Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 4, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 3: william hill blames new restrictions on fixed odds betting for its plans to close hundreds of shops — but critics say problem gambling had to be tackled. i think william hill should be hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 2: apologising both to the staff william hill blames new restrictions on fixed odds brought in for this racket and to betting for its plans to close all the punters, many of whom have hundreds of shops — but critics say problem gambling had to be tackled. gambling debts, lost theirjobs, i think william hill should be broke up their own families. apologising both to the staff a challenge to the conservative leadership candidates to prioritise brought in for this racket and to the crisis in social all the punters, many of whom have care if they become pm, as peers call for a free, gambling debts, lost theirjobs, broke up their own families. nhs—based, system. patients' lives are being put a challenge to the conservative leadership candidates to prioritise at risk because of delays in giving the crisis in social care, them treatment for sepsis — this baby is among the victims if they become pm — as peers call for a free, of the so—called hidden killer. nhs—based, system. patients‘ lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving coming up on afternoon them treatment for sepsis — this baby is among the victims of the so—called hidden killer. live, all the sport. coming up on afternoon live and frank lampard back in a place he
2:01 pm
knows rather well. frank lampard all the sport — will perry. and reaction to frank lampard's back at chelsea and we will have the appointment at chelsea. latest from wimbledon. frank is back at the bridge. britain's harriet dart is ino the 3rd round, she'll lampard returns to chelsea face the world number1 as their head coach, ashleigh barty next. the club he spent 13 years dan evans hasjust booked his place at as a player. in round 3 and frank lampard has more on that and the latest from wimbledon where britain's harriet dart is into the 3rd round. thanks, will. and helen willetts and helen is here with all the has all the weather. how long will it stay dry? it is not weather. for the rest of the week like this for all and in about half here in the south, it gets a little an hour's time bit fresher over the weekend but i like this for all and in about half an hour ‘s time i will tell you what is happening in the east of asia. will tell you all about eastern asia tornados and flash flooding and i where it is far from settled just will have more in half an hour. before half past. also coming up: also coming up: gateway to the lakes — gateway to the lakes — passenger flights to carlisle return passenger flights to carlisle return after a 25 year absense. after a 25 year absense.
2:02 pm
hello everyone — hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. this is afternoon live. the betting group william hill has the betting group william hill has said it will close around 700 shops across the uk — putting more than a,500 said it will close around 700 jobs at risk. the company blamed the closures on the government's decision to cut shops across the uk — the maximum stake on fixed odds putting more than 4,500 betting terminals from £100 jobs at risk. the company blamed the closures to £2 in april. on the government's decision to reduce the maximum stake on fixed campaigners, who argued odds betting terminals from 100 the terminals were encouraging addiction, have welcomed the news. pounds to 2 pounds in april. sir peter bottomley mp was on the all parliamentary group sir peter bottomley mp that looked into fixed odd betting was on the all parliamentary group terminals. that looked into fixed 0dd betting he says the government's changes terminals. were sensible and william hill he says the government's changes should be apologising for the damage were sensible and william hill should be apologising for the damage caused by the machines. caused by the machines. everyone thinks it is sensible to everyone thinks it is sensible bring the state down from £100 to £2 to bring the stake down from £100 to £2 and if that means william hill and if that means william hill stop ripping off gamblers who cannot stopped ripping off gamblers who control their habit, cannot control their habit, the the sooner the better and it should sooner cannot control their habit, the sooner the better and it should have have happened years ago. i think william hill should be happened years ago. william hill should be apologising both to the apologising both to the staff staff brought in for this terrible they've brought in for this terrible racket and to all the punters, many racket and to all the punters, of whom have gambling debts, lost many of whom have gambling debts, their own jobs, lost their ownjobs,
2:03 pm
broke up their families. of whom have gambling debts, lost their ownjobs, broke of whom have gambling debts, lost their own jobs, broke up of whom have gambling debts, lost their ownjobs, broke up their of whom have gambling debts, lost their own jobs, broke up their own it is about time this happened, families. it is about time this it should never be allowed happened, it should never be allowed for william hill and others in this for william hill and others to do country to do what they were not what they were not allowed to do in allowed to do in ireland. the government in power didn't ireland. government didn't intend this rash of betting shops to come intend this rash of betting shops to come up in the poorest areas up this rash of betting shops to come up in the poorest areas in the high in the high streets and because of the limitations streets and because implementations on the number of machines, on the number of machines, they often on the number of machines, they they often had their own shops a few ofte n ha d on the number of machines, they often had their own shops a few doors away from each other, doors away from each other, trying trying to bring in the vulnerable, to bring in the vulnerable, the poor the poor and the gullible. and the gullible. sol to bring in the vulnerable, the poor and the gullible. so i would say to those working for william hill, i so i would say to those working for william hill, hope you find a good job and so to i hope you find a good job, and say to william hill, william hill, why don't you get the why don't you get the high street high street betting back onto the betting back onto the horses, the dogs, football matches, horses, the dogs, football matches, don't rely on a couple of anonymous machines. don't rely on anonymous machines. those are the crack they are the crack cocaine of gambling. cocaine of gambling. with me now is tom blenkinsop, from the union well we can now speak representing betting to dr carolyn downs, shop workers, community. a senior lecturer specialising let's deal with some of those in sociological and business—based approaches to gambling criticisms that we heard there from at lancaster university. sir peter bottomley, the crack cocaine of betting, these fixed odds thank you forjoining us. just how
2:04 pm
terminals. how much of an expansion much of a problem according to has there been and how much is that research are these gambling to blame for what your workers are machines? well, we haven't done the 110w to blame for what your workers are now facing? the industry for some research in the uk on this but in time has been lobbying hard against canada that they found that 60% of legislation which brought down the the income from these sorts of minimum stake to £2, however we have been making the argument that if the machines come from problem gamblers, similar figures industry was aware of this, it machines come from problem gamblers, similarfigures have been found in should have put in implements to australia as well, so they are a make sure our members were having problem because they are very packages put in place in case of attractive to problem gamblers. all this scenario where the industry is of the betting companies predicted that once the stakes were reduced, wanting to close 700 shops at they would be in a position of william hill with over a500 jobs at shutting stores because the take would go down significantly. because risk. i think the industry is moving problem gamblers won of because not because of legislation which it machines have a rapid rate of play has been aware of for some time, it but they have high stakes. so the has been aware of for some time, it has been aware of for some time, it has been moving because gambling has been moving to an online habit as opposed to a traditional habit in betting shops. quite how realistic problem is caused by them and of is it to focus more on the dub course we knew that once the stakes tracks, horse tracks, there is more we re course we knew that once the stakes were reduced, there would be no need traditional places where people can for so many betting shops. there was place bets that we are used to
2:05 pm
a rapid expansion in the number of using? the betting shop has been on shops. why was that? that was the high street. the one—to—one because the regulations that each shop could only have four machines. relationship has been able to the gambling company is rapidly mitigate some of the problem realised they could get round that by having several shops on the high gambling. gambling between races is street and again, more research has very different to what has been shown shops are heavily clustered in the poorest areas because poorer happening in betting shops. a lot of people are more vulnerable to developing gambling problems and so the members, mainly women in areas of course you want your shops where where there isn't much employment they're going to attract the punters have been working for william here who are going to put in plenty of for many years and if the industry money. this has led to significant we re for many years and if the industry were aware of potential consequences of this legislation between the two levels of debt, hardship, marriage of this legislation between the two of them, they should have been break—up and sadly cases of suicide. meeting to mitigate the what is to stop, if the fixed odds circumstances we are now in. how do you expect that loyalty then to be betting machines are no longer of regarded as you enter this appeal because you can only bet £2 ata time, consultation process aboutjob appeal because you can only bet £2 at a time, what is to stop problem losses ? gamblers just turning to the consultation process aboutjob losses? with any negotiation, the best way for that employee to be internet? i think that is what problem gamblers will do but of protected from the employer ‘s worst course what is to stop there being actions is collective bargaining. more regulation as well to actually
2:06 pm
william hill should be meeting with improve the situation, because we us william hill should be meeting with us to stop proper collective consultation not just are not going to make gambling us to stop proper collective consultation notjust the us to stop proper collective illegal, that would be foolish to consultation not just the statutory minimum but as we have seen, whether suggest, but we can have a much better regulated system, so i think it be ladbrokes, or william hill now, they want to plough on a path that really the regulation needs which is nothing to do with root and branch overhaul to make legislation, more to do with their sure it is fit for the purpose wider long—term industrialjourney because online gambling is equally which is to move more online and as dangerous as the betting shops have less of a footprint on the high with the machine. what contribution street. because it is cheaper that way. but how realistic is that when do the gambling companies themselves make to trying to address addiction? you look at so many aspects of modern life which are moving online, well, the regulation is that the not just betting shops modern life which are moving online, notjust betting shops but other polluter pays so the idea is the retail companies to? it is very gambling industry should pay for interesting. that move has already happened for the last ten years and research, education and treatment of peter bottomley is right to talk problem gamblers. the nhs has almost about problem gambling as a no provision for treating problem phenomenon but there are far more problem gamblers now who are betting gamblers. currently gambling online rather than traditionally. companies are supposed to donate 0.1% of their profits every year and the industry will probably see more most do not donate an gambler where likely the opening of arcades.
2:07 pm
struggle to make it up to 10 instead of having a limited number of force in a betting shop, you will million. that is insufficient to see arcades with much more because deal with a50,000 adult problem of the stakes are being brought down gamblers never mind the 55,000 under toa minimum of the stakes are being brought down to a minimum with minimum staffing as well, so you're not going to 16 problem gamblers that we also eradicate them on the high street or have in the uk. we havejust seen problem gambling, all you are doing that the five biggest gambling is shifting the burden and companies have announced they will responsibility which is not donate 1% of their profits, so that justifiable upon the work force and that workforce in areas where there will allow the amount of money to be is scant of employment at the available to rise up to £60 million per year available to rise up to £60 million peryear in available to rise up to £60 million moment. thank you very much for per year in five years' time. one coming in. has to say, well, are theyjust do council leaders have challenged whoever is the next prime minister to publish long—delayed this to prevent further regulation? plans for social care before i hope not, i hope it is they the party conferences begin in mid—september. and a house of lords committee has generally want to do something but said that £8 billion not only do we need more money to a year must be spent to raise the adult social care system allow more effective treatment and to an acceptable standard. research and education, but also we do need in fact to look at the it follows a day of pledges regulation as well. thank you very from the tory leadership candidates on other issues as diverse as fox hunting and police recruitment. much for talking to us. some helena wilkinson reports. borisjohnson‘s message... breaking news regarding that tanker
2:08 pm
make me your next prime minister and i will keep you safe. that was intercepted at the request he says he will do it by recruiting thousands more of the gibraltar authorities. you officers at a cost of around £1 billion, one of his many spending will recall that the british royal commitments. marines seized an oil tanker in i have just talked to a load gibraltar today. this tanker was of police and crime commissioners, they are doing accused of bringing oil to syria in a fantasticjob but they want more violation of eu sanctions. well, police officers out on the streets so we think we can get 20,000 more iran has now summoned the british police officers with this funding ambassador in tehran over what they and keep driving down crime. regard as the illegal seizure of away from bobbies on this tanker. this estate tv in iran the beach, the other candidate in this race has been talking about an altogether different issue. creating a foreign ministry jeremy hunt told the telegraph spokesperson, it was a very dramatic he would offer mps a step of course which could escalate free vote on whether to lift the ban the confrontation between western on fox hunting in england and wales, countries and iran. we were looking but he made it clear it is not his priority. at pictures of a helicopter at night hovering over this enormous vessel the law is not going to change on fox hunting. there is into majority in the house of commons and as those marines, there we are, we i don't see there ever being one. can see the helicopterjust to the i was just restating left of the picture, just above that our position from
2:09 pm
our manifesto in 2017 oil tanker. the united states had there should be a free vote if it ever looks like also wanted to see this happen that majority would change. both candidates are also being challenged because of the actors involved, but over how they will tackle iran summoning the british care for the elderly. ambassador in tehran over what it the committee of peers has published regards as the illegal seizure of a report into social this oil tanker. care, saying repeated promises by those in power have come council leaders have challenged to nothing and there needs to be whoever is the next prime minister to publish long—delayed a move towards plans for social care before a free nhs based system. the party conferences begin in mid—september. and a house of lords committee has my committee consists said that £8 billion a year must be spent to raise of two former chancellors, the adult social care system we have been able to sort this to an acceptable standard. it follows a day of pledges in six months and make from the tory leadership candidates sensible recommendations. on other issues as diverse as fox i would hope anyone hunting and police recruitment. of goodwill would read this report and realise urgent helena wilkinson reports. borisjohnson's message... action is needed now. make me your next prime minister no more talk, no more discussions, and i will keep you safe. just do it. he says he will do it by recruiting both candidates have spoken about the need to take action on social care, thousands more officers at a cost but the question is whether it will of around £1 billion, one of his many be enough and in time. as the current prime spending commitments. minister found out at the last general election, social
2:10 pm
care can be a difficult political i have just talked to a load issue, and with brexit continuing to drown of police and crime commissioners, everything else out, just how they are doing a fantasticjob much would both but they want more police actually be able to do? helena wilkinson, bbc officers out on the streets, so we think we can get 20,000 more news, westminster. police officers with this funding vicki young, our chief political correspondent, and keep driving down crime. is in westminsterfor us. away from bobbies on the beat, the other candidate in this race has been talking social care first. how much more pressure does this put onjeremy about an altogether different issue. hunt given the fact that quite jeremy hunt told the telegraph recently, until quite recently, that he would offer mps a free vote was part of his brief?|j on whether to lift the ban on fox recently, until quite recently, that was part of his brief? i think it does although when you look back at hunting in england and wales, the history of social care plans, i but he made it clear don't think it can all be put at his it is not his priority. door. it really is a huge failure of the law is not going to change on fox hunting. the political classes over very many there isn't a majority in the house yea rs. the political classes over very many years. there seems to be that they of commons and i don't see there ever being one. i was just restating our position are completely incapable of looking from our manifesto in 2017 into the longer term and sorting out that there should be a free vote if it ever looks like that this problem. today, jeremy hunt has majority would change, talked about promising more council but it isn't my priority. funding, he has said he felt the both candidates are also social care cuts have gone too far being challenged over how they will tackle care which people have said, hang on, you for the elderly.
