalanced. the number of homophobic attacks in london has gone up by almost 15% in the last year. 2,600 incidents were reported between may 2018 and may this year, and according to the met‘s own figures, there was a spike during lastjuly of almost 300 incidents. one of those left with life—changing injuries after being punched and kicked at pride last year was tommy barwick. i just felt that crack in the back, like, that kick. and i went down on the floor. it was really quick, a two—second attack.
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it's ruined my life, really — really completely ruined it. endangered european eels are being released into the river thames later today. the eel population has been plummeting for decades, and juvenile eels will be released into the thames at kingston to raise awareness of the issues facing the species. these include the impact of human infrastructure on their natural migration, as well as illegal trafficking. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. 0nto the roads: lane two and three are blocked by two lorries involved in an accident on the m25 clockwise at junction 31 for lakeside. there is a two—car collision on the a13 into town just before the beckton roundabout, causing long delays from rainham. and in batterssea, latchmere road is closed in both directions between battersea park road and sheepcote lane, due to a police investigation.
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now the weather, with sara thornton. hello there, very good morning to you. a beautiful start to your thursday across london. plenty of sunshine out there, which we will keep right the way through the day today. another fine one for you — sunny, dry, and yes, it will be warm. after a slightly cool start this morning in some of our suburbs, it must be said, but plenty of sunshine right across the map. nothing to point at, and that means our temperatures willjust zoom up very nicely into the mid 20s celsius. 25, maybe 26 degrees, high 70s in fahrenheit. a lovely end to the day, a fine evening, and we're dry and clear at first overnight. a little bit of cloud potentially just to sink our way from the north. it shouldn't spoil things, though. should be a dry start tomorrow morning, and a bit warmer than today, temperatures in the mid teens for some. cloud at first, yes, but it pulls away nicely. good sunshine for the rest of the day, and then, actually, it could be even a smidge warmer than today. 26, possibly 27 celsius on the cards.
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a lot of fine weather for the coming days. watch out on saturday — a touch of rain in the middle of the day. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in treatment for sepsis, which can cause catastrophic complications such as organ failure. hospitals are advised to treat suspected sepsis quickly with an antibiotic drip, but research by the bbc suggests a quarter of patients in england are waiting longer than the target of one hour. china is warning the uk not to interfere in its domestic affairs after the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt threatened "serious consequences" if freedoms in hong kong are watered down. tensions between the uk and china have been rising —
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with beijing's ambassador in london accusing the uk of having a "colonial mindset". 0ur china correspondent robin brant is in hong kong. things are more calm protest but now we have a diplomatic situation. member, china and the uk are supposed to be four or five years into a golden error in their relationship, it doesn't feel like that today. — make a —— a golden era. it china has talked about the uk standing foursquare behind the protesters. they see that as an internal matter, protests on the street of hong kong. the chinese ambassador and the leadership in
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beijing particularly didn't like the tone of some comments from the foreign secretary when he contended some of the aggression and violence we saw on monday night but said he thinks china needs to understand what has motivated those people. that i think was particularly problematic. these comments are nothing more than an irritant in beijing but the reason they are so critical in terms of what is being said aboutjeremy hunt here and the media in china, he is shown to be selfish and showing poor logic. they are worried about silver disobedience moving to the mainland and this is why they are so the —— why they are condemning the comments from the uk. they have been some arrests yesterday and they expect more knocks on doors from the police as they continue their
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investigation. one in 10 people admitted to hospital in the uk is dependent on alcohol according to a new study. researchers at king's college london are calling for universal screening for alcohol—related problems and more trained staff to offer support. last year the nhs announced plans to put care teams into the worst affected hospitals. police investigating the disappearance of the estate agent suzy lamplugh in london more than 30 years ago are searching land in worcestershire. she went missing in 1986 from fulham when she was 25. her body has never been found. scotland yard said new information had been received as a result of publicity from a search in sutton coldfield last year. a volcanic eruption on the italian island of stromboli has killed a hiker and caused fires. the volcano is one of the most active in the world but last night's eruption was particularly powerful, and unexpected. some people are reported to have thrown themselves into the sea for safety. the italian navy is on standby for a possible evacuation
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of residents and tourists. the winner of britain's got talent colin thackery has signed his first record deal at the grand old age of 89. # love, love changes everything, how you live and how you die. # love... that was the chelsea pensioner‘s winning performance, singing "love changes everything", in the final of the itv series in june. his label, decca, says he's the oldest person in the world to sign a solo album deal. he's in good company because decca also has dame vera lynn on its books. you may have spotted alicia dixon
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there, we will be talking to her a bit later. imagine being in the room when he did that song. i bet that was a bit special. good morning to you. lots of sport coming up. we have the cricket, football and of course wimbledon and this is where mike is. you look like you are squinting because it is so sunny and glorious. they are so friendly the ground staff. they keep saying hello. i offered to give them a hand but i think they are ok, with some of my lorna skills. what a day in the sunshine. does —— —— lawn was up we
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have andy murray coming up in the doubles, he couldn't compete in the singles because of his hip surgery. we don't know what court yet. the most likely option is after 530 they will say which of the show courts has the most room and the most space and will put them on one of those. we have centre court and this is one of the five british players in singles action, carolyn norrie,. five brits in all. we have norrie,j clark, in the women's, harriet dart and johanna konta. because of what happened yesterday, the british hopes in the singles early rest on the shoulders ofjohanna konta who is in action later and that is because the men's british number one kyle edmund, he bowed out sadly yesterday. british men's number one kyle edmund was knocked out yesterday — he was three games from victory against fernando verdasco but a knee injury hampered him and he lost in five sets. he said he needed to improve his fitness. and heather watson is also out,
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she said she made too many errors, in her straight—sets defeat to the 20th seed anett kontaveit of estonia. but coco gauff‘s fairytale continued with victory over the semi—finalist here two years ago, magdalena rybarikova, in little over an hour, under court 0ne's new roof. the 15—year—old american had already beaten the five—time wimbledon champion venus williams. yeah, i think i played well, especially on the pressure points. she was serving amazing so it was just kind of hard to return sometimes. sometimes i was up 40—15 and she just hit four good serves in a row. next up, you've got caroline wozniacki. does reputation, experience, actually matter to you? does it matter who's on the other side of the net? not at all, i think i can beat anyone who's across the court and if i don't think i can win the match then i won't even step on the court. and gauff got to meet another one of her heroes in roger federer yesterday.
