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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 6, 2019 4:00pm-4:30pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm martine croxall. the headlines at four: murderers who refuse to say where they've buried their victims could be more easily denied parole under a proposed new law. as the two men vying to be pm again attempt to win over members in two hustings today — a bbc investigation discovers some party members are receiving two ballot papers. a powerful earthquake has hit southern california for the second time in a matter of days. it's the strongest in the region for 25 years huge crowds have gathered in london for the city's pride parade — it's expected to be the city's largest ever march. at wimbledon, andy murray and serena williams are due to make their debut as a mixed doubles partnership.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. murderers who fail to disclose the whereabouts of a victim's body could spend longer behind bars, under legal changes being set out by the government. what's become known as helen's law — which will apply in england and wales — follows a campaign by the mother of helen mccourt. she was killed nearly 31 years ago, but her body has never been found. ben ando has more. for 31 years marie mccourt has been fighting for helen's law, named after her daughter, who was just 22 when she was abduct and murdered in 1988. her killer, pub landlord ian simms. he has never revealed the whereabouts of helen's body. to have this law means that other
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families will not have to hopefully go through the pain and grief for as long as i have. i believe that these killers now have to face up to what they have done, because to take a life is horrendous, but then to take the lives of the family of that loved one, and not let them know where their loved one's body is, there is no torture worse than that. marie led a campaign demanding that murderers who refuse to disclose the whereabouts of a victim's remains spend longer behind bars. in 2016, mps voted in favour of helen's law, but it didn't receive government backing until now. with thejustice secretary david gauke proposing that it be introduced as soon as is practicable. the parole board can also use withholding information as a reason not to release a prisoner, because it suggests they are still an ongoing risk to the public. but it is optional. helen's law changes that,
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and makes factoring it in a legal requirement. even now, marie lights candles every week at her home in merseyside. although she still does not know where her daughter's remains are, the creation of helen's law may provide some comfort, especially if it means other families won't have to face both the pain of loss, and the agony of not knowing. ben ando, bbc news. the former conservative leader, iain duncan smith, says more work needs to be done to ensure that party members do not vote twice when they elect the country's next prime minister. a bbc investigation has uncovered evidence that some members have received two ballot papers. around 160,000 people are being sent postal ballots as they decide whether to endorse borisjohnson orjeremy hunt as tory leader. manveen rana reports. the conservative campaign rolled into nottingham today as the tory leadership rivals face members again
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in the battle for number ten. voting has already begun, but the bbc has learned that some party members have received more than one ballot paper in the post. a party insider said at least 1,000 people could be affected, from the total membership of up to 160,000. some were based in more than one constituency and joined the local party in each area. 0thers included women, who received separate ballot papers in their maiden name and married name. i am certain the chairman of the conservative party has been asked to look carefully at how they sift, so there is an issue here, i accept that, but rather than get bogged down in the process, the truth is even in a general election people are registered in different areas. but unlike general elections, electoral law doesn't apply in this contest. the vote will be governed by the conservative party's own internal rules, and its ability to police them. well, it is made clear
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on the ballot paper you are only allowed to vote once, and i expect conservative members to follow that. you rightly point out that if people have joined two associations they may get two ballot papers, i get two in elections because i'm on two different sets of electoral registers, it doesn't mean i vote twice — i don't. the conservative party couldn't confirm how many bsllot papers had been sent in error or how they would ensure that all the votes they received were valid. instead, they issued a statement saying, those who vote twice will be expelled from the party. the onus is now on members to vote once for one of the two candidates before the ballot closes on 22nd july. the former head of british intelligence has told the bbc that the uk is going through a "political nervous breakdown". sirjohn sawers has said he's deeply concerned about the calibre of politicians
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in the uk as the country prepares to leave the european union — criticising both the conservative party and labour. let's ta ke let's take you to nice where england are taking on sweden for the third—place play—off the women's world cup, it only got under way about six minutes ago so no score yet. they are looking for a consecutive third place finish at the world cup. they sadly lost in the world cup. they sadly lost in the semifinal to the united states. sweden the semifinal to the united states. swed e n lost the semifinal to the united states. sweden lost 1—0 to the netherlands in their semifinal. there is phil neville, he has made four changes to the line—up since the semifinal and this is live on bbc one. tomorrow it
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is the turn of the netherlands versus the united states where the final takes place. kick—off is at four o'clock and coverage starts on bbc one. emergency crews in southern california are tackling a number of fires and gas leaks after the state was hit with its biggest earthquake in more than 20 years. the epicentre of the quake, which had a magnitude of 7.1, was near the city of ridgecrest, about 150 miles north—east of los angeles. angus crawford's report contains some flashing images. oh, my god. fear and shock. two quakes in two days. this one, 7.1 on the richter scale, the largest for 20 years. nerves stretched to the limit. go, go, go! panic is infectious. 8:21am here on the air, we are experiencing... and very public. i think we need to
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get under the desk. 0k, we're going to go to break. will be right back. wow. in hollywood, tourists weren't sure what to make of it. everything's moving, and the chandelier was shaking, and the kids were saying, it's an earthquake. we saw that the rest of the people in our neighbouring rooms were looking at each other. we were all kind of scared, just freaking out about it. for cinemagoers, an unnerving experience. my friends and i were watching a movie when it happened. we were watching midsommar, which is a horror movie, and there was a part where the world turned upside down, and we thought it was the speakers, but the whole theatre started shaking. and after about, like, ten seconds people started to get up to leave. 0h oh my gosh, you guys. landslides blocked some roads. motorists using their bare hands to clear the debris. broken gas pipes caused fires, though no serious injuries were reported. and here's why.
