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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 5, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's 11 am and these are the main stories this morning... jaguar land rover pumps hundreds of millions into their west midlands plant — where a new electric car will be produced — securing thousands of jobs. borisjohnson denies downing street attempted to withhold secret intelligence from him when theresa may made him foreign secretary. in the last few minutes it's been announced that the racing pundit, john mccririck, famous for his his ebullient personality, has died at the age of 79. five former police chiefs warn that the public has lost confidence in the police — and drug and knife crime have created a feeling that britain has descended into lawlessness.
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everywhere we look, there is a blank where she should be. families of the victims in the boeing ethiopia air crash demand to know why the 737 max was allowed to fly. in pioneering surgery — nerves inside paralysed people's bodies are "rewired" to give movement to their arms and hands. good morning, welcome to bbc newsroom alive. we willjust start with some breaking news on the death ofjohn mccririck, the racing broadcaster whose family have announced that he has died aged 79. he was at the face of channel 4 racing, one of the sports most recognisable figures, famous for his
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idiosyncratic fashion sense and his larger—than—life personality. idiosyncratic fashion sense and his la rger—than—life personality. he was, of course, an award—winning journalist for the sporting life and work for itv before he worked for channel 4. his death announced this morning, in the last few minutes, the death ofjohn mccririck, the racing broadcaster. we will have more on that later. the british car manufacturer, jaguar land rover has announced it is investing hundreds of millions of pounds to build electric vehicles at its castle bromwich plant in birmingham. it's a boost to the industry after a series of setbacks in recent months. initially the plant will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj. jlr says the move will help secure 2,700 jobs at the plant. the business secretary greg clark said the announcement was a vote of confidence in the uk automotive industry, protecting thousands of skilled jobs. let's get more on this now from theo leggett, our business correspondent who's atjlr's castle bromwich plant for us.
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there must be some relief and some celebration there. absolutely, a bit of both i think. jaguar land rover has been under the cosh are a bit of late and announce it was cutting 4500 late and announce it was cutting a500 jobs worldwide earlier that year. the majority in the here in the uk. workers at this factory have been wondering what any future with hope. the old second max was coming to the end of its run that was produced in the sector pay and one worker told me that morale was at rock bottom and he did not know what was going to happen next. this announcement seems to safeguard the future of this plant. i am joined by steve turner of unite the union. steve, what does this announcement mean for your members? there is fantastic news, not just for today's workforce here at castle bromwich but for those who want to come and
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work any stable industry. it is a best of four a world—class workforce producing a world—class product. we we re producing a world—class product. we were a little sceptical about their future not so long ago. electric i still make up a tiny proportion of the cars at there on our roads today. —— electric cars. and the charging infrastructure are still not there yet, it is a bit of a gamble that investment, is it not? every metre —— if we are to meet our carbon neutral objectives it is the direction to take. it is an investment and is planned for the future, of 20 to 40 years for example. we do need to step up to get the market confidence and use public procurement in a positive way to promote a market for electric and alternatively field vehicles and bring —— field vehicles and bring the battery cells back to the uk.
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what about that other car that has been hanging over the industry, the chief executive of jaguar said that he heard brexit could destroy entire industries in this country and now we have had this announcement? does not mean that backs it is not a worry any more cosmic to the country, brexit would be a disaster, not for the —— notjust country, brexit would be a disaster, not for the —— not just for the motor industry but for the manufacturing industry per se, but for the whole economy. and those two characters running for the leadership of the conservative party right now, they need to build out a no—deal brexit because that would be a complete disaster for plc and the uk automotive industry in particular. that is something we need. and i am hopeful that common sense will play and we will cut a deal with the european union that sees as industry flourish. thank you very much indeed. there's a new hall is where the —— that hollers where the new electric car will be built. it isa the new electric car will be built. it is a stranger to be standing on a production line that is silent, but
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for the next six weeks they will be lapping all of this machinery at —— ripping all of this missionary out. back to the breaking news in the last few moments that any broadcasterjohn mccririck has died aged 79. that has an announcement from his family. let's talk to cornelius. john macrae has been one of the biggest faces, and noisiest voices, in british television, i suppose, since getting his big break ——john suppose, since getting his big break —— john mccririck. he suppose, since getting his big break ——john mccririck. he is suppose, since getting his big break —— john mccririck. he is famous for wearing deerstalker hats, waving his arms around, booming voice, i'm talking to you from the racing track. there will be many people who have memories of his voice echoing around the place in channel a. in
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terms of racing, he was one of the absolute number one or two best known faces. he was a very successful journals known faces. he was a very successfuljournals bill, investigative journalist and very colourfulfigure, investigative journalist and very colourful figure, but a very controversial one as well. there are plenty of people who felt that his attitude towards women, his wife jenny, who he always nicknamed the booby, caused controversy. a very successive —— successful investigative journalists but controversial as well. i am reading that he started at night as at the school bookie, so his punditry began early. he went to harrow school and the late bbc racing presenterjulian wilson and he were contemporaries there. that is where things started. he always defied himself as a veiled
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bookmaker. —— defined himself as a failed bookmaker. he became very successful journalist and won failed bookmaker. he became very successfuljournalist and won awards for his investigative journalism. successfuljournalist and won awards for his investigativejournalism. he then became that there is a very big figure, and channel a racing and then on a much wider television —— toa then on a much wider television —— to a wider television audience, big brother and those type of reality programmes, he became a slightly unlikely star. we're just looking at pictures him in the past and that deerstalker hat. as you are seeing, famous for that dress sense, i will not give it an adjective. was he the same person in private as in public? there is figure, is that the person you knew? i sat next to him in racing media centres for years and yea rs racing media centres for years and years and he was also a really kind person. he was always keen to help, if he could. if we could get a
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little bit of information here and there, i remember the bbc five live tea m there, i remember the bbc five live team won a major award a few years ago and he was the first on the phone to say well done. i do recall his wife one thing to me, which give john a left back —— left back, because he never drove, he would not get into the front seat of the car. as we drove out he was in the back and he was waiting at the crowds as if he were some kind of money, so he was a larger than life, very colourful character, —— as if he we re colourful character, —— as if he were some kind of monarch. but he could not have been kinder or more killing. it is lovely to hear those insight has passed. i want to pick up insight has passed. i want to pick up on something —— kinder or more caring. but he breaking investigations into the murkier sides of the racing industry than?
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greyhound racing was an area that he looked at very closely. he was a great champion, as well as being less broadcaster, he was a champion for the punter. whether it was quite hand horse racing or something that he considered was unjust, he really wa nted he considered was unjust, he really wanted to bang the drum for that. he was unjust, he really wanted to bang the drum for that. had a considerable rate as an entertainer of course, but also someone who really cared for the punter and he also was a punter and was keen to with that particular flag as well. he had been unwell for some time and become increasingly frail in recent months, also he lost an employment case against channel a and that hit him very hard, so he used to, any last year or months, he was increasingly frail and felt he was not quite as appreciative —— appreciated as he had been before
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but in the 1980s and 1990s he was a huge figure in british racing. lovely to talk to you, take care. thank you. borisjohnson has denied he had a row with downing street about access to intelligence when he was foreign secretary. the bbc understands number ten tried to withhold sensitive information. the move caused concern among senior intelligence officials, who were worried he could approve operations without being given all the relevant information. 0ur security corresondent gordon corera reports. after he was appointed foreign secretary injuly 2016, downing street tried to limit borisjohnson's access to some secret intelligence, according to multiple sources with direct knowledge of events. one person attributed the attempt primarily to what they called "control frea kery" by number ten, rather than simply concerns over mrjohnson's discipline. a source close to mrjohnson denied there was any row about access,
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and said he saw everything he needed to see from his first day as foreign secretary. senior intelligence officials had concerns about the attempt to withhold material, the bbc understands. they took legal advice as to whether they could sustain a position in which the foreign secretary, as minister with day—to—day responsibility for mi6 and gchq, could authorise operations for which he might not be shown the intelligence material that was produced. one source said that excluding the foreign secretary would have been unprecedented. in the end, a compromise is believed to have been agreed. both the foreign office and number ten said they did not comment on intelligence matters. five former heads of scotland yard have warned there is a feeling that britain has "descended into lawlessness" and the public has lost confidence in the police. it's being blamed on the amount of knife and drug crime. in a letter to the times newspaper, the former police chiefs say that resources are at dangerously low levels.
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the home office says, police funding has increased by more than £1 billion this year and there are plans to recruit more than 3,500 extra officers and staff. our home affairs correspondent ben ando sent this update from new scotland yard. well, this letter was signed by eight very senior police officers, among them five of the most experienced in the country. they are five former commissioners of the metropolitan police, covering a period from 1993 to 2017 when cressida dick, who is doing thejob now, took over. so i think their views will be given, certainly, some respect in the home office. now, what they are saying in the letter is really two things. the first point they make is that public confidence in the police is falling. people, when they become the victims of a crime, have a precariously low expectation of a good resolution. this is partly because, they say, of the 30,000 cuts in police numbers and police staff numbers, but also because of what they describe as legitimate police tactics, like stop and search, being undermined politically.