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the women's tennis association posted this on twitter, saying, "yeah we got that on camera...the moment greatness meets future greatness". apologies if you can't hear us. i got over here to get away from that dust blower. he is following me. you have the liner blower making sure the courts are spick—and—span. andy murray's mum, judy, says his mixed doubles partnership with serena williams could be the "perfect match". she's excited to see murray team up with williams, who's won seven wimbledon doubles titles, later in the week — but today, he starts his men's doubles campaign — and judy murray is not thrilled at the prospect of he and brother jamie potentially facing each other in the third round. i've been fortunate that andy's career was singles and jamie's was doubles so in terms of family harmony, it's been great,
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because they actually haven't competed against each other for a long time. so if it happens, i'll go to the pub and wait for a text. you won't be watching courtside? ah, no chance! no, that'd be torture. laughs. its just about to start again and we peace and quiet to talk about the cricket. england have reached the semi—finals of a cricket world cup for the first time in 27 years, thanks to victory over new zealand at chester le street. jonny bairstow‘s second consecutive century helped set a target of 306. and new zealand might have reached it had they not lost key batsman kane williamson to an unlucky run out. england went on to win by 119 runs. they'll meet india or australia for a place in the final. england women's head coach phil neville has thanked the nation for the support given to his side during the world cup.
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a peak audience of 11.7 million watched their semi—final defeat to the usa on bbc1. that's a new record for women's football in the uk and now neville said the backing had really made a difference. i'd like to say on behalf of myself, the players and the whole of the fa, that the support you have been sending, the messages, the coverage we've had back home, has been absolutely incredible. the fans that have travelled out to nice, le havre, valenciennes and lyon, your support has been incredible too. we've been inspired, we've been motivated, you've given us energy and the love and care and support you've given us has been amazing. and england will face sweden in their third—place play off on saturday, after the swedes lost their semi—final against the netherlands 1—0 in lyon. manchester united midfielder jackie groenen's goal in extra time saw the european champions through to sunday's final, where they'll face holders the usa.
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it has emerged into the sunshine as well. and finally time for some more tennis before i go. we love showing you footage of sports stars when they were young. this is britain's jay clarke when he was just 12 years old back in 2010. showing some incredible skills. look at this — the hot dog shot! what i like about tennis is that no two days are ever the same, even if you play the same opponent, and you've got to prepare mentally and physically and you've got to have different strategies for different opponents every time you play them. rafael nadal‘s an inspiration because he never gives up and even when he's down, he will still keep hitting the balls. i'm just excited to play. and jay could play rafa nadal in the semi—finals, but he'll have to find a way past roger federer first. a tough challenge
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for any 20—year—old. his inspiration says his ——he says his inspiration is a cocoa golf who he plays with in the doubles. —— coco gauff. we have laura here on the couch. laura is here with us. the women's world cup, for example have you been following it? yes. she has probably never been in that situation. literally the whole
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nation was watching that we have seen the figures and for me, i hope that isn't a —— a turning point for women in sport. there has never been an event where purely, its just females and all of a sudden the nation is watching the whole thing. i think been unbelievable. as much as i'm gutted for them, i also think well. they have done something, they have changed something and can this be yet? can this be the turning point? just watch us in the next few yea rs point? just watch us in the next few years and watch women's football as well. 0bviously years and watch women's football as well. obviously as a woman in the sporting arena, you have seen how the levels of interest peak and trough. we shall show everybody of your special moments.