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the epicentre, remote ridgecrest near death valley. but there's more to come. this was a very large earthquake. and we also know there's going to be a series of after—shocks as a result of the main quake. so we want to prepare ourselves and be able to have those resources in place as the days go on here. for now, california counts the cost of this quake and waits for the next. angus crawford, bbc news. live to washington — and our correspondent david willis. even in the part of the country which is prone to earthquakes, this was a sizeable one. very much so. the biggest in 20 years and the fact that there is no report yet at least of casualties or indeed, serious injuries, being attributed to the fa ct injuries, being attributed to the fact that the epicentre of this
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latest quake, on friday, and the one on thursday was in a remote area. the desert town of ridgecrest which is about 125 miles north—east of los angeles. none the less there are thousands of people without power, buildings have been damaged and fires have been sparked by ruptured gas mains. the effects were felt as far afield as reno nevada, phoenix, arizona and the san francisco bay area. the big concern of the moment is after—shocks. there have been a series of after—shocks following the quake last night already. these are expected to continue over the next couple of days, maybe over the next couple of days, maybe over the next couple of days, maybe over the next couple of weeks in actual fact. geologists are saying there is a 10% chance of another seven point
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magnitude quake in that area in the next week, a 10% chance of that. you can imagine why a lot of nerves are frayed in that area. some people are opting to sleep outdoors rather than run the risk of being hit by things falling on them in another quake. some of the damage that is done depends on the depth of the quakes. but the authorities in california must have a well honed drills put in place because of the activity of this type in that state. absolutely but even the best case scenario, if you like, point to considerable damage if this big one we have been anticipating for so long does happen and happen somewhere near, for example, los angeles. the last big
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quake was 25 years ago, back in 1984 and that was 6.7 and killed 57 people and caused billions of dollars of property damage. it is a mercy, one might conclude, that these two quakes were in very remote areas and one where a not —— we are not a lot of damage could be caused. thank you very much. one of britain's most senior female asian police officers has accused the metropolitan police of discrimination. parm sandhu has begun legal action against the force, claiming she was denied promotion on the basis of her race and sex. last month, she was cleared of allegations that she'd breached rules about the police honours process. the met said it was "inappropriate" to comment. a national newspaper has reported
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that a senior british establishment figure was given anonymity after accusations of sexual harassment and assault in an employment case. the times reported that one woman said she was groped at his country house and another that she was sexually assaulted in his private office. sean 0'neill, chief reporter for the times wrote the exclusive article. earlier he told me about the case. what we can say is that an unnamed very wealthy businessman has basically struck out of court settlements with two women who had made serious sexual allegations about his conduct while they were employed by him. and that, as i said, those claims were settled out of court and the two women were required to sign nondisclosure agreements preventing them from talking about this. however, we found out about this case, that it was ongoing, effectively in secret and the employment tribunal system, and we were able to join ourselves asa party to that case to fight for over
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a year to try and have the right to report it to act as the eyes and ears of the public in the justice system. sarah chilton is a lawyer and partner at cm murray and specialises in partnership and employment. thank you forjoining us. how can employers in this day and age defend nondisclosure agreements of this type for this reason? i think it is difficult for employers in some circumstances to defend these agreements. they are frequently entered into between employers and employees and have been used for yea rs. employees and have been used for years. i think where we see these situations being concerning its when you see repeated multiple allegations being brought up by different employees and the use of nondisclosure agreements allows that conduct to continue. how difficult is it for a woman or a claimant, a
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complainant, to resist signing such an agreement? that is another problem. the huge amount of bargaining power between a compliment and a powerful employer, this case seems to have both the company and respondent, it is difficult for someone who is offered money in exchange for a silence to really do much about it because the alternative is to take it to an employment tribunal and have to pay quite a lot of money in legal cost to get a remedy which may be a small amount of money compared to what they might be offered by a settlement. we have seen in some of the cases of celebrities, who have broken nondisclosure agreements to speak out against regular perpetrators. how great is the risk of doing that? i think the legal risk remains fairly significant. there are different exclusions to
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prevent people talking about it and to whom but if it is enforceable, the people who speaks out runs the risk of being sued. in practice, now there has been a backlash actually an employer who sued someone for speaking out when they should have not been, runs the risk of significant adverse publicity and the horse has bolted by that point so the horse has bolted by that point so what did they achieve by doing that? when are confidentiality agreements legitimately used? use the term gagging order any pejorative sense. they are used a lot when people enter into employment to protect trade secrets. if you go to work for a big company that has a secret formulas for their food, you enter into a confidentiality clause and that is legitimate use of that type of provision. if you settle a claim for sexual harassment, you as the victim might want confidentiality clause
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because you might be concerned about your identity or details being revealed. that would be legitimate use. when we get concerned is when they are effectively being acquired from people who are victims of sexual harassment when they do not have any alternatives so they cannot properly seek a remedy through employment tribunal and neb feel it is their only option. how likely is it that the government will choose to ta ke it that the government will choose to take some action to ban the use of m bas to take some action to ban the use of mbas in cases of harassment? mdas. i do not think they will ban them but i think they will tighten them but i think they will tighten them up and some increased governance in employers to monitor the use in one organisation so if you do have repeat offenders you can try and deal with that rather than all those cases being covered up.