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now, the second part of the letter is a question of what do we do about this? they do not believe that the current structure of a3 different forces in england and wales is equipped to make the kinds of changes that are needed to police in britain in the 21st century —— to police in britain in the 21st century. and they are suggesting the possibility of a royal commission to examine all sorts of different ways that the police might be organised, to be more functional and more successful and to restore public confidence going forward. in response, the home office has said, look, we're spending £1 billion on the police this year, we're recruiting 3500 new police officers and we're also talking to police leaders about ways we can use technology, we can use efficiency to be better at doing the job we are doing. however, it seems likely that this is a debate that is going to run and run. former head of counter terrorism sir mark rowley — who signed this letter — told radio a's the today programme
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that the government was responsible for "eight years of policy misdirection". people notice the police struggling to deal...struggling to respond to all the calls that they put in, and calls are triaged in an increasing way and investigative resources are stretched massively. the growth in confidence in the police, in terms of reporting, for example, serious sexual offences, means that in the last seven or eight years, i think we have got close to tripling those offences. for the police service to build the detective capability to do that has been a real stretch and has stretched resources away from investigating other less serious crimes, like car crimes and burglaries. and the public see that. we have had eight years of, what i would say, policy misdirection that has been characterised by parochialism, by weakening of powers and by cutting of resources. let's talk now to the west midlands assistant police and crime commissioner, waheed saleem. thank you forjoining us. as this
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concern something you would echo?|j support concern something you would echo?” support the majority of what the former police chief had been saying. here in the west midlands we have actually seen a £175 million of cuts, that is over 2000 police officers that we have lost here in the west midlands. the impact of thatis the west midlands. the impact of that is that 85% increase in knife crime since 2012 in the west midlands. these are police officers that are not available to tackle the rising crime in the west midlands. it is just rising crime in the west midlands. it isjust a rising crime in the west midlands. it is just a bad rising crime in the west midlands. it isjust a bad thing, is it not? you will also have heard then, a reporter, saying that the government is saying it is putting more money into policing, so why do you have these cuts when my money is going on? we have not seen a significant increase in funding and the west midlands. we have actually seen a decrease in funding. £175 million has been lost from our budget since 2010. over 2000 police officers have
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been lost from our police force. we have actually seen a significant decrease in our funding. have actually seen a significant decrease in ourfunding. a significant impact that is having on the number of police officers that we can be quite as well in the west midlands. so, iwould we can be quite as well in the west midlands. so, i would call for the government to put additional money, more money, into policing, that is really needed to try and tackle some of the significant increase in crime that we are facing. we are hearing from some of the others involved in that letter this morning and the times that they see it, notjust that letter this morning and the times that they see it, not just as a matter of resources, but one of police powers and they are worried that police powers are being limited in ways that they disapprove of, for example on stop and search. what is your view? stop and searches one tactic that is used to try and tackle some of the significant issues and crimes within the west midlands. the west midlands police had been using stop and search, but they need to be using a proportionate manner that might use any proportionate manner and used as
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one tactic any number of tactics required. the fundamental principle is that we need police officers, more officers on the street. so that they can tackle some of the crimes that we are facing. if you had one message for the government today of the back of this, over what is obviously an unusual letter, what would it be? to make them set up and ta ke would it be? to make them set up and take notice of this increasingly vocal feeling from serving and retired officers? the one thing i would say to both mr borisjohnson and mr hunt is that you need to pull it policing as a top pariah tape in your government. you need to give us the resources —— as a top priority. you need to give us the resources we need across the whole of the police services so we can increase the number of police officers so we can tackle some of the increase in significant crimes. the public will help them to account if they do not
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do that. thank you so much for joining us. thank you. the headlines on bbc news... jaguar land rover is to invest hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands — the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. boris johnson has denied downing street attempted to withhold some secret intelligence from him when theressa may made him foreign secretary three years ago. the racing pundit, john mccririck — famous for his his ebullient personality — has died at the age of 79. in sport, england and chelsea midfielder karen carney will retire from club and internationalfootball after the game against sweden. andy murray is back lighting up wimbledon and 32nd round in men's tumbles. later today he will play in the mixed doubles with serena williams. and pakistan needing to when with at least 316 when set to qualify for
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the cricket world cup. i will be back with more understudies at 11:30am. in the conservative leadership race, official hustings are under way in darlington this morning with borisjohnson and jeremy hunt laying out their pitches for thejob, as party members prepare to vote. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth is there. how much is less intelligent story thatis how much is less intelligent story that is on the bbc and any of the sun playing at this morning? we are about halfway through these hustings, these debates that are going on throughout the country and the format at as... one of the candidates goes fast, today it was borisjohnson, the candidates goes fast, today it was boris johnson, the nikki candidates goes fast, today it was borisjohnson, the nikki speech to the audience of conservative members, there is a q and d with the moderator and then it is open to the
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floor. and you might expect, the first question that was asked was about that story, the suggestion that downing street had prevented him from seeing a sensitive intelligence when he was a foreign secretary. he said that was not true. we can listen back to what he said... it is not true, but i obviously cannot comment any further on intelligence matters. laughter. it seems that the report came from —— that the order came from theresa may? the prime minister will not also comment on these stories either. when you can that some information was being withheld from you? i do not comment on these matters. you're denying it
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altogether? a pretty firm denial from liz altogether? a pretty firm denial from linohnson. he would not seek further on the details stop —— boris johnson. he was asked when he put his own self interest aside for the sake of the country and he said he could have made more money if he was not a full—time politician. he also suggested that he had sacrificed at the chance to finish a book on shakespeare, which was something that he had wanted to do. that's a q and a still ongoing at the moment, borisjohnson and a still ongoing at the moment, boris johnson taking questions and a still ongoing at the moment, borisjohnson taking questions from the floor, conservative party members, and then jeremy the floor, conservative party members, and thenjeremy hunt will ta ke members, and thenjeremy hunt will take his turn. the hustings are becoming crucial because the ballot papers have already gone out. reporting has now started in this contest, despite the fact there is still another couple of weeks to go. when you speak to conservative members who are coming along to watch the candidates, they are saying that these ability events now that are going to make up my mind, make my final decision about who is going to be the next party leader, and the next party leader, and inexpensive. thank you.
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we heard earlier about jaguar landrover‘s big new investment in electric cars , but researchers have warned that the number of cars on the road will have to be reduced, even when all vehicles are powered by clean electricity. the report, from the centre for research into energy demand solutions, says that electrifying all cars will do nothing to address trafficjams, urban sprawl and obesity. it calls on the government to devise a strategy that will eliminate the need to own a car. 0ur environment analyst roger harrabin has more. cars create local air pollution. their emissions are overheating the planet. the clean electric car will solve our problems, the government thinks. but wait a minute. in many city streets, car charging is a tangled obstacle. and not ideal if you can't get a spot outside your house. the report says targets for electrifying the car fleet may be very hard to meet. meanwhile, congestion won't be
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solved by electric cars either. in fact, self—drive electric vehicles could even make jams worse, as people choose to live further and further from the office. the key message is that we need to reduce energy demand in transport by reducing the amount of use of private cars, and by using other forms of transport to substitute for that — so public transport, safe cycling and walking, access to a car through sharing facilities. the government says it is investing and getting people walking and cycling, but critics say that is dwarfed by road—building. we do need technical innovation, the report says, but the innovation needs to help people whether they have a car or not. a strain of the common cold virus could help infect and kill bladder cancer cells,
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a small study suggests. 15 patients were given the cancer—killing virus through a catheter one week before surgery to remove their tumours. all signs of the disease disappeared in one patient, and in 1a others there was evidence that cancer cells had died. current treatments for bladder cancer are invasive and toxic, and university of surrey researchers say the virus could revolutionise patient care. the families of 157 people, who were killed when an ethiopian airlines plane crashed earlier this year, believe the "commercial motivation" of the aerospace giant "boeing", led to the deaths of their relatives. speaking exclusively to the bbc, family members explained the devastating effect the last few months have had on them. simon browning reports from north america. everywhere we look, there's a blank where she should be. struggling with their loss. nadia and michael's daughter samya rose was on a boeing plane that crashed in ethiopian.
