Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 4, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

11:00 am
you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's 11 o'clock and these are the main stories this morning: the bookmakers, william hill, is shutting nearly a third of its shops in the uk, putting 4,500 jobs at risk. the firm blames the government's clamp—down on fixed odds betting terminals. jeremy hunt and borisjohnson are challenged to prioritise the crisis in social care if they become prime minister, as peers call for a free, nhs—based system. patients‘ lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis, research by bbc news has found. royal marines in gibraltar board an oil tanker, suspected of transporting iranian crude to syria in breach of sanctions. in a rare interview, the scientist, james lovelock, warns about the rise of robots, saying humanity could soon be
11:01 am
superseded by a new, hyper—intelligent life form artificial intelligence, i reckon, will be something like 10,000 times faster in thinking than we are. and frank lampard is back at chelsea as manager — the club where he made over 600 appearances and won 11 major trophies. good morning. in the last hour, the betting group william hill has said it plans to close around 700 of its shops across the uk, putting more than 4,500 jobs at risk. the company blamed the closures, which amount to nearly a third of its outlets, on the government's decision to reduce the maximum stake on fixed odds betting terminals to £2.
11:02 am
our business correspondent, emma simpson, is here. a bit of background as to how we have come to this point? the industry had warned that reducing the stakes on these fixed—odds betting terminals from £100 to £2, that change came into effect in april, would trigger store closures and job losses. today william hill said it plans to close 700 stores and they say since april, it has seen an and they say since april, it has seen an increase and they say since april, it has seen an increase in gaming machine revenues. “— seen an increase in gaming machine revenues. —— a significant fall in gaming machines revenues. a500 people's jobs at risk. this is a gaming machines revenues. a500 people'sjobs at risk. this is a big restructuring. it's not clear where these closures will be. it is going to look to apply voluntary
11:03 am
redundancy, redeployment measures. but certainly unintended consequences, it seems, from this decision some time ago by the government. and those fixed odds betting terminals, from £100 to £2, there was a significant factor in how much money was coming into the company? these fixed odds betting terminals, they have been described as the crack cocaine of gambling. the new rules were designed to protect vulnerable people. so they generated £1.8 billion a yearfor the industry. there was huge lobbying going on as the government was coming to a view on this. and william hill said that these fixed odd betting terminals generated just over half of its revenues. it warned that reducing the stake would be a precedent. and it warned that 900 of its shops could become loss—making,
11:04 am
potentially leading to job losses. so that's how we have got to this point today. as you hinted during the debate about the rights and wrongs of this, the concerns about the mental health of those who use these machines was writ large all over this debate? absolutely. we had this controversy because, of course, it was delayed. we had the resignation of the sports minister because the change wasn't coming fast enough. but today, the change is in and now we have the unintended consequences, it seems, that decision. emma simpson, thank you. more on that in the next couple of hours. the two conservative leadership candidates have been challenged to bring forward urgently plans to tackle the social care crisis, if they become prime minister. a committee of peers has called for an immediate £8 billion investment, and a move to a free, nhs—based system. jeremy hunt has said he accepts more money is needed for care, while borisjohnson said a cross—party approach is needed.
11:05 am
the call comes as both candidates make further promises to try to win over tory party members, who will decide which of them becomes prime minister. borisjohnson plans to recruit an extra 20,000 police officers over three years if he becomes pm. mr hunt has promised to offer mps a free vote on whether to lift the ban on fox hunting in england and wales, calling it "part of our heritage". the pledges come two days before ballot papers are posted to the party members to decide the leadership. let's get more on all of this with our assistant political editor, norman smith, who's at westminster for us. with those ballots going out soon, everything is getting more intense, isn't it? it is. decisions are having to be made. but pressure also on the two contenders to spell out their position on this absolutely huge issue of social care, which has been bubbling along really for the past 20 years or so, with successive
11:06 am
governments dodging it despite a plethora of reports, enquiries, royal commissions, green papers, ma nifesto royal commissions, green papers, manifesto commitments, you name it, absolutely nothing has been done. now we have this report by prominent tory peer lord first i, michael forsyth, once a leading thatcherite, now saying the time has come to make social care just like the health service, in other words, for it to be paid by general taxation and free at the point of use. you would still have to pay for your residential ca re have to pay for your residential care what your personal care would be provided by the state. at the same time this morning we have heard from local government leaders who have been holding their annual conference, demanding that whoever the next prime minister is, they publish the green paper on social ca re by publish the green paper on social care by the middle of september. just ten weeks away. this paper has been delayed six times so far. they say enough is enough, we need clarity so that extra funds can be
11:07 am
put into social care to avert a looming crisis, with estimates that at present around 1.a million elderly people are not getting the sort of care they need. so real pressure on the two contenders to speu pressure on the two contenders to spell out where they stand. we have had a bit of clarity from jeremy hunt, who says he favours an insurance basis, a ten year timeframe to bring it about. from borisjohnson we have really had no detail at all beyond suggestions that he would like to do whatever he is going to do on a cross—party basis. my challenge to politicians of all political parties. in order for this to work we need a consensus between the political parties, between the political parties, between the political parties, between the opposition and the government. my committee consists of two former chancellors. we have been able to sort this in six months and make the sensible recommendations i
11:08 am
would hope that anyone of goodwill would hope that anyone of goodwill would read this report and realise that urgent action is needed now. no more talk, no more discussions, just do it. that was michael forsyth, obviously the author of that report. meanwhile, the two leaders have been focusing on, i suppose much more core tory issues, namely bobbies on the beat and fox hunting from jeremy hunt, was asked whether he would allow another vote on the ban on fox hunting. he said yes, if there was a tory majority would. although fox hunting was not his thing, he nevertheless thought it was part of the heritage of the countryside and so the heritage of the countryside and so there should be a chance to repeal the fox hunting ban. difficult in the sense that he has presented himself as the candidate who will appeal to a broader cross—section of the electorate than borisjohnson, cross—section of the electorate than boris johnson, and yet fox cross—section of the electorate than borisjohnson, and yet fox hunting, as we know from opinion polls, is extremely unpopular. so this morning, perhaps not surprisingly,
11:09 am
there appeared to be a degree of rowing back by mr hunt when challenged about his support for another vote on fox hunting. the law is not going to change on fox hunting. there isn't a majority in the house of commons and i don't see there ever being one. i wasjust restating the position in our manifesto from 2017, that there should be a free vote if it ever looked like that majority might change. but it wouldn't be my priority as prime minister. we are going to have brexit. we've got the social care system, which you have been talking about. we've got a huge economic priorities that are going to have to be addressed. now, borisjohnson now, boris johnson has now, borisjohnson has been focusing on his pledge to recruit another 20,000 police officers. in other words, to make good all the police officers cut by david cameron. so we would be back to square one, where we we re would be back to square one, where we were in 2010. his idea to put more bobbies on the beat, particularly in rural areas, where he says they have been particularly hit by reductions in police numbers. this morning one of his key backers,
11:10 am
kit malthouse, said it was imperative to put more officers on the beat to deal with issues like knife crime. it's critical from a kind of psychological point of view of fighting crime, that you maintain a sense of presence on the street. so what boris has said, notwithstanding the difficult decisions the government had to make over the past few years, post the crash, in terms of living within our means, the time has now come where we can spend more money on policing. and so raising the number from about 120,000 across the country to over 140,000, we think, is key. now the way to do that is, obviously, with the next few years to recruit more police officers by injecting about 1.1 billion into the policing budget to allow them to do that. and specifically focusing it on some areas which have lost a disproportionate number of policing. so, rural policing, for example, where we know there is concern in the community. so, pledges from both men on fox hunting and police numbers. will we get a pledge on social care? i think we have to be a little bit cautious
11:11 am
about that because it is such a gargantuan project, you wonder whether any prime minister, whoever it is, will have the time, the space, the courage to press ahead with such a huge reform agenda, while having to deliver on brexit and the aftermath of brexit, which, whatever happens, is probably still going to be soaking up a huge amount of government time and energy. norman smith at westminster. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in treatment for sepsis, referred to by experts as a hidden killer, because it is hard to spot. it's estimated that 50,000 people in the uk die from sepsis every year. hospitals are meant to put patients on an antibiotic drip within an hour when it's suspected, but research by the bbc suggests a quarter of patients in england are waiting longer. lauren moss reports. there's in his house, my friend's house. a father remembering his son as a bright student with ambition
11:12 am
of becoming an accountant and taking care of his family. but in may 2016, amir halling went to hospital in london after a bruise on his ankle left him struggling to walk. the 39—year—old was sent home with paracetamol, and less than 2a hours later, he suffered cardiac arrest and died. doctors had failed to spot that amir had sepsis. his last words when i left him in the hospital, he shook my hand and said, "dad, i love you". he gave me his hand, i kissed him on the cheek, i kissed his forehead and i came home. i didn't realise that was the really last kiss, our last cuddle i would ever give to my son. sepsis is triggered by an infection and early symptoms can include a fast heartbeat, high or low temperature, chills and shivering. it makes the body's immune system go into overdrive which can lead to septic shock, organ failure and sometimes death. figures from around three quarters of hospital trusts in england suggest that one in four patients
11:13 am
aren't being started on antibiotics within an hour when sepsis is suspected. sepsis is not always easy to spot. it can arise in someone of any age, it can arise as a consequence of any infection, so it's difficult for health professionals to spot it first time, every time. what they do need to do is to work in partnership with their patients, listen to their patients and look for sepsis. and if they do that, most of the time, it can be spotted. all uk hospitals are meant to follow the same guidelines, but performance in wales is similar to england and neither scotland nor northern ireland provided recent data. nhs england says huge improvements have been made and it's important not to automatically give antibiotics to everyone who's very unwell, but amir halling's father says he's been robbed of his son and his family is devastated. lauren moss, bbc news. lynda reynolds is a solicitor who has represented clients
11:14 am
with sepsis and families of those who have died. shejoins me now. good morning. what kinds of cases are you dealing with here?” good morning. what kinds of cases are you dealing with here? i deal with a variety of cases, often where sepsis is missed, sometimes altogether, and no treatment has started, and other times treatment has started too late. clearly devastating for those involved because of the speed of this condition can start to have a serious effect on people? yes, sepsis can be very quick and if undetected it can lead to death within a matter of hours. in this particular case, he was only over a matter of 2a hours before he died. before that he was a fit, healthy 39—year—old. before that he was a fit, healthy 39-year-old. when people seek legal help in these kinds of circumstances, what are they looking for? they are looking for answers, accountability, assistant to put