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there is no alternative dialogue for how these are being entered into. thank you for your time. the headlines on bbc news... murderers who refuse to say where they've buried their victims could be more easily denied parole under a proposed new law. as the two men vying to be pm again attempt to win over members in two hustings today — a bbc investigation discovers some party members are receiving two ballot papers. a powerful earthquake has hit southern california for the second time in a matter of days. it's the strongest in the region for 25 years seven time champion wimbledon champion serena williams is safely through to the fourth round in sw19. after beating germany's yulia gurgus in straight sets.... to set up a meeting with the spaniard carla suarez navarro. harriet dart‘s wimbledon dream is over though. the brit managed to win just two
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games against the world number one and top seed ashleigh barty. and angelo mathews hits a century as sri lanka set india a target of 265 to win at leeds in the cricket world cup. india and australia, who are playing south africa, are both already through to the semi finals. i'll be back with more on those stories later. england is a goal down. the uk's biggest pride event is under way in central london, celebrating 50 years since the start of the modern lgbt+ rights movement. more than 30,000 people arejoining the parade itself, with up to 1.5 million expected to line the streets to cheer them on. the organisers say this year's london pride could be the biggest ever. 0ur lgbt correspondent ben hunte gave us this update. a saturday in london like no other, the uk's biggest pride event of all time, it has kicked off. this is thought to be the uk's
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biggest event of all time. there is at least 1 biggest event of all time. there is at least1 million biggest event of all time. there is at least 1 million people biggest event of all time. there is at least1 million people lining the streets and 30,000 people marching in the pride parade. there is thought to be over 600 groups here representing big corporations, supermarkets, government groups and groups that had never marched before. romani people who are marching today for the very first time. a lot of rainbows but some people have said this should go back to its original roots of being a protest. they say it is like a party and it should not be like that. england's run to the world cup semi—finals has enthused the country, and put a bigger spotlight on women's football. phil neville's side were knocked out by the holders, the usa on wednesday — with 11.7 million people watching the game — the highest viewers figures for a sporting event this year. these are live pictures
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england have unfortunately conceded a goal already against sweden but we are only 20 minutes in so we might pull one back, preferably two. they are fighting it out for third place and phil neville says he wants to win bronze and end on a high despite being sick of losing semifinals. with me to discuss what potential impact the world cup will have for participation in women's football is steve jaye, head coach of fulham women's football club. it was not the start we were hoping to beat reporting but they are up againstan to beat reporting but they are up against an impressive team. they have done well to get to this place, to get into the semifinals. they have had an incrediblejourney. to get into the semifinals. they have had an incredible journey. what have had an incredible journey. what have you made of the quality of the play that you have seen in this tournament? i think every single world cup, it has got better and better. it is great that we have had so better. it is great that we have had so much more better. it is great that we have had so much more exposure better. it is great that we have had
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so much more exposure and opportunity to see the quality on show, especially with the women's game growing as it is. what impact are you seeing it having on girls and women who want to play football? it is great. with the programme and organisation i watch for, we have seen an organisation i watch for, we have seen an increased number of people wanting to get in touch and see how they can get involved in playing football. we have seen a lot of players who have not played for a long time wanting to come back and play the game because they have been inspired by watching the world cup. it is really good. i know there was an initiative called back to netball which was very successful for women who played at school and wanted to return to the spot. how well—equipped is football cope with people coming back to it? we want my players to play and we can create the opportunity for that to happen. the fa have a number of different programmes at the moment which is looking to increase participation so we are well equipped to do that.