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—— that crashed in ethiopia. samya's right here. she was one of 157 people on board. how did those first couple of hours evolve for you both? i learned standing right over there in the laundry room. i — it was 3:00am in the morning, and ijust started physically shaking, like, icouldn't stop my body from shaking. and then ijust thought, "i can't tell the other people in the house." it was the second identical boeing jet to crash in five months. initial reports say they happened for the same reason — a faulty flight control system. the 737 max has been grounded ever since. critics say the development and launch of the jets was rushed, and that boeing cut corners at the expense of safety. definitely my daughter died for the profit of boeing, and i don't want anyone else to die for that reason. i want these planes to be safe, and invest in the company,
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and the hardware and the infrastructure, to make our aviation systems safe. nadia and michael want to know why their daughter died, and their fight has taken them to the top of the american government. they are now representing families from across north america. when et302 crashed, there were passengers from more than 30 countries on board. the highest proportion of those were from kenya, because the flight was bound for nairobi. but the second—highest amount were from here in canada, and families in toronto are starting to want answers as to why their loved ones were killed. well, i lost my wife, carol, my three children, ryan, kelly and ruby, and i also lost my mum—in—law. i feel so lonely. i look at people, i see them with their children, playing outside, and i know i cannot
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hug my children. paul njoroge lost his entire family. he believes they would still be alive if boeing had grounded the planes earlier. the crash of ethiopian airlines flight 302 was preventable. but these individuals knew that they will not be held criminally liable, they will not face years in prison. but, if they knew that they would face years in prison, then they would have grounded those planes in november. we asked boeing for an interview, and they declined. in a statement, they said... but, for the families, life is changed forever. their resolve now — finding the truth. simon browning, bbc news, in toronto.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with lucy martin. further south another fine dry day. we have cloudy skies across northern ireland and scotland. summer breaks in the cloud for some sunny spells in the cloud for some sunny spells in the east. some patchy outbreaks of rain, particularly pushing on towards the north west of scotland. there will be some for northern ireland as well, pushing into north—west england too. dry and fine across southern and central england and wales. temperatures reaching maximum 28 celsius in london. through tonight and tomorrow that cloud front is bringing cloud and rain. ahead of it we will stay dry as well. temperatures overnight between eight and 15 celsius. some early brightness vesting and patchy
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rain will fit early brightness vesting and patchy rain willfit in early brightness vesting and patchy rain will fit in from the north. some sunny spells are further north, with temperatures feeling fresher, in 23 celsius. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: jaguar landrover is to invest hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant
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in the west midlands. the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. boris johnson has denied downing street attempted to withhold some secret intelligence from him when he became foreign secretary three years ago. john mccririck, who for many years was the face of british horse racing, has died at the age of 79. five former heads of the scotland yard have warned that the public has lost confidence in the police and drug and knife crime have created a feeling that britain has descended into lawlessness. all the sport, all the tennis, here is will. england and chelsea midfielder karen carney will retire from club and internationalfootball after saturday's women's world cup third—place play—off against sweden. the 31—year—old made her senior debut for birmingham aged 1a, and went on to play in four world cups for england and the 2012 0lympics for great britain. she made her england debut in 2005 and has won 1a3 caps
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and scored 32 goals. i can't give anything more, i have maxed out in every area, i have gone for every percentage game i could to be the best i could be and it is just time. i am very happy with that decision and it is the right decision. i don't have any regrets with that. the thing i miss most, singing the anthem. that will be tough. congratulations to karen carney. derby county have appointed former psv eindhoven coach phillip cocu as manager on a four—year deal following frank lampard's departure to chelsea. cocu played 101 times for the netherlands, and won league and cup honours with psv and barcelona. as a coach he led psv to league and cup success, but lasted only 15 games in his last
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role at turkish club fenerbahce. it's another bumper day at wimbledon with andy murray and serena williams making their first appearance in the mixed doubles later. they take on andreas mies and alexa guarachi. well, last night, the former world number1 murray and his french partner pierre herbert lost the first set in the men's doubles, but came back to win three sets to one against marius copil of romania and france's ugo humbert. that first—round match finished just after 20 past 9 in front of a sizeable crowd under court 0ne's new roof. meanwhile, seven—time champion serena recovered from a set down to beat teenage qualifier kya juvan to reach the third round in the ladies singles. afterwards she turned her thoughts towards teaming up with murray later today i'm looking forward to it, usually
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when i play doubles, it helps me with my singles game. i really need it andl with my singles game. i really need it and i am glad that you guys suggested it(!) i it and i am glad that you guys suggested it(!) lam really looking forward to it. we talked a bit about it before and it made sense for me because i really could use some matches at this point, just so, and we both want to do well, we both love wimbledon. so it was definitely something that we probably could do. well, before murray and williams take to court there's plenty more action. play is already underway on number two court. these are live pictures. fourteenth seed caroline wozniacki is up against shuai zhang. wozniacki has never gone beyond the fourth round at wimbledon. caroline wozniacki is leaving a—1. over on court 3, eight seed elina svitolina is taking on maria sakkari of greece. don't forget you can watch action from all the courts across all the bbc platforms.
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play starts on the show courts from 1 o clock. 0n centre court the men's fourth seed from south africa kevin anderson starts things off against guido pella. then simona halep faces victoria azarenka, before the 15 —year—old sensation cori gauff plays polona hetzog. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website and keep up to date with pakistan v bangladesh in the cricket world cup. there are in play clips available. i think pakistan need to win by 316 runs, no small task on their hands if they are to reach the semifinals.
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breaking story in birmingham crown court. this story has been going on for four and this story has been going on for fourand a this story has been going on for four and a half years, the biggest modern slavery case in the uk since legislation came in a few years ago, known as operation fault, thejudge inside has lifted restrictions that means we can tell you about the case. two trials, the defendants in the second one about to be sentenced later today, there are now eight people, all polish nationals, five of whom have been jailed for between four and a half and 11 years, three others will be sentenced later today, this is a case that west midlands police say involved hundreds of victims, 90 were mentioned in the two cases, effectively trafficked into this country from poland, often very vulnerable people, brought here to work in low—paid jobs, quite legitimately but then their money, their wages were stolen by the gang
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that organised the trafficking. they we re that organised the trafficking. they were coerced into living in dreadful conditions, unsanitary, filthy houses, rat infested accommodation, they were fed very little, some of them were starving and dishevelled. the case came to light when a charity called hope forjustice set up charity called hope forjustice set up in the west bromwich area, where this case is centred, and they set up this case is centred, and they set up soup kitchens and they noticed large numbers of polish men turning up large numbers of polish men turning up in shabby clothes, looking dirty and ill fed, desperate forfood. that led to this operation, this lengthy investigation by west midlands police that we can report for the first time. reading as well, as you are talking, a three—year police investigation, that these we re police investigation, that these were polish, homeless ex prisoners and alcoholics involved. it is obviously a very significant problem that the police have uncovered here. and in fact, and infact, in
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and in fact, in lifting reporting restrictions, thejudge and in fact, in lifting reporting restrictions, the judge said, and in fact, in lifting reporting restrictions, thejudge said, this isa restrictions, thejudge said, this is a massive problem in the uk, hiding in plain sight, that is all the organisations, the police, the charities that work with these people, say, it is going on everywhere. polish nationals can quite legally work here but what this gang was doing was preying on people who were particularly vulnerable, homeless people, people sleeping rough, alcoholics, in one case, a man who walked out of prison, had nowhere to go, and they said, we will pay for you to go to the uk and you will get a well—paid job at the end of it. when he got here, thejob is not particularly well—paid, they said he owed them thousands of pounds and he never saw his wages, they opened a bank account in his name and they farmed that money, one ringleader was driving a bentley around west bromwich, making so much money out of these proceedings. this is a problem going on everywhere, lots of low—paid jobs. 0ne problem going on everywhere, lots of low—paid jobs. one of the things the police and the charities have said is that there is an responsibility not just is that there is an responsibility
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notjust on members of the public, about these people working at car washes, in recycling factories, it is the employers themselves, they have a legitimate workforce who turn up have a legitimate workforce who turn up and work hard but they need to be looking at their body language, working out whether or not they are potentially being enslaved by gang bosses, who are exploiting them. at one banker, 35 bank accounts were openedin one banker, 35 bank accounts were opened in the names of individuals but always somebody with them and the money went to the gang. perhaps the money went to the gang. perhaps the bank should have been more observant, may have told the police. this is a problem, asjudge mary stacey has said, that is going on in plain sight across the country, that now thanks to cases like this, we can find now thanks to cases like this, we canfind a now thanks to cases like this, we can find a report and perhaps people will be more aware of them. my mind is going back to, do you remember the morecambe cockle pickers case, all the discussion about the legislation around gang masters and policing on that type of industry, and it seems reminiscent of that,
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that was almost tender —— two decades ago. as a result of that case and others like it, modern legislation came in, units have been set up, and charities like the salvation army and hope forjustice are involved and have set up teams of investigators that look for this kind of case and legislation is going on but it has taken a long time to gather evidence. three years of police investigations and trials that have been going on for a year. more cases i know, going on across the country, more investigations that are active. we will be hearing more about this problem, there has been a time like since legislation came in, and putting together the evidence. 0rganised criminal activity, often eastern european victims but it can be british victims but it can be british victims as well, it can be people from other parts of the world. it is something going on in big cities and evenin something going on in big cities and even in smaller towns, across the country, as we speak.
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let's return to our top story, and the british car manufacturer jaguar land rover has announced it is investing hundreds of millions of pounds to build electric vehicles at its castle bromwich plant in birmingham. it's a boost to the industry after a series of setbacks in recent months. jlr says the move will help secure 2,7000 jobs at the plant. we can speak now to jack dromey, who's the labour mp for birmingham erdington, which includes the castle bromwich plant. thank you for speaking with us, people were saying the whole plant was on the line over whether this would happen, was it that serious, is ita would happen, was it that serious, is it a big boost? the threat was serious, the plant nearly closed ten yea rs serious, the plant nearly closed ten years ago, it was turned around from closure, more recently it has had an uncertain future. crucially what we have heard today is very welcome news. the plant that built the spitfire during the war, and two
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generations ofjaguar after spitfire during the war, and two generations of jaguar after the spitfire during the war, and two generations ofjaguar after the war will now become the first plant in britain to produce electric cars. the last of the old xjs as they are called, rolled off the production line, today, within a year, the new electric cars will be manufactured at castle bromwich. good for thousands of workers, good for birmingham, good for the global environment, and it is also good for the consumer, because if you have an electric car, you will do 250 miles journey, £80 on petrol, but if you have an electric car, it is £5, after you have plugged it in overnight. this is very good news. what do you say to those who would argue, well, yes, it's better than the other kind of car, but actually it's not good enough for this climate? we had a big report come out this morning that says, basically we all need to be owning fewer ca rs, basically we all need to be owning fewer cars, this is an industry that we need to move away from. the
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industry is an industry of the future and to its great credit, led byjaguar future and to its great credit, led by jaguar land rover, future and to its great credit, led byjaguar land rover, it is future and to its great credit, led by jaguar land rover, it is living up by jaguar land rover, it is living up to the expectations of the public that we tackle the problems associated with pollution and global environment. —— in a global environment. —— in a global environment. that is why the transition to electric cars is so welcome. jaguar land rover are trailblazers in this country, crucially, now, at the next stages, we need government to play its part, what we want to see, for example, the battery cells that are necessary for the cars, produced here in britain. at the moment they are produced in korea and that cannot make sense. crucially, also, what we are determined to see is that the government gets it right at the next stages on brexit. great uncertainty continues to overhang the automotive industry, and all i would say to ministers, is this: jaguar land rover have to date back to britain, we hope our british government backs jaguar land rover. just to take those two issues, one by one: the
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batteries, you say, the government needs to get behind that. why is that a government issue rather than an industry issue? the industry is collaborating together, it wants to see battery cells manufactured here in britain, but if you were to go to france or germany, this would not be a debate they would have, they would recognise the important role of government, and indeed, our own government, and indeed, our own government has taken some welcome steps. if the future is one of electric cars, why not produce them, lock, stock and barrel, here in this country. i hope the government will engage with mps across party, but the industry, to drive forward, establishing here in britain, a battery manufacturing plant. one quick thing, the other point you mention about brexit, there will be some critics who say thatj lr were crying wolf when they said that the ha rd crying wolf when they said that the hard brexit in particular would flatten investment in the uk, here
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they are, investing in the uk amid uncertainty over brexit. it remains the case, i hard brexit would be catastrophic for the automotive industry, we have seen a huge fall in production during the course of the year. -- jlr. therefore, it is critical we do not crash out with no deal, a no—deal brexit would create massive uncertainty over tens of thousands of jobs, but massive uncertainty over tens of thousands ofjobs, but today, i stress again, jaguar land rover had back to britain, now ministers must back to britain, now ministers must backjaguar back to britain, now ministers must back jaguar land rover and back to britain, now ministers must backjaguar land rover and get it right in the british national interest over brexit. tomorrow will see london's pride parade take centre stage with thousands of the lgbt community and supporters descending on the capital. but some people are unhappy that away from the rainbow flags and sequins, the event is being hijacked by businesses. are they simply supporting pride, or profiteering?