2:11 pm
we re which people have said, hang on, you were health secretary during all of a committee of peers has published this. he thinks there should be an a report into social care. it says repeated promises by those this. he thinks there should be an opt out insurance system. boris johnson also talking about more in power have come to nothing money and saying it has to be worked and there needs to be a move out cross party, but that simply towards a free nhs—based system. hasn't worked. it always ends in my committee is all party recrimination. we have had so many and no party, consists reports, the work has been done, of two former chancellors, we have been able to sort this what this requires is political in six months and make leadership and i think the big sensible recommendations. questionmark over all of this is the i would hope that anyone of goodwill fa ct questionmark over all of this is the fact it would be expensive, this would read this report and realise report is talking about £80 billion urgent action is needed now. no more talk, no more immediately just to go report is talking about £80 billion immediatelyjust to go back to the discussions, just do it. position we had in 2010 —— £8 both candidates have spoken about the need to take billion. it is expensive, fraught action on social care, with risk because in the end, who but the question is whether it will be enough and in time. will pay? will it come out of as the current prime minister found out at the last general election, general taxation, will pay? will it come out of generaltaxation, individuals? someone has to pay and that is never social care can be a difficult political issue, and with brexit popular, so this feeds into this continuing to drown everything else media campaign, these pledges that out, just how much will both actually be able to do? keep on coming, how they are going to pay for it, will they have the helena wilkinson, bbc will to do this, to make these news, westminster. incredibly difficult decisions that have been duct for years when they let's talk now to ian hudspeth, a conservative
2:12 pm
are having to deal with the logic councillor who leads 0xfordshire county council and also chairs the lga issue of brexit. quite a wide range community wellbeing board. of subjects they are having to field questions on. it is open season, thank you very much forjoining us. they can be asked anything at any if there is one thing that you need time by anyone. how different are from a government of any complexion, their positions on issues like when it comes to social care, what is it? we need to have the green police recruitment and fox hunting? they will be faced with all sort of paper that has been delayed for two different things. in the case of and a half years published and then that means we can actually work out jeremy hunt, he was asked about the how we're going to pay for social abortion limit and said that actually he thinks it should be 12 care. our challenge to the new prime weeks, but he has no plans to make minister, whoever may be, is to that change. similarly a matter of publish the green paper within ten conscience like fox hunting, again he says he has his views about weeks before the party conference season so we can get hold of it and repealing the ban but doesn't think it isa move on and find a solution. the repealing the ban but doesn't think it is a priority and it is not secretary of state was very clear something he would necessarily that part of the delay has been pursue. when it comes to boris caused because he wants it to be johnson, he is talking about that cross— party caused because he wants it to be cross—party and there is a cross old favourite, bobbies on the beat. party in westminster, so we have he is calling for 20,000 new police said, we will facilitate talks on a officers, the kind of thing that cross— party said, we will facilitate talks on a cross—party basis because we do work does go well with the grass roots to well together across the parties and
2:13 pm
tory members but the experts looking local government and will facilitate at this and we have had that happen those talks so we can find a solution so we can find this funding today, sir tom winsor the chief gap, because it is good we are all inspector of constabulary, casting doubt saying, it is not necessarily living longer, it is fantastic, however it does mean there is more the best use of moneyjust to bring pressure on the system and what more bobbies on the beat. there are people don't understand is that other things which could make the social care is a means tested and police far more effective. they are that came across badly at the last putting ideas out there and people election and it shouldn't be a are criticising them. political issue. we need to find a solution so everybody can have good there's a warning today that social care. how important is it patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays treating them for sepsis. that social care has its own budget hospitals are meant to put patients on an antibiotic drip that social care has its own budget thatis that social care has its own budget that is separate from the nhs within an hour when sepsis is suspected, but bbc research budget? it is vital to shows a quarter of patients that is separate from the nhs budget? it is vitalto keep it in england wait longer than that. separate. we had to work closer delays can increase the likelihood of potentially fatal complications together through integrated care such as organ failure. systems, however the additional 20.5 lauren moss reports. billion for the nhs will all go if we don't have a sustainable funding situation for social care. we have a father remembering his son as a bright student with ambition got to find out how we can do it so of becoming an accountant we can have people in their own and taking care of his family. homes, care where they want it but in may 2016, amir halling went rather than putting them in places to hospital in london where they don't want to be. what
2:14 pm
after he banged his ankle and became about the situation in scotland, how unable to walk. appealing would that be then where the 39—year—old was sent home with paracetamol, your personal care costs to get but less than 2a hours later, funded by taxation even if in some he suffered cardiac arrest and died. doctors had failed to spot that amir had sepsis. cases you are left to pick up the his last words when i left him tab for accommodation or so—called in the hospital, he shook my hand hotel costs ? tab for accommodation or so—called hotel costs? again that is one of and said, "dad, i love you". theissues hotel costs? again that is one of the issues that people don't he gave me his hand, understand about social care in the i kissed him on the cheek, rest of england because if you're i kissed his forehead and i came home. assets are worth more than 23,000, i didn't realise that was the really last kiss, our last cuddle you have to pay all of it. some i would ever give to my son. system that relieves the care and sepsis is often called you system that relieves the care and y°u pay system that relieves the care and you pay for your accommodation would be interesting but what we need to the silent killer. do is have that conversation. without the green paper, without it's triggered by an infection proposals being put forward we can't and early symptoms can include have the discussion, we can't say a fast heartbeat, high or low what the options are. it might be a temperature, chills and shivering. it makes the body's immune system go form of insurance for some people into overdrive, which can but we need to have that ad was lead to septic shock, local government is facing a deficit organ failure and sometimes death. of 3.6 billion by 2025 which means figures from around three quarters
2:15 pm
of hospital trusts in england that local government won't be able suggest that one in four patients to provide other services that are isn't being started on antibiotics vital for people. within an hour when sepsis is suspected. to provide other services that are vitalfor people. if to provide other services that are vital for people. if the lords economic affairs committee is saying it's a similar picture in wales, while neither scotland there is an immediate £8 billion nor northern ireland cash injection that is required, is provided recent data. an acceptable figure, how do you william mead was just a year sell the idea that in future voters old when he died from sepsis after a chest infection. are going to have to accept that it's estimated 25,000 children taxes will have to go up to pay for develop the condition in the uk every year. that level and quality of care that in order to treat sepsis, you first have to think about it. people seem to expect?” that level and quality of care that people seem to expect? i think that and that's the problem — is one of the key thing is, that if we've got to get those health care professionals on the front people want good quality care and we line to first think it, all want good quality care, then to suspect it, to then treat it. actually we will have to pay for it and that's half of the problem. somehow and whether it be a national that's where the disconnect is. the sepsis trust has been government paying through taxes, training nhs staff to treat and deal with it quickly. local government or insurance policies, somewhere the money has we need to ensure that resources got to come from somebody. at the are applied to this. we need to ensure that the new moment if people want good quality ca re moment if people want good quality care and we all want good quality standards for emergency departments care, then actually we will have to accurately measure what's happening pay for it somehow and whether it be to patients with sepsis. national government paying through taxes, local government or insurance and we need to ensure policies, somewhere the money has that the government and statutory got to come from somebody. at the moment here. local government and bodies do more to allow councils to provide the funding doctors to deliver this which of course means we will have care at the right time.
2:16 pm
to ta ke which of course means we will have to take some really difficult in april, new guidance was issued decisions because we have to provide to all nhs trusts in england. the care for the vulnerable and elderly also the working age hospital staff are to look vulnerable adults that are growing for early signs of sepsis in population. we have to provide when a patient comes into a&e, those services which means we have and alert a senior doctor to look at other budgets and people if the patient hasn't responded question, why aren't you doing this to treatment within an hour. any trusts missing those targets or that? because we have to take really difficult decisions but we could face a financial penalty. need to have that conversation, we nhs england says huge improvements need to have that conversation, we need to have the green paper have been made and it's important published and again the secretary of not to automatically give state was clear, he wants to publish antibiotics to everyone it so we can have that debate. so who's very unwell. but amir halling's father says for the new prime minister, please he has been robbed of a son, publish within the ten weeks. thank and his family's grief cannot be healed. you for your time. lauren moss, bbc news. a firearms officer says he shot dead one of the ringleaders of the london bridge attacks a firearms officer says he shot dead because he feared he'd one of the ringleaders stab him, kill him, and get of the london bridge attacks hold of his weapons. because he feared he'd eight people died when three men stab him, kill him, and get drove a van into pedestrians on london bridge before launching hold of his weapons. a knife attack in nearby eight people died when three men borough market two years ago. drove a van into pedestrians on london bridge before launching 0ur correspondentjon donnison a knife attack in nearby borough market two years ago. is at the old bailey. 0ur correspondentjon donnison has tell us more about this firearms the latest from the old bailey. officer and what has been said.
2:17 pm
this is the first time we have heard today we have heard from three from the officers who shot and firearms officers, this is the first killed karen but, she had read one time they have given evidence, the and use of the sag above. appearing three officers who shot and killed behind a screen and identified only karen buck, rachid redouane and as offer b x a6 to protect his youssef zaghba. they appeared identity, he told the court that anonymously behind a screen, their along with two colleagues from the identity is only given as a bx a6, city of london armed response unit, a5 and aa. the court was told they there are about two to three miles we re a5 and aa. the court was told they were actually about two to three from london bridge when they heard miles from london bridge when they there had been a van attack on the heard on a radio that there had been bridge. he said he immediately a van attack on the bridge. feared the worst. this happened less than three months after the westminster bridge attacked. they 0bviously bx a6 said he immediately feared the worst, this just after arrived at borough market within a matter of minutes and onjumping out the westminster bridge attack. they of their car, he said he saw one of arrived at borough market within a the attackers turned towards him, matter of minutes. 0n jumping raise his knife and charged towards arrived at borough market within a him. he shot him dead when he was matter of minutes. 0njumping out the car, officer bx a6 says he saw just a few metres away. later we khuram bhuttt raise his knife and heard from another officer, officer run khuram bhuttt raise his knife and ru n towards khuram bhuttt raise his knife and run towards him. within seconds he had shot him, fearing that he would bx aa, he said he had also shot the be stabbed and that his weapon would
2:18 pm
attacker fearing he was going to be stabbed and that his weapon would be seized. the other two assailants sta b attacker fearing he was going to stab his colleague. he then turned we re be seized. the other two assailants were shot just seconds and shot the other two attackers. be seized. the other two assailants were shotjust seconds later. in court, the counsel for the coroner the inquest continues. said he was aware that going through the evidence was happening at a you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: snail ‘s pace, but he pointed out william hill blames new restrictions on fixed odds betting for its plans that events had just unfolded much, to close hundreds of shops — but critics say problem much quicker. in fact, from getting gambling had to be tackled. out of the car to the three men a challenge to the conservative leadership candidates to prioritise the crisis in social care, being shot was just seven seconds if they become pm — and of course at that point, it as peers call for a free, still wasn't over. the officers said nhs—based, system. they thought there might be other attackers at large, they were also patients' lives are being put aware that the three men were at risk because of delays in giving wearing what they believed at the them treatment for sepsis — time to be genuine suicide vests. so this baby is among the victims of the so—called hidden killer. some five minutes after the initial shots were fired, they fired again into khuram bhuttt when he was seen to move and again a few minutes later they shot him when he moved again. at that point the three officers began to evacuate people briton‘s harriet dot is into the third round after a win over the from within the pubs and bars close to where they were. brazilian. she will now face the
2:19 pm
world number one. and britain's stan you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: william hill blames new restrictions on fixed odds evansis betting for its plans to close world number one. and britain's stan evans is looking good for round three. he is to set up and is hundreds of shops — critics say problem serving for the match. i will be gambling had to be tackled. back with more at 230. join us then. a challenge to the conservative leadership candidates to prioritise the crisis in social care, if they become pm — as peers call for a free, british royal marine commandos have seized a supertanker nhs—based, system. suspected of breaking sanctions. they boarded the vessel off patients' lives are being put the coast of gibraltar because of it was believed at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis — to carrying crude oil to syria, this baby is among the victims in breach of eu sanctions. of the so—called hidden killer. 0ur defence correspondent isjonathan beale whojoins me now. and in sport, dan evans has booked tell us more about this vessel and his place in the third round in why it is a problem. it looks like wimbledon after a straight sets win. this vessel was tracked all the way from the middle east around the horn harriet. also reached round four. of africa, in other words the long people will question my experience way round to get to the but i am ready for that, frank mediterranean. and it seems that lampard is back at stamford bridge head today as chelsea's new coach on this tanker has been involved in a three—year contract. and in smuggling iranian oil in the past and the suspicion is that it was cricket, england are currently 97—2 doing that again. it also seems that
2:20 pm
the reason why the royal marines in the 21st over. we re the reason why the royal marines were sent in was partly because of a request from the us to intervene. so it is not just request from the us to intervene. so it is notjust about request from the us to intervene. so it is not just about where request from the us to intervene. so it is notjust about where this was a boat carrying more than 70 going, this oil which were syria and migrants has capsized off the coast the reason why that intercept of tunisia. happened while that boat was seized the tunisian red crescent said four by the royal marines along with the survivors told coast guards that the boat had sunk off zarzis. gibraltar forces was because it must one of them later died in hospital. it is the latest disaster to strike migrants trying to cross use sanctions. the americans also the mediterranean to reach europe. being worried about oil being last month, at least 65 people drowned when their boat set off from libya and sunk off exported from the us after it the tunisian coast. two rail workers who died stepped up sanctions. this is both after being hit by a passenger train about iran and syria. geopolitics in south wales have been named. 6a—year—old gareth delbridge writ large. tell us what you know and 58—year—old michael lewis, about this operation by the marines. were hit by the swansea to paddington train it happened in the early hours of near margam yesterday. the morning. we know that there was a supply ship, royal fleet auxiliary ship, a tanker that was in the area it's been described as a hidden killer. recently. that would have had there's a warning today that helicopters on board. there is now patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays treating an image that has been released by them for sepsis. hospitals are meant to put patients the royal navy, that shows the tank
2:21 pm
on an anti—biotic drip at no time with the helicopter in within an hour when sepsis the distance hovering above that. is suspected, but bbc research shows a quarter of patients the first people to board were royal in england wait longer than that. marines using fast ropes and then delays can increase the likelihood they would have been backed up by of potentially fatal complications such as organ failure. they would have been backed up by lauren moss reports. the gibraltar forces but also royal marines coming in fast boats as well. i think you can assume that there were elements of british a father remembering his son special forces involved even though as a bright student with ambition the mod policy is to never comment of becoming an accountant and taking care of his family. on that, they are giving credit to a but in may 2016, amir halling went to hospital in london four to who were the royal marines after he banged his ankle and became involved. what happens next to this unable to walk. the 39—year—old was sent vessel? it has been seized. it is in home with paracetamol, but less than 2a hours later, the view of gibraltar, in their he suffered cardiac arrest and died. waters, though the spanish think it was in their waters when it was doctors had failed to spot seized. it will be held. the crew that amir had sepsis. will be questioned but are not under his last words when i left him arrest and of course whoever owns in the hospital, he shook my hand and said, "dad, i love you". the boat and we believe it originates in singapore, could face he gave me his hand, i kissed him on the cheek, the possibility of more sanctions. i kissed his forehead thank you.
