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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 8, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: heather mills, the former wife of sir paul mccartney, settles with the news of the world for a substantial sum over the phone hacking scandal. after my separation you're watching bbc newsroom live — in 2006, the hounding it's11am and these are the main by the media was incessant. stories this morning: for a long time, i was a prisoner in my own home as reporters camped heather mills, the former wife at the end of my road for two years. of sir paul mccartney, settles with the news of the world for a "substa ntial sum" over british airways is facing a record the phone hacking scandal. british airways is facing a record fine of £183 million over fine of 183 million pounds over a data breach involving hundreds a data breach involving hundreds of thousands of customers. of thousands of customers. the foreign secretary reacts donald trump hits back at the uk's ambassador to washington, to leaked emails from the uk‘s after leaked emails described his ambassador to washington, presidency as ‘inept and dysfunctional‘. which describe donald trump‘s presidency as "inept and dysfunctional". families who‘ve lost loved ones to dangerous drivers say they‘ve we will have an enquiry. i hope we been let down by broken promises get to the bottom of it and order to introduce tougher sentences. for a course there will be very serious consequences if we find out performers from this year‘s glastonbury festival, who is responsible. including kylie minogue families who've lost loved ones to dangerous drivers say they've and sheryl crow, have given items been let down by broken promises of clothing to oxfam, to campaign against cheap throwaway fashion.
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to introduce tougher sentences. the united nations is urged to take stronger action to protect christians facing persecution around the world. performers from this year's the united nations is being urged glastonbury festival — to take stronger action to protect including kylie minogue — christians facing persecution have donated items of clothing around the world. to oxfam, to campaign against cheap ‘throwaway fashion‘. one of the worst attacks this year was in april and coming up in sport, a big day at wimbledon — in sri lanka, when at least 207 people were killed and 450 hurt in with 15—year—old coco gauff, facing her biggest challenge yet, in former world explosions at churches and hotels. now a review, carried out by the bishop of truro, number one simona halep. says christians are the most widely targeted religious group. he says governments in the middle east and north africa should do more to protect religious freedoms. i spoke to the bishop earlier this morning and asked him about the extent of the problem. i think it needs some serious analysis of what actually the good morning. phenomenon is, what these drivers welcome to bbc newsroom live. the businesswoman and former wife of sir paul mccartney, heather mills, has received are, and how it should be named. an apology and substantial damages after settling her case against the news of the world what help would a definition be? over phone hacking. in a statement outside i think if you look, for instance, the high court in london,
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she said she feltjoy at a subject like anti—semitism, and vindication — and criticised what she called "the targeted smear i know that that has a particular campaign waged against her" political resonance at the moment and scores of other victims but actually anti—semitism is a term by news group newspapers. that has been in existence for probably the last 200 years our news correspondent keith doyle and there is a particular is at the high court for us. understanding of what it is that constitutes anti—semitism and what doesn‘t constitute anti—semitism. this has been going on for a really i think there needs to be some long time, hasn‘t it, keith? tells parallel work on what constitutes persecution of christians. what has been going on today. yes, how would you define it? indeed, it has. this marks the end of this privacy case between news that is to prejudge group newspapers and heather mills will stop it has been settled with an outcome of such... we know with the anti—semitism definition, that obviously has, that apology in court and an as you say, when into political undisclosed level of settlement issues but is it really funds. we do not know exactly how so difficult to define how much that was about heather mills said this was the largest settlement you would describe discrimination? of its type. this case was brought covering a nine year period between ——as you say, run into political issues but is it really so difficult to define how you would describe discrimination? —— leading up to 2008 when stories i think in some ways it is because, appeared in use of the world where as i said, it is a global phenomenon heather mills claimed that she had and it has multiple drivers
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been hacked, there is no other way but you yourself just said the stories could have got out. discrimination, persecution, so i think there is a scale from what you might call soft there is thought to have been a row pressure within society to, you know, the other end, between her and paul mccartney over a wedding ring and she said these what you get in north korea stories were leaked, they caused a which is where your very life can be under threat seriously corrosive effect on her for being a follower relationship with her friends and ofjesus christ. so there is a whole family, it affected her work with a scale as pressure, discrimination and persecution. landmine charity. outside court, ashley settlement, she made the i think it is worth statement. the feeling i have is one investigating it and taking it with the seriousness ofjoy and that it deserves. statement. the feeling i have is one of joy and vindication statement. the feeling i have is one ofjoy and vindication of realising that after a decade i was fighting both on the half of myself and for that is the bishop of truro speaking to me earlier. other innocent victims as part of the class action legal suit, we have with little over a fortnight to go until the new leader been awarded the highest media of the conservative party is announced, we‘re looking at the policies being promoted settlement in british legal history. by the two candidates. tomorrow we‘ll hear about what borisjohnson is planning to do if he becomes prime minister, but today it‘s the turn in court, a newsgroup —— mac news to hear aboutjeremy hunt‘s campaign pledges. with me now is our reality check correspondent, chris morris, group newspapers have made a to take us through some statement saying they offer their of the foreign secretary‘s campaign pledges. sincere apologies to heather mills and fiona mills for the distress let‘s start on brexit. that is what