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we'll discuss this in a moment but first katie silver has been to oxford street to take a look. 0xford oxford circus, the heart of central london, you cannot go half a block without seeing some business displaying some kind of rainbow, across the street injohn lewis, and here, agua sabi, we can see them putting the finishing touches on a rainbow display. —— at wasabi. topshop has painted their entire wall with rainbow coloured dots. we have a rainbow flag, rainbow on your back, what you make a company is putting out rainbow displays? basically it is good that companies and brands are supporting lgbt rights but it is important that they give back. it is a good thing, spreading awareness further than it already is. it can be a negative
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thing, if the lgbt qi aim members think that they are like not using it appropriately and not using it for the members and not wanting to spread for the members and not wanting to spread awareness. . for the members and not wanting to spread awareness. . they need to probe the brands beyond the shop front. zero transparency about what it actually means but perhaps that is by design, are they investing any money, are they doing anything? nobody really knows... but, it looks good(!) joining me now are comedian and writer andrew doyle, and asad dhuna from pride london. welcome to you both, now, you are obviously very excited about tomorrow. and what do you think about this issue of commercialisation? an issue that comes up commercialisation? an issue that comes up every year, around pride as a concept, and over the last 50 yea rs, a concept, and over the last 50 years, this year is when we are honouring 50 years of queer revolt,
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since the stonewall uprising, and the purpose of what it has been over time has shifted and with that, businesses have become more involved, looking at ways they can support their lgbt employees and that manifests at how they can turn up that manifests at how they can turn up to places like pride. you would say it is not profiteering, it is just supporting? when i look at it, four segments of business: one that looks like how they can support organisations like pride, like ours, that need money to keep the event going, close down the streets, celebrate something. some do not give money but support in other ways. through giving people, giving support. there are some that slap a rainbow on things, and they are the ones that need to be looking at investigating with care. and, the ones that don't know anything. the ones that don't know anything. the ones that don't do anything, they could hear debates like this and say, should i get involved at all? and those that do have the rainbow, we need to be looking into exactly what they are doing and are they supporting the issues that they see the community, like homelessness,
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and exclusion from poorer society. do you agree with the segmentation? interesting way of looking at it, i think we are all used to the idea of corporations and companies cynically exploiting gay people for a quick buck. are we? yes, the pink pound, ongoing thing. this is a critical mass, i take on board what you are saying but we must accept that there isa saying but we must accept that there is a sense that this is slightly distasteful. this is a flag that is related to activism and the concept of pushing equal rights, and it is being manipulated as a kind of indicator that you are good, that you are virtuous, that you are "on the right side of history"; that is not what it should be about, that is not what it should be about, that is not the meaning. a lot of gay people in particular are starting to feel that this is misrepresenting what they stand for. do you agree with they stand for. do you agree with the point that segments one and segments too, supporting financially, or... 0r
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segments too, supporting financially, or... or the logistics... is really helpful? important distinction bear, people actually doing something reductive and other people merely signalling they are for gay rights, but the optics of it, i went to a very popularjapanese optics of it, i went to a very popular japanese chain, they optics of it, i went to a very popularjapanese chain, they told me that they were proud that they did not discriminate against lgbt people and my feeling is, why on earth would you? and my feeling is, why on earth would you ? that and my feeling is, why on earth would you? that is my default expectation, we do not live in a society where that sort of thing is acceptable, it reminds me of when people wore safety pins to broadcast the idea that they are not racist, again, i would assume you are not racist, i would assume it! again, i would assume you are not racist, iwould assume it! but again, i would assume you are not racist, i would assume it! but we live in a time, we need to look at how they get to the point where they thought a doormat was the right way to execute the campaign, or use that, but when you look behind it, i think the rainbow flag right now is becoming a bit like the fair trade symbol, when you look at how fair trade work, it was more about the supply chain, what are you doing, going inside the organisation. do you think there is widespread
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discrimination against gay people in this country? i don't think there is... the bisexual and lesbian woman ona bus, is... the bisexual and lesbian woman on a bus, attacked a couple of weeks ago, there is a need to stand up, last week we did research called pride matters, and we found that it isa pride matters, and we found that it is a celebration for 78% of people, thatis is a celebration for 78% of people, that is a huge step forward from 50 yea rs that is a huge step forward from 50 years ago, a2% it is still a protest, it is how to balance the two. no one will deny that there is homophobia in society, the example you gave is an obvious one, but, we live in a very tolerant society, a society where that kind of thing gets widespread condemnation from all sides of the political spectrum, no one was openly supporting it. we must acknowledge how far we have come. i worry that we forget that. 50 years since stonewall, those people were revolting against police brutality, police harassment, things that have gone. i feel a lot more comfortable about these corporations doing this if, for instance, they had done the same before the equality act, in 2010, if they had
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done the same before section 28 was repealed in 2003, if they had done more before the age of consent was equalised in 2001. no, they have takena equalised in 2001. no, they have ta ken a market equalised in 2001. no, they have taken a market decision to make as much money as possible, and calculated that. in part there is a market decision, one of the things we look at is how we go from one out of 365 to this being all year round, if we had this news debate in november, i don't know if it be that interesting for people because the rainbows are not out in false. this serves a purpose, to some point. rainbows are not out in false. this serves a purpose, to some pointm provides a news peg. yes. -- not out in false. do you worry, if a company does not have the rainbow flag, that maybe they were discriminate?” think that is hugely problematic. no, not at all, i think that some companies do not put on the fly do it as companies do not put on the fly do itasa companies do not put on the fly do it as a conscious decision because they realise, when you look behind they realise, when you look behind the scenes of what is going on, maybe they need to do more for lgbt staff and people do not feel co mforta ble. staff and people do not feel comfortable. very interesting point,
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both of you. wonderful, fascinating points you have made on this debate, which will go on tomorrow, we will leave it there for the moment. i was sitting back and listening to you both, it was great to hear you interview each other, thank you! now: ina now: in a moment, all the business news, but first, a quick look at the headlines. jaguar landrover is to invest hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands. the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. boris johnson has denied downing street attempted to withhold some secret intelligence from him when he became foreign secretary three years ago. the racing punditjohn mccririck, famous for his his ebullient personality, has died at the age of 79. hello, everyone, business headlines. jaguar land rover is investing hundreds of millions of pounds to build a range of electric vehicles at its castle bromwich
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plant in birmingham. initially the plant will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj. jlr says the move will help secure the jobs of 2,700 workers at the plant. average house prices dipped by 0.3% last month compared tojune last year, according to the halifax. however, they rose by 5.7% in the three months tojune from the same period last year. halifax's managing director says the housing market is displaying a reasonable degree of resilience in the face of political and economic uncertainty. john menzies, the aviation services company, has warned that full—year profits will fall below expectations because of a wider industry issues including weak cargo volumes. the company provides services such as moving aircraft, fuelling and handling baggage and cargo for the likes of easyjet and british airways—owner iag. shares tumbled on the news this morning. some welcome news for jaguar landrover workers in its castle bromwich plant in birmingham. jlr has confirmed it will invest in the uk to build electric cars —
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it says the move will "safeguard several thousand jobs". three new electric cars are to be made, with the first being an all—electricjaguar xj. the union unite says to secure the investment, workers agreed to move to working a "condensed week" of four days. steve fowler is editor of auto express. good to talk to you, we have talked in length today on bbc news about the business reasons for whyjaguar is doing this, talk to me about the car industry as a whole, is this, do you think, the way the industry is moving now, putting money towards electric? definitely, the electric future is coming whether we like it or not, and for good reason, macro—guest, concerns are obvious and there are also political concerns because the car industry is being. to make lower c02 cars. again, for the right reasons. in order to avoid tensely huge penalties from the european union, the manufacturers are having to invest more, and trying to persuade
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us invest more, and trying to persuade us to buy more and more electric ca rs. us to buy more and more electric cars. thankfully, more and more of us cars. thankfully, more and more of us want to buy electric cars at the same time, good news. quite a lot of big—name companies are consolidating to make electric vehicles. yes, the days of car manufacturers standing on their own are long gone, every car—maker is working with other car—makers, jaguar land rover, recently announced a deal with bmw to work on electric motors. these previously rival firms, you would never imagine working together, are working very closely together, even bmw and mercedes working together. who would have thought it! laughter how much appetite is therefore fully electric cars, given that there has been some criticism of the infrastructure in the uk to be able to handle that? firstly, infrastructure must improve, but it is improving all the time, as your previous guest said, we would like to see the government taking a bigger role in improving the infrastructure. the appetite is growing enormously. now, there were some stats out this week showing a
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decline in the registration of alternative fuel vehicles, that does not mean there is a decline in registrations of fully electric cars, that is growing. it was plug—in hybrid electric vehicles, and there is a reason for that. in terms of the statistics, people visiting our website, there is a huge appetite for electric vehicles, i don't believe there is a person buying a new car today who does not consider buying electric. may not this time, but next time. they are good to drive, low in terms of costs and more and more people are getting interested in electric cars. good to talk to you. that is the business news. now it's time for a look at the weather with lucy. north—south split, 11 or 12 celsius in the northern isles, 27, 28 in
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southern england. through the afternoon, cloudy skies across scotland, northern england, northern ireland, patchy outbreaks of rain, most persistent for north—west scotland, dry, fine day for much of central southern england wales, with good spells of sunshine. temperatures maximum 28 degrees. through the evening and overnight, cold front bringing the cloud and outbreaks of rain, gradually slipping south. behind it, something dry across scotland and staying dry ahead of the cold front as well. tomorrow, some early brightness first then, for southern parts of england, cloud and outbreaks of patchy rain and drizzle gradually pushing south. behind it, some good spells of sunshine. 0ne pushing south. behind it, some good spells of sunshine. one or two showers in the north, temperatures feeling fresher for most, height of around 23, 20 feeling fresher for most, height of around 23,20 a degrees, and that is the forecast.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live — these are today's main stories... a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forcing people to carry out forced labour. police believe up to a00 victims were put to work victims were put to work by the organised crime gang and made to live in squalid conditions. jaguar land rover pumps hundreds of millions into their west midlands plant, where a new electric car will be produced, securing thousands of jobs. borisjohnson denies downing street attempted to withhold secret intelligence from him when theresa may made him foreign secretary. that has went for — one, 5—1...