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we were all humming along to the music. tell us, the new campaign, i am team gb was up we are trying to get people to participate in sport on the same day. it is actually the week after i won in london. i think its around the time of the olympics. does it matter what you do? just
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something, and activity. not even a sport. we're not saying you need to go out and be a professional all on the one day. we are just saying get off the sofa, stop watching telly. it could be a walk, bike ride, lots of things going on in everybody because my community and that's another thing i love about it. we are bringing people together as well. you remember in london 2012, had the games makers, they are coming back and bringing the title back. there was lots of them in 2012 setting up the activities around the country. i met a few of them a few weeks back and they have still got that buzz. because that's what it was, wasn't it? they were everywhere and they had this buzz about them and they had this buzz about them and that's what we're bringing back. and i think it will be around 11 months until the start of the 0lympics. months until the start of the olympics. the whole idea is to get people passionate about sport. yes, and active, you know. for me, i would do it every day. so what is
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training for you now? it is funny, we're in the olympics but we are kind of a winter sport. we are in a bit ofan kind of a winter sport. we are in a bit of an off—season but we have to go around qualifying so we can race during the winter next year and it kicks off about october. that is the qualification cycle. so an average training day is what? so i have a rest day to day, but it can be anything from two hours in the morning tojim in the afternoon, three orfour morning tojim in the afternoon, three or four hours if it is purely a road ride —— gym. i would probably be at the velodrome four days a week, training towards competition. and what is the buzz around british cycling at the moment? you have been pa rt cycling at the moment? you have been part of the extraordinary success story of british cycling in terms of the metals and everything about it. what is the picture at the moment? it is one of those things, british cycling always has that depth, and come the olympics we come back out.
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is that the feeling that you have got? a work in progress? it is one of those things, we are an olympic programme, we train for the four year cycle, so you never see the end target until the end of the four yea rs. as target until the end of the four years. as much as we think we are on the up, you don't know when it is going to stop until the end of the four year programme. you have had a lot of changes in the last couple of yea rs. lot of changes in the last couple of years. has your mental attitude changed with having the olympics as a target? know, that was always my target. i never thought that that was going to be the end of my career, having alby. i had lots of help from jessica ennis—hill, in the comeback, and that has always been the focus, she gave me exercises, drew little pictures to help me get back in. she was the only one in a multidiscipline sport that had been through it, and so having her there
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has just been unbelievable —— albie. because of the support, obviously, she went back to the olympics and got a silver medal. i wanted to go back and do the same. we were looking at wimbledon a moment ago, and any murray back in action. do you have contact with any of the tennis players? because they are at the olympics as well. no, not really. if you see them around the village, everyone speaks to each other, but sports are... and we saw this amazing 15—year—old girl who has just had this remarkable run. this amazing 15—year—old girl who hasjust had this remarkable run. we saw a clip of her meeting roger federer, and it isjust saw a clip of her meeting roger federer, and it is just those special moments. was there a star within your sport or elsewhere, who was one of those moments that you a lwa ys was one of those moments that you always think... i mean, it was bradley wiggins. we have all seen the photo of me wearing his 0lympic gold medal, and it was that moment that i thought maybe this can happen. really? the seed was sown? it was when he came back from the athens 0lympics, i think. it was when he came back from the athens olympics, ithink. is it was when he came back from the athens olympics, i think. is there anyone you would be starstruck by
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meeting? usain bolt. he is retired now, so i won't even see him at the village. something tells me he will still be going. yes, surely. well, lovely to see you. good luck with the campaign. we are always encouraging, mike particularly, you have probably seen, is always involved in getting people in all sorts of things. heralded the couch to five k, as well. she gave it a go. i wouldn't mess with carol at all. she is in amongst the flowers at wimbledon this morning. good morning, everyone. the couch to five kis morning, everyone. the couch to five k is brilliant. i am standing outside the trophy room, and we are standing alongside it. it is always worth showing you the flowers. they are gorgeous in the summer sunshine, and we have the purple, the white and we have the purple, the white and the green, right next to the
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busts of previous wimbledon winners. virginia wade won it in 1977. and the flowers are always in tip top condition, and it has a sense that —— sensor, so if anything isn't working, it will send the message to the head gardener, and he will come and rectify the situation. you will not get much of a drink from the sky today, because the forecast for wimbledon once again as a dry one. blue skies this morning, we will hang onto them as we go through the course of the day. temperatures getting up to about 25 degrees, and we are looking at a very high pollen level, so if you are coming down, don't forget your hat, your sunscreen, a t—shirt to put over you, and also some water. the forecast for us all in the uk today is almost a north—south split. in the north, we got some rain and you will see more cloud developed through the day. in the south, it's going to be dry, sunny and warm. already we've got the rain across
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northern scotland, the heaviest of which is across the north—west. it is not quite as heavy in the north—east, more patchy in nature, a bit lighter, and as you come further south you can see it will be a bright start, but the cloud will build. after the sunshine in southern scotland this morning, the weather front sinking south will introduce a bit more cloud. northern ireland and northern england with some bright skies, areas of cloud this morning, but the cloud will thicken up through the course of the day. as our weather front sinks slowly south. south of that, for wales, for most of the midlands, east anglia, southern counties of england, we will hang onto the sunshine and see a little bit of fair weather cloud developed, but thatis fair weather cloud developed, but that is about it. light breezes and hires up to 25 degrees. widely in the high teens or low 20s, and quite breezy as well across the far north of scotland. through the evening and overnight, we will still have the rain across the north—west. we also have the cloud slipping further south. it could still produce the odd spot of patchy, light rain and