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what about in schools? there was a time when girls were not encouraged or even allowed in some cases to play, where they? certainly, with the fa and premier league we are trying to change that and we are very fortu nate trying to change that and we are very fortunate we have been able to increase participation, especially in ourarea. increase participation, especially in our area. if a woman or a girl wa nts to ta ke in our area. if a woman or a girl wants to take up football, what is the best advice? i think there is plenty of opportunities to search online, to find localfootball clubs and participation based centres to join. the fa website is a good place to start and look for a local football clu bs to start and look for a local football clubs such as ourselves, lots of professional football clubs from the man's perspective have a woman's section and is looking for a good keen individuals tojoin woman's section and is looking for a good keen individuals to join their teams. how does it work if you are scouting for good talent? it's
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really, really difficult, i guess, because a lot of people... i mean if people have not played the game for a long time, it is challenging for them to be found and come back into them to be found and come back into the game but we are looking to increase the opportunities to do that. thank you very much for coming work to protect a lake district beauty spot from flooding is finally complete after more than three years. glenridding was badly hit during storm desmond in 2015 — flooding twice in a matter of days — since then work's been ongoing to repair damage and protect the community. 1.2 million pounds has been spent on the flood management system. now, it's finally finished there's relief but also frustration as megan paterson reports. it is a landscape which inspired wordsworth and countless others since. glenredding on the shores of ullswater is a lake districtjewel. the tranquillity of today — a stark contrast to
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the chaos of december 2015. obviously very scary, especially for the poor souls who live on this stretch of the village. and the feeling of helplessness, as well, especially at the start, because we were cut off for two days. so, when the rain comes in off those fells, those steep fells, it comes down with some force, and it washes notjust water down, but all of these rocks as you can see here. so, to see it now, and we've got this great new green space, it's superb. however, it doesn't take a lot of rainfall to get this to rise. for much of the last three years, this pretty village has been a building site. tonnes of silt and gravel to shift, walls to build higher, drainage to improve. prevention — the main focus. the main problem was gravel coming down the system and blocking the channel. what we do have now is we've improved the gauging systems, the way we monitor the river levels. we've also installed a camera down by the bridge, so that from our incident room we can monitor how the river is behaving, making sure
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the bridge is clear of debris, so we can keep water moving through the system, rather than coming out of its banks, and then into people's properties. the community came together in the aftermath to mop up and clean out. alan has had a business here for 37 years. like many, he's been left frustrated by the speed of the work. devastating. to see your business and your livelihood sail off down the road in the water. the period of time it took to do, i cannot believe it took three years. three years, why has it taken three years to do this? the challenge of working in a river environment, there is always an opportunity to try and make things faster, we wanted to make sure that the scheme that we left the community in was as good as it could possibly be and blended in with the community in the longer term. as the climate changes, so too will the landscape. this community, like many others, hopeful it can manage those changes and limit the devastating impact of future flooding. megan patterson, bbc news.
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the duke and duchess of sussex's son has been christened by the archbishop of canterbury. 0nly close family and friends attended the service for archie harrison mountbatten—windsor in the private chapel at windsor castle. there have been photographs put on the family instagram account but there has been criticism of the decision to exclude the public and for the secrecy surrounding the identity of archie's godparents. plenty of people are very happy no doubt to see these family photographs. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello, some of us have got away with a fine start to the weekend but for others, there is a weather front that has been pushing southwards in parts of england and wales. notjust cloud, some outbreaks of rain as well and it slips further
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south into parts of southern england on through this evening. still a few showers overnight, towards north—east scotland and many other areas, we are looking dry with a mix of cloud and clear spells and temperatures at the lowest, the clearer parts of scotland and northern ireland, down to five or 6 degrees in some spots. into tomorrow and the early drizzly rain along the south coast of england should clear away. we will still have a few showers running into north—east scotland, one or two popping up into northern england but for most places, it will be a dry second half for the weekend with a mixture of cloud and the sunshine. notice the breeze, not especially strong but it will be quite breezy with those showers in the north—east. the breeze is coming down from the north, indicating it is not especially warm out there. for most of us, temperatures in the high teens to low 20s. bye.
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hello, this is bbc news with martine croxall. the headlines... murderers who refuse to say where they've buried their victims
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could be more easily denied parole under a proposed new law. as the two men vying to be pm again attempt to win over members in two hustings today, a bbc investigation discovers some party members are receiving two ballot papers. a powerful earthquake has hit southern california for the second time in a matter of days. it's the strongest in the region for 25 years. huge crowds have gathered in london for the city's pride parade — it's expected to be the city's largest ever march. the duke and duchess of sussex's son has been christened at windsor castle. 0nly close family and friends attended the service for archie harrison mountbatten—windsor. there's been criticism for excluding the public and keeping secret the identity of archie's godparents. at wimbledon, andy murray and serena williams are due

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