2:22 pm
two rail workers who died and i came home. after being hit by a passenger train in south wales have been named. 6a—year—old gareth delbridge i didn't realise that was the last and 58—year—old michael lewis, kiss, our last cuddle were hit by the swansea to paddington train i would ever give to my son. near margam yesterday. sepsis is often called the silent killer. a man accused of lying about a high—ranking paedophile ring — it's triggered by an infection whose allegations sparked a £2 million inquiry — and early symptoms can include has told a court about the moment a fast heartbeat, high or low when he claims a friend temperature, chills and shivering. was deliberately mown down by a car. it makes the body's immune system go into overdrive, which can carl beech denies 12 counts of perverting the course lead to septic shock, ofjustice and one of fraud. organ failure and sometimes death. june kelly reports. figures from around three quarters i heard the car. of hospital trusts in england suggest that one in four patients isn't being started on antibiotics carl beech in a police interview within an hour when claiming he'd witnessed a friend sepsis is suspected. called scott being deliberately hit it's a similar picture in wales, while neither scotland by a car — one of three boys nor northern ireland he says were murdered provided recent data. by a vip paedophile ring. william mead was just a year today, from the witness box, old when he died from sepsis with his voice occasionally after a chest infection. breaking, he repeated it's estimated 25,000 children the allegation, telling the jury... develop the condition in the uk every year. he went over the front in order to treat sepsis, of the car into the road. you first have to think about it.
2:23 pm
and that's the problem — iran over to him and tried to see we've got to get those health care if he was all right. professionals on the front his leg was dented line to first think it, in a funny direction. to suspect it, to then treat it. there was blood on his head. and that's half of the problem. i had poppies pinned to my chest. that's where the disconnect is. the sepsis trust has been training nhs staff to treat he also described to the police and deal with it quickly. having poppies pinned we need to ensure that resources to his bare chest by the group. are applied to this. we need to ensure that the new he told the jury this happened at imber, an army training standards for emergency departments accurately measure what's happening base on salisbury place. to patients with sepsis. and we need to ensure he claimed the former head of the army, lord bramall, that the government and statutory bodies do more to allow was among those present at what he called these doctors to deliver this remembrance day parties. care at the right time. carl beech says the paedophile in april, new guidance was issued to all nhs trusts in england. ring operated in london hospital staff are to look and beyond in the 1970s and ‘80s for early signs of sepsis and also involved christmas parties. when a patient comes into a&e, and alert a senior doctor if the patient hasn't responded today, he said, "we were the presents to unwrap to treatment within an hour. and they would undress us." any trusts missing those targets could face a financial penalty. he also alleged that the former home secretary lord brittan nhs england says huge improvements have been made and it's important raped him over a bath not to automatically give while holding his head underwater. antibiotics to everyone and he said he went who's very unwell. on to the yacht of the ex—prime but amir halling's father says minister sir edward heath. he has been robbed of a son,
2:24 pm
he told the court that he refused and his family's grief to go out to sea with sir edward, cannot be healed. who comforted him when he started lauren moss, bbc news. to cry. june kelly, bbc news, at newcastle crown court. iran has summoned the british high courtjudges have been told ambassador in tehran over that the former leader what is calls the "illegal seizure" of the english defence league, of an iranian oil tanker stephen yaxley—lennon, in gibraltar, according to iranian was subjectively reckless, when he broadcast defendants state tv quoting the country's in a criminal trial. foreign ministry. british royal marines seized mr yaxley—lennon, who goes the tanker on its way to syria, by the name tommy robinson, thought to be in violation is accused of contempt of court. of eu sanctions. dan johnson reports they boarded the vessel, which was suspected of carrying crude oil to the baniyas refinery in syria, off the coast from the old bailey. of gibraltar. a little earlier i spoke to our defence stephen yaxley—lennon heading back correspondent jonathan beale. to court to answer claims he committed contempt. claims that have already seen him jailed once and it seems that this tanker has been freed on appeal. to the media you involved in smuggling iranian oil in should be standing behind me on the past and the suspicion is that this. i am it was doing that again. it also should be standing behind me on this. iam being prosecuted, i have spent three months in solitary seems that the reason why the royal confinement for nothing. i broke no marines were sent in was partly because of a request from the us to law, committed no crime. iam
2:25 pm
confinement for nothing. i broke no law, committed no crime. i am at the intervene. it is notjust about crown court... he stream this live where this was going, this oil, on facebook last year. how do you which was syria and the reason why feel about your verdict? these men that intercept happened, why that boat was seized by the royal marines along with the gibraltar forces was we re feel about your verdict? these men were on trial accused of grooming and raping young women. the attorney because it passed eu sanctions. the general‘s case is this broadcast american also worried about oil breached a temporary reporting ban being exported from the us having and put at risk of their right to a stepped up its own sanctions after fair trial. he is also accused of it pulled out of that iran nuclear inciting his followers more than deal. this is both about iran and 10,000 watched live over a quarter syria. geopolitics writ large. tell ofa 10,000 watched live over a quarter of a million so it later. harass us syria. geopolitics writ large. tell us what you know about this him, find him, go knock on his door. operation by the marines. us what you know about this operation by the marinesm happened in the early hours of the morning. we know that there was a stephen yaxley—lennon is accused of unlawfully interfering with the administration ofjustice. supply ship, royal fleet auxiliary unlawfully interfering with the administration of justice. his defence is he wasn't aware of any ship, a tanker that was in the area reporting restrictions and that he had tried to check weather were in recently. that would have had helicopters on board, there is now place but the barrister here on an image that has been released by behalf of the attorney general said that was not the case and that he the royal navy. that shows the tank had acted recklessly. some of his at night time with a helicopter in the distance, hovering above that. followers were outside court this the first people to board where morning as he once again took to the
2:26 pm
stage. he has denied contempt but royal marines, from that helicopter could face up to two years back in using fast ropes and then they would have been backed up by the gibraltar prison. the hearing is expected to conclude tomorrow. forces but also royal marines coming in fast boats as well. i think you time for a look at the weather can assume that there were elements forecast and helen hasjoined us but of british special forces involved we are going miles and miles away to even though the mod policy is to china. we are. we have had some never comment on that, they are giving credit to a commander who spectacular weather. not great we re giving credit to a commander who were the royal marines involved in weather, it has caused death and this operation. what happens next destruction but i have some footage and to this vessel? it has been ofa destruction but i have some footage of a tornado. they are not rare in china but all the elements have come seized. it is in their view of together, a weather front coming gibraltar in their waters though the through some very humid and hot air. spanish think it was in their waters when it was seized. it will be held. the problem is it has hit in a city the crew will be questioned but are so the problem is it has hit in a city so usually you hear of the storms not under arrest and of course across the united states, when they whoever owns the boat and we believe it originates in singapore, could hit ina across the united states, when they hit in a major populated area, face the possibility of more obviously they are going to cause sanctions. many more problems. also been time for a look at the weather. hearing about japan as well. that is here's helen willetts. to the north. a completely separate not strictly speaking our weather situation to this mass of cloud
2:27 pm
but what is happening in china? some here. and that is bringing enormous amounts of rain which of course incredible footage. it has been very causes problems in its own right. destructive and has caused some phenomenal amount of rain which has death and destruction. this is what happened in the north—east of china. led to these landslides. more rain and because this tornado, as i say you would see in a typhoon. it is they are not rare but it has monsoon season across this part of the world and we have lots of coincided with some really warm moisture coming up from the tropics weather, the humid weather and it and with the slow moving weather has hit in a major city so it has front which we have seen, here it caused a lot of disruption as you is, it stretches southern china, and can see from these pictures here. phenomenal strength of wins so into japan at really very nasty. it is gone, thank is, it stretches southern china, and intojapan at times, is, it stretches southern china, and into japan at times, you is, it stretches southern china, and intojapan at times, you can see, a metre of rain we have seen since goodness. an entirely different friday which macy more rain but it weather system is still in that part looks like the next few days will of the world but some distance away. see the writers whether, another 300 injapan of the world but some distance away. in japan where of the world but some distance away. injapan where they are coping with a huge amount of rain. they are millimetres of rain in this part of japan. not great news. a huge swathe because it is the monsoon time of year. that whole oscillation as you it is covering. 0ur weather tha nkfully it is covering. 0ur weather can see across india here and across thankfully looks a little bit more benign. yes. we have a ridge of high indochina, and all just can see across india here and across indochina, and alljust toys in around the globe and it has been pressure that is sitting across the southern half of the uk. we had the phenomenally wet across japan. we
2:28 pm
have had more rainfall injapan than cloud further north in scotland and some rather drizzly and dank weather you would see in a month in one day and we have had enough to cause some as well. contrast with england and wales. basically unbroken sunshine devastating results, flash flooding which we will see through today and and landslides. this is in the tomorrow. there is the satellite southern part of japan. and landslides. this is in the southern part ofjapan. there is the risk of more rain to come as you picture. not all of this is rain will see on the weather forecast in bearing clouds but there is quite a just a moment across parts ofjapan, bit of cloud coming into the highlands and islands. we have got but this has what has happened. it is very slow moving at this time of hazy sunshine here. that is the situation throughout the rest of the year, pulling in all this tropical day, so you have the strongest air across southern china, sometimes sunshine, you will see the higher into taiwan, sometimes into southern temperatures getting into the mid 20s quite widely across england and korea but notably into japan and wales. away from those refreshing because it is slow moving, you get a sea breezes around the coast but the lot of rainfall in the short spaces of time. it looks like the next wet sun still as strong. largely dry across northern ireland, but as you speu of time. it looks like the next wet spell is heading towards honshu so can see for scotland, even though it again it could cause further issue is not raining throughout, it is with a months worth of rain falling cooler because you have that inafew with a months worth of rain falling in a few days. it is a bit more westerly breeze and the rain. that will pass in and pulls out as we go upbeat here. not so much rain although here we do and we have through the evening and overnight, needed the rain and we do have some the low pressure still to the rain because it is not sunshine for north—west. we might see a little all. we have had rather grey skies high cloud come southwards on that breeze but it will not bring more and cloudy, dank weather across
2:29 pm
than a little bit of cloud cover and north—west scotland whereas in it shouldn't be as chilly as last night. we got down to three or four england and wales, the sun is shining quite widely. you can see in some areas in wales last night. a bit milder with the cloud and breeze that from the satellite picture. but which again will be evident tomorrow this cloud across northern ireland, across scotland. perhaps a bit to northern england is really quite cut the cloud across northern thin, so quite decent out there but ireland, a few spots of rain. get in the rain is with us further north for the remainder of the afternoon. the south, not very much cloud at but it is warm in that sunshine and all. some strong sunshine once if you don't like the heat, head to again. tomorrow temperatures the coast because there will be some responding to that sunshine, refreshing sea breezes here both starting higher and ending higher, today and tomorrow. son stilljust getting towards the top 20 is in contrast where we have the cloud in as strong even though it is just 16. the north tomorrow, considerably cooler. and behind that cold weather not much sunshine to enjoy across front comes cooler air southwards as the north—west of scotland, we go into the weekend. by the particularly when the rain is being blown in from the atlantic. the rain weekend it doesn't look set to produce much rain but it will should ease off a little bit as we introduce more cloud for england and go through this evening and wales, but there will still be some overnight, but there is the ever present weather front because low sunshine coming through that. they pressure is just sitting to the west might produce the odd shower in and it will continue to throw pulses england and wales, by that stage, of rain through tonight and dry and brighter in scotland, tomorrow. for most of us, it
2:30 pm
northern ireland. still not that shouldn't be as cool in the south as much, but it will feel more pleasant it was last night, temperatures of with some sunshine and outside the 11 or 12 degrees. spot the breeze, which will still be with us difference tomorrow. across southern on sunday, the potentialfor a areas it will be a lovely start to breeze, which will still be with us on sunday, the potential for a few showers right on the south coast but the day, some shallow mist but it it is moving away and we will see won't last. further north perhaps temperatures getting up to the low not quite as wet but we will see 20s. still some fine weather, pulses of rain. might see some late brightness up in the far north—west certainly not a wash—out and as ever of scotla nd brightness up in the far north—west of scotland but quite cool here in there is plenty more information contrast to potentially 27 in the available on the website. more south. temperaturesjust contrast to potentially 27 in the south. temperatures just keep contrast to potentially 27 in the south. temperaturesjust keep rising at the moment but it looks like the peak in the south for this current later. speu peak in the south for this current spell of warm weather because by saturday, that cold weather front that we see bringing in the rain in the north will introduce colder air. there won't be rain left on it but they will be more cloud for england and wales on saturday, possibly the odd spot of rain but it is much drier further odd spot of rain but it is much drierfurther north. may odd spot of rain but it is much drier further north. may have noticed the wind direction, north—westerly, never a warm direction but if you're outside the
2:31 pm
wind and in the sunshine, it won't feel too bad. come sunday we still have that weather front albeit rather weak, just dragging its heels this is bbc news — along the south coast. and just some our latest headlines. william hill blames new restrictions on fixed odds betting for its plans fair weather cloud bubbling up. high to close hundreds of shops — tweens, the low 20s, about where we but critics say problem gambling had to be tackled. should be for the time of year. a couple more hot afternoons to come and then change again for the i think william hill should be weekend but for most of us, some apologising both to the staff at the very usable weather. start they have brought in fort this terrible racket and to all the punters, many of whom have got gambling debts, lost theirjobs, broke up their families. a challenge to the conservative leadership candidates to prioritise the crisis in social care, if they become pm — as peers call for a free, nhs—based, system. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis — this baby is among the victims of the so called hidden killer. sport now on afternoon live with will perry.