11:15 am
their lives back together and often walking through the inquest process with them and assisting them where there is a coroners investigation into any death. in terms of the solicitor bus, there is the inquest to consider but there is also records on occasions? there can be. when there has been negligence, families can recover compensation for their losses. in the same way as if you had a car accident you would be given compensation for those injuries. what about the highlighting of this condition? much was made in the introduction, in the film as well, by the fact it is often seen as a hidden condition because you simply don't know it is happening. no, you don't. there are not obvious signs of what is happening. in this case, he had a knock to his leg when he developed sepsis, which led to a systemic sepsis, which led to a systemic
11:16 am
sepsis problem. where does that leave the legal rights and wrongs in terms of the responsibilities of the law says it should lie with those who are trying to diagnose and trying to treat people? the law has been set for many, many years on what is negligent and what is not. every missed opportunity is not necessarily negligent. that is my job. and the legal team because my job. and the legal team because my job to work out what is negligent and what isn't. families just need to understand what has happened and feel they get some sort of accountability. and where necessary, redress. and what of the consistency around the country? one of the points that has emerged that today is that in some places people are clearly alerted to this, in others, less so? we are working with the sepsis trust of trying to raise awareness of sepsis with clinicians and members of the public. they need to ask, could this be sepsis when people are unwell? and given what has happened today and the amount of coverage you would hope something might change, is that right?|j
11:17 am
coverage you would hope something might change, is that right? i would hope there is a family somewhere, or a doctor or a nurse, that may see a patient and it mayjust cross their mind, could this be sepsis? they will consider it and start treatment appropriately within the hour timeframe. thank you very much indeed. the headlines on bbc news: the bookmakers, william hill, says it will shut nearly a third of its shops in the uk, putting a,500 jobs at risk. the firm blames the government's clamp—down on fixed odds betting terminals. jeremy hunt and borisjohnson have been challenged to prioritise the crisis in social care, if they become prime minister. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis, research by bbc news has found. and in sport, frank lampard has been confirmed as the new chelsea head coach. he leaves derby county after guiding them to the championship
11:18 am
play—off final and returns to sta mford play—off final and returns to stamford bridge, where he spent 13 yea rs stamford bridge, where he spent 13 years as a player. british number one is johanna konta years as a player. british number one isjohanna konta is back on centre court at wimbledon later. she is one of five british players in action today. and england will face sweden for bronze at the women's world cup after the swedes lost 1—0 to the netherlands last night. the dutch take on defending champions the usa in the sunday's final. i am back with more just after half past. china is warning the uk not to interfere in its domestic affairs, after the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt repeated his warning about "serious consequences" if freedoms in hong kong are watered down. tensions between the uk and china have been rising since mr hunt backed demonstrators during large pro—democracy protests in the territory. beijing's ambassador in london has accused the uk of having a "colonial mindset". ben ando sent us the latest on the growing diplomatic row from the chinese embassy in london.
11:19 am
the situation is very tense. at the moment there seems to be no sign of that tension decreasing. we are used to the chinese being very circumspect, very nuanced in their approach to diplomatic language. here they are being very clear. their message is simply that britain should butt out. as far as they're concerned, hong kong is a domestic issue. that is not how it is seen in westminster in the foreign office. for more than 150 years, hong kong was a british colony. it was returned to chinese rule in 1997, with the caveat that the people they would continue to enjoy some of the freedoms and civil liberties that they had become used to. now it is changes being proposed by beijing, particularly around extradition, thatis particularly around extradition, that is causing all the problems. people in hong kong are worried that political dissidents could be more
11:20 am
easily extradited to mainland china than they have been in the past. that is what has caused these quite violent demonstrations. at the moment in hong kong it seems things have calmed down a little bit. here thou, the rhetoric remains high. foreign secretary jeremy thou, the rhetoric remains high. foreign secretaryjeremy hunt is continuing to say the chinese should respect the civil liberties. and internally chinese are saying that it is really none britain's business. —— in—turn the chinese are saying. let's get more now on the news that william hill has said it plans putting more than a,500 jobs at risk. the company says it's due to the government's decision to reduce the maximum stake on fixed odds betting terminals to £2. we can speak to sir peter bottomley. good morning. what is your reaction to what william hill has announced? everybody thinks it is sensible to bring the state down from £100 to
11:21 am
£2. and if that means that william hill stop ripping off gamblers who can't control their habit, the sooner can't control their habit, the sooner the better and it should have happened years ago. i think william hill should be apologising both for the terrible racket they brought in, and to all the punters, who lost jobs, broke up theirfamilies. it should never be allowed for william hilland should never be allowed for william hill and others in this country to do what they are not allowed to do in ireland. what are the william hill in ireland. what are the william h ill staff in ireland. what are the william hill staff whose jobs are now at risk because of a change in policy? iam afraid risk because of a change in policy? i am afraid they are at risk because william hill exploited a loophole. government didn't intend this rash of betting shops to come up in the poorest areas on the high streets. because of the limitations on the number of machines, they have often had their own shops a few doors away trying to bring in the vulnerable, the poor and the gullible. i would say to those working for william hill, i hope you will find a good job. and if you say to william hill, why don't you get the high street
11:22 am
betting back onto the horses, the dogs, the football matches, don't rely on a couple of anonymous machines which could become so addictive, they are like the crack cocaine of gambling? you say to those who are working for william hill, you hope they get anotherjob. but william hill, you hope they get another job. but isn't william hill, you hope they get anotherjob. but isn't this the case ofa anotherjob. but isn't this the case of a government not forcing the inevitable consequences of such a big change? viewers will understand it is your professional duties you put the question that way. a sensible answer is to say, how are thejobs sensible answer is to say, how are the jobs created in the first place? the answer is to let people put up to £100 into a machine every 20 seconds. that is how people lost their money, lost their own jobs. seconds. that is how people lost their money, lost their ownjobs. i would say to william hill employees and others affected, try to find an employer with ethical values. william hill could double the redundancy paid to all those staff if they hadn't spent so much money and time lobbying against this change, which is overdue and is
11:23 am
greatly welcomed. i appreciate there was a great deal said at the time along the lines you have about the failings of the £100 and the preference to £2. i get that. i suppose the point i am getting at is, given that this was likely to happen because of that dramatic change in income that was going to go to william hill and the consequences thereof, was there a way of mitigating that in some way? the simple answer is no. firms like william hill said how about dropping it to 50, how about dropping it to 30,20, it to 50, how about dropping it to 30, 20, ten? iam really glad that tracy crouch put her foot down and said to government, you agreed to two, you can't increase it to a higherfigure. she two, you can't increase it to a higher figure. she resigned two, you can't increase it to a higherfigure. she resigned and written in resigning she was successful. we all knew that many of the new jobs successful. we all knew that many of the newjobs in the betting shops we re the newjobs in the betting shops were unjustifiable and ordinary gambling. they were onlyjustifiable as the person who hardly supervise the punters pouring money into these
11:24 am
machines. when people write the history of this they will say, of course we are always soi’i’y history of this they will say, of course we are always sorry if someone course we are always sorry if someone can't keep theirjob, but many of these jobs were created in recent yea rs many of these jobs were created in recent years because of william hill and others exploiting a loophole that was notjustified, it was not ethical, it was not intended. and they knew it was going to come to an end. they should have been preparing their staff even before our campaign, to save problem gamblers from addiction, came into being. news that they are closing shops. let's hear news that they're going to create jobs let's hear news that they're going to createjobs doing let's hear news that they're going to create jobs doing things that are worthwhile and fun and not addictive. what would you like william hill to learn from this? what would you like them to do in the future as a result of this? first of all, try to make your money ethically. if it turns out that again otherforms of ethically. if it turns out that again other forms of gambling are becoming addictive, help problem gamblers and try to have an approach that does not require people to see
11:25 am
gambling advertisements find they are trying to watch sport. we are trying to restrict their willingness to use their guile, their commercial interest, in ways which are not for the public good. 0bviously when i go gambling i expect to lose but i hope to win. i expect that i don't lose more than i can afford. that applies to others as well. they have got the intelligence. i hope they do it well. and these terrible machines could be confined to supervised casinos where people know what they are doing. thank you. sir peter bottomley mp. the government of gibraltar says it has seized a supertanker suspected of breaking sanctions against syria. a detachment of royal marines boarded the vessel, called grace one, in the early hours of this morning. authorities said there was reason to believe the ship was carrying crude oil to a blacklisted refinery. with me now is our defence correspondent, jonathan beale. what more is known about this incident? this was more than just the gibraltar government are
11:26 am
tracking this ship. according to reports this isn't the first time this particular ship has been moving oilfrom iran this particular ship has been moving oil from iran to other countries, even though there are a number of embargoes from a number of nations, including the eu, in place. what happened is this vessel is believed to have left iran, an iranian port, went round the whole of africa. and as soon as went round the whole of africa. and as soon as it entered into gibraltar waters, they were ready to take action. so they only took action when the ship entered gibraltar waters. we know marines were flown from the uk. members of a2 commando, specially trained onboarding vessels either by helicopters or speedboats, clambering on board. they helped the gibraltar authorities, the law enforcement there. i am told there was what the military says is an end
11:27 am
—— benign environment, no shots fired. they seized the ship and it is now under their control, under the control of the gibraltar authorities. is this about sanctions on syria or iran? this is about sanctions on syria. eu sanctions. gibraltar are part of the eu. this is about the eu imposing sanctions on syria because of what they have donein on syria because of what they have done in that civil war because of the actions of the regime. it is a good question to ask because clearly, there are sanctions also on iran, which have come into place recently. that is being led by the us. the eu has been reluctant to follow to the same extent because of the iran nuclear deal. but essentially these are two countries being watched very closely. and that is why they were tracking this particular ship. interesting as well that you suggest this is clearly not the first time something like this has happened of late? yes, the reports are this particular ship, grace 0ne, reports are this particular ship, grace one, was taking oilfrom iran.
