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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  July 5, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. today at 2... the worst case of modern—day slavery ever seen in the uk — eight people are convicted after forcing more than 400 victims to work for a pittance. translation: i couldn't even leave the house to go for a walk. they were following me, spying on me. they were controlling me. a boost for the uk car industry — jaguar land rover is to invest hundreds of millions of pounds to build electric vehicles in birmingham. borisjohnson says its not true secret intelligence was withheld from him when he became theresa may's foreign secretary. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with will — doubles to look forward to at wimbledon... some really exciting matches to come
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on day 5 at wimbledon, djokovic and 15 year old cori gauff in action later as well as andy murray and serena williams in the mixed doubles. we'll be live there at 2.30 and bring you news on england international karen carney‘s retirement from football. matt has all the weather — sunny and warm in places but will it last? 28 this afternoon in some southern areas, to live this weekend, will it stay dry? i will let you know. i will explain more in 25 minutes. thanks matt. also coming up — tributes are paid to horse racing puinditjohn mccririck. — pundit. with his signature deerstalker hat and flamboyant style, he was a familiar face on british television.
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hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk has been convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forcing people into forced labour. police believe there were up to 400 victims put to work by the polish organised crime gang in the west midlands. a three—year police investigation uncovered a well—organised system which preyed on the homeless, ex—prisoners and alcoholics, from poland. the victims were forced to carry out manual labour on farms and in factories earning millions for their masters. sima kotecha reports. their victims, some as young as 17, were made to live in rooms like these — filthy, often rat—infested with no heating or light. the gang was made up of five men and three women, all from poland. 52—year—old ignacy brzezinski,
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41—year—old wojciech nowa kowski and 26—year—old jan sadowski were found guilty of modern slavery offences. for the first time, the bbc can report that in february, five others were convicted of their roles in the conspiracy and have been jailed. together, they preyed on the vulnerable in poland — former prisoners, the homeless, alcoholics. they were promised a wealthy life in britain and were quickly transported from their homeland to the west midlands, so they didn't have time to change their minds. translation: to be honest, i came here to start a new life, but i didn't know that this new life would start with such really big problems. i couldn't even leave the house to go for a walk. they were following me, spying on me. they were controlling me. more than 90 victims gave evidence during the case, but police believe the true number of victims is in the hundreds.
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they lived in the black country and were forced to work in factories and on farms, carrying out manual labour for as little as 50p a day, while their masters took the rest of their earnings. west midlands police began looking into what was happening four years ago, and named their investigation 0peration fort. they would convince the victims, for example, that they were unlawfully in the country, that if they left the house that the traffickers provided for them, that they would be arrested by the police. sometimes they were given a debt, so they were told that they owed the traffickers £5,000 and they had to work off that debt. so there is a lot of these methods the traffickers would use to make them feel trapped. 0ne slave had his arm broken for complaining, while another was stripped naked in front of others for speaking out. the gang was discovered after charities identified victims. this man works undercover and wants
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to remain anonymous. very withdrawn, physically shaken, disorientated. we had victims presenting with black eyes, one victim presented with a broken arm, so, his broken arm had reset itself out of alignment. ripped clothing, emaciated. while the victims suffered, the gang bosses lived an opulent lifestyle, driving lavish cars and buying designer clothes. over five years, they made at least £2 million. investigators believe it's the largest such prosecution of its kind in europe. charities are urging the public to keep a lookout for other victims, who could be being exploited in similar ways. kathy betteridge is the director for anti trafficking and modern slavery at the salvation army. shejoins me now from birmingham.
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tell us how the salvation army is involved in supporting victims of these crimes? we have a government contract these crimes? we have a government co ntra ct we these crimes? we have a government contract we have been managing this contract we have been managing this contract since 2011, and until now we have supported nearly 8000 victims who have been rescued or identified as potential victims of modern slavery. we offer them a specialist support, may be a safe house or outreach support, and within that there is medical care and translation support and legal aid, andjust to and translation support and legal aid, and just to help them recover and start to assess the situation and start to assess the situation and then regained their lives. how long might that take? i imagine they are suffering from a form of post—traumatic stress disorder. are suffering from a form of post-traumatic stress disorder. they absolutely are, and it can take... you can't put a time limit on the
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recovery, and whilst they are in our service they are supported to start to identify what has happened and look at how they can actually start to recover, so we offer, they could have one—to—one support, group activities, and whilst the home 0ffice activities, and whilst the home office are making the decisions as to whether they are a confirmed victim, we offer them, a needs led support system, which we offered to individuals in our care. the case we are reporting on today, is the biggest network that so far has been uncovered in this country, but how common it from your perspective are the kinds of crimes and practices that these victims were subject to? -- is it. sadly this situation is not unusual and it is great it has got to the point where criminals have been convicted, but yes, people
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coming to our service who have had all kinds of different types of exploitation whether it is through work and labour or sexual exploitation or domestic service, it isa exploitation or domestic service, it is a variety. the car wash industry, nail bars, brothels, that appear and disappear, that is a common story, that individuals will talk to us about. it is growing. since the contract about. it is growing. since the co ntra ct we about. it is growing. since the contract we have had up to 8000 people to support, and it shows that theseissues people to support, and it shows that these issues are growing. people are coming into our service having experienced some horrendous situations. how hidden is this problem? you mentioned businesses which are very much in contact with the public. and yet they go unreported. the term people know and
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use is hidden in plain sight and thatis use is hidden in plain sight and that is the situation. we could be walking past or sitting with or talking to someone who is caught up in one of these businesses and they are held through fear and debt and threatening behaviour, and there was one man who was actually on a construction site and he was able to walk about. but they are held, and he escaped, but he was caught again by his traffickers and beaten severely. that held him because he was threatened that if he was ever to escape again he would be beaten even further. and their families, where ever they have come from, they are told if they escaped in their families will be threatened and potentially killed. they are kept and held. this man eventually after three years did escape and he came
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ona train three years did escape and he came on a train to london and he was picked up by the police and they referred him to our services. it is the people around us that could be caught up in these activities. from the salvation army, thanks for joining us. jaguar land rover is investing hundreds of millions of pounds — to build a range of electric vehicles at its castle bromwich plant in birmingham. jlr says the move will help secure the jobs of 2,700 workers at the plant. today's announcement appears to contradict previous warnings byjlr that investment in the uk would be threatened by a no—deal brexit. our business correspondent theo leggett is at the plant for us. this is an important announcement for people working here because as you may rememberjaguar land rover has been suffering difficult times with sales falling in one of its key
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markets in china, for example. it is cutting a500 jobs around the world, most of them in britain and many people here until recently were very worried about their jobs. people here until recently were very worried about theirjobs. 0ne employee said that morale was rock bottom. today was a very important day for them. the midlands can be a benchmark... thousands of jaguar land rover employees gathered this morning to hear an announcement which appears to make the future of the castle bromwich factory much more secure. today is the day of electrifying the plant and honouring our people who are going with us to define a new, electrified future, and that we will have a complete shift in production, that we have to transform production in the way that we go now, in the electrified era. 2500 people work at the plant and at a time when the company is cutting thousands ofjobs
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elsewhere, they at least have cause to celebrate. this is fantastic news notjust for today's workforce here at castle bromwich, but for the next generation, those that want to come into stable, decent work in a fantastic industry. it is a confidence boost for a world—class workforce. we have all been concerned with the changes in the industry and the changes on the environment which have been put in by the government. it is good news that we have got a good future ahead of us. are you going to be celebrating tonight? i certainly will be. this production line used to make 150 jaguar cars per week. as you can see it is now silent. all of this kit will soon be ripped out as the plant prepares for what jaguar land rover describes as the biggest transformation in its history, ready for a brand—new electric future. the company is investing nearly £1 billion at castle bromwich. it is also building this new battery plant, and it will make electric motors in wolverhampton. it is an ambitious strategy, but one which experts say
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the company simply has to make. electric cars that are genuinely competitive with the combustion engine are just arriving. but as their cost comes down and their range improves, increasingly, we will switch over. in the next five years there is going to be a big push towards electric cars, and car companies have no choice but to try to get into that. jaguar land rover is calling on the government to support electric cars as well. it says what is really needed is battery production on a massive scale so that the entire industry can benefit. it is setting its future on the development of these new technologies, which is exactly where the rest of the industry is going. what matters now is that we've got to turn this into a national shift, and making sure that the way to do that is, as i am sure jaguar land rover will say, is getting what they call a giga factory to make the batteries here in the uk, because that really matters for the future. this announcement has come at what has otherwise been a gloomy time for the uk car industry.
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thanks to falling sales at home and in key markets abroad as well as the uncertainty of brexit. but at castle bromwich, today at least, there was something to smile about. theo leggett, bbc news, castle bromwich. now all of those celebrating workers have gone home, they have six weeks in which to sit back cannot do much, many of them, while this place is transformed into a different kind production line. that is why it is so production line. that is why it is so quiet, they have started taking up so quiet, they have started taking up the machinery here, preparing for the new production line. —— taking out. theo, thanks forjoining us. so is more investment needed across the uk to cope with the demand for electric cars? i'm joined now by sirjohn armitt from the national infrastructure commission. what do we mean by the infrastructure for electric vehicles? these electric vehicles with their batteries are going to
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need to have points at which they can charge their batteries, and people are not going to buy electric ca i’s people are not going to buy electric cars unless they can be confident that they can charge their car and some people will have garages and they can charge up at home but many people don't have garages and they will want to have charging points available to them on the street and in car parks and elsewhere across the country. basically we have got to charge up britain and put in place the infrastructure and the electricity networks which will make sure that people can charge their cars. how would you characterise that at the moment? very limited, there are approximately 2a,000 connector points across the country at the moment. we have 31 million vehicles in the country today so clearly we are going to need a great deal more of these points at which people can connect their car and charge them. tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands, probably come
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across the country in total by the time we have finished. notjust the connector points, the networks behind them and the ability of the grid and the distribution network to support those charge points, that will need to be reinforced, so what we are saying to government is that we are saying to government is that we need a plan which the government will work with the regulator and work with the transmission companies, working with local planning authorities, and can make sure that these points are in place so sure that these points are in place so people can buy these cars with confidence. if we don't go down this route we won't achieve a zero carbon by 2050 which is our bigger target, to reduce emissions and that means electric cars and charge points. how well—placed are we to provide green electricity from renewable resources to charge electric cars if the point is to get away from fossil fuels across the piece? in our own
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estimate, the report we have given to government, we believe by 2050 there is no reason why we should not be 85% able to provide our electricity through renewables. again, that requires a plan and at the moment we are down at about 25% but it is increasing every day with more wind farms offshore and more solar panels, nuclear has a part to play at the moment, and going forward i think we will be able to not be so dependent on nuclear, but there's no doubt that we can deliver and i'm quite confident in the future, that we can have a renewa bles future, that we can have a renewables —based electricity system to charge these cars. sirjohn, thanks forjoining us. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forcing people to carry out forced labour. jaguar landrover is to invest hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant
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in the west midlands — the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. borisjohnson denies downing street attempted to withhold secret intelligence from him while he was foreign secretary. former world number one caroline wozniacki is out of wimbledon. she suffered a 3rd round straight sets defeat against china's zhang shuai. later the 15—year—old american sensation coco gauff will bid to make the fourth round when she faces polona hert—zog of slovenia on centre court. and england and chelsea midfielder karen carney has announced she'll retire from football after tomorrow's women's world cup third—place play—off against sweden. i'll be back with more on those stories at 2.30. the racing punditjohn mccririck, famed for his use of ‘tic tac‘, betting signs and flamboyant dress, has died aged 79.
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he became a household name as part of channel a's racing team. he appeared on on question time, the weakest link and celebrity big brother. the two contenders for the leadership of the conservative party have been taking part in hustings with voters in darlington today. borisjohnson denied he was ever left out of intelligence briefings during his time as foreign secretary. the bbc understands downing street attempted to withhold some secret intelligence from mrjohnson — a move that caused concern among senior intelligence officials. 0ur political correspondent nick eardley reports. do conservatives trust him? borisjohnson could be in no 10 in three weeks' time. but it has emerged the current pm had real concerns about his ability to keep information confidential. were you blocked from seeing any in intelligence when you were foreign secretary, to johnson? i said that politics is not a game...