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drizzle across northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england, but clear skies the south, with lows between nine and 14 degrees. where we have the clear skies by night we will start with sunshine first thing in the morning, and that will be across southern england, south wales, east anglia and the south—west. for the rest of the uk will be a cloudier day, and the uk will be a cloudier day, and the cloud thick enough here or there for the odd spot of drizzle. still some rain across the north and west of scotland. as a result, temperatures will be that bit tomorrow in the sunshine you could hit 27 degrees. the weather front which is sinking south will get into the far south of england during the course of saturday, and we will see a bit more cloud from that front, and possibly the odd spot of drizzle, which may well affect wimbledon. but then, as we head into the new week, temperatures start to rise once again. thank you very much. it really does look rather marvellous. i am always impressed with the colour, the pebbles and
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greens. —— purple and green. is it just is itjust me, or as a small airport a wonderful thing, without the hassle of too many people?” a wonderful thing, without the hassle of too many people? i would like to say it is just you, but it is not. the newest airport in the world opens in the uk today. carlisle lake district airport, or cax for short, will operate flights for tourists and local workers. sarah corker is there for us. there will be lots of fanfare surrounding this, won't there? yes, good morning. the first passengers had just been leaving the departure gate here, and they are boarding the 8am loganair flight to gate here, and they are boarding the 8am loganairflight to dublin. the flights are boarded, the cabin crew are ready, and this is a new beginning for the airport. this will beginning for the airport. this will be the first passenger flight to depart from carlisle in more than 25 yea rs. depart from carlisle in more than 25 years. and initially there will be 28 flights a week to dublin, belfast
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city and london south bend. and there is quite a ceremony when it comes to opening a new airport. earlier we saw the runway all the way over there being blessed by the archdeacon of carlisle —— southend. you might notice there is a fire engine there. that is because there will be a water salute in the next five minutes or so. this plan will taxi through a water arc which will be sprayed by two fire engines, and that i am told is the traditional way to mark the first flight from a new airport. who knew? with me is kate willard from the stobart group. your company owns and operates this airport, doesn't it? it has been a long and difficult journey airport, doesn't it? it has been a long and difficultjourney to get to this stage. two it has been an incredibly difficult journey, this stage. two it has been an incredibly difficultjourney, we had some delays last year which was upsetting for our passengers and for the team here who worked so hard to get this over the line. the fabulous
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quys get this over the line. the fabulous guysin get this over the line. the fabulous guys in stobart who built this airport. so ever so disappointing, but you know what? we regrouped, we work with our partners, people held our hands practically and metaphorically to give us this fantastic day to day, we're so proud and so grateful to the people who worked with us to make this happen. and you are working in partnership with loganair. jonathan hinkles is with loganair. jonathan hinkles is with us now. how has the demand been? today's flights are almost full, to belfast and dublin city, the forward bookings are coming in really well, and i am sure on the basis of today that people can see that this is really happening, and it will be much stronger as well. strong sales through to next march already. we can't ignore the environmental concerns. campaigners are pointing out that do we really need more domestic flights at a time when the uk is trying to reduce the impact of climate change. they have a point, haven't they? of course the environmental agenda is really important one. it is something the
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aviation industry has been working on for a long time, before the recent publicity. but there are very efficient regional aircraft, low fuel burn, and to fly from carlisle to belfast, your carbon emissions will be below two of you in a car and sharing the ferry, because the ferries are significantly worse than flying. thank you forjoining us. you guys have a busy day ahead, so i will let you get on. as you can see, they are getting ready to take off from here in the next five or so minutes, this being promoted very much as a gateway to the lake district, and it is hoped it would boost the economy here for cumbria and bring new tourists to the region. thank you very much. we will be back there a little later on. did you know that about the canopy?” had no idea that happened. that was my impression of the water arc, that is how you christen an airport. never seen that before. we will see
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it this morning. still to come this morning: there is not much alesha dixon hasn't done — pop star, strictly winner, and britain's got talentjudge. now, she is a succesful children's author. she will be here to tell us all about her latest superhero story. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm victoria hollins. the number of homophobic attacks in london has gone up by almost 15% in the last year. 2,600 incidents were reported between may 2018 and may this year, and according to the met‘s own figures, there was a spike during lastjuly of almost 300 incidents. one of those left with life—changing injuries after being punched and kicked at pride last year was tommy barwick. i just felt that crack in the back, like, that kick. and i went down on the floor. it was really quick, a two—second attack. it's ruined my life, really —
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really completely ruined it. a leading trauma pyscologist believes hundreds of people may be suffering from mental health problems as a result of the terror atacks in london two years ago. dr idit albert is part of an nhs team set up to help people affected by the incidents in westminster, london bridge and parson green. she thinks many people will have post traumatic stress disorder, for which they have received no help. endangered european eels are being released into the river thames later today. the eel population has been plummeting for decades, and juvenile eels will be released into the thames at kingston to raise awareness of the issues facing the species, like the effects humans have on their migration. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on the tubes this morning. however, there are severe delays on tfl rail services between shenfield and liverpool street. that is due to a faulty train.
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0nto the roads: lanes two and three are closed on the m25 clockwise atjunction 31 due to a collision involving two lorries. there are long delays on the a13 into town from rainham as far as the beckton roundabout, after a two—car collision. and in battesrsea, latchmere road is closed in both directions between battersea park road and sheepcote lane, due to a police investigation. now the weather, with sara thornton. hello there, a very good morning to you. a beautiful start to your thursday across london. plenty of sunshine out there, which we will keep right the way through the day today. another fine one for you — sunny, dry, and yes, it will be warm. after a slightly cool start this morning in some of our suburbs, it must be said, but plenty of sunshine right across the map. nothing to point at, and that means our temperatures willjust zoom up very nicely into the mid 20s celsius. 25, maybe 26 degrees, high 70s in fahrenheit. a lovely end to the day, a fine evening, and we're dry and clear at first overnight.