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caused to them by invasion of the eve ryo ne let‘s start on brexit. that is what everyone is talking about. both men privacy by people working on a are making promises about how they behalf of news of the world. the will make life better but there is newspapers accept that such activity only one game in town and mr hunt is should never have taken place. that marks the end of this particular not that different from mrjohnson. case. so far, the hacking cases have he wants to change the withdrawal cost news group newspapers have £1 agreement and the irish backstop. he billion and that could double to £1 says he will create a new million as many more cases are in the pipeline. this hacking story might be furniture for heather mills negotiating team including arce brexiteers from within the but it still has a long way to run. conservative party and within the space of a few weeks, renegotiate thank you. president trump has criticised something that took years to britain‘s ambassador in washington, negotiate and which the eu said is after emails were leaked in which he called the white house incompetent. mr trump said sir kim darroch "had not up for renegotiation. it sounds like a bit of a tall order. how does not served the uk well". the foreign office is investigating he think he can square the circle of the source of the leak, as andy moore reports. the irish backstop? the main thing is technology. there are bits of during last month‘s visit to the uk, technology that can make borders smoother, there is no doubt about mr and mrs trump met prince charles and the duchess of cornwall. that, things can be done, but the the president also spotted another face he recognised — agreement between the eu and the uk the uk‘s ambassador to washington. has been that the board in ireland hi again. will be as open, as frictionless as you know everybody.
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hi, mr president. it is now and most people believe hope it's going well. very firmly that the technology to do that in the short term simply not now it is not pleasantries, ready. he says he says he wants to but put—downs, that leave with a deal but if necessary are being exchanged. the president could onlyjust be he says he will leave with deal with heard above the sound of a helicopter engine. a heavy heart. he has said that by the end of september, he would come toa the end of september, he would come to a conclusion about whether he thought a deal was realistic by the end of october. if not, he would press ahead with plans for no deal. the publication of comments don‘t forget, though, that there are made by the ambassador about the president have prompted an official investigation many mps, including many tory mps at the foreign office who have said very clearly we will into the source of the leak. the trade secretary, do whatever it takes to make sure speaking in washington, said the leaking was unethical and unpatriotic. that a no deal set doesn‘t happen. i think that our diplomats have to be able to give a bit what about other things? what money is he promising to spend? that is of colour in their views, what people want to know, what will in both directions, about how they view the political scene. he do to the pound in my pocket. i think the question there is tax and there is spending. here is about the behaviour of someone that would leak a document which has a limited circulation, ina campaign there is tax and there is spending. in a campaign season, of promises get made and it is notable that the for obvious reasons. outgoing chancellor of the exchequer philip hammond has sent warning
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shots to both candidates, don‘t spend money you haven‘t got. mr hunt in the short term, at least, sir kim darroch seems safe in hisjob. he is due to retire at the end eye—catching announcement is to cut of the year anyway. meanwhile, the journalist who wrote corporation tax, the text that the original story has hinted companies pay on their profits, to there might be more revelations to come about what the british 12.5%. it is 19% of the moment, due ambassador really thinks to go down to 17% next year. to put about president trump. it in half, it would cost about £13 well, the foreign secretary billion a year to begin with. that gave his reaction to the leak a short time ago — amount could diminish if more here‘s what he had to say. companies get attracted here by a well, i am very concerned about it because fundamental to the proper functioning of our diplomatic network, which i happen to believe lower tax rate. the iss says it is one of the finest, doesn‘t mean this tax cut can pay if not the finest, in the world for itself. he has also talked about is to be able to exchange opinions frankly and so we need to find out how it happened, not least to give confidence help for high street shops and to our teams all over the world that can continue to give retailers to reduce business rates. he to remove 90% of businesses from us their frank assessment. so that is where we are going to have leak inquiry. business rates, the local tax you i hope we get to the bottom of it and of course there will be serious pay on using a premises for anything consequences if and when we find other than domestic purposes. we reckon that could cost about another billion pounds a year. there is a out who is responsible. lot of tax premises out there. spending, both candidates are
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something to spend more. his most eye—catching proposal is a big rise joining me now is our diplomatic in defence spending. he wants to raise it over five years to 2.5% of correspondent, james robbins. national income. that would cost £15 james, these lea ks billion a year on defence, that is james, these leaks cover material that dates back to 2017, some of it. quite a big increase. he has also it begs the question, why now and talked about an extra £6 billion, a what with the motivation be in leaking it? without knowing who relief fund, if you like, for the lea ked leaking it? without knowing who leaked it, we do not know the motivation but it should seem fishing and farming industries. there‘s other industries that could extraordinary that it comes at this struggle in the event of no deal. particular moment in a political even though there is support in the scenario and you would have to think fishing industry for brexit, they that the leaker would have political would be exposed. sheep farmers, for motives, after all it has clearly example, there could be a 40% tariff done severe damage, the fact that on an exporting lamb to the rest of ambassadors will be nervous that may europe. they would need some the private communications in london protection. he said that is one of the ways he would spend extra money. are not secure. just imagine for a in the end, when you become prime moment that every time a highly minister, all the numbers have to encrypted message from an ambassador add up. and there's160,000 tory overseas to whitehall... just members are voting. a lot of them imagine that every one of those may have already voted. we know a person that —— if every one of those lot of them have voted already. m essa 9 es person that —— if every one of those