2:32 pm
it was the appointment everyone was expecting — frank lampard is the new head coach at chelsea. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. it isa iran has summoned the british ambassador in tehran over it is a good story, he spent 13 what is calls the "illegal seizure" of an iranian oil tanker yea rs it is a good story, he spent 13 years as it is a good story, he spent 13 yea rs as a it is a good story, he spent 13 years as a player at stamford bridge in gibraltar, according and now, a1 years old, return to the clu b and now, a1 years old, return to the to iranian state tv. club where he made his name. william hill blames new restrictions regarded as a chelsea legend. he on fixed odds betting for its plans to close hundreds of shops — left derby county to become chelsea but critics say problem head coach after leading them to the gambling had to be tackled. play—off final in the championship in his debut managerial season. he i think william hill should be signed a three—year contract succeeding maurizio sarri and says apologising, both for the staff they he is immensely proud, and cannot have brought in for there terrible wait to get started. rackets and to the punters, many of lampard is the 10th full—time manager appointed by owner roman abramovich since he bought whom have gambling debts, lost their the club in 2003, and he won't be jobs and broke up their families. making any signings any time soon a call to raise the adult with chelsea banned from bringing social care system to in new players for two an acceptable standard — transfer windows. the conservative leadership candidates are urged their first game of the season to prioritise the crisis, is against manchester united if they become pm — at old trafford on the 11th of august. as peers say they'd like to see 0ne club who can splash a free, nhs—based, system. their cash this summer sport now on afternoon is the champions manchester city, live with will perry — and that's what they've done. plenty of british interest
2:33 pm
they've broken their transfer record by bringing in midfielder rodri at wimbledon today? from atletico madrid for £62.8 million on a five—year contract. five british players in action on day a at wimbledon, he's seen as a long term successor to fernandinho. dan evans has booked his place elsewhere, leicester have in the 3rd round at signed striker ayoze perez from newcastle for £30m on a four—year deal. the all england club. he leaves st james' he beat the georgian nikoloz basilashvili in straight sets on court 2, park after five years. sealing the win by taking the tie break, he'll play the winner of marin cilic and joao sousa. plenty of time, up until the 8th of i was pretty nervous and that august, for clubs to sign players. probably showed. it means so much to get through, especially at we've got plenty of interest of wimbledon, where i have done pretty well. i just want to win matches and british interest at wimbledon this big matches at the grand slams is afternoon. what i really enjoy and that's why five british players in action on day four at wimbledon, it meant so much out there today. let's get straight over to the all england club. not such a good day for the british john watson is there for us — who's carrying the hopes of the nation? number two, though. two british players out in the admittedly, cameron norrie singles yesterday but nearly two had a very tough task against the world number seven, through two so far. kei nishikori. he lost to the japanese player absolutely. we've already had one in straight sets on centre court. and we could have a second. let's go 0n number one court right now is another brit — jay clarke. to court number two are dan evans is he's up against the eight—time
2:34 pm
champion roger federer. these are live pictures. an action against nikoloz basilashvili, he was two sets up, federer got the early break. dan basilashvili, he was two sets up, da n eva ns basilashvili, he was two sets up, dan evans and was a break—up in the third and looked to be closing this further dominating that game as we out before nikoloz basilashvili speak. you can watch this on bbc one broke back. on level pegging now, and the bbc sport website and app. certainly nikoloz basilashvili will in the women's draw, be serving here to try and level this one back up at five games all. britain's harriet dart dan evans, his best wimbledon result was the third round. his best result is into the 3rd round after a three—set win. she'll face world number one ashleigh barty next. was the third round. his best result was a couple of years ago against hoping tojoin dart in the next round is the british roger federer in 2016. roger further number one johanna konta, who's just about to get underway against katerina siniakova knocking him out then. if dan evans of the czech republic. could get through this one it would johanna konta is a—1 up in that be some study. in light of only first set. return from that drugs ban a little this one is on bbc2, as well as the bbc over one year ago. the person who is sport website and app. through, harriet dart, we will come to her any moment but let's go to frank lampard back at chelsea. cameron norrie on centre court he spent 13 years as a player at stamford bridge, now against kei nishikori, the seven frank lampard at a1 years old has seat. cameron norrie's first centre returned to the club where he made his name
2:35 pm
court appearance. he has his work and is regarded a a chelsea legend. lampard left derby county to become chelsea head coach after leading cut out, two sets down an already them to the championship play—off final in his debut been broken at the start of the managerial season. he's signed a three—year contract succeeding maurizio sarri and says third set. kei nishikori taking the he's immensly proud and can't wait to get to work. first two sets 6—a, 6—a and one lampard is the 10th full—time manager appointed by owner break—up in the third. could be roman abramovich since he bought the club in 2003 and he won't be disappointment for cameron norrie. making any signings any time soon but not for harriet dart, what a with chelsea banned from bringing performance from her, she's never in new players for two transfer windows. their first game of the season reached a grand slam thoroughbred before and produced her best is against manchester united wimbledon performance against her at old trafford on the 11th of august. brazilian opponent. great result for the former president of fifa, sepp blatter, her. what a tough test she now faces has started legal proceedings against football's governing body. the 83—year—old's time at fifa in the third round, taking on ashleigh barty, the french open ended four years ago amid a corruption scandal — and he's currently serving a six champion and the reigning number year ban from football. one. that will be a tough test for blatter says he's suing his former her. as we know, it is a bumper day employer for "moral damage", and to reclaim around 60 of his watches he says are still in fifa's possession. here, and johanna konta up later on, jay clark in action against roger federer, what a tough match for
2:36 pm
what i want to have at the end of another of the british. an rafa this procedure which are still there nadal against the curious later on. we know there has been a bit of a asiam an war of words between these two. this this procedure which are still there as i am an honest man, i am an was the dial coming through in his honest man, reputation, it was good last match. the dancers and kyrois and bad, but he was an honest man. this is what i am fighting for and it will come out. england's women are two wickets down in their ashes one—dayer against australia. shows a lack of respect and i expect tammy beaumont‘s hit a half century — she's unbeaten on 67. the war of words could continue. he england won the toss and put themselves into bat for this second did beat the dial back here in 201a game of the multi—format series for one of the biggest wins of his at leicester — australia lead 2—0. england are currently 103 for two in the 23rd over. career. if he produces that again i there's tms coverage wonder what he will have to say on bbc radio a long wave, bbc sport website & app. about rafale the dial this time. —— propjoe marler has come out of international retirement, and he's been named in england's rafa nadal. don't forget you can latest rugby world cup training follow all the action from wimbledon on bbc tv, squad. 5live and the bbc sport website and app. marler won 59 caps before that's all the sport for now. retiring from england duty last september.
2:37 pm
but he told head coach eddiejones he wanted to come back and he's let's return now to the crisis been given the chance, in social care, and the two tory with jones saying it was leadership candidates — "up to him" to prove himself. jeremy hunt and borisjohnson — the squad includes four uncapped have been challenged to urgently bring forward plans to tackle players, as well as danny cipriani. jones will name his final the issue if they become prime minister. a committee of peers has called for an immediate £8 billion cash 31—man party next month. injection and a move to a free, nhs—based, system. well, with me now is that's all the sport for now. i will caroline abrahams — the charity director for age uk. have more in the next hour. the two tory leadership candidates — jeremy hunt and borisjohnson — thank you for coming in. we seem to have been challenged to urgently bring forward plans to tackle have lots of reports over the years the social care crisis if they become prime minister. a committee of peers has called about social care. what sets this for an immediate £8 billion cash one apart? injection and a move it is the committee that's given the report that is the key. it was a to a free, nhs—based, system. very strange and auguste outfit, two joining me now from salford is david rowland, the director for mulch —— two former chancellors of centre for health and the public interest. and two permanent secretaries run thank you very much forjoining us. the treasury and a very eminent world leading economist as well. how much of improving social care is these are not the usual people about throwing more money at it? talking about social care, they are
2:38 pm
very ha rd—nosed economist, that's a very good question. the talking about social care, they are very hard—nosed economist, those who worked at the treasury. if they are figures being talked about right now telling us we need to put £1 billion are significant, 8 billion into social care, who is not to say additional each year is significant. they are right. how much of a shift is it for them increasing that to 15 billion a year to say that? this is the fourth report in about by the mid—2020s is again three months that said more or less significant. in many ways that's the same thing. we had one think very much to be welcomed. the that report from the left, two from committee has come around to a set the right and now this one. they are all more or less coming to the same of conclusions, the royal commission conclusion which is that we cannot on long—term care also arrived at 20 go on as we are and we need to move yea rs the system where we fund social care on long—term care also arrived at 20 years ago in 1999. that was that we much more likely fund the nhs, which need to make personal care for kind of works for people so why people when they need that towards wouldn't we do the same for social the end of their life three at the care. how important is it that it is a point of delivery, funded out of separate fund of money, given that central taxation. there is an interesting issue here about whether the nhs always seems to take that 8 billion right now and the 15 priority and yet at the same time we billion in the future is going to be are saying social care and the nhs enough. it reason i say that is, ok, needs better integration. 0ne needs better integration. one of the key things here is at the it is great the availability of care moment if you need social care you will be expanded, but what about the
2:39 pm
need to pay for it at the same time quality of care provided? we know find out you need it, for example, when an older person goes into right now the care system is not hospital and becomes unwell and it delivering great quality, we know becomes clear that they were only social care. then they are family one in five care homes are either rated inadequate or poor. 0ne have to work out how to pay for this one in five care homes are either rated inadequate or poor. one third of care workers are operating on very expensive care. the key is visible from all the reports is let's pay upfront in some way so if zero—hours contract. there is a very and when you need social care you high turnover within the care can concentrate on what matters to sector. i am a bit concerned the you at that point and not worry figures being talked about, even about paying for it. so it's not necessarily about the nhs are taking though the move by the committee is over social care but it's using a very welcome, it might not actually similarfunding over social care but it's using a similar funding approach. when voters are asked about the nhs have costed the full increase may save more money needs to be put necessary in order to deliver the m, may save more money needs to be put in, when it comes to answering the quality of care required. inevitably, if you want to increase question of whether they are the professionalism within the prepared to pay more tax for it, sector, if you want to increase the many people are not so forthcoming. what's to say it will be different quality, will necessarily cost more? for social care? i think if you look at turnover that's a point many mps have said to within the care sector of 30%, that me over the years. we cannotjust go on as we are, there are 1.a million equates to about 390,000 care
2:40 pm
workers leaving each year. that older people in the country who have suggests the reason why care are a need for care and cannot get it. it could be any of our parents, you leaving is because p is not high enough, terms and conditions are not have to be super rich to not be in good enough. if you have a turnover at this problem. rate of 30% it's going to be very what is the difference with how it's difficult to be able to deliver a dealt with in scotland, northern high—quality service. let's not ireland and wales, where it's forget despite the very hard work devolved? what of those care workers do many the report that's come out today is saying why don't we do in england of them operate without having any what happens in scotland what they qualifications, they have very training available to them and much have free personal care, you do not get all your care costs paid but you more money must be put into that get all your care costs paid but you area in order tojustify get the actual things that are more like nursing costs paid such as more money must be put into that area in order to justify the taxpayer spending much more on washing, helping to get out of bed. social care and indeed, for the ina care washing, helping to get out of bed. in a care home still have to pay public to be comfortable any taxes they pay will be delivering a better your accommodation cost, your food and drink and that sort of thing but it is much more popular system in quality outcome. where does the money spent on social scotla nd it is much more popular system in scotland and they don't have the rows about it we have in england. ca re actually where does the money spent on social it's a very good they've looked not care actually go? if it's not all going to the front line. of the border and thought they are this is something we started to look onto something here. —— looked north at quite recently at the centre for of the border and thought they are
2:41 pm
onto something here. thank you. health and public interest. non—mac lots of money goes into social care, staying with the race particularly the residential care for the tory party leadership. this week the ballot papers are due sector, which does not go to the to be sent out to party front line and it lea ks members who will choose between boris johnson sector, which does not go to the front line and it leaks out into and jeremy hunt. various areas. front line and it leaks out into today and tomorrow, we'll be various areas. for front line and it leaks out into various areas. for example, in the taking a closer look at both men, starting 2006 companies —— 26 companies that with the foreign secretary jeremy hunt. 0ur political correspondent iain watson looks at who he is, operate, one third of all of the ca re operate, one third of all of the where he's come from care homes in the country, £200 and what he stands for. he's been an mp for 1a years, million each year leaks out of the a government ministerfor nine, sector in the management fees for but number ten is where jeremy hunt wants to be. private investors, 200 million of and now only borisjohnson stands in his way. that does not go anywhere near a i'm saying i am trustworthy, and i ca re do believe that i can be trusted. that does not go anywhere near a care worker, nowhere near a person but to trust someone, you need using services. if you add in the to know a little more about them. jeremy hunt first got involved rental cost to landlords, add in the in conservative politics when he was at oxford. debt repayments and add in profits before becoming an mp, he started a public relations agency, that all equate within that part of then a publishing company, and he's keen to brandish his the sector, you are talking about business credentials. as an entrepreneur, £750 million each year. in context and i'm an entrepreneur, of today's announcement, around 10% an entrepreneur by background... he was close to david cameron of today's announcement, around 10% and was made 0lympics minister of the amount the committee is in the coalition government, recommending should be injected into where he got to see a lot social care right now. that is of his future leadership rival.
2:42 pm
not everything has gone another important point for the smoothly forjeremy hunt. public to be aware of, if they are going to be asked to pay more tax in he was the longest—serving health secretary since the nhs order to have free care, if they are was created, and he was embroiled in a conflict with junior doctors, going to pay more tax to have higher leading to theirfirst quality of care, they want to know strike in a0 years. they are getting value for money and under theresa may, they are getting value for money and they want to know as much of the jeremy hunt took on extra money that's going into social care is actually going to the front line. responsibility for social care. hello. another issue that needs to be jeremy. his strategy in this contest seems to be to admit addressed is the financial structure mistakes and try to move on. of the care home industry, there some of the cuts in social care did go too far. needs to be greater understanding of it's so easy to say, where money within the system "of course i was right," but, currently goes. you know, you stand back and you think, "could i have how do you stop that money heading done it a bit better?" and jeremy has not been afraid of saying exactly that. hello! jeremy. in the direction you've described, without fully nationalising all jeremy hunt campaigned for remain in the european referendum, but now says he wants to leave social care in the country? the eu with a new brexit deal. there are various options which jeremy hunt's critics accuse him of being the wind sock candidate, policymakers can adopt. i do not blowing this way and that on brexit. necessarily think full not long after the referendum, nationalisation is the only option. he said he'd consider there are different parts of the way
2:43 pm
having another one. in which the public sector contracts with the pharmaceutical industry, defence industry, which says we will cap your profits, cap them at 5%, then he made it clear he was a leaver but did not want to exit the eu without a deal. that does not happen within now he says he is prepared to leave residential care sector right now. you could have a situation where without a deal, if need be. the big thing thatjeremy hunt has those residential care providers are to offer on brexit is his ability required to be tax registered in the to negotiate and his credibility as a negotiator. uk because lots of them are not. you the downside is, because he voted remain, will the people in parliament trust him could ensure those who are providing to deliver brexit? thank you all very much indeed. ca re could ensure those who are providing care services to local authorities jeremy hunt's supporters say his opponent is gaffe—prone, or directly to the taxpayer dedicate but the foreign secretary, despite spending two years early in his career a certain proportion of their income teaching in japan, managed to misplace his wife's nationality. on staff wages, that would give a also, my wife is japanese. good indication they are committed to delivering high quality care and my wife is chinese, sorry! there are not significant amount of money leaking out of the system. critics ofjeremy hunt there are other ways of doing it say he's got less name without nationalisation. thank you recognition than his opponent, but is this really true? because he's had to contend with embarrassing mispronunciations very much for talking to us this of his four—letter surname. afternoon. he's been described as the most i just think he possibly finds important scientific it slightly amusing, thinker in the world, and sometimes things happen in one's and his work has led to what we understand
2:44 pm
life, these things sort about climate change today. now james lovelock is about to celebrate his 100th birthday. of take hold, you know, and i'm sure he'll remember mishal husain went to meet him. the nationality of his wife in future. james lovelock is about to plant it there. celebrate his 100th birthday. he says he's a serious he is one of the world's most candidate for serious times. jeremy hunt — remember the name influential environmental thinkers. and how to pronounce it. time is getting shorter, iain watson, bbc news. and if we go doing silly things and tomorrow here, we'll look in detail at the other candidate, like global warming, borisjohnson. it gets even shorter still. the united nations says it's getting disturbing reports that guards i think that scientists at a detention centre in libya shot are a bit like artists... in the 1960s, he was an eco—pioneer at migrants and refugees who invented supersensitive testing as they tried to flee from deadly devices which detected air strikes on tuesday. atmospheric pollutants. the un now says 53 have been killed, including six children. nasa used his equipment most of the dead are believed to be to test for life on mars. sub—saharan africans when you put forward your views who were attempting to reach about what the search for life might europe from libya. look like, how was it received? at least 130 people were injured it was received very roughly. during the two air strikes. in fact, the biologists complained to the management in nasa, said, what are you doing upsetting niels scott is the the head of the un office for the coordination all these biologists? nasa's employing them at great of humanitarian affairs in libya. expense, and here are you telling this has been a tragic incident. them that what they're doing is a lot of rubbish. the secretary general of and so — what would you do instead?