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the racing pundit, john mccririck — for many years the face of british horse racing — has died at the age of 79. five former police chiefs warn that the public has lost confidence in the police and drug and knife crime have created a feeling that britain has descended into lawlessness. everywhere we look, there is a blank where she should be. families of the victims in the boeing ethiopia air crash demand to know why the 737 max was allowed to fly. in pioneering surgery, nerves inside paralysed people's bodies are "rewired" to give movement to their arms and hands. good morning. —— good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. in the last half hour, eight people from poland — who forced hundreds of people to live in squalor and work for
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a pittance in the west midlands — have been found guilty of running the uk's largest modern slavery ring. the gangmasters had earned millions of pounds. the case has been investigated by police for three years, and details have been made public today after the judge lifted reporting restrictions. phil mackie is following the case at birmingham crown court. yes, i have been following the case for three and a half years. i went on one of the three raids of operation fought as the operation became known in west bromwich. when the police raided an ordinary look terrors has to —— ordinary —looking terraced housing. the man who is pa rt terraced housing. the man who is part of the gang of polish criminals
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brought people over to this country with the promise of a job, nice accommodation and they were forced into menial work, terrible accommodation, and they had their wages are stolen from them. as you say, it is the biggest investigation of its kind, the first time we can report the story after reporting restrictions were lifted at birmingham crown court today. victims were made to live in rooms like this often without heating or light. the gang was made up heating or light. the gang was made up of three women and five men. these men were found guilty of modern slavery offences for the first time, the bbc can report that five others were convicted. they
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preyed on the homeless, alcoholics and they were promised a wealthy life in britain and were quickly transported from their home lives before they had the chance to change their mind. translation: i came here to start my new life and did not know that it would start with back problems. i could not go for a walk. they were following me, spying on me, controlling me. more than 19 victims —— 19 victims give evidence but at the police believe that the true number of victims is any hundreds. the litany in the black country and refers to work in factories and on farms, carrying out labourfor as factories and on farms, carrying out labour for as little as 50p per day, while their masters took most of their earnings. while west midlands police looked into what was happening four years ago and named
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their investigation operation fought. they conventionally victims that they were unlawfully in the country, for example, and if they left the house they would be arrested by the police. sometimes they were given a date so they would be told that they owed the traffickers are £5,000 and had to work off that debt, so there is a lot of these methods that the traffickers i would use to make them feel trapped. one is traffickers i would use to make them feeltrapped. one is laid had his arm broken for complaining, while another was stripped naked in front of others that make one slave. we can was discovered after charities identified victims. this man works undercover and want to remain anonymous. “— undercover and want to remain anonymous. —— the gang was discovered. with john, physically disorientated —— withdrawn. 0ne victim presented with a broken arm
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and the arm had to be set itself out of alignment, rich clothing, emaciated. the gang that an opulent lifestyle, buying designer clothes and cars. they made at least 29 over and cars. they made at least 29 over a few years —— they made at least £2 million. the public are being urged to keep a lookout for other victims who could be being mistreated in the same way. some of those will be sentenced today and five have already been sentenced. for tracking, conspiring to trafficking, requiring people to perform forced labour and money laundering. watch chatty su btlety labour and money laundering. watch chatty subtlety and people was that they were polish citizens and that
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they were polish citizens and that they could legitimately work in factories, recycling centres, etc. but their employers thought that there was nothing untoward, but these employers should have been more aware when the workers came in looking dishevelled and they should have asked more questions. what the judge has said today, nothing reporting restrictions, and allowing it to tell you the story that for the first time today, is that modern slavery is a massive problem in the uk and is hiding in plain sight. the fa ct uk and is hiding in plain sight. the fact that we can report it now as pa rt fact that we can report it now as part of the effort to bring it to people because my attention so that people because my attention so that people can look for the signs and let people know. i suppose it is not just employers when you talk about letting people know and keeping their eyes open, it is all of us. it isa their eyes open, it is all of us. it is a message to the public to keep an eye out? remember, these... this whole operation was uncovered by the charity hope for justice, whole operation was uncovered by the charity hope forjustice, who set up a soup kitchen in west bromwich where most of these people were living and working unnoticed as
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people coming and starving, dishevelled, clearly not anybody that state. they were desperate for food. that led them to start the conversations which led to the police investigation that became operation fought. surely there would have been people working alongside some of these men and some of the factories, there was a bakery, there was the recycling centre, that ought to have asked some of the questions and perhaps done more about it. and the employers too, but equally if you go to a car wash, in your back, perhaps you should have some of the same questions and your mind and, if you are suspicious, you should let the authorities know. thank you. the british car manufacturer jaguar land rover has announced it is investing hundreds of millions of pounds to build electric vehicles at its castle bromwich plant in birmingham. it's a boost to the industry after a series of setbacks in recent months. initially the plant will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj. jlr says the move will help secure 2,700 jobs at the plant. the business secretary greg clark
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said the announcement was a vote of confidence in the uk automotive industry, protecting thousands of skilled jobs. let's get more on this now from theo leggett, our business correspondent who's atjlr's castle bromwich plant for us. well, this is a vital announcement for workers here at castle bromwich. there are 2500 or so employees under this announcement will safeguard their future. this announcement will safeguard theirfuture. i this announcement will safeguard their future. i was talking to some of them this morning and they were saying that, in recent weeks morale had been at rock bottom. they did not know what was going to happen. the jx, which has been produced here for ten years, was coming to the end of its life and they did not know what was going to happen next. in the wider context, of course, jaguar land rover has been cutting jobs, a500 jobs worldwide, most of them here in the uk. the people working here, that is good news. as for the move towards electric cars, that is very interesting, because, yes, it is to gator, but electric cars still
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make upa is to gator, but electric cars still make up a very small proportion of the vehicles that make it as the future. why did they need to do this? iam future. why did they need to do this? i am joined future. why did they need to do this? iamjoined by future. why did they need to do this? i am joined by we are going electric and any very big way. as the cost comes andy range increases, we will increasingly switch over. in the next five years and there is going to be a big push towards electric cars and car companies have no choice but to try and get into that. i think i saw yesterday that injune, the number of electric cars sold was a 60% higher than it was last year. but it is still a tiny, tiny amount? consumers do not seem convinced yet. i think in some of catch up with some of the technology development that is going on. across europe, pure electric cars are about 296 europe, pure electric cars are about 2% of the market and it is less in the uk. when you add in hybrids and
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plug—in hybrids, which is also part of the electrification, it is a much bigger figure. electric cars are coming any very big way. they already save you money and, for most people, they are perfectly usable. the point made byjaguar land rover itself today, batteries, the need for somewhere in the uk to be building lots and lots of batteries. that is a really important point. i think what we have seen from the government in terms of industrial strategy is great for innovation, but not nearly enough on the supply chain, including having a big, big victory producing battery. we need better skills and... —— big, big battery producing battery. do you believe that it jaguar land rover has it right here? this is a gamble that will ultimately pay off? they will have to do it. there is no alternative. the industry is going to undergo the most profound change in the next ten to 15 years and a bigger change than the last 100 years. jaguar land rover are at the forefront of that and they have had
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some success forefront of that and they have had some success already but the fact that investment is happening here is a great base for the local economy. 0ther car—makers have gone much, much further had they not? we have seen much further had they not? we have seena much further had they not? we have seen a big progress by bmw, but other than that the jaguar land rover had done pretty well. as a small company, having getting this to market. what we'll see is much more collaboration between glr and other companies like bmw in developing the technology going forward. -- glr. in this hall, the machinery has now gone silent and they will start limping it all out and installing new technology for that new electric future —— ripping it alight. borisjohnson has denied he had a row with downing street about access to intelligence when he was foreign secretary. the bbc understands number ten tried to withhold sensitive information. the move caused concern among senior intelligence officials, who were worried he could approve operations without being given all the relevant information.