11:28 am
the documents were forged to suggest it took oilfrom the documents were forged to suggest it took oil from iraq, which wasn't under embargo, and then took it to china. this would have been breaking us sanctions, not eu sanctions. slightly different and a different country in which the sanctions were imposed. clearly they were keeping an eye on this particular ship. jonathan, thank you. jonathan beale. now let's get the weather. simon has it. yes, more sunshine across england and wales today. it will feel warmer than yesterday. it is not the case everywhere. if we look at these, you can see cloud across scotland into northern ireland. some of it moving further south. it is quite thick on the far north—west. that means it is bringing some rain, rain particularly heavy in the north—west of scotland. patchy rain towards the north—east. further south, of scotland. patchy rain towards the north—east. furthersouth, cloud in the north of england, making the sunshine more hazy. blue skies
11:29 am
further south and temperature is 2a to 26 celsius. further north, chile. tonight they will continue to be cloud and rain affecting mainly north west and scotland. elsewhere, clear spells. a dry and a quiet night. temperatures no lower than 13 to 15 degrees. into friday, more blue skies for much of england and wales. ten —— temperature is 27 degrees in the south—east tomorrow. further north, more cloud, 15 to 18 celsius. bye for now.
11:30 am
hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: the bookmakers william hill says it will shut nearly a third of its shops in the uk, putting a,500 jobs at risk. the firm blames the government's clampdown on fixed odds betting terminals jeremy hunt and borisjohnson have been challenged to prioritise the crisis in social care if they become prime minister. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis,
11:31 am
research by bbc news has found. royal marines in gibraltar board an oil tanker, suspected of transporting iranian crude to syria, in breach of sanctions. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, has repeated his warning that china will face serious consequences if it fails to honour hong kong's high level of autonomy from beijing. now for the sport with azi. good morning. frank lampard has been confirmed as the new chelsea head coach, filling the role left vacant by maurizio sarri last month. lampa rd spent 13 seasons as a chelsea player and speculation that he would be taking over intensified when he led derby county to the championship play—off final last season, in what was his first managerial role. he says he's "immensely proud", adding, "i'm here to work hard, bring further success to the club
11:32 am
and i cannot wait to get started." after defeats for kyle edmund and heather watson yesterday, british hopes in the singles at wimbledon rest withjohanna konta. she's second on centre court this afternoon, against katerina siniakova of the czech republic. konta reached the semifinals two years ago, but that's the only time she's made it past the second round. she'll be boosted by her great run at the french open, though, when she reached the last four. andy murray's mum, judy, says she's looking forward to watching him in mixed doubles action with serena williams tomorrow, but not so much the men's doubles. two—time singles champion murray makes his return to wimbledon today, alongside pierre—hugues herbert, and judy isn't thrilled at the prospect of he and brotherjamie potentially facing each other in the third round. i've been fortunate that andy's career was singles and jamie's was doubles, so it has been great in terms of family harmony because they
11:33 am
have not competed against each other for a long time. if it happens, i will go to the pub and wait for attacks. you won't be watching? no, that would be torture. australia's bernard tomic has been fined his entire first—round prize money of £a5,000 following his bizarre defeat tojo—wilfried tsonga on tuesday. he appeared to be making very little effort, winning only seven games and losing in under an hour. he has the right to appeal but the statement from the all england club quoted the grand slam rule book, which states that "all players are expected to perform to a professional standard in every match". england will face sweden in their third—place playoff on saturday, after the swedes lost their semifinal against the netherlands 1—0 in lyon. manchester united midfielder jackie groenen's goal in extra time saw the european champions through to sunday's final, where they'll face holders the usa.
11:34 am
the four—time 0lympic cycling champion laura kenny says the success of england's women at the world cup will go a long way towards changing the perception of women's sport. she's involved in the "i am team gb" campaign, created by the british olympic association, to get as many people as possible physically active, and even though the lionesses were knocked out in the semifinals, kenny believes they are trailblazers. i was heartbroken for them. they are still going for the bronze medal, but honestly to me it feels like we've got some sort of turning happening here and this could be the start of it for women's sport. we all sought the number of people that watched it, and ijust think that is incredible. football obviously has a massive following but for it to be female football is absolutely fantastic. those girls are the true legends for women's sport, they are idols that we need for the next
11:35 am
generation. tour de france champion geraint thomas says he feels under no pressure as he prepares to defend his title, despite a difficult build—up to the race. he was forced to abandon the tirreno—adriatico stage race in march with stomach problems and he crashed out of last month's tour de suisse — his final preparation race. but he says he's under less pressure, having already won a grand tour, and he thinks he can be more chilled and calculated. that's all the sport for now but there's much more on the bbc sport website, including radio and text commentary from the latest cricket world cup match, between afghanistan and the west indies, plus in—play highlights. ballot papers are due to be sent out in the conservative party leadership election this week and, by the end of the month, a new prime minister will have moved into downing street. boris johnson and jeremy hunt are the contenders, but where do they stand on key issues? over the next couple of days,
11:36 am
we're going to be taking a closer look at both men, starting with the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. he has been an mp for 1a years, a government minister for nine, but number ten is where jeremy hunt wants to be. and now, only borisjohnson stands on his way. i'm saying i am trustworthy, and i do believe that i can be trusted. but to trust someone, you need to know a little more about them. jeremy hunt first got involved in conservative politics when he was at oxford. before becoming an mp, he started a public relations agency, then a publishing company, and he is keen to brandish his business credentials. as an entrepreneur... i'm an entrepreneur... ..entrepreneur by background. he was close to david cameron, and was made 0lympics minister in a coalition government, where he got to see a lot of his future leadership rival. not everything has gone smoothly forjeremy hunt. he was the longest—serving health secretary since the nhs was created,
11:37 am
and he was embroiled in a conflict withjunior doctors, leading to theirfirst strike in a0 years. under theresa may, jeremy hunt took on extra responsibility for social care. hello, it'sjeremy... and his strategy in the contest seems to be to admit mistakes and try to move on. some of the cuts in social care did go too far. it's so easy to say of course i was right. but you stand back and think, could i have done it a little bit better? and jeremy has not been afraid of saying exactly that. hello, i'mjeremy... jeremy hunt campaigned for remain in the referendum, but now says he wants to leave the eu with a new brexit deal. jeremy hunt's critics accused him of being the windsock candidate, blowing this way and that on brexit. not long after the referendum, he said he would consider having another one. then he made it clear he was a leaver, but did not want to exit the eu without a deal. now, he says he is prepared to leave without a deal if need be.
11:38 am
the big thing thatjeremy hunt has to offer on brexit is his ability to negotiate, and his credibility as a negotiator. the downside is, because he voted remain, will the people in parliament trust him to deliver brexit? thank you all very much indeed. jeremy hunt's supporters say his opponent is gaffe—prone. but the foreign secretary, despite spending two years teaching injapan, managed to misplace his wife's nationality. also, my wife is japanese... my wife is chinese, sorry. critics ofjeremy hunt say he has less name recognition than his opponent. but is this really true? because he has had to contend with embarrassing mispronunciations of his four—letter surname. ijust think he possibly finds it slightly amusing, and sometimes things happen in one's life. these things sort of take hold. i am sure he will remember the nationality of his wife in future. he says he is a serious
11:39 am
candidate for serious times. jeremy hunt — remember the name, and how to pronounce it. and tomorrow we'll focus on the other candidate in the leadership race, borisjohnson. the next prime minister should give more money to vulnerable children — that's according to the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield. new research from the children's commissioners office estimates that one in five children living in england are growing up in difficult family situations. this is the third annual report on the most vulnerable children. it also says that more than 800,000 children aren't getting support and are being let down by services. earlier, i spoke to anne longfield, the children's commsioner for england. she says she's concerned that little progress is being made. what this report establishes is that there are a huge one in five children in this country that are living vulnerable lives and living in vulnerable family situations.
11:40 am
these are children living with complex problems at home, high levels of dependency on drugs or alcohol, high levels of domestic and severe mental health conditions within the family. from the start, these families are facing huge challenges and what is really important this year is that we have been able to map this against the support they are receiving. two thirds of those children are receiving no discernible support, and a third of them are almost invisible to services. this is a situation when really vulnerable children are getting very little help indeed. why do you say the support is not apparently forthcoming? this is one of the biggest issues, around children not being identified, which is the reason we are doing this work, to show how many children are carrying these hidden vulnerabilities. what we are also seeing within local authorities, who have tighter budgets, is that even though more money is being spent, it is being
11:41 am
spent on fewer and fewer children as levels of crisis and levels of demand increase and councils have to spend on very high cost individual children stop this one council we found in our study, where 20% of the budget is spent on the very high complex treatment for just ten children. of course, the impact of thatis children. of course, the impact of that is that the help for those children with less severe problems is fading away. when you put your concerns to government, is no doubt you have, what response you get? there is a growing understanding that there is an increasing problem here with vulnerable children and crisis for children, but i think the government finds it hard to work out quite where to intervene. the make—up of government, the way it is isn't conducive to children to stop it is in an area where there is already an established area of high
11:42 am
spend or priority, and that is what needs to change. we think it is normal in this country do plan to meet the needs of rail travel or roads for ten or 20 years in advance. the nhs has a ten year plan will stop there is nothing like this we re will stop there is nothing like this were children, and that means that a fifth of all children are being let down with unfulfilled not only childhoods but potentially adult lives as a result. in which case, that make you reflect on the message you are put into government, in terms of convincing them they have to put your issues at the top of their priority list, where perhaps in the past they have not? certainly i think these need to be seen as a hot issue, not something that can be put away for the days when everything else is fixed. understandably, people can see the headlines that come out as a consequence of this and partly for me it's aboutjoining those thoughts and showing what actually will happen to those vulnerable children.