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the bbc understands there was an attempt to withhold sensitive intelligence when mrjohnson was foreign secretary. some have suggested it was control freak array from no 10. others, that there was nervousness in the intelligence community. were you aware at the time that perhaps some sensitive information was being held back from you? it's not true and i don't comment on intelligence matters. you deny it altogether? i do. no 10 says theresa may did trust borisjohnson but it will not comment directly on intelligence. nor would the other leadership candidate. we have a role that we never comment on intelligence matters. borisjohnson‘s team says he got all the information he needed as foreign secretary and it is unlikely this will have a major impact on the leadership race. but as conservatives start voting for our next prime minister, there are others in the party who have their concerns. this former pm says he's backing jeremy hunt. it is fairly evident from my view is that i cannot vote for somebody
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who was part of the brexit campaign which misled the country, so i shall offer my vote to jeremy hunt. at the same time, current cabinet ministers are planning to do whatever they can to stop either candidate leaving europe without a deal. let me quote the speaker of the house of commons, who has said that if the house of commons is determined to do something, he's quite sure that it will find a way. and we can deliver brexit... boris johnson and jeremy hunt will both say that leaving with no deal in four months' time must be an option. we are facing an existential crisis, as a party and indeed as a political class, if i may say so. any negotiator has their hand profoundly weakened if the other side think that you can't walk away. but they both know, if it comes to it, getting the numbers for no deal will be tough, particularly in a political age where trust is often in short supply. nick eardley, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth is in darlington
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and has been watching the two men make their pitch for the keys to no 10. what have they been talking about this morning? we are halfway through the hustings and there have been a series which have taken place across the uk, and for conservative party members, a range of subjects have come up members, a range of subjects have come up on members, a range of subjects have come up on domestic policy, education, further education, business rates, stimulating the economy, defence and security, and of course brexit. a fair bit of ground has been covered and boris johnson was asked about reports that number ten had tried to withhold some intelligence from him when he was foreign secretary. jeremy hunt refused to comment and borisjohnson said it was not true, but the point is we are increasingly getting to the point in this context where it comes down to the character of these people. you speak to conservative members at these events and some have firmly made their mind up as to
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who they are going to bat, and others are coming in fairly open—minded —— going to back. time and time again they say they think borisjohnson has and time again they say they think boris johnson has got and time again they say they think borisjohnson has got the personality to drive through brexit and win support, but others say jeremy hunt is the one they see is more considered and prime ministerial so some of these decisions that are being made right 110w decisions that are being made right now are about who is the best person for thejob and now are about who is the best person for the job and that is why it comes to questions of trust and credibility, which are so important in the contest at this point. conservative party members have already received their ballot papers so already received their ballot papers so the voting has begun, notjust to tuesday next conservative leader but to choose the next prime minister. we have another two weeks of these debates and hustings to take place but some people have now already made up their minds about who will lead the country. alex, thanks for joining us. a man accused of lying about a vip paedophile ring has been giving further evidence at his trial at newcastle crown court. carl beech, who is 51 and from gloucester, denies 12 counts of perverting
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the course of justice and one of fraud. 0ur correspondentjune kelly was in court. what has been said? carl beech denies that he lied to police about what he told them about this vip paedophile ring in which he said he was a victim but today he admitted that he did lie in another criminal investigation. he said initially when he was facing counts of possessing indecent images of children, he denied the charge but then he pleaded guilty. asked why he had the change of plea he said because he was totally ashamed of what he had done and could admit it to himself that he was in denial. this whole case goes to his honesty and he was asked about other issues of honesty including the fact that while he was under investigation he went to sweden and while there he started using different names. he
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was asked about this and he said what name he chose was because it was another family name and then he was another family name and then he was asked about another name and he said he did not know why he had gone on to use another name as well. he described his decision not to return to the uk to face a court hearing as a stupid mistake and he eventually was extradited from sweden by law enforcement agencies following a big manhunt and he had to come back to the uk to face trial. also this morning he has told the court that when he was making his allegations, he was seeing a number of people, and he said tom watson the labour deputy minister asked to have a meeting with him and he said he did meeting with him and he said he did meet with him because tom watson seemed to have interest in the allegations that he was making. he denies 12 counts of perverting the course of justice, and
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denies 12 counts of perverting the course ofjustice, and this case will continue next week. gene kelly, thanks forjoining us. —— june. a senior iranian official says it will seize a british oil tanker if the uk doesn't immediately release the vessel it impounded yesterday. royal marines stormed the ship yesterday off gibralter in the belief the tanker was heading to a syrian oil refinery carrying iranian oil a breach of eu sanctions against syria. time for a look at the weather. here's matt taylor. first a look at alaska, unusual weather? exactly, a picture from yesterday of the glaziers, but it is a shorts and t—shirts weather out there at the moment —— the glaciers. we have had a area of high pressure in the pacific, which has been there a long time, june was the driest and warmestjune on record in alaska,
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and there has been a constant feed of warm southerly winds which combined with the high pressure which has kept skies clear, we have just gone past the summer solstice and so we have seen temperature soaring this month as well. especially over southern parts of the country. the state i should say. anchorage, temperatures have been getting into the high 805, low 905 in terms of fahrenheit. they are shocked in the gallery! the previous record, the highs they have ever got was 29, and yesterday, independence day, the ath ofjuly, they saw temperatures reaching 32 degrees. which is absolutely smashed the all—time record. still very early in the summer and it could go again. this high pressure area, what is keeping it there? there is nothing
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to move it along and usually get an active jet stream. we have seen record breaking ten bridges across france and a meandering pattern in the jet stream but you needed a bit flatter to push the weather system along —— record—breaking temperatures across france. the forecast for the next seven days, bearing in mind they have already broken the record, they are staying hot into the next week, they could break the record even further. the result of that has been a lot of wild fires which of course yesterday, the ath ofjuly, curtailed their celebrations because the fireworks were cancelled because the fireworks were cancelled because the ground is so dry. there's the of wildfire. smoke enveloping anchorage this very morning. not the kind of weather you expect in that part of the united states? yes, and to go on for so long, as well, this is pretty extreme in alaska. what about here? pretty warm out there but not as hot
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as it has been in anchorage. temperatures have reached 28 across the southern counties. eight north—south split. slightly cooler colours further north, temperatures in the teens, and you can see why here on the satellite imagery, cloudy here and clear skies further south. cloud also producing outbreaks of rain across parts of northern and western scotland this afternoon into the evening, and that will push through into northern ireland and southern scotland and northern england. turning a bit more showering and to the south it will bea showering and to the south it will be a warm and humid night, temperatures in london no lower than 15 and further north, down into single figures, that is because chilly air is starting to work its way south and that will make it into southern areas but it will still be nice when you get the sunshine. most places should be dry but there will bea places should be dry but there will be a bit of rain around as i will show you. the rain will be linked to
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the weather front which will introduce the fresher conditions and they will be sitting somewhere across parts of northern england and north wales at first light. 0utbreaks north wales at first light. outbreaks of rain, may be heavier bursts initially, it will fragment as it works its way south, and there could be rain close to wimbledon but it is by no means a guarantee at all. it could still be hanging onto some more air across southern and coastal counties, still a bit of sunshine, 25 not out of the question, but dropping and after the cloudy jump—start in the question, but dropping and after the cloudyjump—start in the midlands, north wales and east anglia, things will brighten up, and a sunny day further north. cloud building up here and there. towards the west of scotland, northern ireland, it will feel a bit warmer than today, given the lighter winds. the cold front pushes down into the english channel, so they could be some rain along the southern coast, and that
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will be lingering into sunday, tailing back into another weather front, trying to approach into ireland but for most it is a day of light winds eddie fresh start but the cloud will bubble up —— and a fresh start. temperatures up a little bit on what we have seen on saturday, and then into next week at high pressure building and southern areas so it stays dry, temperatures climbing a little bit, but in scotla nd climbing a little bit, but in scotland and northern ireland, a greater chance of seeing some rain into the middle of the week.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forcing people to carry out forced labour. jaguar land rover is to invest
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hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands. the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. borisjohnson denies downing street attempted to withhold secret intelligence from him while he was foreign secretary. john mccririck, who for many years was the face of british horse racing, has died at the age of 79. let's return now to our main story — the conviction of the gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk. sima kotecha is at birmingham crown court. what's been happening? wejust what's been happening? we just had three of these sentences handed down over the last ten minutes. these are the three men sentenced today. ignacy brzezinsk was given 11 years.
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he is on the run. he was sentenced in absence. wojciech nowakowski, four and in absence. wojciech nowakowski, fourand a in absence. wojciech nowakowski, four and a half years, and jan sadowski, three years. the slavery ring consists of eight people. five of them convicted and jailed in february and three today. they lured people from poland to birmingham, force them to carry out manual labour work in farms and factories, paying them as little as 50p a day and keeping the money for themselves, most of the earnings. they made around £2 million over three orfour they made around £2 million over three or four years and today we can report that this is the largest prosecution of its kind, some say across europe. charities are speaking about slavery today, saying the public should be more vigilant and alert about what's going on in
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oui’ and alert about what's going on in our society. thank you. sport now on afternoon live with will. another busy day at wimbledon. john watson is at the all england club. we have the 15—year—old sensation to come, and then the doubles, andy murray and serena williams. always a bit of a mystery, the mixed doubles, because we don't know when they are going to be on but everyone is going to be watching, that's for sure. yes, a fascinating day, not least because we've got coco gauff in action. plenty of action, certainly on the show courts and we may have an upset already. kevin andersson, a finalist last year when he was beaten by novak djokovic, two sets down currently against guido pella
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of argentina. 6—a, 6—3. he had an elbow problem which saw him missing the clay—court problem and he went out early at queens. he has his work cut out. we know what a big guy he is, he has a big serve. he came through that massive semifinal, the second longest match in wimbledon history. he has to reproduce some of the form he showed last year if he's to that run. 0n court number one, we know it's very open in the women's draw this year in the absence of naomi 05aka. ashleigh barty is through. karolina pliskova is playing hsieh su—wei. this cover —— karolina pliskova is one of the favourites this year. losing the
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first set and winning the second. if she can hold onto her break and take the third set, she'll be into the fourth round, her best run so far here at wimbledon. andy murray and serena williams, what a line—up it's going to be. huge support for him. they won't be on the court before 5:30pm. they should be on centre court. came through his men's doubles match with pa huge herbert yesterday, going through in four sets. what about serena williams? in the singles it's fair to say she hasn't hit the dizzying heights we know she often produces at wimbledon. chasing her 2ath grand slam which would put her level with margaret court's record. she is playing with andy murray for additional court time when she feels she needs if she is to achieve that. that will be a huge match, as it
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will be for coco gauff, the 15—year—old sensation whose take on this tournament by storm with huge wins over venus williams and rybarikova. if she comes through against polona hercog, she may face simona halep, or victoria azarenka. she is being touted as a future grand slam champion. 15 years old, an incredible tournament. if she produces something special later we will be talking about it through the weekend. you can keep up with the action on bbc two and the bbc sport website. i like the idea of people at work looking down secretly, knowing they shouldn't be watching the tennis! i would never dream of doing such a thing! i'm hard at work. football, and england's karen carney has
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announced she is retiring from club and international football. announced she is retiring from club and internationalfootball. not announced she is retiring from club and international football. not a com plete and international football. not a complete surprise. a great servant for england and chelsea, retiring not just from for england and chelsea, retiring notjust from international for england and chelsea, retiring not just from international football but also domestic football, after the world cup third—place play—off against sweden. she made her senior debut back at the age of 1a. playing infour debut back at the age of 1a. playing in four world cup for england. making her 0lympic debut in 2005. 1a3 caps and 32 goals. i can't give anything more, i have maxed out in every area, going for every percentage game to be the best ican be every percentage game to be the best i can be and it isjust time. i am very happy with that decision, it's the right decision and i don't have any regrets with that. the thing i miss the most is singing the anthem.
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that will be tough. but what i miss the most isjust kicking a ball, and being like a little kid. there you 90, being like a little kid. there you go, you can see what it means to her, and that's what sport is all about. retiring at the top level is what you want to see. more in the next hour. the top level is what you want to see. more in the next hourlj the top level is what you want to see. more in the next hour. i don't mind having a kick around with her sometime! wouldn't be much of a challenge. she has some time on her hands. thank you. amazon is 25 years old today. it was set up byjeff bezos as a way to sell books over the internet. it now sells everything from music to sofas, making bezos one of the richest people in the world. clare bailey is an independent retail expert and the founder of retail champion, shejoins me now. how much of an impact has amazon had over 25 yea rs ? how much of an impact has amazon had over 25 years? we can all agree that they have become the worlds largest
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retailer of everything. a few years ago i met their chief operating officer and that was their mission. what they've done, which i think all retailers can learn from, they've set themselves up to be obsessively focused about the customer, wanting a lwa ys focused about the customer, wanting always to exceed and delight them with new and innovative ways of doing business. we've seen them push the barfor doing business. we've seen them push the bar for everyone else to follow and in that way, they've captured so much market share. a lot of people think of amazon as a tech giant but in reality they are just a very good retailer doing what they customers want, better than anybody else a lot of the time. but of course that has meant that with the rise of online shopping, the high street has suffered. it frustrates me enormously because we hear that innovative businesses who are doing very well, being competitive in an
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open market, being berated for being successful when in reality, the rest of the retail market should have looked at them and said crikey, what should we learn from this threat? and also when you look at the 0ns stats, online sales have stabilised quite significantly over the last few years, around 20% and actually dropping back little bit as a proportion of all retail sales. so i think to many other retailers, they will speak of online as a excuse for failing to deliver when actually the competition have better than —— done better than they have done. to what extent a re better than they have done. to what extent are customers concerned about amazon is a good employer and whether they've paid sufficient taxes? there are certain government structural issues that have led many businesses, not just structural issues that have led many businesses, notjust amazon, the likes of starbucks, vodafone and others, to be able to exploit legal
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loopholes. it's really a matterfor the government to address, to withdraw that facility for businesses who have the ability to ta ke businesses who have the ability to take advantage. what business wouldn't maximise their tax efficiency, given the opportunity? retail, warehouses and so on, it is historically known to be an industry led by employees at the lowest level of the income bracket. they have the potential to work their way up but to keep prices competitive and offer prices that we would like to pay, we don't have an industry that is known for being a higher wage payer, as is also the nature of hospitality, food, and almost all consumer facing industries. 0ften food, and almost all consumer facing industries. often these successful retailers are berated for practices which are universally accepted in their competition. thank you. kirsty young is to step down
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as the host of radio a's desert island discs. she says she's decided to pursue new challenges having presented a96 episodes of the programme. kirsty young has presented the long—running show since 2006 and has interviewed hundreds of guests including annie lennox, morrissey and david tennant. last year, she took a break from hosting the show for health reasons. the bbc says 6 music's lauren laverne, who was drafted in as cover, will continue in the role "for the foreseeable future". let's speak to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson. how surprising is this, knowing that ki rsty how surprising is this, knowing that kirsty has been unwell?” how surprising is this, knowing that kirsty has been unwell? i was surprised. i think desert island discs, hosting it is one of the best jobs in british media. you get to interview a fantastic variety of people, everyone from sir david attenborough, to keith richards and making such a success of it. the preparation that kirsty young put into it, you can see it in her
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interviews. if someone brought up a fa ct, interviews. if someone brought up a fact, she followed up. so methodical in preparation. working out what clothes she should wear to set her guest at ease. when she did bill gates, she knew that he wore open neck shirts, so she did as well. paul weller, see what a smart suit and it paid off. you mentioned morrissey, she researched and found out that he likes a particular drink, vodka, rather than tea and coffee. she felt she had to pull one for herself, although she said she didn't drink it. i was surprised. you mentioned the illness, august 2018, she announced she was stepping back from the show because she had this condition where you feel pain over your body. in a statement today, kirsty young said she is starting to feel better, she's on her way to recovery, but this time
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out has made her rethink what she wa nts to out has made her rethink what she wants to do in life and her career and she's decided to step away from the desert island. for now, lauren laverne gets to stay in the hot seat. yes, people who don't know her, she hosts the breakfast show on six music. she used to be in a music band and people have been impressed with how she's taking over. if you're only standing income it is difficult to make it your own. —— if you are standing in, it is difficult. it is difficult to make it your own but she is now the show‘s fifth host since it started in 19a2. that's how much people like to hold on to the job when they get it. lauren laverne has been told until the foreseeable future, will be the host of desert island discs. thank you. jamie is here with
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the business news. a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forced labour. jaguar land rover is to invest hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands. the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. borisjohnson denies downing street attempted to withhold secret intelligence from him while he was foreign secretary. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. another leap in the number of newjobs in the us. last month, 22a,000 jobs were created. most economists imagined the figure would be closer to 160,000. but elsewhere in the world, in germany and asia, the latest economic figures are looking weak. more on this in a second. jaguar land rover —jlr —
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is investing hundreds of millions of pounds to build a range of electric vehicles at its castle bromwich plant in birmingham. initially the plant will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj. jlr says the move will help secure the jobs of 2,700 workers at the plant. john menzies, the company in charge of loading your luggage on the planes fuelling them, towing them, all those air services you need at airports. it's said profts have taken a hit this year and it's to do with cargo volumes. the shares fell by over 10%. more and more people in employment in america. these figures came out in the last half in our. if you go back, i know you were watching the chinese iron orfigures keenly. back, i know you were watching the chinese iron or figures keenly. as i a lwa ys chinese iron or figures keenly. as i always do! the figures from china we re always do! the figures from china were fairly weak. we saw the price
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of iron ore falling in china, it is very important in construction. when the price goes down, that's a sign of demand. german manufacturing output was very weak. we were wondering what would happen in america in terms ofjob numbers and they are amazing, 22a,000. we expected a lot less. we had a week for the last month. samira hussainjoins us now from the new york stock exchange. sorry, i got the wrong name! people often mistake me for michelle, we look alike! very diplomatic. what do you make of these figures? unexpectedly strong. they are absolutely unexpectedly strong. economists expected jobs to coming in around 160,000. the previous
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month we saw a weakerjobs report. that started fuelling even more concerned that perhaps we are seeing more weakening in the us economy and of course the labour market but the fa ct of course the labour market but the fact that we've seen these numbers coming out really strong, it suggests more that it was a blip in the previous month and that the labour market continues to grow. everyone expecting interest rates to be cut on the understanding that the economy is waking but these figures suggest otherwise. this will make the decision more difficult for the us federal reserve, who meet at the end ofjuly. many people including the people who work here in the stock exchange are hoping for a cut in interest rates. that may not happen. thesejobs in interest rates. that may not happen. these jobs results in interest rates. that may not happen. thesejobs results really make the decision a lot more
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difficult for officials at the fed because it seems that the labour market is doing well. people wondering why the unemployment rate went up, to1.7%. wondering why the unemployment rate went up, to 1.7%. more people are entering the labour market. part of the reason the rate was dropping was that people had stopped looking for jobs. now there is such a need for workers, you see those people who we re workers, you see those people who were not part of the workforce, not looking for a job, now coming back. 0ne brief question, the people you talk to, does it feel like a really strong economy still? searching looking at employment it feels that way. many say it depends. there is some hesitancy. you see that reflected in consumer spending.