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a little bit of cloud, potentially, just to sink our way from the north. it shouldn't spoil things, though. should be a dry start tomorrow morning, and a bit warmer than today, temperatures in the mid teens for some. cloud at first, yes, but it pulls away nicely. good sunshine for the rest of the day, and then, actually, it could be even a smidge warmer than today. 26, possibly 27 celsius on the cards. a lot of fine weather for the coming days. watch out on saturday — a touch of rain in the middle part of the day. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today... thousands of lives are being put at risk because of a failure to treat sepsis patients quickly enough. china warns the uk not to interfere in its domestic affairs as a diplomatic row continues over
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protests in hong kong. a man is killed after a volcano erupts on the italian island of stromboli the uk's newest airport opens today. 28 flights a week will depart from carlisle lake district — or c—a—x — but can it really succeed given how crowded our skies are already? the first flights are about to take off, heading for dublin! the fairytale for coco gauff continues here at wimbledon. at the age of 15, she's now into the third round — and she says she can "beat anyone". carol, thank goodness, much cooler in the shade. we have a north—south split in the weather today, in the north, cloudy with rain, the south hanging on to the sunshine. we'll have more later!
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it's thursdayjuly the 4th. our top story. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in treatment for sepsis, referred to by experts as a hidden killer, because it is hard to spot. it's estimated 50,000 people in the uk die from sepsis every year. hospitals are meant to put patients on an antibiotic drip within an hour when it's suspected, but research by the bbc suggests a quarter of patients in england are waiting longer. lauren moss reports. there's in his house, my friend's house. a father remembering his son as a bright student with ambition of becoming an accountant and taking care of his family. but in may 2016, amir halling went to hospital in london after a bruise on his ankle left him struggling to walk. the 39—year—old was sent home with paracetamol, less than 24 hours later, he suffered cardiac arrest and died. doctors had failed to spot that amir had sepsis. his last words when i left him
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in the hospital, he shook my hand and said, "dad, i love you". he gave me his hand, i kissed him on the cheek, i kissed his forehead and i came home. i didn't realise that was the really last kiss, our last cuddle i would ever give to my son. sepsis is triggered by an infection and early symptoms can include a fast heartbeat, high or low temperature, chills and shivering. it makes the body's immune system go into overdrive which can lead to septic shock, organ failure and sometimes death. figures from around three quarters of hospital trusts in england suggest that one in four patients aren't being started on antibiotics within an hour when sepsis is suspected. sepsis is not always easy to spot. it can arise in someone of any age, it can arise as a consequence of any infection, so it's difficult for health professionals to spot it first time, every time. what they do need to do is to work in partnership with their patients, listen to their patients and look for sepsis. and if they do that,
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most of the time, it can be spotted. all uk hospitals are meant to follow the same guidelines, but performance in wales is similar to england and neither scotland nor northern ireland provided recent data. nhs england says huge improvements have been made and it's important not to automatically give antibiotics to everyone who's very unwell, but amir halling's father says he's been robbed of his son and his family is devastated. lauren moss, bbc news. china is warning the uk not to interfere in its domestic affairs after the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt threatened "serious consequences" if freedoms in hong kong are watered down. tensions between the uk and china have been rising — with beijing's ambassador in london accusing the uk of having a "colonial mindset". 0ur correspondent ben ando is outside the chinese embassy in london for us this morning.
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listening to some of the language used, this is getting pretty tricky in diplomatic terms, isn't it? good morning, that's right. as far as we can see there is no sign of either side wanting to defuse this role. we are used to the chinese being nuanced and delicate in their diplomatic language. not in this case, they are being really clear and they are saying britain, but out, they see hong kong as a domestic problem, nothing to do with britain, but the foreign office disagrees, for more than 150 years hong kong was a british colony, handed back to the chinese and 97 with the caveat that people there would continue to enjoy some of the freedoms and the civil liberties that they had become used to end its plans by the chinese government to change the extradition laws that are causing real concern that political dissidents in hong kong could more easily be taken to mainland china.
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jeremy hunt, the foreign secretary, has been told by the chinese to leave the issue alone, at the moment there is no sign he's going to do that, there are concerns because of the growth in trade and the growth and good relations between beijing and good relations between beijing and london in the last 20 years or so, this could really cause some problems. for the moment, thank you. the laws on assisted dying will be debated in the house of commons today, for the first time since mps rejected changing the law four years ago. currently, anyone found guilty of helping someone to end their own life can face a long prison sentence — but some say the law needs updating. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been to meet one family with a very personal story to tell. vicki was 83 and had stage iv bone cancer when she ended her own life last year. she'd been in constant pain. she was not afraid of dying but afraid of the way she was going to die. she said when she feels ready, she will do it, not when the cancer takes her. her son and daughter, adam and kate,
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were both investigated by police for potentially assisting their mother's suicide. vicki had asked adam to contact the swiss clinic dignitas with a view to potentially ending her own life there. his phone was seized. vicki died in kate's house. kate found her after returning home one day last february. i then sat with her. didn't call an ambulance. as the police took it, mum was a victim and i was a suspect. it was very, very stressful. after almost a year, the coroner returned a verdict of suicide. kate and adam were cleared of any involvement. i would like to see the law changed so that people that are terminally ill can be allowed to die with dignity and to be assisted in the way they die. in england, wales, and northern ireland, being found guilty of assisted suicide can lead to a jail term of up to 14 years.