11:43 am
i have been in these studios talking about gangs and violence around children's mental health, these are the impacts of those vulnerabilities. for all of the prospective candidates and indeed opposition leaders that are putting forward tax cuts of many millions of pounds a year or cuts in tuition fees, they need to be able to justify how they will go ahead with that and not invest in the millions of children that rely on it so badly. the laws on assisted dying will be debated in the house of commons today, for the first time since mps rejected changing the law four years ago. currently, anyone found guilty of helping someone to end their own life can face a prison sentence. tim muffett reports. vicki was 83 and had stage iv bone cancer when she ended her own life last year. she'd been in constant pain. she was not afraid of dying but afraid of the way she was going to die. she said when she feels ready, she will do it,
11:44 am
not when the cancer takes her. her son and daughter, adam and kate, were both investigated by police for potentially assisting their mother's suicide. vicki had asked adam to contact the swiss clinic dignitas with a view to potentially ending her own life there. his phone was seized. vicki died in kate's house. kate found her after returning home one day last february. i then sat with her. didn't go in an ambulance. as the police took it, mum was a victim and i was a suspect. it was very, very stressful. after almost a year, the coroner returned a verdict of suicide. kate and adam were cleared of any involvement. i would like to see the law changed so that people that are terminally ill can be allowed to die with dignity and to be assisted in the way they die. in england, wales, and northern ireland,
11:45 am
being found guilty of assisted suicide can lead to a jail term of up to 1a years. in scotland, it's not a specific crime, but helping someone take their own life can lead to a charge of culpable homicide. all these laws will be scrutinised today in parliament. kidney specialist, dr david randall, supports the view of care not killing, an alliance of organisations which oppose a change to the law. it can appear stern, but invariably it's interpreted with compassion. there's very clear guidance from the director of public prosecutions, which indicates that family members who act out of compassion to assist the suicide of a relative shouldn't be prosecuted. the danger, i think, if we change the law here is that we skew the balance. but for adam and kate, and many others, legal changes are long overdue. tim muffett, bbc news. black and asian victims of sex abuse are staying silent for fear of bringing shame on their families. the muslim women's network believes
11:46 am
the problem is endemic among south asian communities. the nspcc says it's a hidden problem and widely unreported. sabbiyah pervez has been speaking to one asian woman from rotherham who was raped as a child by one of her relatives. ididn't i didn't know what was happening. i knew that whatever was happening was something that i had been told i had to keep a secret. this woman was just five years old when her relative, who is now dead, began sexually abusing her. he repeatedly raped her over several years and on one occasion her mum walked in. we lived in a corner shop and we were in the storeroom, and there were sacks of grain and rice stop he basically dumped me in a sack of grain or whatever it was so my head and shoulders were showing, and he was doing his belt up. my mum walked in at that moment so it became
11:47 am
obvious what was going on. her abuser is now dead but it has taken her a0 years to speak out about her abuse. we as a family never talked about it because, if at the age of five, they then shared with the family or the community what happened, i would family or the community what happened, iwould become family or the community what happened, i would become stigmatised asa happened, i would become stigmatised as a child. that would follow me all through my life. she is not alone when it comes to the reaction of her family and not reporting her abuse to the police. research gathered by community organisations and academics suggest there are multiple reasons why victims from ethnic minority communities don't disclose their experiences. sometimes if they do share it with a parent or other adults, they may be silenced into keeping quiet because of the dishonour and shame it may bring to the family or community. she now i’u ns the family or community. she now runs a charity to help victims of abuse. they have recently developed
11:48 am
workshops looking at sexual abuse within the home. she hopes communities will start to recognise theissue communities will start to recognise the issue so more victims have the confidence to come forward. in a moment, we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. the bookmakers, william hill, is to shut nearly a third of its shops in the uk, putting a,500 jobs at risk. the firm blames the government's clampdown on fixed odds betting terminals jeremy hunt and borisjohnson have been challenged to prioritise the crisis in social care, if they become prime minister. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis, research by bbc news has found. in the business news: the betting group william hill has said it plans to close around 700 betting
11:49 am
shops across the uk, putting more than a,500 jobs at risk. the company blamed the closures, which amount to nearly a third of its shops, on the government's decision to reduce the maximum stake on fixed odds betting terminals to £2. the firm of well—known fund manager neil woodford is planning redundancies after investors pulled billions of pounds from his flagship fund. the cuts are expected to affect a small number of support staff, rather than staff managing investments. woodford investment management employs around a5 people. the national trust has announced it is selling off all its oil and gas stocks by 2022 — more on that in a moment. as we've just been hearing, the national trust has announced that it will sell off the shares it holds in fossil fuel companies. at present, a% of its £1 billion stock market investment is in such firms. the trust, the biggest conservation charity in europe, says it wanted to invest in green start—ups and portfolios that benefited nature and the environment.
11:50 am
the national trust's cfo, peter vermeulen, joins us now. thank you forjoining us. first of all, explain what you hope to achieve by doing this. what is the message you want to get out there? we wa nt message you want to get out there? we want everybody to understand that we ta ke we want everybody to understand that we take the environmental performance of our output very seriously. we have done that for a long time. the carbon footprint of our portfolio is ready a third lower than the market index. we always look to influence organisations to improve the environmental behaviour but in 2019 we feel that oil and gas companies have not done enough to meet the goals set under the paris climate agreement and we believe we must divest and funnel our funds towards green start—ups or businesses that are looking to expand their operations and deliver environmental outcomes as well as sound financial returns. some might argue that these big fossil fuel
11:51 am
companies, bp and shell, they are investing in renewable energy, aren't they? they are making some investment in renewable energy and we applaud that. but when they invest less than 10% of their capital funds in renewable invest less than 10% of their capitalfunds in renewable energy invest less than 10% of their capital funds in renewable energy is an pump the rest of the investment into fossil fuels, we an pump the rest of the investment into fossilfuels, we believe an pump the rest of the investment into fossil fuels, we believe the ratio is not sufficient. there has been some criticism that what you are doing is too little, too late, you should have done this a while ago. it is right to give mrs time to adjust their business models, turning large businesses around ta kes turning large businesses around takes some time. we believe that after giving them three years since the paris climate accord has been signed, we must call time on that. now it's right to divest and look for green companies to invest in. what companies will you be looking to invest in? we have set ourselves seven objectives you want to hit
11:52 am
true that investment portfolio. to date, we have found wind technology companies, energy storage companies and companies that will improve water company, hitting three of those seven objectives we set ourselves. the important thing that people want to know is, you are investing this money, use the return of the investments to look after country's coastline, countryside, stately homes and gardens, so it is important you make money as well, right? that's right. we look after nature, beauty and history on behalf of the nation, as it were. 0ur investments represent 9% of the revenue we need to do that. you'll be investing in green companies rather than fossil fuels, so what is your message to other big companies who are criticised for not doing the same? it is for every organisation to make its own decisions but i
11:53 am
would urge them to look at those new opportunities and ask whether there is an opportunity for them to invest in companies that in ten or 20 yea rs' in companies that in ten or 20 years' time will really thrive in the economy because not only... 0k, peter, thank you. a look at the other top business stories: deloitte has been fined £a.2 million by the accounting watchdog and severely reprimanded for its audit of serco's geografix division during the outsourcing firm's electronic tagging scandal. the penalty comes a day after the company was fined £22.9 million by the serious fraud office over the tagging contracts. primark‘s sales were hit by "unseasonable" weather in may. that's according to primark‘s owner, associated british foods, which says group revenue from continuing businesses for the a0 weeks ended 22june 2019 was 3% up on the same period last year. sales of low emission cars in the uk have fallen for the first time in more than two years.
11:54 am
the decline comes as overall sales of new cars continued to fall, dropping a.9% in june from the year before. that's all the business news. thank you. the newest airport in the world opens in the uk today. carlisle lake district airport — or cax for short — will operate flights for tourists and local workers. 0ur correspondent, sarah corker, has been there for us this morning. this is the uk's newest airport. ca rlisle lake district was officially opened this morning and, at 8am, the first passenger flight for more than 25 years took off and it was headed for dublin. initially, there will be 28 flights a week to dublin, belfast city and london southend. jonathan hinkles is from loganair, who will be operating these services.
11:55 am
what have sales been like so far? really strong, we are really encouraged by the take—up that we've seen. the first flights today are going out nearly full on all three of our flights to dublin, belfast and london southend. the bookings that we've been seeing at loganair are absolutely superb and we are extremely pleased. there have been no commercial passenger flights since 1993 because they weren't viable. what's changed ? i think a lot has changed in the way that people fly, but also a lot has changed in the way that regional airports work. customers who have been using regional airports have been finding them convenient, being able to get through them quickly, check in and get through without the hassle that's associated with big airports, and that's something that's really valuable to them. so more and more people are using regional airports, and that's great to see, particularly here at carlisle lake district airport today. kate willard is here with us as well from the stobart group, who owns and operates this airport. is there really a need for it? train links to this area are really good, there's intense competition from airports in manchester and newcastle. will people actually use these flights? they will. it's really interesting, isn't it?
11:56 am
0ur visitor economy is really important here in cumbria and the lake district but, if you think about it, if you live in essex or in east london, it's very difficult to come up to the lake district, it takes a long time by train, you've got to get around london, you wouldn't drive up on a friday night for a weekend because that would be an eight—hour drive. if you can nip along to london southend airport by train, jump on a plane, you will be having your first pint in ullswater before the sun goes down. so we are certainly opening up the visitor economy to new visitors who haven't been here before. i think that's a great opportunity for our visitor economy. carlisle lake district airport is very much open for business, but there are of course environmental concerns — questions over whether there should be more dommestic flights at a time when the uk is trying to reduce the impact of climate change. now it's time for a look at the weather. we have got lots of sunshine at the moment across england and wales. if
11:57 am
you look at the satellite imagery, there is barely a cloud in the sky across england and wales, but further north a different story for scotla nd further north a different story for scotland and northern ireland, that cloud has been moving its way in and it will move further south to give some hazy sunshine for northern parts. we will continue to see some rain affecting the far north of scotland, primarily the north—west of scotland. to the east, the rain a little bit patchy. that rain moves into the north of england, some hazy sunshine here. 2a to 26 celsius in the south, and fresher further north. tonight, we continue for rain in western scotland. temperatures get down to around nine to 13 celsius into friday morning. during friday, we will continue with the rain across the far north. that is linked to a weather system situated to the north—west of scotland.