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0ur security corresondent gordon corera reports. after he was appointed foreign secretary in july 2016, downing street tried to limit borisjohnson's access to some secret intelligence, according to multiple sources with direct knowledge of events. one person attributed the attempt primarily to what they called "control frea kery" by number ten, rather than simply concerns over mrjohnson's discipline. a source close to mrjohnson denied there was any row about access, and said he saw everything he needed to see from his first day as foreign secretary. senior intelligence officials had concerns about the attempt to withhold material, the bbc understands. they took legal advice as to whether they could sustain a position in which the foreign secretary, as minister with day—to—day responsibility for mi6 and gchq, could authorise operations for which he might not be shown the intelligence material that was produced. one source said that excluding the foreign secretary would have been unprecedented. in the end, a compromise is believed to have been agreed. both the foreign office and number
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ten said they did not comment on intelligence matters. five former heads of scotland yard have warned there is a feeling that britain has "descended into lawlessness" and the public has lost confidence in the police. it's being blamed on the amount of knife and drug crime. in a letter to the times newspaper, the former police chiefs say that resources are at dangerously low levels. the home office says, police funding has increased by more than £1 billion this year and there are plans to recruit more than 3,500 extra officers and staff. our home affairs correspondent ben ando sent this update from new scotland yard. well, this letter was signed by eight very senior police officers, among them five of the most experienced in the country. they are five former commissioners of the metropolitan police, covering a period from 1993 to 2017 when cressida dick, who is doing thejob now, took over. so i think their views will be given, certainly,
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some respect in the home office. now, what they are saying in the letter is really two things. the first point they make is that public confidence in the police is falling. people, when they become the victims of a crime, have a precariously low expectation of a good resolution. this is partly because, they say, of the 30,000 cuts in police numbers and police staff numbers, but also because of what they describe as legitimate police tactics, like stop and search, being undermined politically. now, the second part of the letter is a question of what do we do about this? they do not believe that the current structure of a3 different forces in england and wales is equipped to make the kinds of changes that are needed to police britain in the 21st century and they are suggesting the possibility of a royal commission to examine all sorts of different ways that the police might be organised, to be more functional and more successful and to restore public confidence going forward. in response, the home office has said, look, we're spending £1 billion on the police this year,
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we're recruiting 3500 new police officers and we're also talking to police leaders about ways we can use technology, we can use efficiency to be better at doing the job we are doing. however, it seems likely that this is a debate that is going to run and run. the headlines on bbc news... a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forcing people to carry out forced labour. jaguar land rover is to invest hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands — the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. boris johnson has denied downing street attempted to withhold some secret intelligence from him when he became foreign secretary three years ago.
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time for the sport. yes a busy day at wimbledon let's go straight to the all england club now and join our reporter john watson, and john we'll see andy murray and serena williams team up later. absolutely, yes. even though he is not playing any singles he is still the talk of the town. notjust any men's doubles but in the mixed doubles. we will be seeing them later. he made a winning start on his wimbledon return and they came through in four sets yesterday. as you can imagine, huge support seeing him back as they beat marius coppell and... they have been speaking fondly about each other, and the thing that serine has done so much
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any women's game with all those titles she saying that how much he has done for women's tennis as well, sending up for women's rate —— serena. i am looking forward to it. it will help me out. when i play doubles it really helps out my single skin. i am glad that you guys suggest it. —— my singles game. we talked about it a little bit before and it made sense for me because i really could use as a match is at this point. and it made sense for him and we both want to do well and we both love wimbledon and so... guess, it was definitely something that we thought we could do. john, someone that we thought we could do. john, someone else who everyone is excited to see at wimbledon in action today is the 15—year—old cory gough.
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absolutely, she has been labelled a star in the making. —— gauff. 2a yea rs star in the making. —— gauff. 2a years difference between the two of them but she showed... it means that she is into the third round against polonia hertzog today. she has the extra pressure today and it has been a fantastic tournament for her and it has led to people suggesting that she has a huge future in the game, not leastjohn mcenroe, who said that he believes she will be world number one by the time she has 20. it is that type of pressure she is having to deal with. after those two impressive results in the opening round, we would not bet against her doing it again today. yes, she still has five years as well. 15—year—old
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cody gauff. —— corey gauff. england and chelsea midfielder karen carney will retire from club and internationalfootball after saturday's women's world cup third—place play—off against sweden. the 31—year—old made her senior debut for birmingham aged 1a, and went on to play in four world cups for england and the 2012 0lympics for great britain. she made her england debut in 2005 and has won 1a3 caps and scored 32 goals. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you at 1:30pm. in the conservative leadership race, official hustings are under way in darlington this morning with borisjohnson and jeremy hunt laying out their pitches for thejob, as party members prepare to vote. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth is there. alex on the skill of her electrifying was it, one to ten, give mea
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electrifying was it, one to ten, give me a number? -- scale. that has a hard question. i have sat through a hard question. i have sat through afairfew of a hard question. i have sat through a fair few of these has six now and it isa a fair few of these has six now and it is a different outing each time so you hear pretty much similar from each of the candidates of what they will do if they win that. these are some of the cap party members who have sat through the last two hours or so of promises and pledges from borisjohnson or so of promises and pledges from boris johnson and jeremy hunt. or so of promises and pledges from borisjohnson and jeremy hunt. a whole range of topics come up as they are often do at these events, not least of all brexit. there was one question today, put to the former foreign secretary, boris johnson, and that was about those reports when he was foreign secretary, number ten tried to block some intelligence from being passed on to him. he would not be drawn on the detail, but he did say it was not true. let's had a lesson to an earlier. it is not true, but i obviously cannot comment any further on intelligence matters. laughter.
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it seems, according to reports, that the order came from theresa may? 0ver fears that you could not be trusted? i am sure that the plan would also not comment on intelligence matters either so i am extremely dubious about the providence of these intelligence matters. did you suspect things were being held back from you at the time? it is not true and i do not comment on these matters. you're denying it altogether? jeremy hunt was also asked to comment on that and he says that that it was correct that the foreign minister did not comment on these issues. it shows that there were concerns about borisjohnson and his
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discretion, but borisjohnson did admitany discretion, but borisjohnson did admit any hustings today that he had been responsible for the odd political gas. 0nly subjective character he was asked —— gaffer. he said that he had made sacrifices by being a full—time politician because he had not earned as much as he might have done otherwise and he had had to park a shakespeare biography the writing of a shakespeare biography because the jeremy the writing of a shakespeare biography because thejeremy hunt was asked if he thought there was a time he had let somebody down and he paused and he referred to the case of the british women who has been imprisoned in iranifeel in iran i feel i am letting down nazanin zaghari ratcliffe for every day that she has been held in iran. i met day that she has been held in iran. imet her
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day that she has been held in iran. i met her brave husband richard on many occasions. she has a daughter, the same age as my daughter and that is something that, you know, is a very big deal. jeremy hunt they're answering the question about when he felt he had let somebody down. as the campaign progresses, we are reaching more of a crucial point. the conservative party members are now receiving their ballot papers and are starting to cast their votes. as that is happening where hearing of more prominent backers for both candidates, the daily telegraph newspaper, of which borisjohnson makes a comment, that cannot in favour of him as the future panellist and the former prime minister, john major, he lent his support to jeremy hunt minister, john major, he lent his support tojeremy hunt when he spoke —— prime minister. support tojeremy hunt when he spoke -- prime minister. it is fairly evident from my that i cannot vote for someone who was part of the brexit campaign that misled the country, so i shall offer my work to jeremy hunt and i do not think that
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anyone would be in any doubt about that. —— offer my vote tojeremy hunt. i would that. —— offer my vote tojeremy hunt. iwould hope that. —— offer my vote tojeremy hunt. i would hope that anyone would wait a little while before voting because we need to see both candidates properly interviewed by the media, explaining what they will do and how they will do it. it is an interesting point therefrom john major, because at the ballot papers have gone out. there are still two weeks or so from this contest. some conservative members already think they are starting to cast their votes at this point, so we have reached a crucial stage now of this to decide the next because conservative party leader and the next panellist of the country. the racing punditjohn mccririck has died at the age of 79. mccririck made his career as the face of channel a's racing coverage. he was famous for his larger than life personality and his signature deerstalker hat. he also appeared on reality tv shows
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such as celebrity big brother and celebrity wife swap. we can speak now to neil clark from racing post. we will come to the celebrity aspect any moment, but as a racing pundit, how important a figure was he to all of you who live in that world? he was incredibly important because backin was incredibly important because back in the 1980s he became the face of racing on channel a racing. he was so recognisable, he was... you never saw him without that huge a cigar and never saw him without that huge a cigarand a never saw him without that huge a cigar and a better deerstalker. he brought into the sport people who are not necessarily keen racing fans, so members of the public who turned on were entertained by his style because he was always bombastic, opinionated and he was never boring. i think that was very important. he did bring in many, many more viewers to racing and did a lot to publicise our sport. i think he has much missed and recent yea rs think he has much missed and recent years racing coverage has become a
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bit too serious, a bit too much more serious and we like the sort of characters likejohn serious and we like the sort of characters like john mccririck serious and we like the sort of characters likejohn mccririck and people like derek thompson who was another great one. i think he is a sad loss. did he know his stuff the way other racing journalists new stuff? yes, he did notjust shattered bombast. he would always be any the press room, studying and deciding the sporting life and he knew what he was talking about. it was not just knew what he was talking about. it was notjust going in there to show off and shut his mouth. he was not everyone's cup of tea, we have to admit that, i am a good friend of a friend of hers from school who has some stories to tell about him who was not so flattering —— a friend of hers from school who has stories to tell about him that were not so flattering. you could not ignore him. he publicised the sport and was
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the public face of it and he brought people into it, which is what we want, because racing has to compete with lots of other sports coverage and he helped to do that. he did love the limelight, did he not? coming back to what i was benching at the beginning, the celebrity big brother, the celebrity wife swap —— whatever is mentioning at the beginning. so many appearances on all those shows. we used to joke that he would do anything to get in front of a camera and there was that element, he was a showman and he loved show off. 0ne element, he was a showman and he loved show off. one of the reasons it was because he was on the tv a nyway it was because he was on the tv anyway —— one of the reasons i believe he became ill is because he was not on the tv anyway. he lived to be on the camera and it was quite sad too, to be honest. he thought he had to be firm and when he had no one watching him he was sort of a lost soul. i remember seeing him on the passion and feeling very sorry for him, say two or three years ago, —— sinking in the press room. he wa nted —— sinking in the press room. he wanted to be out there, shouting,
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bombast and telling about the odds on that sort of thing. he came on television last year and said he had kind of lost the will to live because he was not on tv anymore. i think he really loved to be on tv, sadly, from the 80s onwards and he it was a kick and a buzz that he missed. we heard from a racing corresponding cornelius that he could be a kind man. yes. give us your fondest could be a kind man. yes. give us yourfondest memories, i suppose, of him will stop his persona, when i first went to the passion, he had a kind of a starter pack after he got a very bad—tempered with people, interrupting them and telling them to shut up, etc. any passion i was just —— in the passion i was apprehensive about asking to take the courts etc. he said, of course, of course, here you are. and a big
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smile. that was like how he was so often. i think there was someone who is very different. it is always difficult to see how much of the bombast he put on. how much of what that was the real mccririck. certainly he was someone who did have his much quieter side and when the camera was switched off, he was obviously a different person to when it was on and, though sometimes you could not tell which was which because he got so used to playing that act. thank you so much for joining us. lovely of you to come in and share your memories of us. john mccririck who has died today aged 79. now it's time for the weather. we have more cloud across the northern half of the uk and it is further said that we have the blue skies and essentially nothing to the
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afternoon. you can see the cloud across northern ireland and much of scotla nd across northern ireland and much of scotland and patchy cloud into northern england this afternoon. if you shower is pushing in from the north—west, temperatures typically 18 or 19 north—west, temperatures typically 18 or19 and north—west, temperatures typically 18 or 19 and further south in the sunshine we are getting up to 28 celsius in the london region. high levels of pollen —— are very high levels of pollen —— are very high levels of pollen out. we have discovered that works its way south, tomorrow morning that ray will cause it to wales, central england and alight band of cloud. moss and jamie appearing from the north, although it will feel fresher. temperatures around 19 degrees. and to send the image of high pressure keeps things mostly dry and settled. there will be some spells of sunshine and some brochure was. it will not be as warm a saturday, with highs of 21 degrees. read about 13 in the north.