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people are more hesitant about spending money given that there is some sort of uncertainty. and how long can a good thing go? thanks. get her name right. we've got to many talented colleagues! that's the way icn. the markets? we're going to do them later. sorry, i'm too keen. it was the iron ore thing! patients with complete paralysis have been given fresh hope — after pioneering new surgery helped restore movement in hands and elbows. surgeons in australia have successfully ‘rewired' the nerves inside their bodies, meaning they can now do everyday tasks, like feeding themselves and typing at a computer. james gallagher reports. this might seem simple, but it's remarkable. 0nce paralysed patients have been given control over their hands and arms again.
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they can now feed themselves or put make—up on or type at a computer. paul robinson was injured in a dirt bike accident four years ago. i can pick something with my left that i wouldn't be able to do with my right. once i can get it in my right hand, i have a lot of strength. you can now live independently and play wheelchair rugby after having his nerves rewired. so, how did the surgery work? the reason you can move your hands and fingers is because messages come from your brain, travel down your spinal—cord, and through nerves in your arms to control the muscles in your arms and hands. after a spinal—cord injury, those messages from the brain get blocked, get stopped, you lose control and become paralysed. in this study, all the patients had a small amount of control over muscles in the upper arm and shoulder, so the doctors took the nerves that controlled these muscles and rewired them. they connected them to the nerves further down the arm,
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allowing patients to bend at the elbow and open and close their hands. it will make an enormous difference and will mean back to work, more involved in family life, and more independent, able to be by yourself and do the things you want to do with your own privacy restored. jack had the surgery after fracturing his spine diving into a swimming pool. it has taken months of extensive physiotherapy to relearn how to control his arms and hands again. experts warn this is still a new procedure that has been tested very few patients. it is a small study, 16 people, for two hours. so bigger, longer studies will tell us who will benefit most and how long these things will last. in the future, hopefully it will get even better. the procedure cannot restore control to each individual finger, and it does not work in everyone, but patients say it is transforming their quality of life. james gallagher, bbc news.
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now, take a look at this... the so—called mountain of hell. i'ts at les deux alpes ski resort in france — basically hundreds of cyclists speeding down a glacier. and this happened — one single fall precipitates a crash in which dozens of participants hit the ice and slide and skid down the mountain. no serious injuries, surprisingly and fortunately, but look at this, theyjust get up, pick up their bikes and start all over again. i don't know what choice you have because it would be a long walk, didn't it —— wouldn't it, if you didn't it —— wouldn't it, if you didn't cycle. the things we do. it's no good for you sometimes, sport. let's have a look at the weather. matt is with us for the details. thanks, looked a bit slushy there,
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not surprisingly given the temperatures in france. warm again today and indeed for some of us in the uk. temperatures into the mid and high 205 by the end of the afternoon across the south of england and wales. quite a contrast, 28 in the south—east. 1a or 15 in the north west. that's because we have cloud and from that, outbreaks of rain over the highlands and islands. the rain spreading across southern scotland, northern ireland this evening and overnight into parts of northern england and eventually north wales. more showers. to the south, clear skies and another mild night, temperatures in the teens. fresher to the north where temperatures will drop to single figures. cool air moving south to all parts, the biggest difference in southern areas. most places will be staying dry, except close to the weather front, which is
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going to introduce cool air, north—westerly wind. rain in north—westerly wind. rain in north—west england the morning. going to turn patio in places. no guarantee of rain, even under the weather front but claudia skies compared to the last few days. the south, still holding onto the warmest air, the channel islands, 25, 26. 22 or 23 in other areas. sunshine returns after a cloudy morning in the north of east anglia, north wales and northern england. northern ireland and scotland, a brighter day tomorrow. more sunshine, dry. cool down the coast thanks to the breeze. in the went where the —— in the west where the wind is lightest, more sunshine. this evening, a chance of rain in the south. here we are likely to see
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a few showers. tailing back into the weather front in the west of ireland. the cloud builds up, some sunny spells. 0utside chance of one or two showers. the breeze will be keen down the eastern coasts. sunshine where you get it. high—pressure building southernmost areas. staying dry for a good part of england and wales. further north, after a sunny start we will see cloud and rain inching in from the atlantic. temperatures will take a dip. next week, a greater chance of showers, some of them heavy. will they affect wimbledon? i'll keep you updated.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at three: the worst case of modern—day slavery ever seen in the uk — eight people are convicted after forcing more than a00 victims to work for a pittance. translation: i couldn't even leave the house to go for a walk. they were following me, spying on me. they were controlling me. a boost for the uk car industry — jaguar land rover is to invest hundreds of millions of pounds to build electric vehicles in birmingham. borisjohnson says it's not true secret intelligence was withheld from him when he became theresa may's foreign secretary. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. plenty of action to keep us busy at wimbledon! andy murray says, "we're both good
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movers, let's see what happens," as he prepares to team up with serena williams in the mixed doubles in the next couple of hours. plus, news that fifa has pledged to increase the size of the women's world cup to 32 teams and double its prize money in four years' time. he might have been talking about us, he would have been right! matt has all of the weather, a beautiful picture, how long will it last? this is the scene across southern parts of the country, mid to high 205, mid to high teens across northern areas, we even things out a little bit, most will be drier, details on that, and talked about baked alaska, it will all make sense in an hour. also coming up, tributes are paid to one of the most famous faces in horse—racing, the punditjohn mccririck(. with his signature deerstalker hat and flamboyant style, he was a familiar face on british television.
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hello, this is afternoon live, i am martine croxall. a gang behind the biggest modern—day slavery network ever exposed in the uk has been convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering, and forcing people into forced labour. police believe there were up to a00 victims put to work by the polish organised crime gang in the west midlands. a three—year police investigation uncovered a well—organised system which preyed on the homeless, ex—prisoners and alcoholics from poland. the victims were forced to carry out manual labour on farms and in factories, earning millions for their masters. sima kotecha reports. their victims, some as young as 17, were made to live in rooms like these — filthy, often rat—infested, with no heating or light. the gang was made up of five men
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and three women, all from poland. 52—year—old ignacy brzezinski, a1—year—old wojciech nowa kowski and 26—year—old jan sadowski were found guilty of modern slavery offences. for the first time, the bbc can report that, in february, five others were convicted of their roles in the conspiracy and have been jailed. together, they preyed on the vulnerable in poland — former prisoners, the homeless, alcoholics. they were promised a wealthy life in britain and were quickly transported from their homeland to the west midlands, so they didn't have time to change their minds. translation: to be honest, i came here to start a new life, but i didn't know that this new life would start with such really big problems. i couldn't even leave the house to go for a walk. they were following me, spying on me. they were controlling me. more than 90 victims gave evidence during the case, but police believe the true number
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of victims is in the hundreds. they lived in the black country and were forced to work in factories and on farms, carrying out manual labour for as little as 50p a day, while their masters took the rest of their earnings. west midlands police began looking into what was happening four years ago, and named their investigation 0peration fort. they would convince the victims, for example, that they were unlawfully in the country, that if they left the house that the traffickers provided for them, that they would be arrested by the police. sometimes they were given a debt, so they were told that they owed the traffickers £5,000, and they had to work off that debt. so there is a lot of these methods the traffickers would use to make them feel trapped. 0ne slave had his arm broken for complaining, while another was stripped naked in front of others for speaking out. the gang was discovered after charities identified victims. this man works undercover and wants
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to remain anonymous. very withdrawn, physically shaken, disorientated. we had victims presenting with black eyes, one victim presented with a broken arm, so, his broken arm had reset itself out of alignment. ripped clothing, emaciated. while the victims suffered, the gang bosses lived an opulent lifestyle, driving lavish cars and buying designer clothes. over five years, they made at least £2 million. investigators believe it's the largest such prosecution of its kind in europe. charities are urging the public to keep a lookout for other victims, who could be being exploited in similar ways. sima kotecha has been
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at birmingham crown court where some of the gang have been sentenced. we've just had three of the sentences handed down over the last ten minutes. these are the three men sentenced today. ignacy brzezinsk was given 11 years. he is on the run. he was sentenced in absence. wojciech nowakowski, four and a half years, and jan sadowski, three years. the slavery ring consists of eight people. five of them convicted and jailed in february and three today. they lured people from poland to birmingham, forced them to carry out manual labour, work in farms and factories, paying them as little as 50p a day and keeping the money for themselves,
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most of the earnings. they made around £2 million over three orfour years, and today we can report that this is the largest prosecution of its kind, some say across europe. charities are speaking about slavery today, saying the public should be more vigilant and alert about what's going on in our society. sima kotecha reporting. the head ofjaguar land rover has said its decision to build electric vehicles in the west midlands is a "vote of confidence in the uk". the multi—million—pound investment will help secure the jobs of 2,700 workers at the firm's castle bromwich plant. our business correspondent theo leggett reports the midlands can be a benchmark... thousands of jaguar land rover employees gathered this morning to hear an announcement which appears to make the future of the castle bromwich factory much more secure. today is the day of electrifying the plant and honouring our people who are going with us to define a new, electrified future, and that we will have a complete shift in production,
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that we have to transform production in the way that we go now, in the electrified era. 2500 people work at the plant and at a time when the company is cutting thousands ofjobs elsewhere, they at least have cause to celebrate. this is fantastic news notjust for today's workforce here at castle brom, but for the next generation, those that want to come into stable, decent work in a fantastic industry. it is a confidence boost for a world—class workforce. we have all been concerned with the changes in the industry and the changes on the environment which have been put in by the government. it is good news that we have got a good future ahead of us. are you going to be celebrating tonight? i certainly will be. this production line used to make 150 jaguar cars per week. as you can see, it is now silent. all of this kit will soon be ripped
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out as the plant prepares for what jaguar land rover describes as the biggest transformation in its history, ready for a brand—new electric future. the company is investing nearly £1 billion at castle bromwich. it is also building this new battery plant, and it will make electric motors in wolverhampton. it is an ambitious strategy, but one which experts say the company simply has to make. electric cars that are genuinely competitive with the combustion engine are just arriving. but as their cost comes down and their range improves, increasingly, we will switch over. in the next five years there is going to be a big push towards electric cars, and car companies have no choice but to try to get into that. jaguar land rover is calling on the government to support electric cars as well. it says what is really needed is battery production on a massive scale so that the entire industry can benefit. it is setting its future on the development of these new technologies, which is exactly where the rest of the industry is going. what matters now is that we've got to turn this into a national shift,
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and making sure that the way to do that is, as i am sure jaguar land rover will say, is getting what they call a giga factory to make the batteries here in the uk, because that really matters for the future. this announcement has come at what has otherwise been a gloomy time for the uk car industry. thanks to falling sales at home and in key markets abroad as well as the uncertainty of brexit. but at castle bromwich, today at least, there was something to smile about. theo leggett, bbc news, castle bromwich. graeme cooper is the project director for electric vehicles at national grid, and hejoins me now. thank you forjoining us, how well positioned is the uk for what is likely to be a big expansion in the demand for electric vehicles? well, the uk is actually well—positioned.