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in scotland, it's not a specific crime, but helping someone take their own life can lead to a charge of culpable homicide. all these laws will be scrutinised today in parliament. kidney specialist, dr david randall, supports the view of care not killing, an alliance of organisations which oppose a change to the law. it can appear stern, but invariably it's interpreted with compassion. there's very clear guidance from the director of public prosecutions, which indicates that family members who act out of compassion to assist the suicide of a relative shouldn't be prosecuted. the danger, i think, if we change the law here is that we skew the balance. but for adam and kate, and many others, legal changes are long overdue. one in 10 people admitted to hospital in the u.k is dependent on alcohol according to a new study. researchers at king's college london are calling for universal screening for alcohol—related problems and more trained staff to offer support.
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last year the nhs announced plans to put care teams into the hospitals with the highest alcohol—related admissions. police investigating the disappearance of the estate agent suzy lamplugh in london more than 30 years ago are searching land in worcestershire. she went missing in 1986 from fulham when she was 25. her body has never been found. scotland yard said new information had been received as a result of publicity from a search in sutton coldfield last year. the two tory leadership candidates, boris johnson and jeremy hunt, have been challenged to bring forward plans to tackle the social care crisis. a committee of peers has called for an immediate eight billion pound cash injection and a move to a free, nhs—based system. the local government association has urged the next prime minister to publish the long—awaited policy document on the future of social care. a volcanic eruption on the italian island of stromboli has killed
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a hiker and caused fires. the volcano is one of the most active in the world but last night's eruption was particularly powerful, and unexpected. some people are reported to have thrown themselves into the sea for safety. the italian navy is on standby for a possible evacuation of residents and tourists. we'll be speaking to experts in the next few minutes, talking through what that would have felt like on the island itself and the ongoing risk of eruptions. one more story to bring you. more than 200 guests at a 90th birthday party for imelda marcos, the former first lady of the philippines, have fallen ill with suspected food poisoning. more than 2,000 people were attending the celebration at a sports stadium in manila, where mrs marcos is still revered despite her late husband being ousted from power more than 30 years ago. some of the guests had to be taken to hospital. those are the main stories. it's ten minutes past eight. it's a hidden killer which claims almost 50,000 lives in the uk a year, and now new figures suggest one in four patients with sepsis
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in england aren't treated quickly enough. campaigners say that, while the figures are an improvement on previous years, and it is difficult to spot, more could be done to fight the deadly illness. dr ron daniels, the founder of the uk sepsis trustjoins us now. i think ithinka i think a lot of people will think they probably know what sepsis is and it's possibly very dangerous, can you give us a snapshot of sepsis asa can you give us a snapshot of sepsis as a condition? of course. sepsis arises as a consequence of any infection, it might be a cut or bite, chest infection, might be a water infection but in sepsis the body's water infection but in sepsis the body 's immune system goes into overdrive and if we don't act quickly that starts to damage organs. how difficult is it to act quickly? it can be tricky to spot, some patients especially those deteriorating very rapidly are easy to identify but for many patients, deterioration happens over a period of hours. what does it look like when deterioration happens? patients
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start with flu—like symptoms, they gradually deteriorate, the presentation varies hugely, it can arise as a consequence of any infection at any age, there is no one blood test measurement of vital signs that denotes sepsis, this has to have an alert, bunch of health professionals and an aware public. in terms of this study, one in four hospital patients with suspected sepsis are waiting longer than an hourfor antibiotics. which sepsis are waiting longer than an hour for antibiotics. which of course is the treatment. what's the consequence of that? for every hour we delay in giving antibiotics the chance of survival reduces by a couple of percent so people will be dying as a result and i think it's important to note we have improved, five years ago only one in three patients were getting antibiotics on time, now it's three quarters of patients but there's still a long way to go. you said people will be dying as a result, this is happening now as we speak, people in hospital today, yesterday, tomorrow, who would have the science but are not
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being treated soon enough and you are saying very clearly, that will be the cause of unnecessary deaths? absolutely. this is hundreds of patients in england alone. play 1000 across the uk presenting to hospitals today. from 250 according to this data, won't be getting the treatment they need at the right time. so we have two of the game. whose fault is that? you said we needed earlier a public that is aware and alert hospital staff, we are more than aware of the pressure that hospital staff are under when it comes to terms of staffing, cost, financing funding, so how is this going to improve? absolutely, resource issues come into play here. we have highly educated health professionals who are all trained around sepsis and in a system that isn't stressed, it's highly likely that they wouldn't miss sepsis and would always treat it reliably, even though it's difficult to spot but we are operating in a stress system, we
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don't always have a senior health professional with years of clinical judgment to assess a patient. we have to empower our junior staff judgment to assess a patient. we have to empower ourjunior staff as well as train them to act decisively. if they were to get this one infour decisively. if they were to get this one in four not seen in the correct length of time, if they were to get that right, the figures we are using, the bbc is using, could be as many as 50,000 deaths every year linked to sepsis. what effect would changing that timeline have on that 50,000 people? how would the statistics change in terms of life and death? it would certainly save, it would be counted in the thousands, we would save thousands more lives at the system responded reliably every time. some codes are as many as 14,000 lives could be saved and is possibly that high a number. but certainly, many thousands of lives would be saved if the system dealt correctly every time. we need to be clear, we don't wa nt to time. we need to be clear, we don't want to scaremonger either, but it