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messages was available on your mobile. obviously ambassadors would stop giving frank assessments, they there are other big media events coming up. there is an itv debate would write ultra—bland messages to london and there would be —— like tomorrow, there are interviews by they would be no use the direct andrew neil later this week, but by the tenders go on air, a lot of policy —— back no use to people will have voted, their minds policy—making. it is no surprise will already have been made. that this does great damage to the tomorrow you are doing boris way the system operates. why now? johnson. we will have a look at mr well, i think the leak enquiry, if it is able to identify the culprit, johnson‘s plans tomorrow. johnson. we will have a look at mr johnson's plans tomorrow. thank you very much. might make that a little bit clearer but it has to be said, quite a number of large people see these deutsche bank has made the first messages. parts of whitehall are of the 18,000 job cuts meant to be within themselves open, announced yesterday as part of a radical reorganisation. teams of share traders in tokyo close to us but open within and other offices in asia were told themselves so there will be a today that theirjobs were going. distribution list for the sort of in london, some staff stayed away from work telegrams which goes outside the after being told their access to the bank‘s building foreign office into other was being removed. departments, including quite a lot we can cross to the city of senior officials, all of whom and speak to our economics will have had some sort of security correspondent andrew verity. clea ra nce. will have had some sort of security clearance. ministers and in some it sounds pretty brutal. people are cases ministerial staff, so there will be quite a lot of people who being told not to show up to work. will be quite a lot of people who will have seen these telegrams in order to make it possible to have a yes. there have been told not to grown up, joined up conversation so
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show up at work and they don‘t have i think your list of suspect is access to the bank. we don‘t have quite large. you said damaging to access to the bank. we don‘t have the system. what about the impact on access to the bank. we have to stand to the edge here. the chief relations. clearly, in the short executive were saying from this very building that this was the most term, it is not good. donald trump radical transformation of deutsche jumped on it, was pretty critical of in decades. we are doing nothing short, he said, of reinventing the ambassador, kim direct, to whom ido the ambassador, kim direct, to whom i do not think any blame attaches in deutsche bank. he said it wasn‘t london. —— came darroch. he likes profitable enough. if you put £2 into dutch bank, the match you get dishing out insults but does not like receiving them, he is back would be just one p. thin—skinned, so he would have not like this at all and because of the into dutch bank, the match you get back would bejust one p. so into dutch bank, the match you get frankness of kim darroch‘s back would be just one p. so for assessment, this is a trump every £2 shareholders put in, just ip every £2 shareholders put in, just 1pa year administration riddled with faction every £2 shareholders put in, just 1p a year comes back. it is not very fighting, with a policy on iran good and they have admitted they are not profitable enough. they have which sir kim says is chaotic, with heavies costs which they are that level of criticism, it is not attempting to cut now from 17 surprising that donald trump took a billion euros by 6 billion by 2022. very dim viewing of it either in the short term at least, it is clearly going to be a hindrance to that means getting rid of staff and getting rid of whole businesses. the chief also said they have been in relations. is this the end of it? a businesses that won‘t making much
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money, they had too much of a tendency in the past to get into any kind of business where they might be large number of material was leaked? able to generate revenue and that is there more? people have meant that they didn‘t put their capital in the right places and petitioned the government to issue therefore they weren‘t making very much money as i havejust described. tougher sentencing... the people who have been coming out here, some of them won‘t be coming back. most of them here well. we are —— more than 160 thousand people have petitioned the government to introduce tougher sentences talking about a 20% cut but across for those who cause death by dangerous driving in england and wales. the business that is 74,000 staff a debate is being held in parliament today, to discuss the issue. violet—grace ewans was four employed, it means 18,000 staff when she was killed by a man driving worldwide will go and probably a stolen car at 83 miles per hour in a 30 zone. karen morrison has been to meet her parents. violet—grace youens was just four thousands from here in the city. the years old when she was hit bank hasn‘t yet given us a break and killed by a man driving a stolen car. down region by region as to whether we were shopping for headstones, when all of violet‘s friends‘ job losses will fall but people who parents were shopping for school uniforms for reception have been in this building this class in september. morning we‘ll know a lot more we do. that‘s wrong. aidan mcateer was sentenced to nine years and four months for death so no regional breakdown, what about by dangerous driving, the areas of the business where but he will only serve half of that in prison before staff are going to be vulnerable? we being eligible for release. we have a life sentence. glenn has a life sentence. know for example they are getting most importantly, violet has a life sentence. since violet‘s death, out of the business of equities