2:45 pm
the united nations has called for an investigation to ensure that we really understand what happened and his revolutionary gaia theory argues those responsible are that life does more than adapt to the earth. brought tojustice. it changes the earth to its own purposes. refugees and migrants who the un agency spoke to yesterday today, he calls himself an engineer first, and is very proud morning reported that indeed shots of his inventions. so what is this? were fired at certain people, that's a palladium transmodulator. is this what you came up refugees and migrants, with at very short notice... yes. as they tried to escape ..when nasa sort of set you a challenge? that's my life. in the chaotic circumstances the electron capture detector. between the two strikes on the camp. it worked like a dream. it could analyse incredibly small quantities of certain compounds. his new book, novacene, ben is here — in a moment, argues that we are entering a new age, where artificial he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. intelligence systems take over. first a look at artificial intelligence, i reckon, the headlines on afternoon live: william hill blames new restrictions will be 10,000 times faster on fixed odds betting for its plans to close hundreds of shops — but critics say problem in thinking than we are. gambling had to be tackled. a challenge to the conservative leadership candidates to prioritise the crisis in social care, if they become pm — as peers call for a free, nhs—based, system. it's a new form patients' lives are being put of life that evolved.
2:46 pm
and a new form of life at risk because of delays in giving that you think will, them treatment for sepsis — this baby is among the victims in the fullness of time, be much more intelligent of the so called hidden killer. than we are, and supersede us? yes. if supersede is the right word. we are all necessary. here's your business so does all of this fit headlines on afternoon live. into the theory that you're best as we've heard, william hill plans to close 700 betting shops across the uk. that's almost a third of its shops. known for, the gaia hypothesis, that the earth is a self—regulating entity? it puts more than a500 jobs at risk. the firm says it's making less money from fixed odds betting terminals is this the next stage after the maximum stake of that, if you like? yes, the earth is in a really was cut to £2. in a rather dodgy position, the ticket reseller viagogo has been looked at astronomically. accused of not doing enough i think we should just stop to overhaul the way it presents burning fossil fuel. information on its website. i think it's a crazy, daft, britain's competition watchdog says very dangerous thing to do, it is now moving forward with legal but we continue to do it, proceedings for contempt of court because there's so much money invested in it. against the website. they could have — use nuclear the firm of well—known fund manager energy quite safely, neil woodford is planning without worrying the planet at all. redundancies after investors pulled billions of pounds from his flagship fund. the cuts are expected james lovelock, happy 100th birthday. to affect a small number thank you very much. of support staff, rather thank you, thank you. than staff managing investments. woodford investment management
2:47 pm
changing places toilets are bigger employs around a5 people. disabled toilets with a hoist, a changing bed and more space around the toilet for someone who needs assistance. lets talk about these plans by the uk government wants to make these toilets mandatory in new large public buildings. william hill. why do they say they are needing to close at these shops? fiona from bolton, who has muscular they say they have been hit by the dystrophy, and lorna, from north lincolnshire, government's decision in april to tell the bbc‘s ellis palmer why such drastically cut the it's toilets are necessary for them to do government's decision in april to drastically cut the its maximum sta ke drastically cut the its maximum stake on fixed odds betting the things many take for granted. terminals from £100 down to £2 and you shouldn't be restricted of your own life just they say they've seen a significant because you need a wee. fall in the amount of money it makes from those machines. at the time the a loo gives my disabled association of british bookmakers child freedom. warned they thought it would lead to she is now nine years old and i am job losses. why did the government cut that still having to change her on a baby changing facility. maximum stake so drastically? i feel like i'm playing frankly, because some said these russian roulette. machines work the equivalent of the crack cocaine for gamblers and there was a lot of concern, widespread concern, players were readily able to lose large amounts of money very
2:48 pm
quickly. sources said at the time before the steak was cut, the maximum stake was cut, something like 50% of the turnover of a people need changing serious number of william hill shops places toilets because relied on that money from those some people need more thanjust machines. in context, how big a chunk of the the odd grab rail and there are some people who cannot get out william hill business are we talking of their wheelchairs by themselves. standard accessible toilets don't provide the about? when they say closing 700 stores out space for carers. ofa when they say closing 700 stores out of a total of 2300. just over one it's got more than grab rails, third. it could lead tojob it's got a hoist, of a total of 2300. just over one third. it could lead to job losses of a500, out of a total of 12,500 an adult changing bench. you can transfer from either side of the employees. about one third of the toilet, instead of the toilet workforce. they say the closures being in the corner. could be by the end of the year, they have not said which stores will rise and fall sinks, so you can wash your hands, take a be affected and said they will try selfie in the mirror, and get voluntary redundancy if you wanted to! applicants and redeploy where they there is also a lot of space. can. the staff at the shops told about the decision early in the week it's about giving emily may a normal childhood, before it was made more publicly about being able to go to the places that any other child known. would be able to go.
2:49 pm
the changing places toilet adam bradford is founder here means we can come of the safer 0nline gambling group. here every week. it means we can come here and have a day and not i think what is playing out here is worry about where my daughter is going to be toileted the bad business decisions of because we know that there william hill in the past. let's not is somewhere that is safe and where she can have her toilet talk about this, they have known for needs met in a dignified and timely a year at this regulation was coming manner. in and they've known for years that at the moment it's not mandatory to install a changing places toilet. these are fixed odd betting we have 1300 or so, terminals caused a problem so it seems to me they had a lack of which is an enormous improvement on foresight in that their business several years ago. planning. what about the people who will lose when we only had 130. what the government intends to do their jobs, what about the people who will lose theirjobs, in some cases people who is make it mandatory so when have been very loyal to the company, you build a new large building such as a cinema what about their jobs? or a shopping complex or it is unfortunate to hear people a stadium, something like that, you will have to install one of the will lose theirjobs because of the changing places as standard. scott and i feel sorry for them but there is a changing places toilet in my i feel sorry for william hill on the local area, in the bolton interchange. whole, lots of families up on down it's made going out so much easier. the country have been damaged by gambling addiction. if we look at people committing suicide because of gambling loop the problem is i don't see how we can make a choice between i am able to be spontaneous, i am able to say, keeping people safe and keeping them let's go into town with my two girls. injobs. i was a nurse for 20 years.
2:50 pm
isn't there a danger if you close to shops, if they are no longer viable, until i had emily may... yes, you. ..i didn't even realise people will turn to online gambling people needed changing places toilet facilities. where it is much harderfor anyone i had never even heard of them at that to spot if there is a problem if time. putting it into building regulations they are spending lots of time, will also mean we will spending money on sites like that? not end up with a postcode lottery of whether there is a toilet you are right, there is a major risk available in the area you live because your council gets it or not. people flocking to online gambling. it's the small things that we started to see that in a small make a big difference. ben is here. way, particularly with young people. in a moment he will be telling us what's hot and what's not in the business news. target by social media adverts. i first, a look at the headlines would say to the industry make sure on afternoon live: iran summons the british ambassador your online product as safe and in tehran over what it calls people don't get into too much the "illegal seizure" of an iranian oil tanker in gibraltar, danger, and have protection measures according to iranian state tv. there because if that does not william hill blames happen we will seek the same with new restrictions on fixed odds betting for its plans to close hundreds of shops — online operators having limits critics say problem imposed in the future as well. gambling had to be tackled. a call to raise the adult social care system what is the future for the gambling to an acceptable standard — the conservative leadership candidates are urged industry, as you see it? to prioritise the crisis, if they become pm — 0ne industry commentator said the as peers say they'd like to see a free, nhs—based, system. industry is on the precipice, and i would agree. they've fallen behind or protecting vulnerable people from
2:51 pm
gambling —related harm such as fixed—odds betting terminals and online gambling. what's happened here's your business with this regulation is its focused headlines on afternoon live: as we've heard, william hill plans heavily on machines on the high to close 700 betting shops across the uk. street but we've now got a gaping that's almost a third of its shops. hole in online regulation. the industry could be proactive in looking at how to make those it puts more than a500 jobs at risk. products safe and making sure they the firm says it's making less money from fixed odds betting terminals don't ever advertise to people, after the maximum stake don't ever advertise to people, don't offer uncouth incentives and was cut to £2. they properly check the the ticket reseller viagogo has been accused of not doing enough affordability of people's betting. to overhaul the way it presents information on its website. they could do that now in order to britain's competition watchdog says it is now moving forward with legal prevent devastating legislation that proceedings for contempt of court could cause huge cuts for them. where does the onus line? is it on against the website. the firms themselves or is it on britain's oldest building firm — government and politicians? currently refurbishing the brighton pavilion — has ceased trading. these job losses, are 100% the fault r durtnell and sons was founded in 1591. of the gambling company itself, 100% it has been run by 13 generations of the same family. william hill's fault. the new this the move puts more law was coming in since last may so than 100 jobs at risk. they've had around 1a months to look at how to shift their business model
2:52 pm
have you got your phone here? that but that's obviously not worked. before that they should have studied isa have you got your phone here? that is a bit risky. it is almost here, the harm these machines because just in case. it's one of these before the regulation q n. surely things, never let it interfere. that's the job of a responsible operator. —— before these regulations came in. phone rings. that's all the business news. i can't stop it. hang on. you see? in aboutan in about an hour we will talk about using these in the workplace. i hope it switched off. this is leading some employers to try and dissuade that, in fact, one a boat carrying more than 70 band workers having mobile phones in the workplace. it came to light when migrants has capsized off the coast someone went to the last were cathy of tunisia. the tunisian red crescent said four survivors told coast guards and saw a supervisor collecting that the boat had sunk off zarzis. one of them later died in hospital. it is the latest disaster to strike staffs' phones. —— cafe. she was migrants trying to cross the mediterranean to reach europe. told the policy was they are not allowed to have their phones when serving customers. last month, at least 65 people drowned when their boat set off from libya and sunk off the tunisian coast. what is the justification? a one person has been killed spokesman for the library said,
2:53 pm
during a volcanic eruption on the italian island of stromboli. presumably in hushed tones, a recent letter in the guardian described an the victim, believed to be a tourist, incident at the cafe, we work was walking on the volcano closely with our catering and was hit by rocks thrown out by the eruption. holidaymakers are reported to have contractors investigating, staff run into the sea to seek shelter. welfare is important to us and we a ship has been sent to the island expect the same from our in case it needs to be evacuated. contractors. they will review the there's a boost for tourism mobile phone compote —— policy with in the lake district with the return of commercial passenger flights their contractors. presumably other employers could do to carlisle airport for the first time in more than 25 years. the same sort of things. scottish airline loganair will there are anecdotal reports of connect it with london southend, belfast city and dublin airports. others doing the same thing. it sarah corker reports. comes down to the idea of productivity, if people are checking social media, texting their friends, keeping with airport tradition, sending e—mails, personal e—mails, a water salute marked the first they are not as productive as they passenger flight to take off from carlisle for more might otherwise be in the workplace. than quarter of a century. loganair will fly to the unions are warning this kind of three destinations. policy could create a new front of belfast city, london southend, friction between workers and the and this is the 8am departure to dublin. companies they work for. let's get this is the uk's a1st passenger airport and one of its smallest. the thoughts of assistant professor of organisation and human resource it is hoped tourists management at the university of will use it as a gateway to
2:54 pm
the lake district. warwick. do you think this is the cumbria tourism is obviously right way to go about things? all about the visitor economy, but we work really strongly in partnership with the business sector. it depends what you're talking so it's really important about. the idea, what you're talking for them too to be able to bring people here, for people to be about. the idea, what you're talking about companies using productivity able to come here for work argument, these ideas are based on and people to be able to come here and invest. managerial prerogatives, managerial millions have been spent —— managerial ideology. there is no on upgrades, but it will face tough competition from other northern practical, empirical, rigorous airports, including newcastle and manchester. there have been attempts to restart research to suggest employees using commercial operations here for the best part of 20 years. mobile phones at work damages and after a few false productivity, there is no concrete starts and delays, today way of measuring something like it became a reality. but not everyone is happy this. there is some research here with the decision to and there that mentions some ideas open another airport. there are questions on how and there that mentions some ideas encouraging more domestic flights and estimates but at the end of the fits with the uk's targets to reduce day there is nothing concrete to say the impact of climate change. taking away the mobile phone of your we are using the most fuel—efficient type employees would improve of regional aircraft that there are, productivity. there is nothing we to operate these new services can say definitively suggest from here. something like that. but also, if you look do you think it's most likely to at the alternatives to travel, for
2:55 pm
example, if you are to get in your cause friction if employees are told to hand the phone in? car, drive to get on the ferry and go across to belfast, the emissions by flying it depends. somebody like you at the are actually a lot less. the lake district national park already attracts a7 million people bbc, i suppose you carry your phone a year, many arriving at all times. i was at the by carand rail. university of warwick this morning andl university of warwick this morning and i had my phone at all times. who in carlisle city centre today most people said they would use it are we to say a retail worker if the price was right. i did used to use the trains. somebody at the lower end of the expensive. employment spectrum should not be flights tend to be cheaper these days. allowed to have the phone, i go home to ireland especially in the retail industry all the time by bus, what this kind of policy is more ferry, and it's just fantastic for me. the offset is there is less predominant. yes, it could create traffic on the road. the flights will compensate all sorts of questions with regards for that, i think. to what we consider to be fair. why it's inevitable if we are going to bring money into carlisle, are you and i able to carry our we have to open up transport links. phones were as other workers are not? why can some workers able to it may be a welcome boost for cumbria's economy, carry that while others are not, for but with the airline industry under pressure to cut emissions, emergency or other reasons? it it is a challenging time to get a new airport of the ground. creates lots of questions. 0ne sarah corker, bbc news. emergency or other reasons? it creates lots of questions. one of the streets questions between in carlisle. employers and employees we would expect some kind of friction —— this creates questions. we would expect just when you thought you'd seen everything, along comes a story like employees raising their voice, quit
2:56 pm
the company, fight back or anything this. else in that arsenal. here is the queen at a city farm in taken to the next step, some might say, don'tjust edinburgh. she was shown around by taken to the next step, some might say, don't just ban taken to the next step, some might say, don'tjust ban staff in a cafe this creature, 0live is the name of using their phones or a supermarket, band the customers as well because it's so rude. we've all seen it, the this creature, 0live is the name of this adopt. she's not very keen, apparently, and rabbits and guinea person behind the customer is trying pigs, the duck, that is, but she to ask a question and the customer isn't even looking at them. loves people and she thinks she is right. i human. she is looked after by the isn't even looking at them. right. i think that would be going a farm worker, who said, i never step too far, to ban the customer thought i'd meet the queen and from using their phone. you are walking a duck with her was right, there is research, probably brilliant. he wants a not in the employment field, but once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. and a bizarre moment. —— once in a otherwise, health, in particular, that talks about smartphone lifetime opportunity. this duck addiction and employees not been likes to get out of the city farm able to control themselves and and even managed to make it onto the people in general not be able to control themselves in terms of number 25 bus and had to be escorted smartphone usage. however, it would be quite a draconian move to stop back by a rather confused driver. the queen looks quite happy, doesn't banning people carrying their phones she? brings a whole new meaning to because they might have a very the phrase free range. legitimate reason for it, such as
2:57 pm
having a child, school, an elderly time for a look at the weather forecast with helen. good afternoon. pa re nt having a child, school, an elderly parent who needs care. there are a i hope it was a nice day for the very legitimate reasons for people to carry their phones but banning duck and the queen because it's beautiful for london and many parts employees, banning clients from of england and wales. this picture carrying their phones, while you may was sent in earlier, but not for have good intentions behind it, it seems to be kind of a draconian move all. further north, scotland has a that would probably elicit some kind of vigorous response from unions or cloud and rain. not reaching northern ireland or northern employees. england, just hazy sunshine here. thank you very much indeed. and i the rest of the afternoon brings further rain for the north but for just hope the students have their mobile phones off and they give him the south temperatures are rising their undivided attention during his lectures. iam only lectures. i am only too glad to come in here all the time, 25, 20 six celsius. a and put the thing somewhere else. little fresher along the coast with a refreshing sea breeze. refreshing some breaking news from spain, two for the north with the cloud and british men have died after falling from a beachfront in alicante. it rain, that atlantic breeze to rid other than the rain will tend to ebb happened near torrie var. a third and flow from time to time through man was taken this evening and overnight but that
2:58 pm
weather front sticks with us with the foreign office says we are those pulses moving eastwards. low supporting families after the deaths pressure to the north—west. further of two british men in alicante. pulses of rain to come. dry for many another man was also involved. we areas overnight. cloudier then last are providing assistance over that night, breezy so not quite as cold. accident. thank for the weather. the fine we could have some missed dennis weather continues for england and around first thing in the morning in wales for the rest of the day and the south but it will be another well into the evening. farther north a weather front is giving rain for fine, dry and sunny day for england north and west scotland, highlands and wales. more cloud and the odd and islands. cloudy and breezy for showerfor and wales. more cloud and the odd shower for northern england, many parts. sunshine turning hazy northern ireland and the rain for the north—west highlands. cool once across northern ireland. some higher again here. higher than today, cloud filtering further south overnight. mild foremost, not below temperatures, as not quite as chilly 12 celsius for many. the rain is first thing tomorrow. will it last? still with us across the north—west of scotla nd still with us across the north—west through friday night that cold of scotland and will be during weather front will be very weak, friday. chance for some rain for that's pushing the fresher air northern ireland and cumbria in the south—west of scotland but likely further south and behind its much drier and brighter for scotland on for much of wales, midlands, central and southern england to be another
2:59 pm
saturday, and northern ireland and northern england. not too much rain very and southern england to be another very warm and southern england to be another very warm day. temperatures are for the south but more cloud and slightly higher than today. quite warm if you get deep bright weather therefore feeling fresher. very further north but the fresher weather eventually heading southwards with more cloud and the pleasa nt therefore feeling fresher. very pleasant in the strong sunshine further north. that weather front odd shower. goodbye. still potentially lingers on the south coast on sunday. taking its time to ebb away. just the odd shower, no more. fine and dry for most were temperatures around about where they should be for the time of year. as ever, more on the website andi year. as ever, more on the website and i will have more from you a 00:59:34,229 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 little later on. goodbye.
3:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at four: iran summons the british ambassador in tehran over what it calls the "illegal seizure" of an iranian oil tanker in gibraltar. william hill blames new restrictions on fixed odds betting for its plans to close hundreds of shops — but critics say problem gambling had to be tackled. i think william hill should be apologising to the stuff they have brought into this terrible racket and to the punters, many of whom have gambling debts, lost their own jobs, broke up theirfamilies. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis — this baby is among the victims of the so—called hidden killer. coming up on afternoon live: all the sport. and frank lampard has a newjob. yes, we will hear from franklin
3:01 pm
and frank lampard has a newjob. yes, we will hearfrom franklin park —— frank lampard. and helen willetts has the weather. sunshine prevails from many parts of england and wales. further north, more cloud, a weather system around that will make its way south to all parts. more detail on thatjust before half past. also coming up in news nationwide: researchers develop a new way of designing and manufacturing bespoke prosthetic liners, in less than a day. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. iran has summoned the british ambassador in tehran over what is calls the "illegal seizure"
3:02 pm
of an iranian oil tanker in gibraltar. british royal marines seized the tanker on its way to syria, thought to be in violation of eu sanctions. they boarded the vessel, which was suspected of carrying crude oil to the baniyas refinery in syria. 0ur diplomatic correspondent, jonathan marcus, is here. i was under the impression this vessel was registered in singapore, but now iran is summoning the british ambassador. indeed, it seems to bea british ambassador. indeed, it seems to be a singaporean managed vessel under a panamanian flag, to be a singaporean managed vessel undera panamanianflag, but to be a singaporean managed vessel under a panamanian flag, but the crucial thing is it is believed there is a oil on board. we don't know yet what the outcome of this meeting in tehran is, the british ambassador having been summoned by the iranian authorities. 0n the face of it, it would appear to be an admission that it is iranians oil. we don't know what their complaint is. the vessel was seized under eu
3:03 pm
sanctions which relate to supplying syria with oil products. whether there is an iranian angle as well, it is suggested that the intelligence for the seizure of the ship came from the americans. the americans are keen to clamp down on iran's petroleum industry as part of the pressures over the nuclear deal with tehran. clearly, the iranians, one imagines, are going to be stressing that end of the argument, stressing that end of the argument, stressing that end of the argument, stressing that the europeans once again, they will say, need to do more to help relieve the sanctions pressure. how did the uk get involved? the gibraltar authorities decided they needed back—up in case anything went wrong. it seems to have been a benign operation in terms of one person involved saying, nothing particularly dramatic. we believe the marines came down onto the deck of the vessel from
3:04 pm
helicopters and they were able to assist the authorities of gibraltar in seizing the vessel. jonathan, thank you. to make british men have died on the beachfront in spain. —— two british men. a third man was taken to hospital but has been discharged. a spokesman for the foreign office said, we are supporting the families of the men and are in contact with the spanish authorities. the betting group william hill has said it will close around 700 shops across the uk — putting more than a500 jobs at risk. the company blamed the closures on the government's decision to reduce the maximum stake on fixed odds betting terminals from £100 pounds to £2 in april. sir peter bottomley mp was on the all parliamentary group that looked into fixed 0dd betting terminals.
3:05 pm
he says the government's changes were sensible and william hill should be apologising for the damage caused by the machines. everyone thinks it is sensible to bring the stake down from £100 to £2. if that means that william hill stops ripping off gamblers who can't afford it, the sooner the better, and it should have happened years ago. william hill should be apologising to the staff they have brought into this terrible racket, and to the punters coming out —— to the punters, many of whom... the government and parliament didn't intend this rash of betting shops to p0p up intend this rash of betting shops to pop up in the poorest areas. they have their own shops a few doors away from each other trying to bring in the poor and the vulnerable.
3:06 pm
don't rely on a couple of —— anonymous machines that become addictive. well the move to online gambling is part of the reason bricks and mortar betting shops have fallen out of favour, that's according to tom blenkinsop, from the union representing betting shop workers, community. the industry has been lobbying against legislation that brought down the minimum is the —— the minimum stake. they should have made sure our members had packages in place in case of this scenario. we have been here with coral and ladbrokes recently, and i have to say i think the industry is moving
3:07 pm
not because of the legislation but because of gambling moving onto an online habit as opposed to a traditional habit in betting shops. how realistic is it to do what sir peter bottomley says and focus more on the dog tracks and horse tracks, the traditional places where people can place bets that we used to use more in the past? the betting shop has always been on the high street. the traditional one—to—one human relationship has mitigated against some of the consequences people have been talking about. spaced out timings between races is different to what has been happening. a lot of these people, mainly women, in areas where there isn't much employment have been working loyally for william hill for years, and if the industry and government were aware of potential consequences of this
3:08 pm
legislation, they should have been meeting to mitigate the circumstances. council leaders have challenged whoever is the next prime minister to publish long—delayed plans for social care before the party conferences begin in mid—september. and a house of lords committee has said that £8 billion a year must be spent to raise the adult social care system to an acceptable standard. it follows a day of pledges from the tory leadership candidates on other issues as diverse as fox hunting and police recruitment. helena wilkinson reports. borisjohnson's message... make me your next prime minister and i will keep you safe. he says he will do it by recruiting thousands more officers at a cost of around £1 billion, one of his many spending commitments. i have just talked to a load of police and crime commissioners, they are doing a fantasticjob but they want more police officers out on the streets, so we think we can get 20,000 more police officers with this funding
3:09 pm
and keep driving down crime. away from bobbies on the beat, the other candidate in this race has been talking about an altogether different issue. jeremy hunt told the telegraph he would offer mps a free vote on whether to lift the ban on fox hunting in england and wales, but he made it clear it is not his priority. the law is not going to change on fox hunting. there isn't a majority in the house of commons and i don't see there ever being one. i wasjust restating our position from our manifesto in 2017 that there should be a free vote if it ever looks like that majority would change, but it isn't my priority. both candidates are also being challenged over how they will tackle care for the elderly. this a committee of peers has published a report into social care. it says repeated promises by those in power have come to nothing and there needs to be a move towards a free nhs—based system.
3:10 pm
my committee is all party and no party, consists of two former chancellors, we have been able to sort this in six months and make sensible recommendations. i would hope that anyone of goodwill would read this report and realise urgent action is needed now. no more talk, no more discussions, just do it. both candidates have spoken about the need to take action on social care, but the question is whether it will be enough and in time. as the current prime minister found out at the last general election, social care can be a difficult political issue, and with brexit continuing to drown everything else out, just how much will both actually be able to do? helena wilkinson, bbc news, westminster. vicki young, our chief political correspondent, is in westminsterfor us. how much of a priority so far has social care been fulljeremy hunt and boris johnson in social care been fulljeremy hunt and borisjohnson in their campaigning? it has been mentioned.
3:11 pm
they have found it difficult to get off the subject of brexit and talk about other things, and today it is because of this report that is out that they are being asked their views on it. jeremy hunt, the health secretary for many years, has admitted he thinks the cuts to local government and to social care did go too far, so he is promising more funding and an opt out insurance scheme. borisjohnson says there should be more money, but the policy should be more money, but the policy should be more money, but the policy should be worked out according to a cross— party should be worked out according to a cross—party plan. there in lies the problem with this. i think every time we hear about social care, reports or green papers, consultations, really i greet them with a weary sigh, because this has been going on for decades. the political parties have not been able to go past the short term and look at what is really required. all the parties say this is a huge problem. we have an ageing population and we will have to do something about this
3:12 pm
and people need to work out who will fund it, but they are not able to get together and work it out without it descending into acrimony. the reports have been done and are there on the shelves, lots of ideas, but this will need money, and today's report talks about 8 billion being needed immediately, and it will also needed immediately, and it will also need political leadership and someone who is willing to take the risk, because there are political risks here. someone will have to pay more, always a bad thing to have to tell the electorate. the question will be whether either of these two men will feel it is a priority for them when there is so much else to do, not least brexit. what else have they been fielding questions on today? a whole range of things, interestingly. jeremy hunt would say he has done far more interviews so has had more controversy because he has had more controversy because he has answered my questions. you learn things you may be didn't know before. we talked about the abortion limit, saying how he thought it should be brought down to 12 weeks.
3:13 pm
he said it is a free vote, a matter of conscience and not something he would pursue to try and change the policy. equally, fox hunting, another very contentious issue. it may go down well with the tory party, and they are the electorate at the moment, but some say bringing up at the moment, but some say bringing up sucha at the moment, but some say bringing up such a divisive issue is not a great thing to do. borisjohnson talked about more bobbies on the beat. 20,000 police officers. it is not clear how he thinks he will pay for this, and there has been criticism of it already. the chief inspector of constabulary has said this is not necessarily the right priority. it sounds good but there are other things you can do, getting the police to use technology to make them more efficient would be a better use of money. lots of promises, not much detail about how they will pay for it. i'm clear about how they could get anything contentious through the parliament when there is barely a majority for
3:14 pm
the conservative party. later this hour, we will speak to a woman who was a health care professional throughout her life and who cared for her husband when he was sick. a student who was detained by north korea has been released. it follows a meeting between the north korean government and swedish officials as australia doesn't have its own embassy in the north korean capital. a firearms officer says he shot dead one of the leaders of the london bridge attacks because he feared he would stab him, kill him and get hold of his weapons.
3:15 pm
a firearms officer says he shot dead one of the ringleaders of the london bridge attacks because he feared he'd stab him, kill him, and get hold of his weapons. eight people died when three men drove a van into pedestrians on london bridge before launching a knife attack in nearby borough market two years ago. 0ur correspondentjon donnison reports from the old bailey. the court was told they were about two or three miles from london bridge when they heard on the radio there had been a van attack on the bridge. 0ne officer said he immediately feared the worst. this came two and a half months after the westminster bridge attack. they arrived at borough market alongside london bridge within a matter of minutes. 0njumping london bridge within a matter of minutes. 0n jumping out london bridge within a matter of minutes. 0njumping out the car, one officer said he saw the ringleader races knife and run towards him. within seconds, he had him, fearing kiwi british —— fearing he would be
3:16 pm
stabbed and his weapons seized. the other assailant was shot seconds later. in court, the councillor for the coroner said he was aware that going through the evidence was happening at a snail‘s pace, but he pointed out that events unfolded much quicker. in fact, from getting out of the car to the three men being shot was just seven seconds, and of course, at that point, it still wasn't over. the officers said they thought other attackers might be at large, and they were aware that the three men were wearing what they believe that the time to be genuine suicide vests, so some five minutes after initial shots were fired, they fired again into the ringleader when he was seen to move, and again, a few minutes later, they shot him again when he moved again. at that point, the officers began to evacuate people.
3:17 pm
you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: iran summons the british ambassador in tehran over what it calls the "illegal seizure" of an iranian oil tanker in gibraltar. william hill blames new restrictions on fixed odds betting for its plans to close hundreds of shops — critics say problem gambling had to be tackled. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis — this baby is among the victims of the so—called hidden killer. in sport, five british players in action at wimbledon, two of them already through to the third round. can johanne nudge —— already through to the third round. canjohanne nudge —— canned johanna konta join them? frank lampard has been named as chelsea's new head coach on a three—year contract. joe marlow comes out of retirement to be named in england's world cup squad.