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hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk has been convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forcing people to perform forced labour. police believe there were up to a00 victims put to work by the polish organised crime gang in the west midlands. jaguar landrover is to invest hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands. the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. five former heads of the scotland yard have warned that the public has lost confidence in the police and drug and knife crime have created a feeling that britain has descended into lawlessness. john mccririck, who for
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many years was the face of british horse racing, has died at the age of 79. the families of 157 people who were killed when an ethiopian airlines plane crashed earlier this year, believe the "commercial motivation" of the aerospace giant "boeing", led to the deaths of their relatives. speaking exclusively to the bbc, family members explained the devastating effect the last few months have had on them. simon browning reports from north america. everywhere we look, there's a blank where she should be. struggling with their loss. nadia and michael's daughter samya rose was on a boeing plane that crashed in ethiopian. samya's right here. she was one of 157 people on board. how did those first couple of hours evolve for you both? i learned standing right over there in the laundry room.
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i — it was 3:00 in the morning, and ijust started physically shaking, like, i couldn't stop my body from shaking. and then ijust thought, "i can't tell the other people in the house." it was the second identical boeing jet to crash in five months. initial reports say they happened for the same reason — a faulty flight control system. the 737 max has been grounded ever since. critics say the development and launch of the jets was rushed, and that boeing cut corners at the expense of safety. definitely my daughter died for the profit of boeing, and i don't want anyone else to die for that reason. i want these planes to be safe, and invest in the company, and the hardware and the infrastructure, to make our aviation systems safe. nadia and michael want to know why their daughter died, and their fight has taken them to the top of the american government. they are now representing families from across north america. when et302 crashed, there were passengers from more than 30 countries on board. the highest proportion of those were from kenya because the flight
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was bound for nairobi. but the second—highest amount were from here in canada, and families in toronto are starting to wa nt a nswers as to why their loved ones were killed. well, i lost my wife, carol, my three children, ryan, kelly and ruby, and i also lost my mum—in—law. i feel so lonely. i look at people, i see them with their children, playing outside, and i know i cannot hug my children. paul njoroge lost his entire family. he believes they would still be alive if boeing had grounded the planes earlier. the crash of ethiopian airlines flight 302 was preventable. but these individuals knew that they will not be held criminally liable, they will not face years in prison.
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but, if they knew that they would face years in prison, then they would have grounded those planes in november. we asked boeing for an interview, and they declined. in a statement, they said: but, for the families, life is changed forever. their resolve now — finding the truth. simon browning, bbc news, in toronto. studio: there's been a remarkable development for a group of people with paralysis in australia. following pioneering surgery, they can now perform everyday tasks, like feeding themselves, brushing their teeth and writing. the procedure involves "rewiring" the nerves to give movement to arms and hands, and was successful in 13 of the 16 patients who took part in a study.
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now we can talk to reconstructive surgeon dr natasha van zyl, who led the study. it is great to talk with you, dr van zyl. thank you very much. this sounds incredibly exciting. it is a wonderful thing to see hands moving that were not able to move at all before. tell us more about what you did,i before. tell us more about what you did, iset before. tell us more about what you did, i set it out very briefly, give us did, i set it out very briefly, give us the detail. nerve transfer is when you take the nerve to a muscle thatis when you take the nerve to a muscle that is working and still connected to the spinal cord and the brain, but it is connected to a muscle that is expendable because you have other muscles that are doing the same function as that muscle. you cut that nerve and you move it towards a paralysed nerve, and then you cut that paralysed nerve and you join
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the working nerve and the paralysed nerve together, under the microscope, using fine stitches. and then, the nerve fibres from the working nerve travel down the paralysed nerve, and make contact with the muscle and reactivate it. how long does it take them to do that? how do they know to do that?! how do they know where they are going?! they know where they are going?! they know where they are going because they have a nerve to grow into, and it is a natural process , grow into, and it is a natural process, if a nerve is cut, those nerve fibres will regrow. what we are doing isjust nerve fibres will regrow. what we are doing is just tricking the body into thinking that a nerve is being cut and it has to repair itself. it ta kes, cut and it has to repair itself. it takes, depending on the nerve transfer, between three and nine months for the nerves to make contact with the muscle. and to reactivate it. the body, the brain does not know that we have taken a nerve that used to supply a
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different muscle and sneakily moved it to supply a new one. and so, when patients are trying to get the new muscle to move, what they have to do is do the movement of the old muscle. and then, eventually, with therapy, you can train the brain to realise, no, this is now plugged into a different muscle. that is so clever. give me an example. one of the operations that we do, we take a nerve that turns the hand up to the ceiling. and that little nerve is in the forearm, and often working in the forearm, and often working in the c56 quadriplegic patient, but you don't need that nerve, because the bicep has that function as well, in addition to pulling the hand up to the mouth, it has a turning around, a supernatant function. we ta ke around, a supernatant function. we take that little nerve and we plugged it into a nerve which is a nerve that supplies a number of
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muscles, in fact, seven, which extend the fingers, and extend the thumb. so, what we do when we have done the operation is we ask the patient to turn their hand up to the ceiling and what they notice is that when the nerve transfer first lands, there is a little flicker of extension. in theirfinger there is a little flicker of extension. in their finger and their thumb. —— supinating. —— supinator. and they practise that movement and over a long period of time, about a year or so, over a long period of time, about a year or so, that ability to open up the hand spontaneously strengthens and improves. are they still having to think about turning their hand over? are they thinking about opening their hand? it is different for different people, some people seem for different people, some people seem to be able to make the transition really quickly and easily, some people can do it either way. but it is stronger when they think about the movement. so, it is really very variable and we cannot
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quite predict who is going to do better on that front than others. everyone managers, certainly, to make the muscle that has been transferred, to work. well, the next obvious question, whyjust 16 people, because there must be thousands, hundreds of thousands of people, across the world, who would benefit, have their lives transformed, by this experience. there is no reason why this surgery cannot be applied to them. there are a lot of surgeons around the world, that specialise in surgery to improve hand function, and quadriplegia, and most of those surgeons use tendon transfers. where you take a muscle that is working and you move it to a new spot. now, nerve transfers offer us another tool, and sometimes you don't have enough tendons, or muscles, to rearrange, to get the functions you
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want. if you add nerves to your tool box, then you can expand that. so, i have spent a lot of time in the last five years presenting as much as i can, about the work that we are doing and hopefully giving surgeons, andi doing and hopefully giving surgeons, and i hope this study will give surgeons some good hard evidence about what exactly nerve transfers do and what the outcomes are, so that they will be encouraged to take them up and then a patient —— patience all around the world will make contact with a surgeon who specialises in spinal—cord injury and reconstruction, super specialised but there are quite a few of us around. and hopefully all their waiting rooms will be filled with people who did not know about the surgery, and who can now go and seek improvement in their upper limb function. well, i'm sure that every viewer hopes the exact same thing. thank you very much forjoining us, fascinating to talk to you. you are
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welcome, thank you very much. donald trump's opponents have accused him of politicising america's independence day celebrations to boost his campaign for re—election. the president's "salute to america" event included military fly—pasts, tanks and fireworks. 0ur north america correspondent chris buckler reports with jet fighters overhead and tanks on the ground, president trump stamps a military mark on america's independence day. that wasn't without criticism. some felt he had hijacked the national holiday, putting himself at the centre of a series of expensive events in washington. aware of the controversy, the white house have promised that in mr trump's speech, he would stick to patriotism rather than politics. this was an event to celebrate service, not a campaign rally. today we come together as one nation with this very special salute to america. we celebrate our history, our people and the heroes
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who proudly defend ourflag, the brave men and women of the united states military. usa! what the white house couldn't plan for was the weather. there were several heavy downpours but many of mr trump's supporters braved the rain to see him, dressed in red, white and blue. oh, it's just electric. what's better than being around tens of thousands of american—supporting, freedom—loving americans? in the rain! what's better? trump! this was not a typical donald trump speech. there were no attacks on political opponents and he praised america's civil rights movement. this was a president doing all he could to appear presidential and that may have been deliberate with an election next year. chris buckler, bbc news, washington.