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other families have suffered. trading, that is bank speak for other families have suffered before violet‘s death, and we‘re all being insulted buying and selling shares. they will by the current system in place, and that‘s why it needs to change. also shrink theirfixed buying and selling shares. they will also shrink their fixed income division which is where they buy and sell instruments like government in england and wales last year, 157 people were found guilty bonds. the bond traders will be leaving, some of them, and not of death by dangerous driving. of those, nine walked free from court with suspended sentences. coming back. this is magazine we are the average sentence given a jack of all trades and master of to drivers who kill was five years, none. we have to be doing more of and since 2012, no offender received the maximum sentence of 1a years. the things we‘re good at. they were in 2017, the government announced that drivers who kill in the most serious cases of dangerous and careless driving would face life sentences. saying they need to recapture the stacey barrows and lucy pygott were both dedicated runners, better parts of deutsche bank over with county and european medals between them. in 2016, they were hit and killed on the road while out training. the last 150 years. this bank was stacey‘s father was close by. not affected by regulatory find than any other bank. money—laundering ijust heard a big thud. scandal, interest rate rigging scandal, interest rate rigging one of her team—mate's friends, scandal, foreign exchange rigging scandal, foreign exchange rigging one of their parents, stopped me, scandal and it seems it has not been and she said...it's stacey. up scandal and it seems it has not been up to scratch in terms of conduct
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but its shareholders are more bothered about the fact it doesn‘t seem to making much money. thank you much, andy. michael casey was drunk, speeding, malta has said that all and went through a red light. he was sentenced to six years, 65 migrants on board a german—flagged rescue ship will be allowed onto the island. the vessel, alan kurdi, arrived off malta‘s coast but will serve half that in prison. after it was denied access to italian ports. the maltese prime minister said that following discussions with the european commission it‘s looked upon too leniently. all of the rescued migrants would be that car is a lethal weapon, relocated to other eu member states. that car was a lethal weapon, and they should be in prison for life. the ministry ofjustice insists it is committed several performers from this year‘s to changing the law, glastonbury festival have but victims say it donated items of clothing to oxfam, is taking too long. as part of a campaign against cheap throwaway fashion. # come on, baby, do the locomotion. british airways is facing a fine # of 183 million pounds after data artists including kylie minogue, belonging to hundreds of thousands sheryl crow, and the smiths guitaristjohnny marr are backing the charity‘s battle against low of its customers was stolen. wages in clothes factories and the extra landfill caused that is 10% of their profits. by discarded outfits. the airline said it was "surprised the donated items will be sold and disappointed" with the fine, which will be the biggest ever or given away as prizes. issued by the information earlier i spoke to the commissioner‘s office. head of pr at oxfam,
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customers‘ personal and financial cordelia kretzschmar. details were stolen after british airways‘ security basically, what we have got here are systems were breached last august. some of the biggest names in music turning the biggest stage in the joining me now is simon calder, world this summer, glastonbury, into travel editor at the independent. that is a massive fine, simon, isn‘t a platform for the cause. they are talking about loving clothes, the it? it is calculated as 1.596 of its same time as loving the planet. we revenue in 2017 which happens to all know now that a throwaway correspond, as you say, to 10% of fashion is harming the environment. its profits last year and british for goodness‘ sake, in terms of the damage it does, it is almost right airways, i must say, is furious this up damage it does, it is almost right morning. they were braced for up there with aviation, so what they something in the space of £20 are saying is encouraging their fans million or £50 million, far more to shop second hand because when you than any previous information shop second hand you are commission penalty. this they regard single—handedly slowing down fast fashion by giving clothes a second as completely off the scale, since they say they did everything right chance to be one, a second chance to after the breach, they contacted be loved. there something we can all people, let them know, they do, i guess, to try to address the cooperated with the information to me at the met commissioner and yet balance. they‘ve still been hit that is fine for the information commissioner waiting lists for routine surgery meanwhile says, if you‘re going to have risen by up to 50% be entrusted with people‘s data, you have to look after it and in england because senior doctors say they cannot afford u nfortu nately, to work extra shifts. have to look after it and unfortunately, airlines are huge
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favourites among cybercriminals because they tend to have legacy consultants have begun refusing to work beyond their planned systems, very easy to breach in some hours after receiving unexpected tax bills, cases, and which carry extreme amounts of personal data, including in this case, notjust their main following new pension rules in 2016. travel plans, but there is three nhs hospitals said delays are becoming increasingly precious numbers, the advocate they routine as a result. make verification value from the back of your credit card. white my copy so the question for customers they said they would try to stop the is, what happened with that data? did people lose out? british airways immediately got in touch with lots problem by having a flexible of people, the information pensions. commissioner said half a million people were affected. of course many the deputy chief executive of us had to change our credit of nhs providers, saffron cordery. cards, get new numbers to avoid possible problems. ba said it knows 80%. there is a substantial issue. exactly no cases at all in which this was used fraudulently and people were harmed, it says it will there is an overall workforce indemnify anyone who can demonstrate shortage. but a substantial chunk of they way harmed. that‘s not saying these criminals are not keeping this is coming because we are seeing their information they can be used co nsulta nts this is coming because we are seeing consultants who are deciding that later. as a result of that, the they can‘t work those extra hours. how much of it would you apportion average passenger didn‘t suffer to the pension issue?”