3:18 pm
more on those stories at a:30pm. the two tory leadership candidates have been challenged to urgently bring forward plans to tackle the social ca re forward plans to tackle the social care crisis if they become prime minister. the committee of peers has called for an immediate £8 billion cash injection and a move to a free nhs based system. well, with me now is margaret dangoor — a volunteer and member of the alzheimer's society and a local ambassador for carers uk. she also cared for her husband eddy until he died. thank you for coming in. let's talk to you about the professional side of social care in this country. what further support does it need? more money, more professionalising?m
3:19 pm
needs more money so that the care workers who provide the social care are better trained and also that it a tt ra cts are better trained and also that it attracts the right sort of people. my attracts the right sort of people. my husband, i needed social care, although we were self funding, towards the end of his life. i found the actual people very dedicated to their role, but their working conditions were extremely poor, and they really didn't have the training. iam they really didn't have the training. i am an ex nurse, and i really had to train them for the level of care he needed, and that really worried me, because they are going into homes without any supervision at all. i think it is training, money and of course more money put into the social care system generally. from a patient's point of view, the person who actually needs the care, and those people like you who need the support, what are the shortcomings? they are that there just isn't the
3:20 pm
money around to pay for all those people that need support. carers ta ke people that need support. carers take ona people that need support. carers take on a very significant role and responsibility when they care for someone with a long—term condition such as my husband with dementia. evenif such as my husband with dementia. even if you have funding, social ca re even if you have funding, social care and health service interventions are a very small part of that journey. many interventions are a very small part of thatjourney. many people really receive support, if they receive it, very late into the care journey, so ca re rs very late into the care journey, so carers are coping. they are perhaps elderly themselves, and they are really doing a job they shouldn't be doing without support. how do we have for the kind of care that people say they want? yes, well, i think there needs... i would like health and social care, personally, to be looked at together. i feel that if social care is funded
3:21 pm
better, and the training is improved, then you will have a better community support system, and that will keep people out of hospital, particularly the elderly frail, people with dementia. hospital is not the right place for them. we need better support within them. we need better support within the community, and then you could tra nsfer the community, and then you could transfer the funds from the nhs, although i know that is always a debatable issue. how important is it to have a separate fund that is dedicated to social care? even if you try to integrate the workings of the nhs with social care? because these days, with so many complex and advanced treatments available on the nhs, it is a bottomless pit, isn't it? it is, but i think we should get the basics right, and those are about supporting people in their homes, keeping them out of hospital, and generally giving everybody that basic good service when they need
3:22 pm
it. of course, the nhs is a bottomless pit, but we have to be, you know, pragmatic about these issues. we really have to look at the whole picture, and i believe we should look at social care and health care together, because really, there isn't a divide for individuals. when do you go over the boundary between social and health care? they are supporting each other. how supportable is it without means testing? my husband's care cost £125,000. for my mother, it cost £125,000. for my mother, it cost over £a00,000. 0f cost £125,000. for my mother, it cost over £a00,000. of course, it is spread over years, but there is no way, i don't think, that we could ta ke way, i don't think, that we could take on that responsibility altogether as a country. but we need to sort of get the basics right, as
3:23 pm
i say, and realise if we support people better at earlier stages, then you know, a lot of the additional long—term costs of keeping people in hospitalforfar too long because there aren't the social care services in the community, well, you know, itjust has to be done. margaret, nice to meet you. thank you for coming in. there's a warning today that patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays treating them for sepsis. hospitals are meant to put patients on an anti—biotic drip within an hour when sepsis is suspected — but bbc research shows a quarter of patients in england wait longer than that. delays can increase the likelihood of potentially fatal complications such as organ failure. lauren moss reports. a father remembering his son
3:24 pm
as a bright student, with ambition of becoming an accountant and taking care of his family. but in may 2016, amir went to hospital in london, after he banged his ankle and became unable to walk. the 39—year—old was sent home with paracetomol, but less than 2a hours later he suffered cardiac arrest and died. doctors had failed to spot that amir had sepsis. his last words when i left him in the hospital, he shook my hand, he said "dad, i love you." he gave me his hand, i went and kissed him on the cheek, kissed his forehead and i came home. i didn't realise that was the last kiss or last cuddle i ever give to my son. sepsis claims more lives in the uk each year than bowel, prostate and breast cancer combined. it is often called the silent killer, and is triggered by an infection. early symptoms can include a fast heartbeat, high or low temperature, chills and shivering. it makes the body's immune system go into overdrive, which can lead to septic shock,
3:25 pm
organ failure and sometimes death. figures from around three—quarters of hospital trusts in england suggest that one in four patients isn't being started on antibiotics within an hour when sepsis is suspected. it's a similar picture in wales, while neither scotland nor northern ireland provided recent data. william was just a year old when he died of sepsis, after a chest infection. it's estimated 25,000 children develop the condition in the uk every year. in order to treat for sepsis you first have to think about it, and that's the problem, we have to get those health care professionals on the front line to first think it, to suspect it, to then treat it, and that is half of the problem, that is where the disconnect is. the sepsis trust has been training nhs staff to detect and deal with it quickly. we need to ensure that resources are applied to this. we need to ensure that the new standards for emergency departments accurately measure what is happening for patients with sepsis, and we need to ensure that the government
3:26 pm
and the statutory bodies do more to allow doctors to deliver this care at the right time. in april, new guidance was issued to all nhs trusts in england. hospital staff were to look for early signs of sepsis when a patient comes in to a&e and alert a senior doctor if a patient hasn't responded to treatment within an hour. any trust missings those targets could face a financial penalty. nhs england says huge improvements have been made, and it is important not to automatically give antibiotics to everyone who is very unwell. but amir‘s father says he has been robbed of a son and his family's grief cannot be healed. two rail workers who died after being hit by a passenger train in south wales have been named. 6a—year—old gareth delbridge and 58—year—old michael lewis were hit by the swansea to paddington train near margam yesterday.
3:27 pm
a man accused of lying about a high—ranking paedophile ring — whose allegations sparked a £2 million inquiry — has told a court about the moment when he claims a friend was deliberately mown down by a car. carl beech denies 12 counts of perverting the course ofjustice and one of fraud. june kelly reports. i heard the car. carl beech in a police interview claiming he'd witnessed a friend called scott being deliberately hit by a car — one of three boys he says were murdered by a vip paedophile ring. today, from the witness box, with his voice occasionally breaking, he repeated the allegation, telling the jury... i had poppies pinned to my chest.
3:28 pm
he also described to the police having poppies pinned to his bare chest by the group. he told the jury this happened at imber, an army training base on salisbury place. he claimed the former head of the army, lord bramall, was among those present at what he called these remembrance day parties. carl beech says the paedophile ring operated in london and beyond in the 1970s and ‘80s and also involved christmas parties. today, he said, "we were the presents to unwrap and they would undress us." he also alleged that the former home secretary lord brittan raped him over a bath while holding his head underwater. and he said he went on to the yacht of the ex—prime minister sir edward heath. he told the court that he refused to go out to sea with sir edward, who comforted him when he started to cry. june kelly, bbc news, at newcastle crown court. now, it's time for a look at the weather with helen willets. good afternoon. the fine weather will continue
3:29 pm
for england and wales, particularly for the rest of the day, well into the evening. further north we have got a weather front, it is giving some rain, particularly for the north and west of scotland, the highlands and the islands, but for many parts it is cloudier, it is breezier here. we have seen the sunshine turn hazy across northern ireland as well. some of that higher cloud will filter further south overnight. but for most, relatively mild, temperatures don't fall much below 11 or 12 celsius, and that rain on that weather front, although weaker, is still with us across the north—west of scotland, and still will be during friday. there's a chance we will see a few drops of rain for northern ireland and perhaps cumbria and the south—west of scotland through the day, but it is likely for much of wales, the midlands, central and southern england it will be another very warm day. temperatures higher than those of today, and quite warm if you have the bright weather further north across scotland and northern ireland as well. eventually that slightly fresher weather will make its way southwards with a little bit more cloud and perhaps the odd shower. bye— bye.
3:30 pm
this is bbc news — our latest headlines. iran summons the british ambassador in tehran over what it calls the "illegal seizure" of a tanker containing iranian oil in gibraltar. william hill blames new restrictions on fixed odds betting for its plans to close hundreds of shops — but critics say problem gambling had to be tackled. i think william hill should be apologising both to the staff they brought in for this terrible racket and to all the punters who, many of whom who have gambling debts, lost theirjobs, broke up their families. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis — this baby is among the victims of the so—called hidden killer. sport now on afternoon live with will perry. plenty of british interest at wimbledon and a win forjohanna
3:31 pm
konta. it has been a good day. three players into the third round, andy murray to come. let us catch up with john watson there. the latest of those three to progressjohanna konta, impressing on centre court, into round three. yes, absolutely, brilliant for johanna konta, into to the third round. it was an impressive round. she came through in straight sets, remember, johanna konta, a semifinalist two years ago, we know she has had some difficulties on the grass of late, with early exits and the grass court tournaments in the lead up to wimbledon but no problems here, which is great new, because as you can imagine, a lot of extra pressure on her shoulders now as the british number one in the women's singles so a big win for her but a difficult test await, she faces sloane stevens, a former grand slam winner the next round. great result today for harriet dart who came
3:32 pm
through her match. her point knocked out mug russia, so this was a notable victory for her and the furthest she has been. she came through in three sets. her opponent had to have some treatment but she did what she had to do on court in the end. she is through to the third round. two women safely through. let us round. two women safely through. let us take you over to centre court shall we. i should say court number 0ne shall we. i should say court number one where roger federer has a match point against another brit. this jay clarke, jay clarke having produced a brilliant result to get through the first round. you had to feel for him coming through to face roger federer. and that is it, federer has done it. a tough ask this forjay clarke, but he will have loved that experience in front of a home crowd. that experience of facing roger
3:33 pm
federer, the eight time wimbledon champion, remember, he is chasing a record ninth wimbledon crown and the way he has been playing you wouldn't bet against him. bear in mind that a lot of the so—called next generation have already gone out. the likes of zverev and tsitsipas, they are all out. it is opening up for the likes of novak djokovic, roger federer and rafael nadal who plays later. a big win came from dan evans. as we know eva ns, win came from dan evans. as we know evans, he has only really been climbing up the rankings since returning from that drugs ban a little over a year, a, he was close to tears after booking his place in the third round, his best run was the third round, his best run was the third round, he lost to roger federer several years ago. but he is through, a big win this for dan eva ns, through, a big win this for dan evans, and he certainly has form on the grass, he has won a couple of
3:34 pm
titles in the challenger series so a big win there, so good news for the brits and we have big games to come, not least andy murray playing in the doubles in the men's doubles later on. thank you. you can follow the action he spent 13 years as a player at stamford bridge, now frank lampard at a1 years old has returned to the club where he made his name and is regarded a chelsea legend. lampard left derby county to become chelsea's news head coach after leading them to the championship play—off final in his debut managerial season. he's signed a three year contract succeeding maurizio sarri. having played here i felt that the pressure was high, because of expectation, because of pressure i put on myself, having being a managerfor one put on myself, having being a manager for one year put on myself, having being a managerfor one year at put on myself, having being a manager for one year at car by, at this side of the fence the pressure is at whatever club you are at, when you come to chelsea, who have standards, competitive year in, year
3:35 pm
out, i understand that. i can't hideaway. i wouldn't say apprehensive, i am a league list, i understand what is wanted from me, from within the club and i will try that's all the sport for now. azi farni will have more at 5.30. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide, and see what's happening around the country, in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. we'll speak to matt graveling at a site in dorset, where an archeological dig has revealed some unexpected results. and liz beacon is in bristol to tell us about a new way of developing prosthetic limb liners that could really benefit amputees. so first of all, let us speak to matt u you have picked a good day for it, what is happening there? martine, welcome to the south coast, what beautiful weather this is for an archaeological dig which is three
3:36 pm
yea rs an archaeological dig which is three years in the making, i want to take you on a journey back to 1,000ad. this inspired a lot of the game of thrones series, over the last five weeks 50 students from bournemouth university have been here digging. how did they find this site in the first place? that is geophysics, they use a device to go across a field and they send signals down using the earth's magnetic field to find out what is under our feet. from there they discovered this site so they came down an started to dig and started to record. as you can see from the pictures they started to sketch out this incredible site, which is a medieval workshop. now, the man who knows more about this than i do, is with me now. derek pitman is from bournemouth, you found this site, but the people here, how do you think they used to li and work? we are in the middle of
3:37 pm
a large salt working complex where we have three established workshop area, it is interesting because this is probably the lower echelons of society, so it is not like history telling the story of kings and queens, this is every day people going about their work, their day—to—day lives. going about their work, their day-to-day lives. this was the paupers not the kings. yes, this is the normal people. it is notjust about the digging because just to the right, there is also an irrah where you can almost try your hand at what went on here. we do experimental archaeology which allows students and visitors to see the past come to life. anything they find from ceramics to harts we will rebuild and recreate and see them working. you are seeing incredible pictures we took of some of the student, they were making the salt just as they did here all that time ago and crafting glass, and making clay pots. it is notjust about having fun, this is educational. let us having fun, this is educational. let us not forget. as i crouch down here
3:38 pm
to one of these trenches that have been built, i am joined by connor, you are a student here, at bournemouth university, this must beat being in the classroom. bournemouth university, this must beat being in the classroomm bournemouth university, this must beat being in the classroom. it is so beat being in the classroom. it is so much better it is more hands on, so so much better it is more hands on, so it is nice to see it in the first person. tell me what you are doing down here? so basically, we have got a salt boiling hart here and i am just defining the outer edge of where it is. ok, i have been told by derek there is a big red patch here of soil, just behind us, and that was used as one of the ovens for getting the salt out, and that was the livelihood for the people who used to live here. sadly it seems in a few weeks' time all of this will be recovered once they have recorded their finds be recovered once they have recorded theirfinds and be recovered once they have recorded their finds and the lines, but if you would like to have a closer look you would like to have a closer look you can donnelley on sunday between 11 and four for you can donnelley on sunday between 11 and fourforan you can donnelley on sunday between 11 and fourfor an open day and you can donnelley on sunday between 11 and four for an open day and find out more about this incredible place in dorset.