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we have got solid regulation, we have got a very strong network, and actually with the government committing to net a zero by 2050, and therefore we have an industrial strategy that gives us a trajectory to the end of internal combustion engine only vehicles by 20a0, that means we have a clear line of sight to be able to get the country ready for electric vehicles. how much of this needs to be led by the government, rather than relying on free market forces? the neat thing about... from a car perspective, a charging car perspective, buying an electric car and charging it at home isa electric car and charging it at home is a unique thing that you have in an electric car, you can't do that with a petrol car today. the challenge you have got in doing that, though, is great if you have off street parking overnight, that is the best way to charge an electric car. but if you leave it purely to the market, though, the public charging network will tend to go where early adopters of cars are
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being deployed, and that is generally london and the south—east. what we really need across the country is a quality, you know, that social mobility pieces really quite important. even if you travel locally for your day—to—day, you know, working week, we all do longer journeys to visit friends, family or for holidays. you need a level of consistency across the uk from charging infrastructure. now, that really needs that top—down thinking from government, to have a minimal viable product, a core network to allow the commercial charge point providers to provide the actual charging infrastructure, plugs and sockets, that you need to charge the car. top—down thinking from government is quite important, as well as that local interpretation of that plan. how do we make sure, though, that we are charging electric vehicles with electricity from renewable sources, rather than fossil fuels, from renewable sources, rather than fossilfuels, which is what
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from renewable sources, rather than fossil fuels, which is what we are trying to get away from? of the nice thing is, before ijoined national grid, i actually build wind farms, and wind is generating power when the wind is blowing, we have solar generating solar when the sun is shining. a beautiful day today, a lot of the country is being run on solar. what i do as an gigafactory owner already, my smart charger bias is charging my car when both the energy is cheap and plentiful, and when it is clean. so that means that my relatively clean electric car is forever getting cleaner and cheaper. and what that allows us to do is deploy more renewable resources, because we have flexible demand, i should say, to be able to take that power when it is readily available. how well—equipped are the manufacturers, though, to meet the demand that is likely to be forthcoming for electric vehicles? a lot of car manufacturers will have
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ploughed in huge amounts of money to catch and diesel engines, and somehow they need to recoup that investment. certainly. bearing in mindi investment. certainly. bearing in mind i am coming from the energy industry perspective, but what we see from that perspective is at the moment there are more people trying to buy electric cars and there are electric cars being brought into the country. that is why the announcement from jaguar land rover is incredibly positive. did you generally from the automotive sector is by the time they have retooled and are able to provide those cars, and are able to provide those cars, and others are coming into the market from competitors, the next challenge will be having the right infrastructure for ev charging, and thatis infrastructure for ev charging, and that is the ability for the energy networks to make sure we are the enabler to a low carbon car future. the energy networks industry won't actually provide the last point charging, the leeds and sockets, but what we are able to do is make sure we can enable the right capacity at the right location to enable it to
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happen in public. and that will stimulate the market, because i guess range anxiety is either a perception or a reality depending on your view, but we just need confidence that you can charge your car at home and your workplace and en route. that will allow the car market to be able to move electric ca rs market to be able to move electric cars add volume, and that will allow them to recoup that investment in infrastructure cost. i think you win the prize for sentence of the afternoon so far with are used to build wind farms, i do not know who will top that! graeme cooper, thank you very much. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. a gang behind the biggest modern—day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forced labour. jaguar land rover is to invest hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands. the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. borisjohnson denies downing street attempted to withhold secret intelligence from him
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while he was foreign secretary. in sport, caroline wozniacki is out of wimbledon, she suffered a third round straight set defeat against zhang shuai of china. later, 15—year—old american sensation coco gauff will bid to make the fourth round, she takes on polona hercog of slovenia on centre court, we will be live there shortly. and gianni infantino live there shortly. and gianni infa ntino wants to live there shortly. and gianni infantino wants to increase the size of the women's world cup 232 teams and double its prize money in four yea rs' and double its prize money in four years' time. —— to 32 teams. the racing punditjohn mccririck has died at the age of 79. mccririck made his career as the face of channel a's racing coverage. he was famous for his la rger—than—life personality and his signature deerstalker hat. he also appeared on reality tv shows such as celebrity big brother and celebrity wife swap.
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derek thompson is a horse racing broadcaster and long time colleague ofjohn. derek, thank you so much forjoining us, share some of your thoughts, if you would of what he was like as a friend and colleague? he was an incredible man, martin. to put it quite simply, he was the most professional journalist quite simply, he was the most professionaljournalist i have ever worked with, and i have worked with plenty, and i worked with him for nearly 35 years, and we sat alongside each other in the press room, and! alongside each other in the press room, and i will tell you a true story about him. he had two of everything, two race cards to do his homework, two watches, and i said, why do you do two of everything? well, in case i lose a watch or it stops, and he looked at me incredulously, yes, 0k, stops, and he looked at me incredulously, yes, ok, i understand that. he was that professional, and the way he put things over, he endeared himself to the british racing public. he helped to not put horse racing on the map, but he took
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it to horse racing on the map, but he took ittoa horse racing on the map, but he took it to a new level, he was incredible, waving his hands around, top of the head, 6—a, like it used top of the head, 6—a, like it used to be in the old days, and i will tell you a true story. about 30 yea rs tell you a true story. about 30 years ago, we had a channel a meeting on a saturday morning at york, and i remember andrew franklin, who run channel a racing, he said, guys, channela franklin, who run channel a racing, he said, guys, channel a want to do a20 he said, guys, channel a want to do a 20 minute programme forfive he said, guys, channel a want to do a 20 minute programme for five weeks during the summer holidays looking ahead to the afternoon's racing, what shall we call it? and beit mac said, it has got to be the morning line! it ran for 35 years, notjust five weeks, he was incredible, and it was ill, i know it was a blessing and all that, but it is very sad, because it is a big void. nobody will be able to filljohn mccririck‘s boots, he was incredible. he was, for some people, a controversialfigure, some of the
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views he expressed were unpalatable, some described them as misogynistic, his wife described them at nonsense, which is the truth? the truth as he was a gentleman, he would open a doorfor a lady was a gentleman, he would open a door for a lady and was a gentleman, he would open a doorfor a lady and all was a gentleman, he would open a door for a lady and all that. remember, he was of a different age, it was the 19705, 19805, 19905, and he's called his wife, as we know, jenny, he called her the booby, which was a silly thing to say, and she loved him, they lived together in london for so many years, and it is an old—fashioned thing to say, we would not be able to say it now, but thatis would not be able to say it now, but that is what he called his wife, and he invented... the word female, he used to call the assistant to wim the female, but there was nothing rude, it wasjust the female, but there was nothing rude, it was just that in those days we would respond to e—mails on the morning line, and the lady who did it was female, and she loved it. there was never anything, remember, it was tv, it was live, he was
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different, the whiskers, the funny hat, he madejokes and all that, waved his hands about, but there was nothing malicious about it. remember, he was journalist of the year not once but twice, so remember, very good at making stories, you are a trained journalist he trained as a journalist, admittedly in the horse racing world, but somebody incredible, as i said, the most professional guy i have ever worked with. 0bviously with. obviously very flamboyant, unforgettable on—screen, was it like that in real life, away from the cameras? i would love to say no, of course he wasn't, but yeah, he was! but that is the way he was, whenever you went out for dinner, i stayed with him in london a few times, and people obviously, he was instantly recognisable wherever he went, and he would lap it all up. and rightly so. but at the same time, he didn't suffer fools gladly, he was right on the ball, he was a guy who wanted
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the ball, he was a guy who wanted the best for his company, people in his company, and when i found out that he had passed away, 79, he had beeniu that he had passed away, 79, he had been ill for some time, so as i say, a blessing, but at the same time, you know, it is a very sad moment for me, someone who sat next to him in the press room for over 30 years, you know, i still remember all the jokes, all the banter and all that. when i was present in the morning line all those years, if ever i was in trouble, as you know, presenting a programme, sometimes you don't hear the year, i would hand over to him and say, big mac, what is happening? you would always come back and save you, i will never forget that, rest in peace, john mccririck. we all need colleagues like that! derek thompson, thank you very much. the two contenders for the leadership of the conservative party have been taking part in hustings with voters in darlington today. borisjohnson denied he was ever left out of intelligence briefings during his time as foreign
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secretary. do conservatives trust him? borisjohnson could be in no 10 in three weeks' time. but it has emerged the current pm had real concerns about his ability to keep information confidential. were you blocked from seeing any in intelligence when you were foreign secretary, mrjohnson? i said that politics is not a game... the bbc understands there was an attempt to withhold sensitive intelligence when mrjohnson was foreign secretary. some have suggested it was control freakery from number ten. others that there was nervousness in the intelligence community. but were you aware at the time that perhaps some sensitive information was being held back from you? it's not true, and i don't comment on intelligence matters. you deny it altogether? i do.
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number ten says theresa may did trust boris johnson but it will not comment directly on intelligence. nor would the other leadership candidate. we do have a rule that we never comment on intelligence matters. borisjohnson's team says he got all the information he needed as foreign secretary, and it is unlikely this will have a major impact on the leadership race. but as conservatives start voting for our next prime minister, there are others in the party who have their concerns. this former pm says he's backing jeremy hunt. it is fairly evident from my views that i cannot vote for somebody who was part of the brexit campaign which misled the country, so i shall offer my vote to jeremy hunt. at the same time, current cabinet ministers are planning to do whatever they can to stop either candidate leaving europe without a deal. let me quote the speaker of the house of commons, who has said that if the house of commons is determined to do something, he's quite sure that it will find a way. and we can deliver brexit... boris johnson and jeremy hunt
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will both say that leaving with no deal in four months' time must be an option. we are facing an existential crisis, as a party and indeed as a political class, if i may say so. any negotiator has their hand profoundly weakened if the other side think that you can't walk away. but they both know, if it comes to it, getting the numbers for no—deal will be tough, particularly in a political age where trust is often in short supply. nick eardley, bbc news. well the action is now moving to perth, and our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is there. lorna, questions over the candidates' character have dominated the contest so far. is that focus likely to remain when the pair are in scotland? well, i think character has been an undercurrent of this whole campaign,
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but here in scotland it is possible the questioning will shift a little to matters of the union, not the european union, but the union that is the united kingdom. the warm up act yesterday, if you like, theresa may, prime minister, was here in scotla nd may, prime minister, was here in scotland giving a speech where her message to those who would follow her was that she believed there was a very real risk that the uk could break up in the event of a poor brexit deal. joannes hunt have already made their position is known on the matter, borisjohnson has talked of becoming a ministerfor the union to try to ensure it is maintained, jeremy hunt's position has got progressively tougher, now saying that he would never, ever allow the union to be broken up if he was prime minister. but expect more questions on that theme when this hustings gets under way, when
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they take to the podium in perth early this evening. what sort of reception of they likely to get? well, they will be speaking to tory party members here in the concert hall, we are expecting several hundred of them to be attending, coming from all over scotland, of course perth is quite centrally located. 0utside course perth is quite centrally located. outside the concert hall, it may be a little different. there has been some suggestions that there might be protests, one local business has talked of giving out 1003 milkshakes because their message is that a no—deal brexit is not welcomed in scotland. remember, a majority of people here in scotla nd a majority of people here in scotland voted in favour of remaining in the european union. but ultimately, though, it all comes down to conservative party members,
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those ballots dropping through their letter boxes over the next couple of days, focusing their minds ahead of the hustings here, and people undoubtedly making up their minds about who they will vote for to become the next conservative party leader and the next prime minister as well. lorna, thank you very much. time for a look at the weather. matt has joined us, matt hasjoined us, we are heading to alaska, and it doesn't look quite like we would expect. a lovely glacier here, who is walking above it, shorts and t—shirt, that is what we have got at the moment in alaska, the most northerly state in the us, it does get warmer during the summer months, but perhaps not as warm as it has been getting recently. under the influence of a big area of high pressure, unusually warm sea waters, 2.5 degrees higher than normal, that stops whether systems coming in, so
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it has stayed dry, june was the highest and warmest on record. now it isjuly, highest and warmest on record. now it is july, and highest and warmest on record. now it isjuly, and with high pressure in place, feeding and warm southerly air, blue skies overhead, summer solstice the other week, that sun is at its strongest, and that has been steadily warming up the states. let me take you into anchorage, the capital of the state, and on this temperature profile from yesterday, notice the warmer orange colours have been appearing. anchorage is further north than shetland, so you don't expect it to be too warm, but yesterday the temperatures soared. the temperature record in anchorage was set back in 1969, 50 years ago, 29 degrees. yesterday, independence day, the ath ofjuly, absolutely shattered that, 32 celsius. so like we have seen in europe, notjust breaking records, absolutely shattering them, an all—time record, not just shattering them, an all—time record, notjustjune, shattering them, an all—time record, not justjune, the shattering them, an all—time record, not just june, the warmest shattering them, an all—time record, notjustjune, the warmest ever temperature.