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how much of it would you apportion to the pension issue? i don't think apart from having quite a lot of ican to the pension issue? i don't think i can answer that. i don‘t have that ke rfuffle apart from having quite a lot of kerfuffle getting cards changed and information but we know it is there is fine by the way it doesn‘t substantial. we met with over 100 of go back to the passengers. if it our trust leaders last week and it did, that would be £366 each, it was really top of their worry list that was what are they going to do goes straight to the treasury and about the impact that these pension philip hammond picks up a bit of a rules are having on the availability bonusif philip hammond picks up a bit of a bonus if the fine is confirmed by of their consultants to work to cut the information commissioner. thank you very much indeed, simon. waiting lists. what are they going to do? they are looking at how they the headlines on bbc news... can build some flexibility into the scheme in the short term but that is not going to hold for the long term. heather mills, the former wife so looking at schemes where they of sir paul mccartney, could perhaps, consultants could be settles with the news of the world for a "substantial sum" over the phone hacking scandal. british airways is facing a record injusta could perhaps, consultants could be fine of 183 million pounds over a data breach involving hundreds injust a portion. it isn‘t of thousands of customers. donald trump hits back at the uk‘s could perhaps, consultants could be in just a portion. it isn‘t a solution that works for everyone. do ambassador to washington, after leaked emails described his you have sympathy with the presidency as ‘inept consultants? absolutely. this isn't and dysfunctional‘. in the sport, wimbledon has resumed a them and us situation. trust with every fourth round match in the leaders are working with consultants singles draw due to be completed today. it‘s only the second time thatjohanna to work around this in the short
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today. it‘s only the second time that johanna konta today. it‘s only the second time term but they want to see a thatjohanna konta has reached this long—term solution. we have got to remember that this isn‘t just about round, she faces two champion petra kvitova. megan rapinoe said talks hospital consultants, we know that thatis hospital consultants, we know that that is having an immediate impact on patients because of the waiting about equal pay for the women‘s game needs me for the next level and list issues and cancelling operations. this is something that tyson fury said a rematch with wbc goes across the public sector. this will be impacting on senior staff in heavyweight champion deon taylor wilde has been agreed for next the fire service, in the police, february. they drew their last bout local government, so we have really got to think about this. this isn‘t in december. —— with deontay wilder. just about the nhs. in the nhs, i will be back in 15 minutes. see though, if somebody has an operation you then. cancelled all they have to wait much longer than they were expecting for an operation, it has a material impact on the ninth of patients, the the united nations is being quality of life depending on what urged to take stronger action to protect christians facing condition they are dealing with. —— persecution around the world. the carried out by the bishop of truro — says they‘re the most widely targeted religious group. he says governments in the middle com pletely completely recognise the impact on east and north africa should do more individual when the operation is to protect religious freedoms. cancelled. that causes substantial well, the bishop of truro, revd canon philip mounstephen canjoin us now... personal distress and potentially good morning. welcome. so, tell us could lead to their condition how you perceive the scale. you said
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worsening. we know that we have got they are the most persecuted religious group in the world. where to be able to find a solution that in particular and what is happening? works for hospital consultants, i think the remarkable thing about works for hospital consultants, works for hospital consultants, works for senior nurses, and also this is it seems to have come out of works for senior nurses, and also works for senior nurses, and also works for patients so that we make almost a clear blue sky. it almost sure that we are cutting waiting lists, not adding to waiting lists. crept up on us. the fact is today we have to remember we havejust come through one of the toughest that the persecution of christians winters we have ever seen, we are in isa that the persecution of christians is a global phenomenon on the. it a situation where waiting lists are ma nifests is a global phenomenon on the. it manifests itself in pretty much at their longest for a substantial every continent and there are period of time, so it is really important that the treasury and government put their minds to multiple drivers behind it, so in working out what the solution to some cases it is organised criminal this might be. thank you very much activity driven by drugs, for joining us. an update on our headlines. authoritarian regimes, intolerant of heather mills, the former wife of sir paul mccartney, settles with the news of the world nationalism, religious fundamentalism of various sorts, so for a "substantial sum" over it isa the phone hacking scandal. fundamentalism of various sorts, so it is a global phenomenon on. i british airways is facing a record fine of £183 million over think it has kim crept up on us. a data breach involving hundreds of thousands of customers. donald trump hits back at the uk‘s ambassador to washington, after leaked emails described what i will do is urge the british his presidency as inept and dysfunctional.