3:39 pm
form an orderly queue, you might be ambushed, what a beautiful day, from the past to the state—of—the—art in bristol. liz is here. to talk to us about prosthetic limb liners, tell us about prosthetic limb liners, tell us what they are and what makes these so special, liz. these liners are made to measure, they are said to fit like a glove. engineers at the university of bath have been using lasers and they take precise measurements of someone's stump, so that the end product follows even individual contour. now up until now liners can be a source of problem, they can cause rubbing and pain for amputees, so getting this right could really make a difference to people who have to use prosthetic limbs. tell us about the trial. chief guinea pig is a man calljohn roberts, he is from ghost terse, he was born with one leg longer than the other and he has lived in pain, got through each day on a cocktail of painkillers, so recently be way
3:40 pm
of painkillers, so recently be way ofa of painkillers, so recently be way of a last resort, he decided to have his leg amputated which has improved his leg amputated which has improved his quality of life. he used to have to wear a silicon sleeve and four pairs of socks, and now there is just this one slipper, as he calls it. when i have to get up in the night, itake, don't it. when i have to get up in the night, i take, don't use it. when i have to get up in the night, itake, don't use it, i push three socks on, push my leg in and i go three socks on, push my leg in and i go and come back, this one you have to push it in, it will save three or four minutes and in a fire, it has to bea four minutes and in a fire, it has to be a godsend. so far he has just worn this slipper round the campus of bath university while the trial takes place but researches hope if they can find enough evidence that they can really relieve pain, and help people with artificial limbs to walk in a way that doesn't put pressure on any other joints, that doesn't put pressure on any otherjoints, then that doesn't put pressure on any other joints, then they that doesn't put pressure on any otherjoints, then they may be able to get the nhs to start using them.
3:41 pm
that sounds promising, liz, in bristol and matt in dorset, thank you for taking us nationwide the united nations says it's getting disturbing reports that guards at a detention centre in libya shot at migrants and refugees as they tried to flee from deadly air strikes on tuesday. the un now says 53 have been killed, including six children. most of the dead are believed to be sub—saharan africans who were attempting to reach europe from libya. at least 130 people were injured during the two air strikes. on wednesday night the un security council met — but failed to agree on a joint statement condemning the air strikes. niels scott is the the head of the un office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs in libya.
3:42 pm
this has been a tragic incident. the secretary—general has called for an independent investigation, to ensure that we really understand what happened, and those responsible are brought tojustice. happened, and those responsible are brought to justice. refugees and migrants who are un agency spoke to yesterday morning reported that indeed shots were fired at certain people as they the refugees and migrants as they tried to escape, in the chaotic circumstances between the chaotic circumstances between the two strikes on the camp. the chaotic circumstances between the two strikes on the camp. there's a boost for tourism in the lake district with the return of commercial passenger flights to carlisle airport for the first time in more than 25 years. scottish airline loganair will connect it with london southend, belfast city and dublin airports. sarah corker reports. keeping with airport tradition, a water salute marked the first passenger flight to take off from carlisle for more
3:43 pm
than quarter of a century. loganair will fly to three destinations. belfast city, london southend, and this is the 8am departure to dublin. this is the uk's a1st passenger airport and one of its smallest. it is hoped tourists will use it as a gateway to the lake district. cumbria tourism is obviously all about the visitor economy, but we work really strongly in partnership with the business sector. so it's really important for them too to be able to bring people here, for people to be able to come here for work and people to be able to come here and invest. millions have been spent on upgrades, but it will face tough competition from other northern airports, including newcastle and manchester. there have been attempts to restart commercial operations here for the best part of 20 years. and after a few false starts and delays, today it became a reality. but not everyone is happy with the decision to open another airport. there are questions on how encouraging more domestic flights fits with the uk's targets to reduce
3:44 pm
the impact of climate change. we are using the most fuel—efficient type of regional aircraft that there are, to operate these new services from here. but also, if you look at the alternatives to travel, for example, if you are to get in your car, drive to get on the ferry and go across to belfast, the emissions by flying are actually a lot less. the lake district national park already attracts a7 million people a year, many arriving by carand rail. in carlisle city centre today most people said they would use it if the price was right. i did used to use the trains. expensive. flights tend to be cheaper these days. i go home to ireland all the time by bus, ferry, and it's just fantastic for me. the offset is there is less traffic on the road. the flights will compensate for that, i think. it's inevitable if we are going to bring money into carlisle, we have to open up transport links. it may be a welcome boost for cumbria's economy, but with the airline industry under
3:45 pm
pressure to cut emissions, it is a challenging time to get a new airport of the ground. sarah corker, bbc news. ben is here for a look at first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. iran summons the british ambassador in tehran over what it calls the "illegal seizure" of a tanker containing iranian oil in gibraltar. william hill blames new restrictions on fixed odds betting for its plans to close hundreds of shops — critics say problem gambling had to be tackled. patients' lives are being put at risk because of delays in giving them treatment for sepsis — research by the bbc finds. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. as we've heard, william hill plans to close 700 betting shops across the uk. that's almost a third of its shops. it puts more than a500 jobs at risk.
3:46 pm
the firm says it's making less money from fixed odds betting terminals after the maximum stake was cut to £2. the ticket reseller viagogo has been accused of not doing enough to overhaul the way it presents information on its website. britain's competition watchdog says it is now moving forward with legal proceedings for contempt of court against the website. britain's oldest building firm — currently refurbishing the brighton pavilion — has ceased trading. r durtnell and sons was founded in 1591. it has been run by 13 generations of the same family. the move puts more than 100 jobs at risk. the national trust has announced that it will sell off the shares it holds in fossil fuel companies — seems logical for a conservation charity? yes, i mean the national trust is the biggest conservation charity in the biggest conservation charity in the whole of europe, it says i wants
3:47 pm
to invest in green start ups and to have money invested in shares that benefit the environment and nature, so at the moment, something like a% of the total £1 billion they have invested in the stock market is in forcing fuels, or is derived from fossil fuels. forcing fuels, or is derived from fossilfuels. until forcing fuels, or is derived from fossil fuels. until now the trust has been prepared to invest in firms that get less than 10% of their turn over from either terse that get less than 10% of their turn overfrom either terse mall that get less than 10% of their turn over from either terse mall coal or oil extracted from it. when will they make the change? they say within three years, but most shares that are caught would be sold one a year, so this is after the church of england did something similar, its general synod voted to withdraw investment from companies that do not meet the terms of the paris climate agreement by 2023, then last month the norwegian parliament also voted a similar measure, for the country's sovereign wealth fund. this is huge, would be sold one a
3:48 pm
year, so this is after the church of england did something similar, its general synod voted to withdraw investment from companies that do not meet the terms of the paris climate agreement by 2023, then last month the norwegian parliament also voted a similar measure, for the country's sovereign wealth fund. this is huge, it has a trillion $s of investment and it is getting rid of investment and it is getting rid ofa of investment and it is getting rid of a lot of what it has invested in coal, and oil and investing in renewable energy projects instead. we are looking at it is starting to look like a trend and the national trust the latest to make the movement their chief financial officer said that while some of the oil giants were making progress and investing in renewable energy, simply not enough is being done for them to warrant having the shares in their portfolio, so i want to talk tojeremy their portfolio, so i want to talk to jeremy thompson cook about this. really interesting this, do you think we are starting to see a trend of more conscious and more activist conscious investors. absolutely, there is two strands to this, in so much that the national trust said we will sell the shares, while the church said we will sell out of some, some other companies have said we want to be more rowdy as
3:49 pm
shareholders and try and get businesses to change their minds from the inside. you can see this developing as younger investors start to move money into pensions, start to move money into pensions, start to move money into pensions, start to think about savings and investment and they want to do it with a certain amount of ethical background, they may be anything from fossil fuel extraction to fake meat and veganism. all of this will start to, will continue to roll on in the coming years and the national trust is the latest to jump on this. the other big business story that has been round today, is william hill announcing the store closure, the shop closure, really interesting, whether this will have a ripple effect throughout the rest of the bedene betting industry. you would have to say, so if you take the average uk high street, the only real shops on there at the moment seem to be take away, bashers shops and bookies so if they are closing down, that is more people living the high street. there is another story of retail being pushed off the high street and on to online, they said
3:50 pm
when the fixed odds betting terminals, when the maximum stake was lowers it may mean there is more to come in the future, as well, but you would have to say the if you are looking at william hill you are looking at william hill you are looking at william hill you are looking at ladbrokes and other quotes bookmakers because they all have these terminals and they will feel the effects. we had interesting figures from the car industry. a foul in sales in plug in hybrid more low emission vehicles, which is the opposite of the trend that the government would like to see. yes, this is, we are a country at the moment where 70% of people drive to work, every day, they commute to work, every day, they commute to work and they commute by on average ina carforabout work and they commute by on average in a car for about 30—45 minutes, so if you are, if you have a petrol car or diesel car and you can refuel
3:51 pm
where ever you want, that is fine, however the infrastructure spending on renewable cars, electric car, hybrid cars isn't there at the moment, for the average consumer, i doubt feel safe enough to take on a hybrid car, simply put as well, there isn't the incentive, we saw a huge amount and they were taken out of spending are views, out the budget earlier on, the government isn't backing hybrid vehicles, the investment isn't there, so people are staying with petrol and diesel. ok, are staying with petrol and diesel. 0k, fascinating to get your thoughts on that. good to have you on. that's all the business news. changing places toilets are bigger disabled toilets with a hoist, a changing bed and more space around the toilet for someone
3:52 pm
who needs assistance. the uk government wants to make these toilets mandatory in new large public buildings. fiona from bolton who has muscular dystrophy and lorna from north lincolnshire tell the bbc‘s ellis palmer why such toilets are necessary for them to do the things many take for granted. (vt the things many take for granted. you shouldn't be restricted of your own life, just because you need a wee. a loo gives my disabled child freedom. she is now nine-year-old, i am still having to change her on a baby changing facility. i feel like iam baby changing facility. i feel like i am playing russian roulette.
3:53 pm
people need changing places toilets because some need more than just the odd grab rail. some people cannot get out of their wheelchairs by themselves. say in don't provide the space for carers? standard access to i lets. space for carers? standard access toilets. it has more than grab rail, it has a hoist. an adult changing bench. can transfer from either side of the toilet instead of the toilet being in the corner. the rise and fall sink, you can wash your hands. take a selfie in the mirror if you wa nted take a selfie in the mirror if you wanted to. there is is a lot of space. it is about giving emily a normal childhood without being able to go the places any other child would be able to go. the toilet here means we can come here every week. it means we can come here, and have a day and not worry about where my daughter will be toileted because we know there is somewhere that is safe
3:54 pm
and where she can have her needs met ina and where she can have her needs met in a dignified and timely manner. at the moment, it is not mandatory to install a changing places toilet. we have 1300 or so, which is an enormous improvement on several yea rs enormous improvement on several years ago. what the government is intending to do is make it mandatory so when you built build a new large building, you will have to install one of these changing places as standard. there is a changing places toilet in my local area in the bolton interchange. it has made going out so much easier, i am able to be spontaneous, i am able to say let's go spontaneous, i am able to say let's go out into town with my two girls, i was go out into town with my two girls, iwasa go out into town with my two girls, i was a nurse for 20 years until i had emily may, yes, you. i didn't realise that people needed changing places toilet facilities. i hadn't heard of them. putting it into building regulations will mean we
3:55 pm
won't end one a postcode lottery of whether there is is a toilet available in the area your live because your council getting it or not. it is the small things that makes a before the weather, we've a quackers story for you. i without like do you meet a four—year—old duck by the name of olive. she has met the queen. she has taken the queen for a walk. around the city farm, this is part of the queen's week of royal engagements. in scotland. the keeper of this duck is mia who says this was a once in a lifetime opportunity, if rather bizarre, as i am sure you can agree. this is a free—range duck, she likes to leave the city farm, she even tried to get ona bus, the city farm, she even tried to get on a bus, she got on to the number 25, much to the alarm of the driver who then had to bring her home. but she looks rather comfortable in that
3:56 pm
role, doesn't she, to the manor born you might say, very stately she is too. olive i mean rather than her majesty, who is always stately. that is it from afternoon live. next is the bbc news at five with ben the sunshine will continue well into evening, more cloud round for scotla nd evening, more cloud round for scotland and northern ireland, but mostly thin high cloud. further north we have got thicker cloud and that cloud has been bringing rain through the day. that will continue through the day. that will continue through this evening, pushing across the highlands, while further south in contrast, we have got the heat, the strong sunshine, almost unbroken sunshine lifting temperatures to a peak at round 26 degree, they will start to taper off in the next few hour, the further north, not so warm because we have cloud, fairly brisk wind coming from the west and of
3:57 pm
course some rain as well. so it is a tale of two halves, the weather through the rest of the day and through the rest of the day and through this evening andover night, that rain is still with us in the north and west of scotland. we will see the cloud filtering further south, picking up a bit. but for most of us it prevents temperatures falling as low as they did last night so we will hold at 11 or 12, possibility of the odd mist patch round dawn in the south if you are up round dawn in the south if you are up early enough. for the south another repeat really of today. plenty of strong sunshine to come. you can see the rain in northern scotland. there is a chance for thicker cloud for northern ireland and the north—west, just the odd spot of rain, light shower. so temperatures won't be as high here and considerably lower in the north with the wind and rain. we could see temperatures a degree higher than today further south. the high pressure relings its grip into saturday, allowing the weather
3:58 pm
front, albeit well, weak pushing southwards. there won't be widespread showers on saturday. to north dry and brighter for scotland. a decent day, the rain having cleared from northern ireland through the night. northern england as well. temperatures on a par with those, for the last few days but it will feel fresher because we are behind that cold weather front, which willjust be about hanging round on sunday, still with the possibility of a shower on it, but just more cloud generally, for most of us it looks fine and dry, more fair weather cloud round on sunday but a decent day, highs between 18-22 but a decent day, highs between 18—22 degrees celsius. bye
3:59 pm
4:00 pm
today at five... a,500 jobs at risk at the betting chain william hill. the firm blames the planned closure of 700 shops on recent changes to the regulations on fixed odds gambling. a lot of these people, mainly women, in areas where there isn't much other employment have been working for, and very loyally, for william hill for many years. and if the industry as well as government were aware of the potential consequences of this legislation, between the two of them, they should have been meeting to mitigate the circumstances that we're now in. we'll have the latest from our business editor simonjack. the other main stories on bbc news at 5...
4:01 pm
4:02 pm
4:03 pm
4:04 pm
4:05 pm
4:06 pm
4:07 pm
4:08 pm
4:09 pm
4:10 pm
4:11 pm
4:12 pm
4:13 pm
4:14 pm
4:15 pm
4:16 pm
4:17 pm
4:18 pm
4:19 pm
4:20 pm
4:21 pm
4:22 pm
4:23 pm
4:24 pm
4:25 pm
4:26 pm
4:27 pm
4:28 pm
4:29 pm
4:30 pm
4:31 pm
4:32 pm
4:33 pm
4:34 pm
4:35 pm
4:36 pm
4:37 pm
4:38 pm
4:39 pm
4:40 pm
4:41 pm
4:42 pm
4:43 pm
4:44 pm
4:45 pm
4:46 pm
4:47 pm
4:48 pm
4:49 pm
4:50 pm
4:51 pm
4:52 pm
4:53 pm
4:54 pm
4:55 pm
4:56 pm
4:57 pm
4:58 pm
4:59 pm
5:00 pm

55 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on