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and wildfire is a problem too. yes, because of that dryjune, the ground has dried out, temperatures like this, the seven day forecast keeps temperatures above that, could even get hotter over the next few days, and you put it into perspective, it should be 18 or around this time of year, still pushing into the 305 as we go into next week. yes, the drier weather has meant wildfires have become a big issue. in anchorage, some of the smoke from this fire just south of the capital has come in across the city. so pretty miserable atmosphere there this morning. 0ur weather not quite so severe, not so extreme, but it has been pretty warm this afternoon, temperatures in the mid to high 205 across southern counties of england and wales, cooler on our temperature profile further north, mid teens at best for some in western scotland. here we have seen cloud, outbreaks of rain, with the satellite imagery, you can see the cloud in place, just inching
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southwards. the rain at the moment is across the western highlands in particular, through the ceiling that will push into northern ireland, southern scotland, went for time, then overnight into northern england. not everyone will see rain but it could reach the north midlands by the end of the night. warm enough overnight, fresher further north across scotland and northern ireland, away from the towns and city centres, temperatures down to single figures. the big story for the weekend across southern areas is how much cooler it will feel, evening out the temperatures across the country, but if you have got outdoor plans, most places will be dry. rain will be tied into a weather front, here places will be dry. rain will be tied into a weatherfront, here it is, straddling the central part of the uk as we start the weekend, northerly winds developing to the northerly winds developing to the north of that, but with sunny spells. through the morning, parts of wales, the midlands, norfolk, cambridgeshire could see outbreaks of rain, the same in lincolnshire, pushing toward southernmost counties
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later in the afternoon, but i can't guarantee you won't see rain on that. if your garden needs it, it could be hit and miss. some of the southernmost counties, particularly the channel islands, will stay dry for longest, temperatures still hitting 25 degrees. that drops away, cloudy afternoon, the rest of southern england and south wales, the midlands, norfolk, lincolnshire, north—west, brightening up compared with the morning, and for the north of the country sunny spells to take us of the country sunny spells to take us through a good part of the day, representing big improvement, northern ireland in particular will feel a bit warmer than today, a cool breeze, though, down to the eastern coast. there we go into the evening, could be a little bit of rain around the english channel coast, that will linger into sunday morning, stretching back into a weather front trying to nudge back in towards ireland and south wales, south—west england later. most start the day with a fresh note, sunny spells, a bit more cloud in the afternoon, isolated chance of showers, mostly dry, temperatures probably not as
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cool down the eastern coast as the winds ease, pleasant enough in the sunshine. as we go to next week, many parts of england and wales will start the week dry, sunny spells, turning warmer. scotland and northern ireland brightest on monday, rain moves in tuesday and into wednesday. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forced labour. jaguar land rover is to invest hundreds of millions
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into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands — the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. borisjohnson denies downing street attempted to withhold secret intelligence from him while he was foreign secretary. john mccririck, who for many years, was the face of british horse racing, has died at the age of 79. sport now on afternoon live with will perry. plenty of exciting matches to keep eve ryo ne plenty of exciting matches to keep everyone occupied at wimbledon but a big name has gone. former world number one caroline wozniacki is out on day five, a straight sets defeat against a chinese player, 6—a, 6—2. the number three seed karolina pliskova is
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through, defeating hsieh su—wei o. kevin andersson losing the first two sets against gidon peller —— guido pella. this is on court one. my but djokovic is in action against hubert hurkacz. nothing to panic for the world number one in that one. later the 15—year—old, look at this for skill, coco gauff, bidding to make it to the fourth round, where she will face polona hercog from slovenia, on centre
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court. i'm really enjoying it, i'm excited to play. and the brits, we love a fairy tale and they've been loving you. yeah, they have. everyone talking about serena williams pairing up with andy murray, in the mixed doubles. they should be on court at about 5:30pm, after then, on centre court. plenty to enjoy for the crowd. serena can't wait to get on the court with murray. i'm looking forward to it. it will help me out. usually when i play doubles it helps might singles play. i really needed it and i'm glad you guys suggested it. i'm really looking forward to it. we talked about it before and it made sense for me because i could use some matches at this point and it
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made sense for him, and we both want to do well and we both love wimbledon, so it's something we thought we could do. everyone looking forward to that match and i think we'll all be watching it. you can watch it on bbc tv and also the app as well. some great news from the fifa president regarding women's football. this is gianni infantino, news in the last hour. he wants to increase the size of the women's world cup to 32 teams and double the prize money. great news for the women's game. he wants to launch a clu b world women's game. he wants to launch a club world cup as well. he has set out a five—point plan to make sure that football seizes the opportunity. he said that they want a world league for national teams, similarto a world league for national teams, similar to that uefa nations leak which would include promotion and relegation as well. some cricket news, new zealand confirmed for the
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world cup semifinals. pakistan needed to beat bangladesh by at least 308 runs. that's all the export for now. a lot going on. plenty more wimbledon to bring you later. let's get more now on the death of racing punditjohn mccririck. he was 79. famous for his eccentric style and his signature deerstalker hat, mccririck made his career as the face of channel a's racing coverage. let's speak to our horseracing correspondent cornelius lysaght, who's at sandown. how good wasjohn mccririck for the sport of horse racing ways yellow he was very good. people are talking
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today at sandown about what he contributed and what i've thrown into the pot is that i think over the last 35 years, the three best—known faces associated with british racing have been frankie dettori, her majesty the queen, especially at an —— at ascot, and john mccririck. we called him a racing pundit, quite rightly but he was larger—than—life, racing pundit, quite rightly but he was la rger—than—life, waving racing pundit, quite rightly but he was larger—than—life, waving his arms around, the whiskers, the trademark rings on his fingers. he made the sport of kings the sport of beakfor a made the sport of kings the sport of beak for a while. he gave made the sport of kings the sport of beakfor a while. he gave it made the sport of kings the sport of beak for a while. he gave it a massive boost in profile, which is so important these days for all sports and he played a big part. —— he made it into the sport of big mac. an earlier guest talked about how personal he was, how generous and knowledgeable —— how
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professional he was. that's the striking thing. i hope that when people talk in the obituaries and tributes they don't just talk about his flamboyant tributes they don't just talk about his fla m boya nt style tributes they don't just talk about his flamboyant style because behind that was someone who knew the sport inside and back to front. he had been and was a punter, so he was a lwa ys been and was a punter, so he was always keen to champion punters and if he saw injustice he wanted to jump if he saw injustice he wanted to jump on it. he was very knowledgeable and for all the bluster and brightly coloured outfits etc, he was a perfectly normal human being. i always sat near to normal human being. i always sat nearto him and normal human being. i always sat near to him and near him and we chatted about this and that, not just the sort of things he was famous for. he was much more than the public persona ofjohn mccririck, although he loved it all. someone said that if he saw a red button on top of a camera, he'd go straight towards it, where do you wa nt straight towards it, where do you want me, i'll be here! that was
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absolutely him. that's a deerstalker that once they had to sit on. do you fa ncy that once they had to sit on. do you fancy it? no, but i'll tell you what, his legacy will be many things. one of them will be, at sandown tomorrow, at haydock, some of the summer rae sources, there will be some stag parties and people come dressed up, many come with the deerstalker and the sunglasses. there will be reminders ofjohn mccririck tomorrow and in the future as well. —— summer racehorses. a man accused of lying about a vip paedophile ring has been giving further evidence at his trial at newcastle crown court. carl beech, who is 51 and from gloucester, denies 12 counts of perverting the course of justice and one of fraud. 0ur correspondentjune kelly was in court — i spoke to her a little earlier.
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well, carl beech denies in this case that he did lie to police about what he told them about this vip paedophile ring of which he said he was a victim. but today from the witness box he admitted that he did lie in another criminal investigation. he said that initially when he was facing counts of possessing indecent images of children, he initially denied that charge but then he pleaded guilty and asked why he had this change of plea, he said "because i was totally ashamed of what i had done and couldn't admit it to myself, i was in denial." now obviously this whole case goes to carl beech's honesty and he was asked about other issues of honesty, including the fact that while he was under investigation he went to sweden and while there, he started using different names and he was asked about this. and he said one name he chose because it was an old family name.
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and then he was asked why he used another name. and he said he couldn't and that he didn't know why he'd actually gone on to use another name as well. he described his decision not to return to the uk to face a court hearing as a stupid mistake, and he eventually was extradited from sweden by law enforcement agencies following a big manhunt. he had to come back to the uk obviously to face trial here. now also this morning he's told the court that when he was making his allegations he was obviously seeing a number of people. and he said that the labour's deputy leader tom watson asked to have a meeting with him, and he said he did meet tom watson because tom watson was a man who seemed to have interest in the allegations that he was making. he denies 12 counts of perverting the course of justice and one of fraud. this case will continue next week. postal ballots have started going out to conservative party members as the race for number 10 enters its final few weeks.
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either borisjohnson orjeremy hunt will be announced as the new prime minister on the 23rd july. yesterday, we had a closer look atjeremy hunt. today, it's mrjohnson's turn. here's our political correspondent chris mason. as a child, borisjohnson said he wanted to be world king. oh, well, being prime minister isn't too bad. and if he beatsjeremy hunt, he will be. he has made a political career out of being different. i could have illustrated this with all sorts of pictures, but these take some beating. oh, and this is pretty good too. oh, no! so, who is borisjohnson? he went to school at eton and then to oxford university. i declare the motion overwhelmingly carried. boris! then it was journalism. he got sacked from one job for making up a quote. he got an mp, he became an mp and got sacked as a shadow minister because his boss said he had lied to him. and then he was mayor of london, during the olympics.
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release the rings into position...now! as one of the biggest voices in the leave campaign, he travelled about on this bus with that claim about sending the eu 350 million quid a week, a claim the uk statistics authority — among many others — said was rubbish. shortly after, he had a brief, doomed attempt at becoming prime minister. that person cannot be me. but this time, he is the frontrunner. his supporters welcome his clarity on leaving the eu this autumn, with or without a deal. under theresa may's premiership, the eu never thought we would be prepared to walk away from the negotiation, and boris is very clear that he is prepared to do that. as foreign secretary, he had to apologise for comments he made in parliament about nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, the british iranian woman in prison in tehran accused of spying. she was simply teaching people
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journalism, as i understand it. she was actually on holiday. sonia purnell wrote a book about johnson called a tale of blonde ambition. we cannot afford to have that sort of chaos with our next prime minister. we are, is borisjohnson himself says, in a time of national crisis. we need stability and calm and a lot of attention to detail. and then there is his private life. and there is a lot of it. "who cares?", say his supporters. and there is a lot of them as well. they see borisjohnson as one thing, above everything else, a winner. someone they hope can beat jeremy corbyn, nigel farage and the liberal democrats. say "brexit"! brexit! so, delivering brexit and winning elections is his pitch. and we have never been closer to finding out if he can do it. chris mason, bbc news.
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jamie is here with the business news but first, the headlines. a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forced labour. jaguar land rover is to invest hundreds of millions into its castle bromwich plant in the west midlands. the factory will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj model. borisjohnson denies downing street attempted to withhold secret intelligence from him while he was foreign secretary. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. another leap in the number of newjobs in the us. last month 22a,000 jobs were created. most economists imagined the figure would be closer to 160,000. but elsewhere in the world in germany and asia the latest economic figures are looking weak. jaguar land rover —jlr — is investing hundreds of millions
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of pounds to build a range of electric vehicles at its castle bromwich plant in birmingham. initially the plant will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj. jlr says the move will help secure the jobs of 2,700 workers at the plant. john menzies, the company in charge of loading your luggage on the planes fuelling them, towing them, all those air services you need at airports. it's said profts have taken a hit this year and it's to do with cargo volumes. the shares fell by over 10%. i can't believe it, amazon, 25 years old. it's funny to say this because i render it as a book firm. he was a hedge fund manager, he gave up his dayjob to hedge fund manager, he gave up his day job to sell hedge fund manager, he gave up his dayjob to sell books. hedge fund manager, he gave up his day job to sell books. seemed mad at the time, probably. seems like a step down but it has obviously turned into this leviathan, $1
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trillion company. interestingly, mr corbyn has sent many happy returns... many happy tax returns! he says he would like and was on to pay its taxes and treat its staff a little bit better. —— who would like amazon to pay its taxes. a lot of criticism about it being a monopoly and avoiding tax. it paid in the uk about £1.7 million in tax last year on revenues of about 11 billion, not on revenues of about 11 billion, not on profit. profit very small, it says because it is a competitive market. it seems that everyone these days is an amazon customer so i've come here to put it to the test. hello,
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ladies. are you guys amazon customers? yes. big time. i don't like to go to the store anymore, i buy it online. i think! like to go to the store anymore, i buy it online. i think i shop more because of amazon. what do you use amazon for? gifts. i buy it for my son. i'm looking for deals. amazon! jeff pays offs —— jeff pays off filed papers to found and was on 25 alexa, what is amazon? amazon.com incorporated is an american multinational technology company that focuses on e—commerce, cloud computing, digital streaming and artificial intelligence. it is known for its disruption of well—established industries through technological change. but its growth has displaced retailjobs and it has
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faced criticism over worker conditions at its warehouses. it's not a good local or any of these companies, where efficiency is so prized, that the human product has a very challenging time. one decision it may come to regret, its failure to place a second headquarters in new york. the acrimonious split with america's biggest city points to a future in which governments are less friendly towards amazon. alexa, is amazon good or evil?|j friendly towards amazon. alexa, is amazon good or evil? i like amazon. without amazon i wouldn't exist. the thing with amazon, sometimes it is hard not to use them. it is difficult, isn't it? if you decide you're going to give up amazon, like going on a diet, it's impossible because they own so many other
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companies. so much of the stuff that's online is a hard place to go to. andy mulcahy is strategy and insight director at imrg, the uk's industry association for online retail. andy, on its success, you can't deny this. we have to appreciate it. why was it so successful? they got there before anybody else. started seeing books and cds, which fit through the letterbox, which is useful. if you compare the range of stuff they carry and thinking about that against a shop which may have 200 products, something like that, it is so vast and it is backed up by an amazingly convenient way to buy things. everything about it is very convenient. we've all done it, you know how easy it is and there's a very fast delivery service. they sort out customer service problems
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quickly, and customer value. they don't look to make a massive margin. very competitive. the reason they can do that, they have a lot of companies. amazon web services is an additional 30 billion. that is where it makes its money. we assume the company is going to go on for ever, but it won't. at some point things are going to go wrong. what is its biggest challenge? government? 0ther companies? small people coming into the market and doing stuff it can't do? at the moment, retail is going through a massive change. amazon have been successful because we live ina rampant have been successful because we live in a rampant consumer culture where you've got to have more stuff all the time but we've ended up dumping more stuff in the ocean, you have this plastic waste pollution and bad air in cities which is by the amount driven of vehicles going around. i
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think retail has to adapt to that new reality. there's a big shift coming. it's not tomorrow, next week but over the last ten years, if you we re but over the last ten years, if you were to say, are they the big thing, there is a big change for such a massive company. sending millions of orders around, that creates quite a lot of waste. we have to adapt to that reality and that's a significant challenge, especially for one so big. interesting answer. thank you. not the answer i was expecting. the idea that because everything is changing so much in retail, can amazon change? we'll see. we will, thank you. kirsty young is to step down as the host of radio a's desert island discs. she says she's decided to pursue new challenges having presented a96 episodes of the programme. ki rsty young has presented the long—running show since 2006 and has interviewed hundreds of guests including annie lennox, morrissey and david tennant. last year, she took a break from hosting the show
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for health reasons. the bbc says 6 music's lauren laverne, who was drafted in as cover, will continue in the role "for the foreseeable future". earlier i spoke to our entertainment correspondent colin paterson. i think desert island discs, hosting it is one of the best jobs in british media. you get to interview a fantastic variety of people, everyone from sir david attenborough, to keith richards and making such a success of it. the preparation that kirsty young put into it, you can see it in her interviews. if someone brought up a fact, she followed up. so methodical in preparation. working out what clothes she should wear to set her guest at ease. when she did bill gates, she knew that he wore open neck shirts, so she did as well. paul weller, see what a smart suit and it paid off.