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government to really address this is the really serious problem that it actually is what i also want to say that central to our recommendations the charity beat has exclusively told the bbc that nice it is really a cry that we should guidelines for how the families protect freedom of religion or belief for everyone. this is a of people with an eating disorder fundamental human right, so i‘m not should be supported are not being properly followed. trying to privilege christians in they‘re today launching this situation, although i am trying new guidance. the victoria derbyshire programme to sit —— my lo i think the had rare acess to an eating disorder out—patient centre — situation it faces questions is where they sat in on a group therapy particularly overlooked. you think session to see how the service aims to treat people. there should be adequate in this correlation anyway that is for other do you want to say what it is about religions? it has kind of crept up the object that you have picked that make sense to you about your on us and i think it needs some anorexic identity? i have picked a serious analysis of what actually the phenomenal and it is. what those date which represents being trapped drivers are and how it should be inside my eating disorder. like the named. what help with a definition real me is trapped inside the be? i think if you look for instance illness, kind of like i have drawn ata be? i think if you look for instance on this picture. i would say this at a subject like anti—semitism, i was me know that has a particular political on this picture. i would say this was me and that is my eating
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resonance at the moment but disorder. it looks nice but really it is not your friend, it is your anti—semitism is a term that‘s been enemy. there will be some people in existence for probably the last few hundred years and there is a watching who won‘t understand why, particular understanding of what it when you go back home after being in is that constitutes anti—semitism hospital, you can‘t just when you go back home after being in hospital, you can‘tjust eat. when you go back home after being in and what does not constitute hospital, you can'tjust eat. yeah. can you explain that? it is anti—semitism. i think there has to be some parallel work on what different, isn‘t it? it is so constitutes persecution of christians. how would you define it? different. we know we need to eat and when people sayjust eat, it is i think that is to prejudge the not like that. it is frustrating for outcome of such... we know with the us because we know to eat but we have got something else inside us anti—semitism definition, that thatis have got something else inside us that is stopping us eating. if that obviously has come as you say, run makes sense. yes, it does. and that into political issues but is it really so difficult to define is just makes sense. yes, it does. and that isjust a small what. .. how you makes sense. yes, it does. and that really so difficult to define is just a small part of the victoria derbyshire programme. if you want to what... how you would describe this? see more of that, there is plenty in some ways it is, because, as i more available on the website and also on the facebook page for the say, it is a global phenomenon that programme. emmerdale actor gemma oaten has multiple drivers but you yourself just at this correlation, was diagnosed with an eating persecution. there is a scale of disorder as a child. she told victoria about her experience — and why early intervention what you might call soft pressure is so important.
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within society to... at the other i started to withdraw and eat less end, what you get in north korea, at the age of ten and my mum and dad very quickly picked up on the which is where your very life can be warning signs. they took me to the gp who said i wasn‘t low enough in under threat for being a follower of wait to have a problem, it will be jesus christ. there is a wholescale fine, it isjust a phase. long story short, two years later, i was of pressure, this coronation, admitted to aid children‘s persecution. i think it is worth investigating it and taking it with psychiatric unit and given 24 hours to live if i didn‘t eat or drink. i the seriousness it deserves. when you say it has come out of the clear hope this will highlight that early intervention is key. the longer we blue sky, is that because people have been blind to it or because it wait to treat somebody with an eating disorder, the more they hold suddenly become an issue?” it has on that person. waiting for have been blind to it or because it suddenly become an issue? i think to a large extent people have been blind to it. we have been used to the weight to change does not change this as a phenomenon during the cold it. the longer they have an eating war. i think with the collapse of the berlin wall, we thought the thing had gone away and actually, as disorder, longer they it. the longer they have an eating disorder, longerthey will it. the longer they have an eating disorder, longer they will recover, is that true? absolutely. as with i say, it is presenting itself in most disorders, the earlier you get multiple places around the world and in there, the the outcomes. we set up it is driven by multiple different in there, the the outcomes. we set up an early intervention service and factors so it really deserves proper it was quite surprising that we have attention. thank you very much for not done this before. we found that joining us. if we can get in there early, people
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come to treatment early, we can provide a service that is friendly and open and one and they can come now the congolese warlord bosco ntaganda has been found guilty and open and one and they can come of war crimes and crimes and get evidence—based treatment that they will go on to live their against humanity by the international criminal court. lives a lot quicker. judges at the hague ruled that he was guilty of all 18 also in that group with charges against him, victoria was sue barnes including rape, murder, who lost her daughter last year sexual slavery and as a result of anorexia. recruiting child soldiers. anna holliganjoins she said we need to move away us from the hague. from strict guidelines for when people with eating tell us more about what he has been disorders start to be seen by the nhs. found guilty of. this is a case of speaking to rees, it was amazing to find people living away from those stiff had guidelines of bni. we can‘t dictate to people their the persecutor becoming the treatment by their bmi, by their persecuted. bosco ntaganda began blood results, by their sugar levels, by everything else. my daughter, very sadly, was mismanaged conscripting children under the age from her first diagnosis at 18. she of 18. some of them graphic. 49 was ill before that and u nfortu nately we was ill before that and unfortunately we weren‘t able to bodies of men, women and babies found mutilated in a banana field, a access. it was through no fault of pregnant woman killed while she was the gp, it was the mental health