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is improving. this is getting a lot, lot better, it's a lot more reliable thanit lot better, it's a lot more reliable than it was five years ago. nhs england have put in place measures, we put in place wells as well, it has sepsis six bundle, the scottish government has a public awareness campaign. the scottish government through the patient safety programme have invested in a public awareness campaign which we really need in the other countries as well. wales, through the saving thousand lives programme have rapidly increased the delivery of right care at the right time to the right care at the right time to the right patient but there is still, in each of the countries, a long way to go. can i ask one other thing, on the face of it it sounds like straightforward care and attention. that could change the situation within hospitals, is it a money thing? what is it? what is the element there that's missing? this is about partly awareness and education of health professionals, partly the tools but it is also
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partly the tools but it is also partly about resource. there are many different conditions that quite rightly should be a priority for health care systems and whichever condition is being resourced most appropriately is going to secure better delivery of care. very interesting to talk to you this morning, thank you. thank you. it is 60 minutes past eight. let's bring you somejoy, some 60 minutes past eight. let's bring you some joy, some sunshine, 60 minutes past eight. let's bring you somejoy, some sunshine, some tennis, at least they look ahead to the tennis. some lovely courts and carol, of course. good morning. good morning. we've moved into centre court. i'm standing in the area where the competitors guest will be sitting and what a view into centre court. from the far side next to the screen is for the bbc commentator said, they've got a bird's eye view as well across the court and you can see the roof, it's being tested at the moment, takes up to ten minutes
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for it to completely close, we don't expect it to be closed of rain today because none forecast in behind me, just here, we have the royal box. still covered at the moment. but that's where members of the royal families and celebrities and dignitas will sit. and you know what? the tradition of players bowing or curtsying in front of the royal box ended in 2003. but there is an exception and that's if her majesty of wales attend wimbledon. now the forecast is set fair for wimbledon today. once again, going to be dry and sunny. it's going to be won. hardly a cloud in the sky today, possibly a little bit of fair weather cloud but that's it. light breezes, don't forget your hat, sunscreen, water and something to cover yourself with because it gets very hot, especially so in the courts. for all of us today we are looking at a north—south split, in the north a bit more cloud and rain, in the south we hang onto the blue
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skies. this weather front across northern scott —— scotland is producing some rain, heavy and persistent in the north—west, not as heavyin persistent in the north—west, not as heavy in the north—east, as we come south, we have brighter skies but the club will build through the day. nine this morning we have the ring, southern scotland sees some sunshine, northern ireland and northern england seeing some sunshine but through the day as this front slips further south, it will throw more clout ahead of it so it will cloud over. as we come south of that for the rest of england and all of wales, we start off bright and sunny for most. that will continue through the day with very high or high pollen levels so bear that in mind. temperature rise in the sunshine we are getting up to around 25-26d in sunshine we are getting up to around 25—26d in the south—east, widely we are looking at the high teens to the low 20s. cool for the time of year across the far north of scotland, it will also be breezy. through this evening and overnight the weather front slips a little bit further southis
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front slips a little bit further south is a weaker feature but it's going to bring cloud across northern england, again, northern ireland and into north wales. you could see drizzle from that and we will also have rain across the north—west of scotland. here skies in the south. temperatures falling to between 9-14d. temperatures falling to between 9—14d. tomorrow, where we had clear skies by night we had sunshine to start the day. but the weather front continues to slide a bit further south. again, you can see drizzle coming from that, northern ireland, northern england, southern scotland, rain across the park north—west but in the sunshine tomorrow, i temperatures reaching 27 in the south—east but again, we are looking widely at the high teens to possibly the mid 20s and pollen levels again in the sunshine will be high or very high. back to you. carol, thank you. talking about ridiculously high temperatures, looking glorious at wimbledon. we've had awful conditions on the island of
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stromboli. witnesses have reported seeing people jump into the sea to escape the lava from an erupting volcano on the italian island of stromboli. a hiker has died after he was hit by a falling stone. it's one of the most active volcanoes in the world, and someone who knows it well is volcanologist mike burton from the university of manchester. good morning. these are extraordinary images. there has been a loss of life which is sad but explain what has happened. stromboli is always active, always producing these really small explosions which make it very attractive for tourists. particularly over the summer people are going up and down pretty much all the time. but especially in the evening, you can see the incandescence nicely. he spent 15 years in italy, this is one of the volcanoes you've monitored quite closely. i'm assuming because it's constantly rumbling or small explosions, there are safety guidelines in place that people on the island are accustomed to the
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activity? absolutely. the local authorities are very aware of the risks posed by stromboli. because as well of the typical activity of the small explosions every 5—10 years, you get an event like this. and so, it's quite a brief explosion, it's not an ongoing process, but the risk for the people up there when it happens are very high. can it be predicted? anticipated? there are precursors, typically lasting 2—3 minutes which is why in theory people there should be with a guide, the guide should have a radio he was in contact with someone looking at seismic data who can see if something will happen. my understanding on this occasion the person he went up did not have a guide and he wasn't following the regulations of the island. nevertheless, there is still a real risk of the people who go up there at that this could happen to them.