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you mentioned morrissey, she researched and found out that he likes a particular drink, vodka, rather than tea and coffee. she felt she had to pull one for herself, although she said she didn't drink it. i was surprised. you mentioned the illness, august 2018, she announced she was stepping back from the show because she had this condition, fibromyalgia, where you feel pain over your body. lady gaga has had it. in a statement today, kirsty young said she is starting to feel better, she's on her way to recovery, but this time out has made her rethink what she wants to do in life and her career and she's decided to step away from the desert island. for now, lauren laverne gets to stay in the hot seat. yes, if people who don't know her, she hosts the breakfast show on 6 music. she used to be in a music band and people have been impressed
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with how she's taking over. if you're only standing in, it is difficult to make it your own. sometimes it felt she was playing it safe, almost doing a cover version because it wasn't her show. she is now the show‘s fifth host since it started in 19a2. that's how much people like to hold on to the job when they get it. lauren laverne has been told until the foreseeable future, will be the host of desert island discs. time for the weather. hello. well once again we do have big weather contrasts north to south across the uk. this afternoon we've seen temperatures get into the high 205 for some across southern coastal counties and particularly the southeast. notice further north or much cooler temperatures in the teens. that's because this year we've had the cloud in place again
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with more rain north west scotland but some gaps coming in for this evening brightening up across parts of the hebrides and eventually north highlands. and that's as thick as cloud with rain. this weather front pushes its way suffered some outbreaks around some scotland order on the evening and then overnight into northern england eventually north wales. to the south of it, you stay largely clear. another reasonably warm night temperatures into the teens for some further north tends much fresher particularly for the towns and cities down into single figures to start your saturday morning. so we enter the weekend and that cooler air in the north is going to work its way southward so the biggest drop in temperature will be in southern parts. most places that will stay dry. there'll be some showers around and on saturday linked into this weather front which is going to take that cooler air fresher air that little bit further southwards. starts in northern england north wales, north midlands during the morning some heavy burst possible but actually it turns lighter and patches on that weather front as it works its way southwards. western air not much rain or drizzle at all maybe a bit more towards east anglia could get very close to the wimbledon area into the afternoon. no guarantees though,
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anywhere we'll see rain but certainly cloudy compared to the past few days and we could still see temps in the mid 205 right on the coast come inland. temperature dropped around four maybe five degrees on what we've seen this afternoon. sunshine for the afternoon after the morning patchy rain across north midlands north wales northern parts of east anglia. sunny spells for northern england too and northern ireland and scotland are vastly brighter on saturday compared the past few days. winds making it feel rather cool down towards eastern areas but in the west would like to wednesday we could see temps is actually up in recent days, even feel a little bit warmer. saturday evening so the rain just clearing away from the south coast our weather front grinds to a halt along the english channel and it's here where we could still see some spots of rain on sunday. isolated showers can't be ruled out elsewhere on sunday but for most sunny start cloud building up spreading out. not as chilly down eastern coasts given the fact the winds be a bit lighter. pleasant enough where you have the sunshine. dry again and much of the world stays dry through the first half of next week warming up a little bit in the south. but telling wetter to scotland and northern ireland.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at four: the worst case of modern—day slavery ever seen in the uk, eight people are convicted after forcing more than a00 victims to work for as little as 50 pence a day. translation: i couldn't even leave the house to go for a walk. they were following me, spying on me. they were controlling me. a huge boost for the car industry — jaguar land rover says the company's decision to build electric vehicles in birmingham will protect hundreds ofjobs. borisjohnson says it's not true secret intelligence was withheld from him when he became theresa may's foreign secretary. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. and a very important doubles match
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for a lot of fans to look forward to this afternoon. absolutely, martine, andy murray and serena williams in action after 5:30, but a shock on centre court, last year's finest kevin anderson, fourth seed, knocked out in the third round. we will be live there in half an hour. the news that fifa has pledged to increase the size of the women's world cup to 32 teams, doubling its prize money, infour 32 teams, doubling its prize money, in four years' time. matt taylor has all the weather. turning cooler this weekend, but martine, will it stay dry? all the details of the next 25 minutes. also coming up, in news nationwide, giving hope to the youth — how this boxing club in county antrim is helping young people get work.
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hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. eight people from poland have been jailed after being found guilty of modern—slavery offences in the west midlands. the gang preyed on the homeless, ex—prisoners and alcoholics from poland, forcing them to live in squalor and work for a pittance. the judge described it as the most "prolific slavery network ever". three of the men were sentenced today to a combined total of more than 20 years. sima kotecha reports. their victims, some as young as 17, were made to live in rooms like these — filthy, often rat—infested, with no heating or light. the gang was made up of five men and three women, all from poland. 52—year—old ignacy brzezinski, a1—year—old wojciech nowa kowski and 26—year—old jan sadowski were found guilty of modern slavery offences. for the first time, the bbc can
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report that, in february, five others were convicted of their roles in the conspiracy and have been jailed. together, they preyed on the vulnerable in poland — former prisoners, the homeless, alcoholics. they were promised a wealthy life in britain and were quickly transported from their homeland to the west midlands, so they didn't have time to change their minds. translation: to be honest, i came here to start a new life, but i didn't know that this new life would start with such really big problems. i couldn't even leave the house to go for a walk. they were following me, spying on me. they were controlling me. more than 90 victims gave evidence during the case, but police believe the true number of victims is in the hundreds. they lived in the black country and were forced to work in factories and on farms, carrying out manual labour for as little as 50p a day,
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while their masters took the rest of their earnings. west midlands police began looking into what was happening four years ago and named their investigation 0peration fort. they would convince the victims, for example, that they were unlawfully in the country, that if they left the house that the traffickers provided for them, that they would be arrested by the police. sometimes they were given a debt, so they were told that they owed the traffickers £5,000 and they had to work off that debt. so there is a lot of these methods the traffickers would use to make them feel trapped. 0ne slave had his arm broken for complaining, while another was stripped naked in front of others for speaking out. the gang was discovered after charities identified victims. this man works undercover and wants to remain anonymous. very withdrawn, physically shaken, disorientated. we had victims presenting with black eyes, one victim presented with
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a broken arm, so his broken arm had re—set itself out of alignment. ripped clothing, emaciated. while the victims suffered, the gang bosses lived an opulent lifestyle, driving lavish cars and buying designer clothes. over five years, they made at least £2 million. investigators believe it's the largest such prosecution of its kind in europe. charities are urging the public to keep a lookout for other victims, who could be being exploited in similar ways. detective chief inspector nick dale from west midlands police, the senior investigating officer for operation fort, gave his reaction outside court to the sentences that were handed down. i'm really pleased with the sentencing. we've achieved sentences of a total of 55 and a half years
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for the eight defendants that we've convicted so far. i think that sends a really strong message to people not to, you know, that they're not welcome in this country if they're going to exploit people in the way that this organised crime group has done. the judge, in her sentencing remarks, said that it was the biggest investigation of its type ever prosecuted in the uk. we believe it's probably the biggest in europe as well. we don't know for sure the full extent of it. we know that they would have been at least 200 victims exploited by this group, probably twice that. it was a long and complicated investigation, as you can appreciate. there was a lot of phone evidence, in total 650,000 lines of telephone data had to be analysed, numerous bank accounts, hundreds of bank accounts, over a thousand statements were taken, there were 3,000 exhibits. this was a complex and extensive investigation. whilst it was going on, we were aware that there were risks to other victims.
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we used the slavery and trafficking risk order, the new legislation under the 2015 modern slavery act, in order to control the activities of the suspects, and at the end of the day, a thorough investigation into these individuals and the disruption and dismantling of this organised crime group was a way that we could manage the risk they presented to the community in the long term. i think estimates that we've had so far of the scale of the problem, i think it is accepted that they are underestimated. this is something which is hidden within societies. we were very fortunate in terms of being able to get into the polish community in west bromwich particularly, to gain their trust in order to fully and properly investigate this offence. this is something that we cannot, as the police, investigate and arrest our way out of alone. you know, other members of society, the community, businesses, banks, recruitment agencies, everybody has to play their part in making it as difficult as possible for the traffickers to exploit people in this way.
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andrew wallis is the ceo at unseen uk, a charity working towards ending modern slavery. hejoins me now. thank you forjoining us this afternoon on bbc news, how close is the connection between modern slavery and homelessness? we have just released a report, we run the uk's modern slavery helpline, showing the connection, especially around the vulnerability of people becoming homeless. traffickers look for people who are vulnerable, who it is easy to isolate and exploit, and ways we have seen with this case, it results in them turning a human being into a commodity, and for the traffickers it means vast amounts of money. how is it that traffickers can infiltrate companies which are legitimate, that are trying to remain above board, and
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that infiltration doesn't even get spotted to begin with?|j that infiltration doesn't even get spotted to begin with? i think we have to recognise that traffickers are very smart, and a look at business operations and work out, how can i take my commodity, as you being, insert it into the operation? in this case, we have to ask questions, why is it within the agricultural and construction sectors that these people were able to come and go and nobody noticed? we talk about this as a crime hidden in plain sight, and as the police officer said, this isjust the in plain sight, and as the police officer said, this is just the tip officer said, this is just the tip of the iceberg that we are seeing. so how can a company look for signs that perhaps this infiltration has taken place so that they can be vigilant to prevent it and call in the authorities if they think it is happening? yeah, so the first thing is to make themselves and their staff aware of what the indicators are, to look more closely at the people that are around them, you know, do they seem withdrawn, are
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they controlled, are they dressed appropriately, are there multiple bank accounts, you know, if there is a group of people coming into a business, have they got particular bank accounts? there is a responsibility on the banks to look closer at hewitt is that is opening the banks. in this case, we had being marched into a bag, and they had complete control over their accounts. so it is awareness. it is then having the courage to report suspicions. we would encourage businesses to call the uk's modern slavery helpline oh call police if they have concerns. we need people to get over that british reserve. if you see something that you do nothing is right, you have a responsibility to speak up, your voice might bring freedom for these people. hair —— something that you do nothing is right. how can you be sure that a report of a suspicion of
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modern slavery doesn't put the potential victim in greater harm? this is why we would encourage people to call the helpline, there are trained call handlers who will ta ke are trained call handlers who will take the information, interface with the relevant agencies, whether it is police or another ngo, or other statutory agencies, and so that proper procedures are followed. you are right, we need to keep a victim safe, and we have seen about 10% of our call is coming directly from victims, another 50% coming on behalf of victims, and so it is important to the information is handled correctly and dealt with properly. andrew wallace of unseen uk, thank you very much. the head ofjaguar land rover has said its decision to build electric vehicles in the west midlands is a "vote of confidence in the uk". the multi—million—pound investment will help secure the jobs of 2,700 workers at the firm's castle bromwich plant. our business correspondent theo leggett reports. the midlands can be a benchmark... thousands of jaguar land rover employees gathered this morning to hear an announcement which appears to make the future
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of the castle bromwich factory much more secure. today is the day of electrifying the plant and honouring our people who are going with us to define a new, electrified future, and that we will have a complete shift in production, that we have to transform production in the way that we go now, in the electrified era. 2500 people work at the plant and at a time when the company is cutting thousands ofjobs elsewhere, they at least have cause to celebrate. this is fantastic news notjust for today's workforce here at castle brom, but for the next generation, those that want to come into stable, decent work in a fantastic industry. it is a confidence boost for a world—class workforce. we have all been concerned with the changes in the industry and the changes on rules on the environment which have been put
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in by the government. it is good news that we have got a good future ahead of us. are you going to be celebrating tonight? i certainly will be. this production line used to make 150 jaguar cars per week. as you can see, it is now silent. all of this kit will soon be ripped out as the plant prepares for what jaguar land rover describes as the biggest transformation in its history, ready for a brand—new electric future. the company is investing nearly £1 billion at castle bromwich. it is also building this new battery plant, and it will make electric motors in wolverhampton. it is an ambitious strategy, but one which experts say the company simply has to make. electric cars that are genuinely competitive with the internal combustion engine are just arriving. but as their cost comes down and their range improves, increasingly, we will switch over. in the next five years there is going to be a big push towards electric cars, and car companies have no choice but to try to get into that. jaguar land rover is calling on the government to support electric cars as well.
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it says what is really needed is battery production on a massive scale so that the entire industry can benefit. it is setting its future on the development of these new technologies, which is exactly where the rest of the industry is going. what matters now is that we've got to turn this into a national shift, and making sure that the way to do that is, as i am sure jaguar land rover will say, is getting what they call a gigafactory to make the batteries here in the uk, because that really matters for the future. this announcement has come at what has otherwise been a gloomy time for the uk car industry. thanks to falling sales at home and in key markets abroad as well as the uncertainty of brexit. but at castle bromwich, today at least, there was something to smile about. theo leggett, bbc news, castle bromwich. so is more investment needed across the uk to cope with the demand for electric cars? i'm joined now byjustin meyer, the general manager at electric car
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charging point manufacturer evolt. welcome to bbc news. just how great is the demand for your products at the moment? yeah, well, we are at a very exciting place at the moment. 0ur very exciting place at the moment. our business was formed back in 2010, we had set up the business back then to offer electric vehicle charging infrastructure, so one of the early players, so for us it has been really fascinating and exciting to see the electric vehicle charging infrastructure grow over the years, and where we are today is that there isa and where we are today is that there is a significant demand coming through from local authorities, as well as private businesses. we have been appointed to set up charging outlets for 91 areas across the country, but the private sector has also decided it needs to do something to provide a charging service to customers visiting their sites. who gets to decide where charging points should be located?