11:58 am
further south, this nose of high pressure is influencing conditions across england and wales was not starting off with a bit cloud in the morning and there might be some more cloud into northern areas by the afternoon. into england and wales, it will remain dry with some sunshine and temperatures. 2a to 27 degrees. further north, bricks of rainfor degrees. further north, bricks of rain for western scotland, and fresher between temperatures between 17 and 19 degrees. we bring in a northerly wind, bringing cooler air to northern parts were stopped temperatures will take a dip on saturday and there will be patchy cloud moving southwards. some rain associated with that but for most it will stay dry. a northerly wind with sunny spells in northern parts, and temperatures down by a few degrees. 22 degrees in southern areas, 17
11:59 am
degrees further north. by sunday, some showers, but otherwise a dry day. more cloud around, especially across central and southern areas was maximum on with saturday, 1a to 18 degrees in the north, 22 to 23 degrees in the south. that's all from me. goodbye.
12:00 pm
you're watching bbc newsroom live — these are today's main stories: the bookmakers, william hill, is shutting nearly a third of its shops in the uk, putting a,500 jobs at risk. the firm blames the government's clampdown on fixed odds betting terminals. jeremy hunt and borisjohnson are challenged to prioritise the crisis in social care, if they become prime minister, as peers call for a free nhs—based, system. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis, research by bbc news has found. royal marines in gibraltar board an oil tanker, suspected of transporting iranian crude to syria, in breach of sanctions. in a rare interview, the scientist, james lovelock, warns about the rise of robots, saying humanity could soon be superseded by a new, hyper—intelligent life form
12:01 pm
artificial intelligence, i reckon, will be something like 10,000 times faster in thinking than we are. and frank lampard is back at chelsea, as manager. the club where he made over 600 appearances and won eleven major trophies. good morning. it's thursday, july ath. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the betting group william hill has said it plans to close around 700 of its shops across the uk, putting more than a,500 jobs at risk. the company blamed the closures — which amount to nearly a third of its outlets — on the government's decision to reduce the maximum stake on fixed odds betting terminals to £2. (read our business correspondent emma simpson told me earlier that these closures were widely
12:02 pm
predicted by betting companies. the industry had warned that reducing the stakes on these fixed—odds betting terminals from £100 to £2, a change which came into effect in april, would trigger store closures and job losses. today william hill said it plans to close 700 stores and they say since april, it has seen a significant fall in gaming machines revenues. a500 people's jobs at risk. this is a big restructuring. william hill is 2300 shops. it's not clear where these closures will be. it is going to look to apply voluntary redundancy, redeployment measures. but certainly unintended consequences, it seems, from this decision some time ago by the government.
12:03 pm
and those fixed odds betting terminals, from £100 to £2, there was a significant factor in how much money was coming into the company? these fixed odds betting terminals, they have been described as the crack cocaine of gambling. the new rules were designed to protect vulnerable people. so they generated £1.8 billion a year for the industry. there was huge lobbying going on as the government was coming to a view on this. and william hill said that these fixed odds betting terminals generated just over half of its revenues. it warned that reducing the stake would be a precedent. and it warned that 900 of its shops could become loss—making, potentially leading to job losses. so that's how we have got to this point today.
12:04 pm
as you hinted, during the debate about the rights and wrongs of this, the concerns about the mental health of those who use these machines was writ large all over this debate? absolutely. we had this controversy because, of course, it was delayed. we had the resignation of the sports minister because the change wasn't coming fast enough. but today, the change is in and now we have the unintended consequences, it seems, that decision. emma simpson. sir peter bottomley mp was on the all parliamentary group that looked into fixed 0dd betting terminals. he says the government's changes were sensible and william hill should be apologising for the damage caused by fixed 0dd betting terminals. i think everyone thinks it is sensible to bring the stake down from £100 every 20 seconds, to £2. if that means that william hill stopped ripping off gamblers who can't control their habit, the sooner can't control their habit, the sooner the better, it should have happened years ago. william hill should be apologising to the staff
12:05 pm
they have brought in for this terrible racket, and to the punters, many of whom have got gambling debts, lostjobs, many of whom have got gambling debts, lost jobs, broke many of whom have got gambling debts, lostjobs, broke up families. it's about time this happened. it should never have been allowed for william hill and others in this country to do what they were not allowed to do in ireland. one of the william hill staff whose jobs are now at risk because of a change in government policy?” now at risk because of a change in government policy? i am afraid because they —— they are at risk because they —— they are at risk because william hill exploited a loophole. we didn't intend this rash of betting shops to come up at the poorest areas on the high streets. they often have their own shops a few doors away from each other trying to bring in the vulnerable, the poor and the gullible. sol would say to those working for william hill, i hope you find a good job. sata william hill, why don't you get the high street betting back onto the horses, the dogs, the foot ball onto the horses, the dogs, the football matches, don't rely on a couple of anonymous machines, which could become so addictive, they are like the crack cocaine of gambling.
12:06 pm
you say to those working for william hill whose jobs you say to those working for william hill whosejobs are at you say to those working for william hill whose jobs are at risk, you hope to get anotherjob. is this a case of the government not foreseeing the inevitable consequences of such a big change?” think viewers will understand it is your professional duty to put the question that way. i think a sensible answer is to say, how were these jobs created in the first place? the answer is to let people put up to £100 into a machine every 20 seconds. that's how people lost their money, lost their own jobs. 20 seconds. that's how people lost their money, lost their ownjobs. i would say to william hill employees and others who might be affected, try to find an employer with ethical values. william hill could double the redundancy pay to their staff if they hadn't spent so much money and time lobbying against this change, which is overdue and is greatly welcomed. i appreciate there was a great deal said at the time along the lines that you have about the failings of the £100 and the preference to £2. i get that. i
12:07 pm
suppose the point i am getting at is that given this was likely to happen because of the dramatic change in income that was going to go to william hill, and the consequences thereof, was there a way of mitigating that in some way? the simple answer is no. firms like william hill through their trade association, who got much more airtime thanl association, who got much more airtime than i ever have had on this issue, said, how about dropping it to 50, 30, 20, ten, five? i issue, said, how about dropping it to 50, 30, 20, ten, five? lam really glad that tracy crouch put her foot down and said to government, you agreed to two, you can't increase it to a higher figure. she resigned and in resigning she was successful. we all knew that many of the jobs in the u betting shops were unjustifiable on ordinary gambling. they were only justifiable as the person who supervised the punters pouring money into these machines. when people write the history of this they will say, of course we are always sorry if someone can't keep theirjob. but many of these jobs were created in re ce nt many of these jobs were created in recent years because of william hill
12:08 pm
and others exploiting a loophole that wasn'tjustified, and others exploiting a loophole that wasn't justified, wasn't ethical, wasn't intended, and they knew it was going to come to an end. they should have been preparing their staff even before our campaign, to save problem gamblers from addiction. obviously it is news they are closing shops. when are they are closing shops. when are they going to create jobs and do things that are worthwhile, are fun and not addictive? what would you like william hill to learn from this? what would you like them to do in the future as a result of this? first of all, try to make your money ethically. if it turns out in other forms of gambling, if again people are becoming addictive, try to increase the money as their trade association is, to help problem gamblers. try to have an approach that does not require people to seek —— to see gambling advertisements when they are trying to watch sport. restrict their willingness to use theirguile, their restrict their willingness to use their guile, their commercial interest, in ways which are not for the public good. obviously when i go
12:09 pm
betting i expect to lose. i hope to win but i expect to lose. i can make sure i don't lose more than i can afford. they have a responsibility that applies to other people as well. they have got the intelligence. i hope they do it well. these terrible machines should be confined to supervised, regulated casinos, and people who know what they are doing. so peter bottomley. the two conservative leadership candidates have been challenged to bring forward urgently, plans to tackle the social care crisis if they become prime minister. a committee of peers has called for an immediate £8 billion investment, and a move to a free, nhs—based system. jeremy hunt has said he accepts more money is needed for care, while borisjohnson said a cross—party approach is needed. let's get more on all of this with our assistant political editor, norman smith, who's at westminster for us. there is mounting pressure care following the publication of the report this morning by a group of peers calling in effect for the
12:10 pm
social care system to be made just like the nhs, in other words, it would be funded by the taxpayer and there would be free personal care for everyone regardless of income, but you would have to pay for your accommodation costs. this comes after yea rs of accommodation costs. this comes after years of prevarication and delay and endless reports being sidelined, and demands now for the two leadership contenders in the tory party leadership race to commit to deal with the issue, the local and association adding to the pressure this morning, demanding that the long delayed green paper on social care is published by the middle of september. —— local, the association. so far we have not heard much from borisjohnson about how he would deal with the social ca re how he would deal with the social care crisis. he has intimated he would help to address it on a cross— party would help to address it on a cross—party basis. we have had slightly more from jeremy hunt, who has mooted this idea possibly some sort of system like the pension system, where you can opt into it as
12:11 pm
pa rt system, where you can opt into it as part of a state pension. however, he seems to be envisaging rather a long process to bring in the new system, lasting up to ten years. i think there are some very good ideas but i want to negotiate with the social care system, a ten year plan that all sides agree will do what it takes, including full integration with the nhs, so that people are not pushed around from one system to the other. and i think there is enormous will to do that, but in the nhs and the social care system, because these are british values. we are a country that wants to look after older people in our society. i think everyone feels that social care is something we haven't got right. now is the chance to do so. the current health secretary, matt hancock, who is backing boris johnson in this leadership tussle, was at the leadership conference and was at the leadership conference and was challenged to set a date for the publication of the green paper. he declined to do so. he suggested it
12:12 pm
had been held up by what he called parliamentary deadlock. i presume he means brexit. and the lack of a cross— party means brexit. and the lack of a cross—party consensus, both of which could last for some time. on the labour side, barbara keeley, their ca re spokeswoman, labour side, barbara keeley, their care spokeswoman, said it was far too late now to be talking about a green paper. they now actually needed to be bringing forward concrete plans for reform. it is absolute vital to tackle this issue. we are in a situation where a lords committee which includes two former chancellors of the extractor, looks at the funding and calls it a national scandal. it's atrocious that people who need care, elderly people, vulnerable help —— vulnerable people, are all in this situation when there is insufficient ca re situation when there is insufficient care for them, low quality care, and thatis care for them, low quality care, and that is not acceptable. the question is, will anything be different this time? will this
12:13 pm
report have kick—started a genuine move to reform social care or are we in the land once again of words and no action or very difficult to tell, to be honest. it seems to be one of the big difficulties, pushing ahead with social care reform in such a gargantuan issue. comparable really to setting up the nhs. it is a huge landmark social reform. it would require colossal amounts of political will and effort and courage and time. if you just think with brexit likely to continue, whatever happens on october the sist, whatever happens on october the 31st, the ramifications, the implications of trade negotiations, potentially for years afterwards, will any pm have the space to get to grips with social care? norman smith, thank you. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in treatment for sepsis,
12:14 pm
referred to by experts as a hidden killer, because it is hard to spot. it's estimated that 50,000 people in the uk die patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays hospitals are meant to put patients on an antibiotic drip within an hour when it's suspected, but research by the bbc suggests a quarter of patients in england are waiting longer. lauren moss reports. there he is in my friend's house. a father remembering his son as a bright student with ambition of becoming an accountant and taking care of his family. but in may 2016, amir halling went to hospital in london after a bruise on his ankle left him struggling to walk. the 39—year—old was sent home with paracetamol, and less than 2a hours later, he suffered cardiac arrest and died. doctors had failed to spot that amir had sepsis. his last words when i left him in the hospital, he shook my hand and said, "dad, i love you". he gave me his hand, i kissed him on the cheek, i kissed his forehead and i came home. i didn't realise that was the really last kiss, our last cuddle
12:15 pm
i would ever give to my son. sepsis is triggered by an infection and early symptoms can include a fast heartbeat, high or low temperature, chills and shivering. it makes the body's immune system go into overdrive which can lead to septic shock, organ failure and sometimes death. figures from around three quarters of hospital trusts in england suggest that one in four patients aren't being started on antibiotics within an hour when sepsis is suspected. sepsis is not always easy to spot. it can arise in someone of any age, it can arise as a consequence of any infection, so it's difficult for health professionals to spot it first time, every time. what they do need to do is to work in partnership with their patients, listen to their patients and look for sepsis. and if they do that, most of the time, it can be spotted. all uk hospitals are meant to follow the same guidelines, but performance in wales is similar to england and neither scotland nor northern ireland provided recent data. nhs england says huge improvements
12:16 pm
have been made and it's important not to automatically give antibiotics to everyone who's very unwell, but amir halling's father says he's been robbed of his son and his family is devastated. lauren moss, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news: the bookmakers, william hill, is to shut nearly a third of its shops in the uk, putting a,500 jobs at risk. the firm blames the government's clampdown on fixed odds betting terminals. jeremy hunt and borisjohnson have been challenged to prioritise the crisis in social care, if they become prime minister. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis, research by bbc news has found.