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if this had occurred a few hours later it could have much, much worse. the reports we are hearing, in amongst other things, saying people were running into the sea because they were terrified, i have never been in a situation, maybe you have come of what that feels like to be in have come of what that feels like to beina have come of what that feels like to be in a place where there is an eruption happening. the real challenge on stromboli is the two kind of hazards, one is from the explosion but in the past, explosions like this have triggered a tsunami and so, actually going into the sea is the worst possible thing to do in that situation. fortunately there was no tsunami in this event. that's because of the volcanic action possibly under the sea itself. exactly. that happened in 2002. and that created a lot of damage on the island, so you are stuck between the devil and the deep blue sea. literally. also, iwould imagine if hot love is in the sea it's not going to be cooled down
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straightaway anyway. no, there is also hazards produced by that because it reacts with the salt water to make chlorine ridge acid gas. and so, it's all pretty ropey. actually. this morning, as it calmed down, how do you know whether the real danger moment has passed? from looking at the historical record, which is what volcanologists to do to understand the risk, these events are usually one—off and then there a period of is calm and it gradually gets back to normal activity. it's very rare to have a sequence of these events so now this has happened, it's probably a low probability of anything bigger happening. i mentioned you spent 15 yea rs happening. i mentioned you spent 15 years in italy, you are a volcanologist, where are the hotspots around the world now, pardon the phrase, the danger spots that you guys are looking at and thinking, ok, there's going to be significant activity here. typically there is 30—50 volcanoes erupting at
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any one time around the world. really? yes, there is plenty of volcanoes to go around and there is 1500 volcanoes that have erupted in the last 10,000 years. some of those continuously active like stromboli. i suppose we are not reporting on them because they are not in highly populated areas? because they are not creating major damage. many volcanoes are active, producing problems, but to get in the newspapers, sadly, it typically has to be some major deaths or destruction of infrastructure but they are all pretty active, there's many active at one time. good to speak to this morning, thank you. the time is 8:24am. the uk's newest airport opens today. sarah corker is there
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for us this morning it's a brand—new airport. small but important. yes, as you say, quite a ceremony when it comes to opening a new airport. a bit of a tradition, what we've seen in the last 30 minutes, a water salute, we had two fire engines part, you might be able to see this, the plane taxied through this water arc before it set off on its way to dublin. that is a tradition, who knew? and it's in the airat the tradition, who knew? and it's in the air at the moment, the first passenger flight to depart from this airport in carlisle for more than 25 yea rs. airport in carlisle for more than 25 years. it was pretty much full and initially, there will be 28 flights every week going from here to dublin, belfast city and london southend. they will be operated by a scottish airline loganair. and they are working in partnership with the store bought group and there have
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been a store bought group and there have beenafair store bought group and there have been a fairfew store bought group and there have been a fair few false starts here. it's fair to say. it was supposed to open a year ago but there were problems recruiting air traffic control staff and some infrastructure problems. there have been many owners through the years, there have been attempts to restart commercial operations here for the last 20 years. but today is the day. it's very much being promoted as the gateway to the lake district, we are close to the city of carlisle, nearby is the scottish borders, 15 miles down the wall is he dreams of all, it's very much targeted the tourist passengers but there are environmental concerns, should there be more domestic flights at a time of the uk is trying to reduce climate change? that's it from me. let's now hand to the news, travel and weather wherever you are this morning.
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you can see from the satellite imagery here, lots of clear skies, that will translate to some sunshine, further north, this area of cloud here, spreading through northern ireland, into scotland, that cloud edging its way further south, into northern parts of england as well. dry for most of us, rain across the far north of scotland, particularly north—western scotland, particularly north—western scotland, quite a bit of rainfall, to the east of the higher ground, a bit patchy. quite cool, and a warmer day compared to yesterday for england and wales, 24 to 26. patchy rain across northern parts, edging a bit further south. clear skies, rain across northern parts, edging a bit furthersouth. clearskies, not going to be a cold night, a fresh night, temperatures 12 to 15
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degrees. into friday, we have this weather system across the north, bringing that cloud i showed you earlier, the patchy rain further south, a bit quieter, so, again, during friday, plenty of sunshine for england and wales. more cloud across northern areas, patchy rain affecting the far north, particularly the west of scotland. temperatures across southern areas, higher still, 24 to 27, further north, temperatures 17 to 19 degrees. and it is that whether front that will move south, as we go through saturday, we noticed behind it, cooler air, filtering in from the north. temperatures will take a drop during saturday for most of us. cloud moving through the southern areas, during the day, spots of rain likely as well, sunny spells breaking through to northern parts, look at the temperatures, 23 degrees in london, quite a drop. further north, temperatures 14 to 17
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degrees.
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this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and maryam moshiri. exchange irate! president trump accuses china and europe of playing "a big currency manipulation game" — and calls for the us to do the same. live from london, that's our top story on thursday 4th july. currency threat — orjust hot air? are china and europe really manipulating their currencies? and is the us treasury about to
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intervene to weaken the dollar?

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