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the headlines on bbc news: a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forcing people to carry out forced labour. jaguar land rover is to invest hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands — the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. boris johnson has denied downing street attempted to withhold some secret intelligence from him when he became foreign secretary three years ago. postal ballots will be going out to conservative party members from tomorrow, as the race for number 10 enters its final few weeks. either borisjohnson orjeremy hunt will be announced as the new prime minister on the 23rd july. yesterday, we had a closer look atjeremy hunt, today, it's mrjohnson's turn. here's our political correspondent chris mason
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as a child, borisjohnson said he wanted to be world king. oh, well, being prime minister isn't too bad, and if he beats jeremy hunt, he will be. he's made a political career out of being different. i could've illustrated this with all sorts of pictures, but these take some beating. oh, and this is pretty good too! so who is borisjohnson? he went to school at eton, and then to oxford university. i declare the motion overwhelmingly carried. good morning, boris! then it was journalism. he got sacked from one job for making up a quote. he became an mp and got sacked as a shadow minister because his boss said he'd lied to him. and then he was mayor of london during the olympics. release the rings into position now. as one of the biggest voices in the leave campaign, he travelled about on this bus with that claim about sending the eu £350 million a week —
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a claim the uk statistics authority, among many others, said was rubbish. shortly after he had a brief, doomed attempt at becoming prime minister. that person cannot be me. but this time, he's the front—runner and his supporters welcome his clarity on leaving the eu this autumn with or without a deal. under theresa may's premiership, the eu never thought we would be —— under theresa may's premiership, the eu never thought we would be prepared to walk away from the negotiation, and boris is very clear he's prepared to do that. as foreign secretary he had to apologise for remarks he made about nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, the british—iranian woman imprisoned in tehran accused of spying. she was simply teaching people journalism, as i understand. she was actually on holiday. sonia purnell wrote a book on boris johnson called a tale of blonde ambition. we can't afford to have that sort of chaos with our next prime minister. we are, as borisjohnson himself says, in a time of national. we can't afford to have that
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sort of chaos with our next prime minister. we are, as borisjohnson himself says, in a time of national crisis. we need stability, calm and a lot of attention to detail. and then there's his private life, and there's a lot of it. "who cares," say his supporters, and there's a lot of them as well. they see borisjohnson as one thing above everything else — a winner — someone they hope can be jeremy corbyn, nigel farage and the liberal democrats. say brexit! all: brexit! so, delivering brexit and winning elections is his pitch, and we've never been closer to finding if he can do it. attempts by amazon to move into the uk food delivery sector have suffered a blow after the competition watchdog revealed it was launching an inquiry into a deal with deliveroo.
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the competition and markets authority said it would look into the details of the tech giant's purchase of a significant stake in the food delivery platform two months ago. tomorrow will see london's pride parade take centre stage with thousands of the lgbt community and supporters descending on the capital. but some people are unhappy that away from the rainbow flags and sequins — the event is being hijacked by businesses. are they simply supporting pride, or profiteering? we'll discuss this in a moment but first katie silver has been to oxford street to take a look. oxford circus, the heart of central london, you cannot go half a block without seeing some business displaying some kind of rainbow,.
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topshop has painted their entire wall with rainbow coloured dots. we have a rainbow flag, rainbow on your back, what do you make of companies is putting out rainbow displays? basically it is good that companies and brands are supporting lgbt rights but it is important that they give back. i think it is a good thing, spreading awareness further than it already is. it can be a negative thing, if the lgbtq members think that they are like not using it appropriately and not using it for the members and not wanting to spread awareness. 0n the whole, definitely good, but consumers must probe a bit harder what is going on behind the shop front. zero transparency about what it actually means but perhaps that is by design, are they investing any money, are they doing anything?
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nobody really knows... but, it looks good(!) some good news to finish the programme with — the story of one family, and their dog, who've they've just been reunited with — six years after she went missing. fern the sprocker spaniel was suspected stolen from her owner's driveway in chessington in 2013. for more than 2,200 days the family hoped for her return. a little earlierjoanna gosling spoke to ownerjodie and her 8 year old son ethan on the victoria derbyshire programme. so amazing, such a remarkable time. when did you get the call that your dog was coming back to you six years after she had disappeared? well, after she had disappeared? well, after six years of playing that call in my head and hoping it would come, i was cooking dinner on tuesday, for 30 pm, and the phone call came
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through, they left a message on my answerphone and i listened to it and thought, that can't be right. i called them back, the lovely nurse at twyford veterinary practice said, i think at twyford veterinary practice said, ithinki at twyford veterinary practice said, i think i have got your dog. at that point i fell to pieces! incredible, did you ever give up hope that you would get her back? we never gave up hope, push the campaign all the time, tried to get her out on social media, in the press, wherever we could, whoever spotted her, the biggest hope was that the microchip would be scanned and that is exactly what happened. ethan, you are nodding your head, you were part of the campaign, you wrote a letter, tell us what you said in your letter. i can't quite remember it, but i know that it was something where, isaid, but i know that it was something where, i said, forthe people but i know that it was something where, i said, for the people who stole her, to bring her back. must
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have been very upsetting for you, you were so young have been very upsetting for you, you were so young when she was taken, you were just one years old. he was two years old. very little, was it upsetting for you at the time? yes. did you think you would ever get her back? well, it depends how long it was. if it was a long time, maybe not, but if it was not that long, then, yes. how do you feel now you have got her back and you can give her nice big cuddles?” feel very happy! i can snuggle up with her again. so, jodie, tell us what you have been able to piece together about what happened to fern? we think she has been
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breeding, probably several litters of puppies. it appears that she was found in bracknell, just wandering down the road, scooped up by a really lovely guy who managed to get her in his car, he asked around to see if anyone was missing this dog, nobody knew anything about her. he took her to the vets in twyford, and got her scan. we think maybe she has been used for breeding, and now that she is seven, maybe she is not quite so she is seven, maybe she is not quite so useful anymore and was let loose or she managed to get away. from what i can gather, nobody has come forward looking for her since. do you think she was effectively stolen, to order, to be used for breeding? that has always been my suspicion, how i thought it had played out. sadly, that appears to be exactly what has happened. so
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thankful, six days, six years, six months, doesn't matter, you keep going, you keep trying. that is all that matters. in a moment, the one o'clock news, with simon mccoy, but first, a look at the weather forecast. the spell of reasonably settled summer the spell of reasonably settled summer weather continues, although it isa summer weather continues, although it is a mixed picture out there for the rest of the afternoon. bedford, beautiful blue skies, and many places across the southern half of the uk will continue to see blue skies and long spells of sunshine through the afternoon, further north, more cloud, and some outbreaks of showery rain around. the latest radar and satellite picture, for the past few hours, across parts of northern ireland, scotland, showery rain towards north—west, rain edging south and east across scotland into northern ireland, a few spots into northern england. further south, clearer skies. taking a look around the country, four o'clock this
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afternoon, temperatures in the south as high as 27,20 8 degrees, london region will be the hottest part of the country. sunshine across central england, much of wales. into the north of england, southern scotland, more cloud, some showers for parts of northern ireland and particularly for western scotland. some showers will be effecting the likes of aberdeenshire, off towards the northern isles as well as we head into the afternoon. nothing particularly heavy but cloud and showery rain will be on into the evening hours. cloud and light rain pushes south into the evening and tonight, cold front, bringing fresh air towards the north of that. some rain pushing into parts of northern england and the far north of wales first thing saturday morning. overnight lows to the north, further south, humid, 15, the overnight low in london. how is that weak on shaping up? we still have this band of cloud, frontal system, it is a cold front, pushing its way south, introducing a fresher northerly flow. more sunshine reappearing
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across much of scotland, northern ireland and northern england through saturday, further south in england and wales more cloud and a few spots of light and patchy rain, down towards the south—east through the latter part of the afternoon. temperature wise, still reasonably warm for the time of year, particularly in the south. further north, typically the mid to high teens. sunday, weak ridge of high pressure, fairly quiet picture, just one or two rogue showers, many of us should avoid them, long spells of sunshine and temperatures a little bit fresher than saturday, so, highs of 13 to 21 degrees. goodbye for now.
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the worst case of modern—day slavery the uk has ever seen — eight people are convicted after forcing up to a00 people to perform forced labour. the gang forced them to live in rat—infested houses, put them to work in menialjobs, and earned millions from their victims. translation: i couldn't even leave the house to go for a walk. they were following me, spying on me. they were controlling me. it took three years for police to discover a well—organised set—up which preyed on vulnerable people who'd travelled from poland. the victims, for example, they were unlawfully in the country, that if they left the house that the traffic is provided for them, they would be arrested by the police. we'll have the latest from our correspondent at birmingham crown court.
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also this lunchtime...

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