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trying to protect herself from being team. she languished on a ward four raped. this was a trail of horror months before put into a eating left behind by bosco ntaganda and disorder unit. she was put into a rebel forces in the drc between 2002 unit which was very damaging. 11 and 2003. he was found guilty on all yea rs unit which was very damaging. 11 years later, my daughter lost her life. she lost her life not because 18 charges. this case is remarkable in two respects. aside from the fact of the care she received at the end, that he was actually a child soldier but because of the ferry at the and grew into this career criminal, beginning. she was amazing, it is the first case of which i intelligent, erudite, beautiful, caring young lady who was let down suspect voluntarily surrendering bya caring young lady who was let down by a service but, again, and i agree themselves to the icc. that was with gemma here, . .. march 2013. he walked into the us embassy in rwanda and asked to be transferred to the hague and by a service but, again, and i agree with gemma here,... don‘t, because you want to start me off. the moves secondly it‘s the first time that a forward being made by the psychiatrists in this illness are suspect has been found guilty of sexual crimes, so sexual slavery and what i‘m going to save the lives of our children. thank you. for rape of women, and children. some of them we heard today as young as nine yea rs them we heard today as young as nine years old. that in itself will be seen as a victory of sorts for the for most people it is unimaginable. can you describe what it is like to
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prosecutor who has made it her life lose your daughter. her organs shut mission to make rape as a weapon of down as a result of an eating war recognised by the court. this disorder. what can i say? it is the international court ofjustice, war recognised by the court. this international court of justice, and biggest fear. it is the most painful then really put it on the statute as something that people in the fields, thing you will ever experience. it is the greatest loss and there is a these commanders, can be prosecuted for. we‘ve already heard some huge hole in my heart. i managed to response from human rights groups who say this is a measure ofjustice get through each day by having a for the victims and in terms of mission. my mission is the trust so those victims, more than 2000 were cleared to take part in this trial ican bring which has been going on for years mission. my mission is the trust so i can bring to the area come from which is the isle of wight, a group now and the next stage will be to and gemma is going to happen as work out what kind of sentence he well, for parents, carers and should be given because we know he friends because there are so many has been an icy —— in icc custody isolated pockets in this country that don‘t provide any support. if for 26 years, he has 30 days to your daughter is taken, as mine was, to another part of the country to be appeal against this guilty verdict. treated, you can‘t afford to travel —— for six years. the judges will there and if you can you cut get decide how long he should spend behind bars for these crimes if that there and if you can you cut get there between six and seven when the appeal is unsuccessful. thank you pa rents there between six and seven when the very much indeed. reporting from the parents meeting is. you are cast adrift and you look to charities and
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hague. beat and other websites to try to waiting lists for routine surgery have risen by up to 50% in england find help and support that you need and it doesn‘t exist. where you need because senior doctors say they cannot afford to work extra it. you need this. you need a hold, shifts. you need the warmth of another human tx consultants have begun refusing to work beyond their planned being beside you. my life will never hours after receiving unexpected tax bills, following new pension rules in 2016. nhs hospitals said delays being beside you. my life will never be the same but i have a mission and are becoming increasingly routine as a result. my mission is to save at least one the department of health said it aimed to solve the problem with more flexible pensions. person and that is what i will do. if you‘d like to see more of that well, our health correspondent nick discussion you can watch the whole show by searching triggle is with me now. for the victoria derbyshire programme on bbc iplayer. nick, i mean, these issues around a pensioner numbering around for a while and it complicated that that statistic that waiting lists have a so—called ‘free climber‘ has been gone up 50% is quite extraordinary. you might guess, i think it has taken some time for these changes to seen scaling the shard in london. he was spotted climbing the pension arrangements to start the skyscraper — really having an impact. -- yes, i one of the tallest in europe — at around quarter past five this morning. police said he then entered think. the the nhs is short of the building, where he was spoken to by officers but not arrested. it in itina it in a moment it is staff. short of asking doctors to do time for the one o‘clock news but first time for the weather. pleasant enough at the moment where you have extra shifts to keep things running the sunshine but cloud around. cloud