12:17 pm
good afternoon. frank lampard has been confirmed as the new chelsea head coach, filling the role left vacant by maurizio sarri last month. lampa rd spent 13 seasons as a chelsea player and speculation that he would be taking over intensified when he led derby county to the championship play—off final last season, in what was his first managerial role. he says he's "immensely proud", adding "i'm here to work hard, bring further success to the club and i cannot wait to get started". let's get over to wimbledon now where play is on day four. john watson is there. john, we u nfortu nately lost a cou ple of british players yesterday. there are five more in singles action today. who is carrying the hopes of the nation now? it is harriet dart who is up first. she has taken the first set. she is
12:18 pm
looking to reach the third round of wimbledon for the first time in her career. johanna konta is an action later. she takes on catalina siniakova. she is a player who knocked out the then number one, naomi osaka, the french open a few weeks ago. on court it is harriet dart who is out in action at the moment. going well having taken the first set. johanna konta, having knocked out ana bogdan in the opening round, want to make it through. a former wimbledon semifinalist. a lot of pressure on her shoulders. kyle edmund and heather watson went out yesterday. there are three other brits in action today. cameron norrie plays kei nishikori on centre court. dan evansis kei nishikori on centre court. dan evans is in action as well. and spare a thought forjay clarke, who
12:19 pm
won his first wimbledon match here. he takes on none other than roger federer. what a match for him. looking out of play, it seems rafael nadal against nick kyrgios looks the most tasty? yeah, it does indeed. it's fair to say their relationship has gone a little bit sour following rafa nadal‘s victory over kerry diaz in acapulco earlier this year. nadal accused him of showing a lack of respect. nick kyrgios duly responded by saying that rafael nadal is super sulky, saying that is how he reacts every time that nick kyrgios beat him. they are level pegging at a 3-3. him. they are level pegging at a 3—3. let's not forget as well that of course it was nick kyrgios who famously beat rafa nadal in the fourth round at wimbledon in 201a, one of his most famous victories. he has not had many more of those notable big wins over the top three since. one of the newsline today.
12:20 pm
bernard tomic, the australian, has seen bernard tomic, the australian, has seen his match fee from the first round, £a5,000, that is the fine he has been hit with after failing to perform to his fullest in that opening round match. and of course despite that we did have some fantastic matches today. roger federer in action. serena williams as well. and andy murray will be in action in the doubles. it is a bumper day here at wimbledon. john watson, thank you. that is all the sport for now. i will have more for you in the next hour. thank you. the united nations says it has received reports that libyan guards shot at migrants as they tried to flee from airstrikes that hit a detention centre near tripoli on tuesday. 53 people, including six children, are now confirmed dead from the attack on the camp. bodies are reportedly still being recovered from the rubble. imogen foulkes is in
12:21 pm
the swiss capital, bern. imogen, bring us up to date with what is known? what we have is the latest situation from the un about this air strike. the second hit a hanger housing 120 people. that is where fatalities occurred. it looks like the death toll of 53 may rise. what the un has also said is that a p pa re ntly what the un has also said is that apparently between the first strike, which didn't cause any fatalities, and the second, some refugees tried to flee. and some of those have reported to un officials that they we re
12:22 pm
reported to un officials that they were shot at by libyan guards as they tried to get out of the detention centre. this exposes again some of —— something the aid agencies have been warning about for some time, conditions in which migrants are detained, forcibly detained, in libya. inhumane. and it looks as if people don't want them to leave even when they are in the heat of the conflict. so when they are exposed to this kind of danger. and the phrase libyan guards, there are so many and the phrase libyan guards, there are so many factions at play in libya, is it possible to say who might be behind this? well, who was behind the air strike? the un's line is, we don't know yet. what they say is, we don't know yet. what they say is that all warring parties in libya, and there are many, now the coordinates of all the detention centres. so the worry is that if this was a deliberate attack on
12:23 pm
civilians, it would be a violation of the geneva convention, it would bea war of the geneva convention, it would be a war crime. this is why the un is calling for an independent investigation to find out what actually happened. as far as the reported shooting of migrants as they tried to flee, there are all sorts of different groups. militias official, semi—official, and some are also involved in the security
12:24 pm
respondent is at the old bailey. telus about that. this is the first time we have heard from any of the armed officers. he was given anonymity and appeared behind a screen, and was identified only as of acerbi x a6. he said that they had had a van attack. he said he feared the worst. this happened just 2.5 months after the westminster bridge attack. they arrived at borough market within a matter of minutes. when they first got out of their car, old with his rifle, he thought it might just their car, old with his rifle, he thought it mightjust be a bar fight. then he saw the man running towards him with a large knife and within seconds he shot and killed
12:25 pm
him. news there the lawyer representing the coroner said he was aware that describing these actions they were moving at snail‘s pace in court. but when we footage from cctv of the moment where the attackers we re of the moment where the attackers were killed, you realised it happened in a matter of seconds. the officers then this burst to go and see if they there could be more attackers. it turned out there wasn't. we will hear from the other two armed officers today, who shot and killed two of the terrorists. thank you very much. the government of gibraltar says it has seized a supertanker suspected of breaking sanctions against syria. a detachment of royal marines boarded the vessel in the early hours of this morning. the authority said there was reason to believe the ship was carrying crude oil to a blacklisted refinery. earlier i
12:26 pm
spoke to our defence correspondent jonathan beale. this is more than just the gibraltar government are tracking the ship. according to reports this isn't the first time this particular ship has been moving oilfrom iran this particular ship has been moving oil from iran to other countries, even though there are a number of embargoes from a number of nations, including the eu, in place. what happened is this vessel is believed to have left iran, the iranian port, gone around the horn of africa and as soon as gone around the horn of africa and as soon as it entered gibraltar waters, they were ready to take action. so they only took action when the ship entered gibraltar waters. we know marines were flung from the uk. members of a0 commando, quys from the uk. members of a0 commando, guys who are specially trained onboarding vessels, either by fast ropes from helicopters or by speedboat essentially, on board. they helped the gibraltar authorities, the law enforcement there. i am told there was, the
12:27 pm
military say there was a benign environment, no shots fired. they managed to seize the ship and it is now under their control in the gibraltar authorities control. now under their control in the gibraltar authorities controlm this about sanctions on syria or sanctions on iran? this is about sanctions on iran? this is about sanctions on iran? this is about sanctions on syria. eu sanctions. remember, gibraltar part of the eu. this is about the eu imposed sanctions on syria because of what i have done in that civil war, because of the actions of the regime. it is a good question to ask because clearly there are sanctions too on iran, which have come into place much more recently. that has been led by the us, the eu has been relu cta nt to led by the us, the eu has been reluctant to follow to the same extent because of the iran nuclear deal. but essentially these are two countries which are being watched very, very closely. and that is why they were tracking this particular ship. interesting as well that you suggest this is clearly not the first time that something like this has happened ?
12:28 pm
first time that something like this has happened? yes, so the reports are that this particular ship, grace one, was taking oilfrom iran again. documents were forged to suggest it took oilfrom iraq, which documents were forged to suggest it took oil from iraq, which was documents were forged to suggest it took oilfrom iraq, which was not under embargo. and then took it to china. this would have been breaking us sanctions, not us sanctions. —— eu. clearly they were keeping an eye on this particular ship. jonathan beale. he's been described as the most important scientific thinker in the world, and his work has led to what we understand about climate change today. now james lovelock is about to celebrate his 100th birthday. mishal husain went to meet him. james lovelock is about to celebrate his 100th birthday. he is one of the world's most influential environmental thinkers. time is getting shorter, and if we go doing silly things like global warming, it gets even shorter still.