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well, when it is local authority led, it is generally led by the individual overseeing that funding, likely to have come from central government. we do support, so part of our services that we are engaging with those overseeing electric vehicle charging funding, and we are providing them with guidance with respect to where we think those charging points should be installed. but most importantly, what type of specification for that specific location as well. so private businesses, we are also supporting them with identifying where points should be installed, and what specification is best suited to that specification is best suited to that specific application. how important is on specific application. how important ison— specific application. how important is on — streets charging going to be if more and more people decide that they want to buy an electric vehicle? i think it is going to be very important. 0bviously, on—street parking for residents, there are a
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number of different schemes set up by central government, obviously you have the ultralow city is a scheme, the electrification of eight cities there, the bus charging scheme, the ultralow emissions vehicle taxi scheme. the other scheme is actually the on—street residential charging scheme, and that is for residents who do not have off—street parking, soa who do not have off—street parking, so a relatively new scheme, and we will see those networks start to expand. how many people, though, have the capacity to charge at home? it is an interesting question. you know, i think at the moment you are probably seeing the majority of homeowners do have sufficient capacity to charge a vehicle. you know, it might become more challenging when those homes move over to may two or three vehicles all charging at the same facility. but i think we are going to be ok
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with respect to charging power. 0bviously, with respect to charging power. obviously, you have the national grid scenarios papers, which are very interesting to read, and they give guidance and confidence that we will have sufficient power to support ev charging moving forward. but obviously what is going to be key as complimenting technologies, like energy storage, and also smarter charging solutions that offer intelligent load management functionality, that is key to mass adoption. just ed mayo from evolt, thank you for talking to us. adoption. just ed mayo from evolt, thank you for talking to usm adoption. just ed mayo from evolt, thank you for talking to us. it is a pleasure, thanks for having me. tonight on bbc news we'll be having a wider discussion about this story. you can get in touch with your questions and comments on electric vehicles by texting 6112a. the car expert stuart masson will be here to answer them at 8:30 tonight.
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some breaking news to bring new, tommy robinson, also known as stephen yaxley—lennon, the former leader of the english defence league, he faces jailafter leader of the english defence league, he faces jail after being found in contempt of court by high courtjudges. it is following his filming of defendants in a criminal trial and the broadcasting that footage on social media in contravention of contempt of court laws. he denied the allegations, but high courtjudges were told yesterday, as part of the proceedings, that he was reckless to broadcast footage of defendants in a criminal trial. the footage was from outside leeds crown court in may last year. the jury in the second trial of the series was considering its verdict at the time. so tommy robinson facing jail after being found in contempt of court at the
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high court. you are watching afternoon live, these are the headlines. a gang behind the biggest modern—day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forced labour. jaguar land rover says the company's decision to build electric vehicles in birmingham will protect hundreds ofjobs. borisjohnson denies downing street attempted to withhold secret intelligence from him while he was foreign secretary. last year's beaten finalist and fourth seed kevin anderson has been knocked out of wimbledon on day five. the south african lost in straight sets to argentine guido pella, who's through to the fourth round of a grand slam for the first time in his career 0n centre court later, the 15—year—old american sensation coco gauff will bid to make the fourth round when she faces polona hercog of slovenia and fifa president gianni infantino wants to increase the size of the women's world cup to 32 teams and double its prize money in four years' time and launch a women's club world cup as well. i'll be back with more
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on those stories at a:30. the two contenders for the leadership of the conservative party have been taking part in hustings with voters in darlington today. borisjohnson denied he was ever left out of intelligence briefings during his time as foreign secretary. the bbc understands downing street attempted to withhold some secret intelligence from mrjohnson, a move that caused concern among senior intelligence officials. 0ur political correspondent nick eardley reports. do conservatives trust him? borisjohnson could be in number ten in three weeks' time. but it has emerged the current pm had real concerns about his ability to keep information confidential. were you blocked from seeing any in intelligence when you were foreign secretary, mrjohnson? i said that politics is not a game... the bbc understands there was an attempt to withhold sensitive intelligence when mrjohnson was foreign secretary. some have suggested it was control freakery from number ten,
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others that there was nervousness in the intelligence community. but were you aware at the time that perhaps some sensitive information was being held back from you? it's not true, and i don't comment on intelligence matters. you deny it altogether? i do. number ten says theresa may did trust boris johnson but it will not comment directly on intelligence. nor would the other leadership candidate. we do have a rule that we never comment on intelligence matters. borisjohnson's team says he got all the information he needed as foreign secretary, and it is unlikely this will have a major impact on the leadership race. but as conservatives start voting for our next prime minister, there are others in the party who have their concerns. this former pm says today that he's backing jeremy hunt. it is fairly evident from my views that i cannot vote for somebody who was part of the brexit campaign which misled the country, so i shall offer my vote to jeremy hunt. at the same time, current
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cabinet ministers are planning to do whatever they can to stop either candidate leaving europe without a deal. let me quote the speaker of the house of commons, who has said that if the house of commons is determined to do something, he's quite sure that it will find a way. and we can deliver brexit... boris johnson and jeremy hunt will both say that leaving with no deal in four months' time must be an option. we are facing an existential crisis as a party, and indeed as a political class, if i may say so. any negotiator has their hand profoundly weakened if the other side think that you can't walk away. but they both know, if it comes to it, getting the numbers for no—deal will be tough, particularly in a political age where trust is often in short supply. nick eardley, bbc news.
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the action is now moving to perth in central scotland and our scotland correspondent lorna gordon is there. character has featured in some of the other hustings, how likely is it to crop up there as well?” the other hustings, how likely is it to crop up there as well? i think undoubtedly there will be the theme of character running through the questions here this evening as well, but in addition to that there will also be plenty of questions, i think, on the union, not the european union, but the union of the united kingdom. there have been conservative party alarm bells ringing this week, if you like, on this issue, david liddington, the deputy prime ministerjust a couple of days ago saying that the union is under greater strain than he had ever seen in his lifetime and would be under even greater strain still in the event of a no—deal. then theresa may, in one of a last appearance as per as prime minister, perhaps a last visit to scotland, yesterday gave a speech when she said there was a very real risk of the uk breaking up in the event of a
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bad deal. they are ringing the alarm bells, borisjohnson, jeremy bad deal. they are ringing the alarm bells, boris johnson, jeremy hunt have started to make their position on this issue clear, borisjohnson has talked of a minister for the union, he has said that he believes delivering brexit properly could strengthen the union and make it much harderfor strengthen the union and make it much harder for independence supporters. mr hunt has said he would never, never allow the union to be broken up if he was prime minister. but it is a tricky balancing act for them, one recent poll suggested that around 60% of tory party members would rather that brexit took place even if it meant scotla nd brexit took place even if it meant scotland and northern ireland leaving the uk, and remember a majority of people here in scotland, not the conservative party membership per se, but the wider electorate, voted to remain in that referendum on the eu three years
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ago. so a tricky balancing act for them, it is likely that many of the questions here in perth when they ta ke to questions here in perth when they take to the podium later, will be focused on the issue of the union. which of the candidates is most popular? you know, hard to tell. borisjohnson is a marmite figure, a lot of people in the tory party here in scotland like him a lot, and do not, when it came to the vote amongst mps at westminster, a majority of scottish conservative mps majority of scottish conservative m ps voted majority of scottish conservative mps voted for borisjohnson. however, ruth davidson has thrown her weight behind jeremy hunt. she says because of his unequivocal support for the union. and a majority of msps, conservative party msps at holyrood have also said that they supportjeremy hunt. so a
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tricky situation to read, that one, hopefully it will become a little clearer amongst the membership of the tory party in scotland, because after a ll the tory party in scotland, because after all they are the ones who will be voting over the next couple of weeks, hopefully that will become a little clearer this evening. lorna, thank you very much, lorna gordon in perth. the families of 157 people, who were killed when an ethiopian airlines plane crashed earlier this year want to know whether the boeing 737 max was airworthy and safe at the time. speaking exclusively to the bbc, family members explained they believe what they call "the commercial motivation" of the aerospace giant led to the deaths of their relatives. simon browning reports. everywhere we look, there's a blank where she should be. struggling with their loss. nadia and michael's daughter sammy rose was on a boeing plane that crashed in ethiopia. sammy's right here. she was one of 157 people on board. how did those first couple of hours
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evolve for you both? i was standing right over there in the laundry room. it was three in the morning, and ijust started physically shaking, like i couldn't stop my body from shaking. and then ijust thought, i can't tell the other people in the house. it was the second identical boeing jet to crash in five months. initial reports say they happened for the same reason — a faulty flight—control system. the 737 max has been grounded ever since. critics say the development and launch of the jets was rushed and that boeing cut corners at the expense of safety. definitely, my daughter died for the profit of boeing, and i don't want anyone else to die for that reason. i want these planes to be safe and invest in the company, the hardware and the infrastructure to make our aviation system safe. nadia and michael want to know
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why their daughter died, and their fight has taken them to the top of the american government. they are now representing families from across north america. when the plane crashed, there were passengers from more than 30 countries on board. the highest reported of those were from kenya, because the flight was bound for nairobi. but the second highest amount were from here, in canada, and families in toronto are starting to want answers as to why their loved ones were killed. i lost my wife carol, my three children — ryan, kelly and ruby. and i also lost my mom. i feel so lonely. i look at people, i see them with their children, playing outside, and i know i cannot have my children. paul lost his entire family. he believes they would
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still be alive if boeing had grounded the planes earlier. the crash of ethiopian airlines flight 302 was preventable, but these individuals knew that they would not be held criminally liable, they would not face years in prison. but if they knew that they would face years in prison, then they would have grounded those planes. we asked boeing for an interview, and they declined. in a statement, they said, "we are sorry for the tragic loss of life in these accidents." "we are focused on re—earning the trust and confidence of the public in the months ahead." but for the families, life is changed forever. their resolve now — finding the truth. simon browning, bbc news, in toronto. a senior iranian official says the country will seize a british oil tanker if the uk doesn't immediately
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release the vessel it impounded yesterday. royal marines stormed the ship yesterday off gibraltar in the belief the tanker was heading to a syrian oil refinery carrying iranian oil in a breach of eu sanctions against syria. we have just heard that the attorney generalfor the we have just heard that the attorney general for the government of gibraltar has obtained an order which extends the detention of the vessel, thought to be carrying iranian oil, owing by the name of grace one. it can be held for another 1a days. that's just come m, another 1a days. that's just come in, according to the attorney general of the government of gibraltar. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. even the weather was a little bit this weekend with the time being sunny warm evening on the way to southern areas. cloudy with outbreaks of rain to the north. that rain across the highlands at the moment
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spreads across scotland, northern england. things will change, the weather front, outbreaks of rain and drizzle, moving south through east anglia through the day, perhaps reaching the south—east corner by the end of the afternoon. a lot more cloud across the south compared with what we've seen over the last few days. temperatures taking a hit by four, 5 degrees. further north, more sunshine. a fine day for many on sunday with very wet cloud, the shower, and that continues into monday. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking,
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money laundering and forced labour. the founder of the english defence league, tommy robinson, faces jail after being found in contempt of court, forfilming defendants in a criminal trial and broadcasting the footage on social media. jaguar land rover says the company's decision to build electric vehicles in birmingham will protect hundreds ofjobs. borisjohnson denies downing street attempted to withhold secret intelligence from him while he was foreign secretary. and the flamboyant horse racing pundit, john mccririck, has died at the age of 79. sport now on afternoon live with will perry, a great line on day at wimbledon. novak djokovic is in action. a lot to look forward to, not long until we see andy murray and serena williams in mixed doubles action. john watson, you've been watching novak djokovic, defending champion,
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who is being made to work hard against you but her cats —— against hubert hurkacz. the number one stepping up to close the first set 7-5. he stepping up to close the first set 7—5. he can step up the tempo when he needs to and he did that against hubert hurkacz, who isjust inside the world top 50. djokovic hoping to win back—to—back titles, as he did in 201a-15. win back—to—back titles, as he did in 201a—15. these two met at the french open, djokovic winning then and as things stand he may well come through. kevin andersson was beaten by novak djokovic in last year's final. andersson is out. we know he's been struggling with an elbow
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problem which forced him out of the clay—court season. guido pella coming through in this one, straight sets as well, for— six, 3—6, 6—7. he'll play milos raonic next. guido pella's best wimbledon performance. 0ne pella's best wimbledon performance. one of the main stories has been the emergence of coco gauff, the 15—year—old who upsets venus williams in the first round. we can see she's got the talent, balancing the tennis ball on her racket. she's preparing for this big match later. the talk of the town is andy murray
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and serena williams, going out on court later in the mixed doubles. they won't be out before 5:30pm. they won't be out before 5:30pm. they may take centre stage later. compliments played between them, having teamed up in the mixed doubles, giving everyone a left. andy murray going through with pierre—hugues herbert in the men's doubles yesterday. the same can't be said forjamie murray who is out in the men's doubles with his partner, neal skupski. beaten in five sets. they could have faced each other in the next round. the only way to see the next round. the only way to see the murray brothers potentially facing each other is in the mixed doubles where they could meet in the final. judy marie will be quite happy because she didn't want them to meet in the third round, which was a possibility. who would you be rooting for? some
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good news for women's football. fifa announcing an expansion over the next world cup and bigger prize money. the fifa president gianni infantino money. the fifa president gianni infa ntino wants to money. the fifa president gianni infantino wants to increase the size of the women's world cup to 32 teams, and double the prize money, which is good news for the women's game, and to launch a women's club world cup as well. he has called the ongoing tournament the best women's world cup ever and he has set out a five—point plan to make sure that football seizes the opportunity. he has said that they want a women's football world league for national teams, similarto football world league for national teams, similar to the nations which would have promotion and relegation. new zealand have been confirmed in the world cup semi—finals. pakistan needed to beat bangladesh today by at least 308 runs but after pakistan made 315—9 off their 50 overs, with imam ul haq hitting a century, in reply bangladesh are already 120—3. so even if they win, pakistan cannot move
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that's all the sport for now. lizzie greenwood hughes will have more at 5.30 now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide — and see what's happening around the country — in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. we'll go to beccy barr in salford to tell us about the difficults the fishing industry is having in the north west. niall mccracken is in belfast to tell us about a boxing club in northern ireland which is helping young people fight back against anti—social behaviour. becky, why is there a crisis now? we know that for years the fishing industry has been hit hard by declining catches, dwindling fleets, growing hardship forfishing communities around the northwest.