12:29 pm
i think that scientists are a bit like artists... in the 1960s, he was an eco—pioneer who invented supersensitive testing devices which detected atmospheric pollutants. nasa used his equipment to test for life on mars. when you put forward your views about what the search for life might look like, how was it received? it was received very roughly. in fact, the biologists complained to the management in nasa, said, what are you doing upsetting all these biologists? nasa's employing them at great expense, and here are you telling them that what they're doing is a lot of rubbish. and so — what would you do instead? his revolutionary gaia theory argues that life does more than adapt to the earth. it changes the earth to its own purposes. today, he calls himself an engineer first, and is very proud of his inventions. so what is this? that's a palladium transmodulator. is this what you came up with at very short notice... yes.
12:30 pm
..when nasa sort of set you a challenge? that's my life. the electron capture detector. it worked like a dream. it could analyse incredibly small quantities of certain compounds. his new book, novacene, argues that we are entering a new age, where artificial intelligence systems take over. artificial intelligence, i reckon, will be 10,000 times faster in thinking than we are. it's a new form of life that evolved. and a new form of life that you think will, in the fullness of time, be much more intelligent than we are, and supersede us? yes. if supersede is the right word. we are all necessary. so does all of this fit into the theory that you're best known for, the gaia hypothesis, that the earth is a self—regulating entity?
12:31 pm
is this the next stage of that, if you like? yes, the earth is in a really in a rather dodgy position, looked at astronomically. i think we should just stop burning fossil fuel. i think it's a crazy, daft, very dangerous thing to do, but we continue to do it, because there's so much money invested in it. they could have — use nuclear energy quite safely, without worrying the planet at all. james lovelock, happy 100th birthday. thank you very much. thank you, thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom to matt taylor. and afternoon. blue sky, sunny and warm across many parts of england and wales again. temperatures higher than yesterday, but a different story for scotla nd than yesterday, but a different story for scotland and northern
12:32 pm
ireland, lots of cloud around, rain again in some parts as well. temperatures in the teens here, but in the mid—20s across much of england and wales. tonight, mist and fog patches, more of a breeze further north. some of the bible is off for a further north. some of the bible is offfora time, further north. some of the bible is off for a time, and it should not be a cool night at all, ten to 15 celsius. it will be a friday full of sunshine again across southern areas, maybe more in the wake of high cloud around. the odd shower just about possible in scotland and northern ireland. writing up in the hebrides later. temperatures still in the teens in the north—west, 27 or 28 in the teens in the north—west, 27 or28 in the in the teens in the north—west, 27 or 28 in the south east corner. fresher air is on the way to all of us fresher air is on the way to all of us into the weekend. 12 showers for england and wales, but mostly a dry weekend with variable cloud and sunshine.
12:33 pm
good afternoon. the headlines: the bookmakers, william hill, says it will shut nearly a third of its shops in the uk, putting a,500 jobs at risk. the firm blames the government's clampdown on fixed odds betting terminals jeremy hunt and borisjohnson have been challenged to prioritise the crisis in social care if they become prime minister. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays
12:34 pm
in giving them treatment for sepsis, research by bbc news has found. royal marines in gibraltar board an oil tanker, suspected of transporting iranian crude to syria, in breach of sanctions. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, has repeated his warning that china will face serious consequences if it fails to honour hong kong's high level of autonomy from beijing. china is warning the uk not to interfere in its domestic affairs after the foreign secretary jeremy hunt repeated his warning about "serious consequences" if freedoms in hong kong are watered down. tensions between the uk and china have been rising since mr hunt backed demonstrators during large pro—democracy protests in the territory. beijing's ambassador in london has accused the uk of having a "colonial mindset". our correspondent, ben ando,
12:35 pm
sent us the latest on the growing diplomatic row from the chinese embassy in london. the situation is very tense. at the moment there seems to be no sign of that tension decreasing. we are used to the chinese being very circumspect, very nuanced in their approach to diplomatic language. here they are being very clear. their message is simply that britain should butt out. as far as they're concerned, hong kong is a domestic issue. that is not how it is seen in westminster in the foreign office. for more than 150 years, hong kong was a british colony. it was returned to chinese rule in 1997, with the caveat that the people they would continue to enjoy some of the freedoms and civil liberties that they had become used to. now it's changes being proposed by beijing, particularly around extradition, that is causing all the problems. people in hong kong are worried that political dissidents could be more easily extradited to mainland china than they have been in the past. that is what has caused these quite
12:36 pm
violent demonstrations. at the moment in hong kong it seems things have calmed down a little bit. here though, the rhetoric remains high. foreign secretaryjeremy hunt is continuing to say the chinese should respect the civil liberties. and in turn, the chinese are saying that it is really none britain's business. ballot papers are due to be sent out in the conservative party leadership election this week — and by the end of the month a new prime minister will have moved into downing street. boris johnson and jeremy hunt are the contenders, but where do they stand on key issues? over the next couple of days, they stand on key issues? we're going to be taking a closer look at both men, starting with the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt. here's our political correspondent, ian watson. he has been an mp for 1a years, a government minister for nine, but number ten is where jeremy hunt wants to be. and now, only borisjohnson stands on his way. i'm saying i am trustworthy, and i do believe that
12:37 pm
i can be trusted. but to trust someone, you need to know a little more about them. jeremy hunt first got involved in conservative politics when he was at oxford. before becoming an mp, he started a public relations agency, then a publishing company, and he is keen to brandish his business credentials. as an entrepreneur... i'm an entrepreneur... ..entrepreneur by background. he was close to david cameron, and was made olympics minister in a coalition government, where he got to see a lot of his future leadership rival. not everything has gone smoothly forjeremy hunt. he was the longest—serving health secretary since the nhs was created, and he was embroiled in a conflict withjunior doctors, leading to theirfirst strike in a0 years. under theresa may, jeremy hunt took on extra responsibility for social care. hello, it'sjeremy... and his strategy in the contest seems to be to admit mistakes and try to move on. some of the cuts in social care did go too far. it's so easy to say of course i was right.
12:38 pm
but you stand back and think, could i have done it a little bit better? and jeremy has not been afraid of saying exactly that. hello, i'mjeremy... jeremy hunt campaigned for remain in the referendum, but now says he wants to leave the eu with a new brexit deal. jeremy hunt's critics accused him of being the windsock candidate, blowing this way and that on brexit. not long after the referendum, he said he would consider having another one. then he made it clear he was a leaver, but did not want to exit the eu without a deal. now, he says he is prepared to leave without a deal if need be. the big thing thatjeremy hunt has to offer on brexit is his ability to negotiate, and his credibility as a negotiator. the downside is, because he voted remain, will the people in parliament trust him to deliver brexit? thank you all very much indeed. jeremy hunt's supporters say his opponent is gaffe—prone. but the foreign secretary, despite spending two years teaching injapan, managed to misplace his wife's nationality. also, my wife is japanese... my wife is chinese, sorry.
12:39 pm
critics ofjeremy hunt say he has less name recognition than his opponent. but is this really true? because he has had to contend with embarrassing mispronunciations of his four—letter surname. ijust think he possibly finds it slightly amusing, and sometimes things happen in one's life. these things sort of take hold. i am sure he will remember the nationality of his wife in future. he says he is a serious candidate for serious times. jeremy hunt — remember the name, and how to pronounce it. and tomorrow we'll focus on the other candidate in the leadership race, borisjohnson. let's return now to news that patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in treatment for sepsis. hospitals are supposed to put
12:40 pm
patients on an antibiotic drip within an hour when sepsis is suspected, but research by the bbc suggests a quarter of patients in england are waiting longer. earlier i spoke to sarah hamilton—fairley, executive director of the charity sepsis trust uk. she says more needs to be done to ensure patients are treated quickly. the point about sepsis is that if it is diagnosed early untreated quickly, a lot of patients will survive. currently, there are a quarter of a million people contracting sepsis every single year in the uk and over 50,000 of those lose their lives. not knowing at the time that they have contracted it because it is a hidden illness for some? absolutely. sometimes called the silent killer and a number of people still don't know what it is. i was people still don't know what it is. iwas ina people still don't know what it is. i was in a car coming this morning andi i was in a car coming this morning and i asked the driver if he knew what it was and he had never heard
12:41 pm
of it. we have got a long way to go. what does this mean the messages to both the medical profession but also to each of us who might have a suspicion that we might have something wrong? there are two strands to that and it is important we wa ke strands to that and it is important we wake up those health professionals who are not thinking about sepsis was our strapline for the general public is, just ask, could this be sepsis? we don't want to create an avalanche of people going into a&e, because that could disrupt the system but we do when people were seriously worried to ask theirgp, people were seriously worried to ask their gp, a&e, 111, could this be sepsis? because that could set their thinking quicker perhaps about weather it could be. that could be after a cut or an insect bite which sta rts after a cut or an insect bite which starts to behave in a way you would not have expected. exactly. and going to the dentist, an abscess was copied doesn't have to be that you
12:42 pm
are in hospital and it is you —— it is pneumonia, it could be anything. it is any age, we see people from all walks of life being troubled by sepsis was up the difference clearly is that time element. if you attack it early, if there is an antibiotic drip attached to you within an hour orso, drip attached to you within an hour or so, then your chances of survival are or so, then your chances of survival a re pretty or so, then your chances of survival are pretty good? absolutely and that is why it is encouraging that 75%, and three quarters of hospital trusts are treating it within the first hour. but that actually means that one in four are not. we have got to close that gap. the focus is on that one in four to learn from the three and four? absolutely. and with government support? does that have to play a role? there are things we have to do better. the first is raise awareness, we are trying to encourage big companies,
12:43 pm
universities and corporate to spread the word to their immunities. we are trying to work with government to produce what is well overdue, which isa produce what is well overdue, which is a registry, basically a database of accurate data on anyone who is going through the journey of sepsis. at the moment, we don't have that. it is really pretty shocking that we don't. that is what we are talking to the secretary of state about and we have his support in principle that they should happen as a matter of priority. that was sarah hamilton fa i rley of priority. that was sarah hamilton fairley talking about sepsis. the second network rail operator that was killed by a train yesterday whilst working on the line between port talbot and bridgend has been named as michael ‘spike' lewis.
12:44 pm
in a statement issued by british transport police, they said: "he was known by everyone, and loved by everyone. "we would like to thank everyone so much for their support during this difficult time and ask that we are now given the space we need to grieve." mike lewis was 58. gareth delbridge, 6a, known as "gazza", was an "absolute staunch" kenfig hill rfc supporter and was well known at the club. the second man to have died in the accident, his name has now been released. one in ten people admitted to hospital in the uk is dependent on alcohol, according to a new study. researchers at king's college london are calling for universal screening for alcohol—related problems and more trained staff to offer support. last year, the nhs announced plans to put care teams into the hospitals with the highest alcohol—related admissions. more than a million people living onjapan's southern island of kyushu have had to leave their homes as torrential rain
12:45 pm
continues to cause disruption. the extreme weather has raised the risk of floods and mudslides, with authorities warning that a major disaster could happen at any time. last year, 200 people were killed after heavy rain devastated the west of the country. the headlines on bbc news: the bookmakers william hill are to shut nearly a third of their shops in the uk, putting a,500 jobs at risk. the firm blames the government's clampdown on fixed odds betting terminals jeremy hunt and borisjohnson have been challenged to prioritise the crisis in social care if they become prime minister. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis, research by bbc news has found. the next prime minister should give more money to vulnerable children.
12:46 pm
that's according to the children's commissioner for england, anne longfield. new research from the children's commissioners office estimates that one in five children living in england are growing up in difficult family situations. this is the third annual report on the most vulnerable children. it also says that more than 800,000 children aren't getting support and are being let down by services. earlier i spoke to anne longfield, the children's commsioner for england. she says she's concerned that little progress is being made. what this report establishes is that there are a huge one in five children in this country that are living vulnerable lives and living in vulnerable family situations. these are children living with complex problems at home, high levels of dependency on drugs or alcohol, high levels of domestic violence and severe mental health conditions within the family. from the start, these families are facing huge challenges and what is really important this year is that we have been able to map this against the support they are receiving. two thirds of those children are receiving no discernible support, and a third of them
12:47 pm
are almost invisible to services. this is a situation where really vulnerable children are getting very little help indeed. why do you say the support is not apparently forthcoming? this is one of the biggest issues, around children not being identified, which is the reason we are doing this work, to show how many children are carrying these hidden vulnerabilities. what we are also seeing within local authorities, who have tighter budgets, is that even though more money is being spent, it is being spent on fewer and fewer children as levels of crisis and levels of demand increase and councils have to spend on very high cost individual children. this one council we found in our study, where 20% of the budget is spent on the very highly complex treatment forjust ten children. of course, the impact of that is that the help for those
12:48 pm
children with less severe problems is fading away. when you put your concerns to government, as no doubt you have, what response do you get? there is a growing understanding that there is an increasing problem here with vulnerable children and crisis for children, but i think the government finds it hard to work out quite where to intervene. the make—up of government, the way it is, isn't conducive to children. it is in an area where there is already an established area of high spend or priority, and that is what needs to change. we think it is normal in this country do plan to meet the needs of rail travel or roads for ten or 20 years in advance. the nhs has a ten—year plan. there is nothing like this for children, and that means that a fifth of all children are being let down with unfulfilled not only childhoods but potentially adult lives as a result. in which case, that make
12:49 pm
you reflect on the message you are put into government, in terms of convincing them they have to put your issues at the top of their priority list, where perhaps in the past they have not? certainly i think these need to be seen as a hot issue, not something that can be put away for the days when everything else is fixed. understandably, people can see the headlines that come out as a consequence of this and partly for me it's aboutjoining those thoughts and showing what actually will happen to those vulnerable children. i have been in these studios talking about gangs and violence around children's mental health — these are the impacts of those vulnerabilities. for all of the prospective candidates and indeed opposition leaders that are putting forward tax cuts of many millions of pounds a year or cuts in tuition fees, they need to be able to justify how they will go ahead with that and not invest in the millions of children that rely
12:50 pm
on it so badly. cuba is feeling the economic effects of the trump administration's latest sanctions — tourism especially. since the announcement from washington that american cruise ships would once again be banned from visiting the island, noticeably fewer tourists are making the trip. from havana, will grant. it was a fitting metaphor. when the empress of the seas pulled out of havana's port last empress of the seas pulled out of hava na's port last month, empress of the seas pulled out of havana's port last month, it marked the definitive end of the obama policy of engagement with cuba. under the trump administration, it will be the last us ship to dock on the island for the foreseeable future. it is all in stark contrast to the jubilant scenes three years ago. in may 2016, i travelled amid the excitement and celebration on the excitement and celebration on the dona, the first cruise ship in 50 yea rs the dona, the first cruise ship in 50 years to make the short trip
12:51 pm
across the straits. it is now estimated that hundreds of thousands of tickets to cuba will go on used, hitting the tourism industry hard, particularly tour guides and taxi drivers. i think it is pretty unjust because honestly the problems the us government have with the government of cu ba government have with the government of cuba shouldn't mean that we have to suffer the consequences. translation: i am against this policy because people should be free to visit whatever country they like. restau ra nt to visit whatever country they like. restaurant owners will be hurt to come notjust by the cancellation of cruise ships but also tighter rules on us visitors in general. this first runt once entertained resident obama during happier times. we are at about 80% capacity at the moment. just six tables were occupied yesterday and i'm one of the fortu nate yesterday and i'm one of the fortunate one micro, people know is
12:52 pm
because we were visited by president obama during his visit. there are other rest rooms that have not had a single visitor recently. there can be fewer better symbols than the changing policy than this. days ago, there were us cruise ships in the port, now there is the russian navy. the trump administration's squeeze on cuba is intended to hurt it where it will feel it most, in its nascent tourism industry. the stated reason? to punish the island for its support for venezuela. cu ba ns for venezuela. cubans had hoped the friendship under obama would last. instead, the trumpet ministration is determined to cut the island off anyway at camp, including by c. will grant, bbc news, havana. the newest airport in the world opens in the uk today. carlisle lake district airport — or cax for short — will operate flights for tourists and local workers. our correspondent sarah corker
12:53 pm
was there for us this morning. this is the uk's newest airport. ca rlisle lake district was officially opened this morning and, at 8am, the first passenger flight for more than 25 years took off and it was headed for dublin. initially, there will be 28 flights a week to dublin, belfast city and london southend. jonathan hinkles is from loganair, who will be operating these services. what have sales been like so far? really strong, we are really encouraged by the take—up that we've seen. the first flights today are going out nearly full on all three of our flights to dublin, belfast and london southend. the bookings that we've been seeing at loganair are absolutely superb and we are extremely pleased. there have been no commercial passenger flights since 1993 because they weren't viable. what's changed ? i think a lot has changed in the way that people fly, but also a lot has changed in the way that regional airports work. customers who have been using regional airports have been finding them convenient,
12:54 pm
being able to get through them quickly, check in and get through without the hassle that's associated with big airports, and that's something that's really valuable to them. so more and more people are using regional airports, and that's great to see, particularly here at carlisle lake district airport today. kate willard is here with us as well from the stobart group, who owns and operates this airport. is there really a need for it? train links to this area are really good, there's intense competition from airports in manchester and newcastle. will people actually use these flights? they will. it's really interesting, isn't it? our visitor economy is really important here in cumbria and the lake district but, if you think about it, if you live in essex or in east london, it's very difficult to come up to the lake district, it takes a long time by train, you've got to get around london, you wouldn't drive up on a friday night for a weekend because that would be an eight—hour drive. if you can nip along to london southend airport by train, jump on a plane, you will be having your first pint in ullswater before the sun goes down. so we are certainly opening up the visitor economy to new visitors who haven't been here before. i think that's a great opportunity
12:55 pm
for our visitor economy. carlisle lake district airport is very much open for business, but there are of course environmental concerns — questions over whether there should be more dommestic flights at a time when the uk is trying to reduce the impact of climate change. in a moment it's time for the one o'clock news with ben brown but first it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. good afternoon. another blue sky and particular warm day for parts of england and wales today. different parts of scotland and northern ireland. satellite images show the cloud has been advancing that further southwards compared with yesterday, still some breaks for the south—east of scotland and northern ireland, but these will disappear at times this afternoon as well. further south, loose guys overhead and temperatures higher than yesterday, peaking in the mid—20s for the vast majority, slightly cooler on the coast. northern england clouds over more this
12:56 pm
afternoon, some sunny spells. great conditions for scotland, breezy conditions for scotland, breezy conditions as well and outbreaks of rain. some of that will reach the east of scotland at times, but the bulk will be over highlands and the hebrides, whereas there will be brighter spells for shipment later. —— for shetland later. by and large, it will get that little bit milder night by night at the moment and temperatures stay in double figures in scotland and northern ireland. the breeze and cloudy still here for tomorrow. brightness for the east of scotland. more rain returns across the north of the mainland and the islands. much of england and wales, particularly wales, the midlands and south southern england, temperjust could climb another degree or two to 28 celsius. in the fresh error
12:57 pm
scotland, but will work southwards into saturday. not a huge amount on it, but this is where it is to start the weekend, parts of wales in the north midlands was not to see some patchy rain and drizzle working towards the south. could we see our first rain of wimbledon? it is a close—run thing. feeling fresher thanit close—run thing. feeling fresher than it has done over the past few days. by brightening up further north and more sunshine for northern ireland and scotland. into sunday, most places. with some sunny spells with some cloud building up. the isolated shower here and there, particularly southern and western parts of finland and wales. temperatures where they should be for the time of year, between 18 and 22 celsius was not goodbye for now.
12:58 pm
12:59 pm
1:00 pm
evidence that patients' lives are being put at risk by a delay in treating them for sepsis. this baby is among the victims of the so called hidden killer. campaigners are calling for quicker treatment. we need to ensure that resources are applied to this. we need to ensure that the new standards for emergency departments accurately measure what's happening for patients with sepsis, and we need to ensure that the government and the statutory bodies do more to allow doctors to deliver this care at the right time. we'll be live with our health editor. also this lunchtime... william hill blames the clamp—down on fixed odds betting machines as it closes hundreds of shops — threatening four and a half thousand jobs an armed policeman says he shot dead the leader of the london bridge

136 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on