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this new from seafarers uk has raised fears of a fresh crisis after new legislation and uncertainty over brexit. that's bound to get some hackles up, any mention of brexit. you could argue either way but seafarers uk says that many fishing communities supported brexit because of eu restrictions on their catches by leaving the eu doesn't necessarily mean a return to pre—eu fishing levels. brexit according to seafarers uk wood and access to the eu maritime fisheries fund, providing grants to support things like vessels and businesses. this report from the charity has identified fleetwood in lancashire as one of the fishing towns suffering from higher levels of deprivation than the national average as a result of these challenges i mentioned faced by the sector. fleetwood expanded really quickly in the first half of the
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20th—century when the fishing industry was looking healthy. since the 605, the cod wars with iceland which some viewers may remember, it has had a decline. there is fish processing as a major economic activity but these towns are really suffering. what is the charity suggesting? seafarers uk which knows the industry well says there is a brief window of opportunity to prevent this region's small boat fishing fleets to be something of the past. the thing to start with, to buy local. we as a country bought 80% of the fish we eat and yet 75% of british caught fish is exported. people should be doing both in in shops and restaurants is asking where are our local fish, demanding more local fish. the food miles in the areas that we're talking about are just a few miles. they're not thousands of miles around the globe. and if people want it then
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producers will provide it. we talk a lot about food miles these days, don't we? fishing industry is a tough business, poorly paid, many fishermen are self—employed and struggling with a tough industry. many once thriving fleets of fishing boats are now just many once thriving fleets of fishing boats are nowjust a handful of craft in places like fleetwood. the industry only employs 22,000 people nationally compared to many other industries, it is nothing, a tiny proportion of gdp. but its demise would have a massive cultural impact on the country and on the coastal communities around our islands. thank you. tell us about this area of northern ireland, monks town. it is in county antrim, just north of belfast. it would be considered working glas by many, a high level of deprivation.
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we looked at the fact that a number of people with a degree or higher qualification was 8.a% less than the rest of northern ireland average. the local boxing club in monkstown decided it wanted to do something about it and it received some lottery funding to start the in your corner project, which is about getting local kids off the streets and into classrooms through boxing. some challenging behaviour by young people, people in the boxing club have identified it, people coming to the front door with anti—social behaviour problems, drug and alcohol addiction and essentially, mental health problems. after a long way at school, if you have problems, they are saying come in, use a punchbag, have a spa with someone, take your frustrations out and have a conversation about your future. what are the concerns about the risks
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associated with paramilitary groups? yeah, well, there's no doubt that monkstown is a place that has a strong unionist and loyalist political identity. like other parts of northern ireland, monkstown has murals and flags. some of these murals and flags. some of these murals are right outside the boxing clu b murals are right outside the boxing club and have affiliation to the paramilitaries. you speak to those working in the club and they say that's just a reality of monkstown in northern ireland in 2019, that this still goes on. in our peace we spoke to one young person who is involved in the club, 18—year—old courtney cooper, who has very strong views on the fact that her town was my generation is the first one in her area where she feels they have a voice saying they don't want to go back to the past, back to the old ways, the old dark days. she was involved in the in your corner project and will be the first member of herfamily project and will be the first member of her family to go to university.
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she starts in september in england and she is going to do forensic science. she said that would not be possible if not for the monkstown boxing club. not as big as it used to be but there is a strong power, and they have a strong hold over the younger generation. this generation is the new generation and we're going to beat them. we're not going to let them brainwash us and get us back into the old times, the and stuff. we are going to be the new generation, we're going to university and make a name for ourselves. courtney clearly has strong views on what her generation has to offer. it is on the bbc news northern ireland section of the website. a lot more to read about. thank you.
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the irishwoman lisa smith, who travelled to join the islamic state group in 2015, has given her first broadcast interview to the bbc from the camp in syria where she's now being held. the 37—year—old former soldier used to be part of the crew aboard the irish presidential plane used by bertie ahern and mary mcaleese. the current taoiseach, leo varadkar, has said she will be allowed to return to ireland with her two—year—old daughter, but the kurdish administration who run the camps told us no contact has yet been made to arrange repatriation.
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this is lisa smith and these are the remnants of the islamic state group in syria. they enslaved raped and murdered. yet as a shocked world condemned the group's brutality she was planning tojoin it. despite all evidence to the contrary, she claimed what she was seeing was propaganda and she didn't believe it. i want for myself an actual caliphate, like as in a muslim country, not like a group. no a brutality group. brutality group. do you accept now that that's what the islamic state was. yeah. i think there was a lot of brutality in this. she says a decade in the irish army and air corps left her depressed lost in drink and drugs and searching for answers for her. they lay in radical islam. i realized that this other life this one the life i actually live in ireland i didn't find satisfaction in my heart and my soul you, know. so for me it was like,
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0k what do i do in this situation? do i actually go out here actually stay. and then i say okay i have to make a decision what am i going to do my life. do i sit and stay here or do i actually go to an islamic state? lisa smith isn't being treated as a prisoner. she's being held with her daughter in a camp for is! daughter in a camp for is women and children. but she told me she's been visited more than once by the fbi for questioning and they've taken herfingerprints and dna. can you understand, you've got a military background, as you can understand why people would think that it would be a waste for you to stay at home. yeah. that's not how it works. i have my daughter. they must have asked you to. no. you trains girls aged maybe nine to 12. not true. why do you think those girls say
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that? they say that you taught them. they can sit here and see my face and then we will speak and we will see the truth. why do you think they are saying that about you? i don't think it's the military background. people don't know i'm in the military. we know that she associated with the so—called white widow, sallyjones. associated with the so—called white widow, sally jones. she and her husband and eight hussain radicalised others to join husband and eight hussain radicalised others tojoin isis. both are dead. she is now in limbo. i'm not here to kill anyone. are you safe to go in ireland? would you plan attacks if you didn't agree with the life people lived? no, if you asked me if i'm going to hurt anyone, no. if! you asked me if i'm going to hurt anyone, no. if i have any intention, no. i didn't come here to kill anyone and when i was there i didn't kill anyone. i'm the same, you know.
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we cannot verify anything that lucien smith says. —— michael lisa smith. the irish government says she can return home with her two—year—old daughter, one child among thousands trying to navigate an uncertain future. they are the innocent casualties of their parents's murderous ideology. leo varadkar has commented on this, saying they have to put the safety interests of irish citizens and people in living in ireland as the paramount concern. so, should she return, she'll be interviewed, there'll be a security assessment done to make sure she's not a threat to others. but let's never forget there is a child involved here too and that child is innocent and that child is an irish citizen." jamie is here with the business
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news, ina jamie is here with the business news, in a moment, after the headlines. a gang behind the biggest modern day slavery network ever exposed in the uk is convicted of offences including trafficking, money laundering and forced labour. the founder of the english defence league, tommy robinson, faces jail after being found in contempt of court, forfilming defendants in a criminal trial and broadcasting the footage on social media. jaguar land rover says the company's decision to build electric vehicles in birmingham will protect hundreds ofjobs. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. another leap in the number of newjobs in the us. last month, 22a,000 jobs were created. most economists imagined the figure would be closer to 160,000. but elsewhere in the world, in germany and asia, the latest economic figures are looking weak. more on this in a second. jaguar land rover —jlr — is investing hundreds of millions of pounds to build a range of electric vehicles at its castle bromwich plant in birmingham.
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initially the plant will produce an electric version of the jaguar xj. jlr says the move will help secure the jobs of 2,700 workers at the plant. john menzies, the company in charge of loading your luggage on the planes fuelling them, towing them, all those air services you need at airports. it's said profts have taken a hit this year and it's to do with cargo volumes. the shares fell by over 10%. some good numbers onjobs in the us. how have the markets reacted? we thought the figures would be subdued. subdued figures last month, some low figures from china regarding the iron ore fighters, which i know that you follow closely! they were fairly weak, and we had manufacturing figures in germany which were very weak. the thinking was that things were slowing down but they came out very strong. people think well, the
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american economy seems to be going well. how you expect there may be interest rate rises possible when we thought they would be cut. the stock market has gone down quite sharply. gervais williams is managing director of miton. what do you make of these figures? the market has gone down 150 points, to do with interest rates and thoughts about growth. it's very interesting, mixed figures from different parts of the world. the last set of figures from the us and job numbers was quite weak. it implies that we are at a turning point. the world seems to be slowing. these figures were good in the us but it probably means that interest rates won't be cut as much as they would have been, which is why the market is down but generally i think the world is slowing. at
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some point in the nearfuture i think the world is slowing. at some point in the near future you may see these figures starting to go down quite quickly in terms of employment? yes, i think what's going to happen is that the us is the strongest economy in the world at the moment but looking at european numbers, german factory orders were well down on what people expected, which has been disappointing, and as you mentioned, the asian market has seen very weak production figures recently. the asian market has seen very weak production figures recentlym the asian market has seen very weak production figures recently. jl are ——jlr production figures recently. jl are —— jlr starting electric car production in the uk. when we've had grim numbers coming from car manufacturing, it's a surprising decision. it's a case of them being forced to make a decision, they need to make a call about putting an electric car into production, they can't wait for more brexit news, so they pushed on with the investment. good news in the context of honda
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closing their plant in a couple of yea rs' closing their plant in a couple of years' time, so it is good to see manufacturing investment at a time when others are pulling out. john menzies, ed used to be newspaper distribution, various shops around scotla nd distribution, various shops around scotland but now it is all in air transport. what does it say about what is going on in the cargo trade with the uk? a business which has had some pressure for the last few yea rs. had some pressure for the last few years. it has been in aviation services for many years and as a result they are very experienced, a very good operator. but volumes are coming down, especially in cargo, especially the asian markets and they are seeing the slowdown affecting profits. the share price was down over 10% and it has come down from £7, to £a.09 in the last few years. we could have a quick look at the markets, can we? i've been told they're gone. you need to
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been told they're gone. you need to be quicker! the dowjones, down about 150 points. employment figures are strong but it suggests we perhaps won't have an interest rate cut in the us. nice to see you. a local radio programme has received a thank you card with a difference. the card was sent following the death of an avid fan called john. he'd planned it that way and thanked bbc radio solent‘s breakfast in dorset show for all their programmes and local interest. we are nowjoined by bbc radio solent breakfast in dorset presenter steve harris. tell us aboutjohn and this card. john was someone i sort of inherited. i started on the show five years ago. sad to say thatjohn was part of the furniture, he would call in everyday and get involved increases and competitions but more
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than that, he would come on the outside broadcasts, send us christmas cards, if he knew someone on the team had a significant event, he would bring shortbread and presence. pretty impressive from a man in his 805 who lived in weymouth. he would come to dorchester on public transport or taxi to crs. clearly he felt that we we re taxi to crs. clearly he felt that we were pa rt of taxi to crs. clearly he felt that we were part of his family. —— to see us. we seem to stop hearing from him and we were concerned and we got a call from him saying he was sorry he hadn't been in touch because he's been poorly. and then nothing until yesterday morning, a card of his came through and i recognised his handwriting and i thought, this is a relief, at least he's still writing a card. it is the show‘s sixth birthday on monday and i thought he was writing to wish us well. he said, to the team, when you see this
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card, i will have departed from the earth, just a thank you for your programmes. i hope your coverage continues for many years to come. thanks to everything, from john. " of course we were shocked, very moved. someone's last will and testa m e nt moved. someone's last will and testament involved thinking about our show and testament involved thinking about ourshow and ourteam. testament involved thinking about our show and our team. what do you know about what happened at the end of his life and how he got the card to you? very little, we are trying to you? very little, we are trying to figure it out. i've been talking to figure it out. i've been talking to the solicitors who were executing his estate today. he died aged 83 at the end of last month. we don't think he has any relatives, which makes the fact that he felt so warmly about us all the more poignant. and we are trying to find out now, you know, what's happened, how he died, whether the funeral has happened, whether it is something we can go to and pay our respects, or what. it has made a huge impact on us. of course. testament to the
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power and importance of local radio. i'm sure you'll pay tribute to him along with the rest of your colleagues. thank you. that's it. next, the bbc news at five. we will even out the weather this weekend but for the time being, warm in the west, cloud and rain in the north, rein in the highlands spreading to scotland and northern ireland into the evening and the north of england tonight. maybe reaching north wales by the morning. to the north—west, northerly wind bringing fresher temperatures into the countryside. staying warm and sunny to stay with across the south of england. things will change, the weather front, cloud, of england. things will change, the weatherfront, cloud, rain and drizzle moving south through wales, the midlands and east anglia through the midlands and east anglia through the day, perhaps reaching the south—east by the end of the
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afternoon. no guarantee of rain but more cloud compared with what we've seen over the last few days and temperatures taking a hit. further north, more sunshine with lighter went over western scotland and northern ireland, feeling warmer. a fine day on sunday with variable cloud, the odd shower which will continue into monday. see you later.
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today at 5: the biggest network of modern—day slavery ever to be exposed in the uk. eight people are convicted after forcing more than a00 victims into manual labour on farms and in factories. victims lived in squalid conditions in houses with leaking toilets and no access to water. i couldn't even leave the house to go for a walk. they were following me, spying on me. they were controlling me. we'll have the latest on that story and i'll be talking to the charity that helped expose the network. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: a boost for the uk car industry. jaguar land rover is to invest hundreds of millions of pounds to build electric vehicles in birmingham. the founder of the english defence
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league, tommy robinson,

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