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smoothly. that is the case for routine surgery like knee and hip operations what what they have been moving across the country. sunshine reporting recently at hospitals is defined as increasing the difficult a little hazy. the cladding between to get doctors to fill those overtime shifts and doctors say this is because of the changes to the the bring splashes of rain to pension arrangements which have northern ireland through the rest of landed them with what they say are this afternoon, maybe to the isle of unexpectedly large tax bills. we of man, and we could see isolated heavy doctors having bills of of thousands of pounds sent to them by hmrc. this showers across southern counties of england. here, temperature 22 are 22 celsius. the cloud thickens more as relates to the changes as you say we go into this evening. heavy bursts of rain developing in backin relates to the changes as you say back in 2016. like any individual, doctors can take... be given a northern ireland as we go through the night. it keep temperatures up tax—free allowance on the kind of pension they can accrue and there with the cloud around, ten to 15 are two allowances, an annual celsius as we start tuesday morning. allowa nce are two allowances, an annual allowance of £40,000 a day lifetime allowa nce allowance of £40,000 a day lifetime into tuesday, we have high pressure allowance of £40,000 a day lifetime allowance of just over 1 still trying to hold on across allowance of £40,000 a day lifetime allowance ofjust over1 million. as soon as they go over those, they are liable for quite a large tax rates southern counties. around the top edge of it we have these by the french which continue to produce outbreaks of rain. shetlands will be and it is reaching those thresholds that have landed them with in the sunshine first thing but the unexpected bills so doctors are
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wondering if it is worth doing those rest of scotland will be wet. extra shifts if they will get these heaviest of the rain should be in large tax bills. do they say it glasgow by 8am but will be pushing costs them money to work the extra in across the edinburgh area. shifts? they do not take home overnight rain will have played away anything for it? how do the figures from northern ireland for a time, dry here. patchy rain for northern work out? one hospitalwas anything for it? how do the figures work out? one hospital was expanded like this, he said that typically england and north wales. east anglia and southern counties should be dry for a four hour shift, a daughter but a little bit of cloud as they would get £600. they would lose will be in wimbledon to start your nearly half of that in tax anyway day. even though it is not quite as for that —— make a doctor would get £600. they lose another 25% of that, warm, so make sure you have that sunscreen on. it is still strong. so they may be left with £150 — that sunshine breaking through the south flew tuesday afternoon. further four hour shift. for a of people, north, further clad with outbreaks that would be a lot of money but for of rain. heavy breaks in northern the doctors who are earning sometimes in excess of £100,000, ireland in the afternoon. they are saying it is not worth then temperature is in the teams in scotland. perhaps mid 20s in the working a six day four that sum of south—west. another one day with money, especially when, at the end clad bricks to the on wednesday but of the year, these things are true and they are landed with a large tax may be a chance of a few showers in bill to pay. thank you very much, east anglia. plenty of cloud, rain
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coming and going. thursday, slightly nick. several performers from this year‘s more humid feel for the sunshine to glastonbury festival have donated items of clothing to oxfam, as part of a campaign against cheap ‘throwaway fashion‘. the south and east, nasty thunderstorms could develop in scotla nd thunderstorms could develop in scotland and north—east england. # come on, baby, do the locomotion #. artists including kylie minogue, sheryl crow, and the smiths guitaristjohnny marr are backing the charity‘s battle against low wages in clothes factories and the extra landfill caused by discarded outfits. the donated items will be sold or given away as prizes. let‘s talk more about this now with head of pr at oxfam, cordelia kretzschmar who joins us from oxford. good morning, cordelia. thank you for joining good morning, cordelia. thank you forjoining us. good morning, cordelia. thank you for joining us. obviously good morning, cordelia. thank you forjoining us. obviously it has got people talking about it. what do you think the stars‘ donations will do in terms of the impact? well, basically, what we‘ve got here are some of the biggest names in music turning the biggest stage in the world this summer, glastonbury, into
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a platform for the cause. they are talking about loving close at the same time as loving the planet. we all know now that throwaway fashion is harming the environment. for goodness‘ sake, in terms of the damage it does, it‘s almost right up there with aviation. what they are saying is encouraging their fans to shop second hand because when you shop second hand because when you shop second hand you are single—handedly slowing down fast fashion by giving clothes a second chance to be worn, to be loved. it is something we can all do, i guess, to try to redress the balance. do they do it themselves, do you know? coco gauff —— ha! good question. some of them did look a little worse for wear, the clothes but let‘s not delve too closely as to whether they do find themselves in oxfam or other charity clothing shops but what they
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are doing is lending their support to the message you‘re putting out there, so kylie minogue denoting a sun visorfor there, so kylie minogue denoting a sun visor for instance. that‘s right. they‘ve turned this platform... the stage into a platform... the stage into a platform for the message so what they are trying to do and what they are helping us to do is shine a light on the fact that every week in the uk 11 million items of clothing end up in landfill. when you buy a shirt in an oxfam shop, not only are you saving it from landfill because nothing you give to oxfam goes to landfill what you are funding enough and now it gets personal. president trump responds clea n water to criticism of him from the uk ambassador to washington. landfill what you are funding enough clean water for to sustain ten people in an emergency because this is about the planet, yes, but it‘s as he says sir kim darroch has not served the uk well, also about people. the reason one of the foreign secretary orders an inquiry into the leak that‘s the appeal is a fast fashion, the caused a most undiplomatic row. low prices, it is cheap and we all love a bargain but big companies we are going to have a leak inquiry keep those prices down by not paying andi we are going to have a leak inquiry and i hope we get to the bottom of the garment workers around the world it. of course, there will be very serious consequences if and when we a living wage, something oxfam find out who is responsible.
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campaigns on and works to redress, we‘ll be getting the latest from our dipomatic correspondent. so it is about loving clothes, also this lunchtime. british airways faces a record £183 million fine for last year‘s enjoying fashion but also protecting breach of its security systems. the planet and its people. the airline says it‘s enjoying fashion but also protecting surprised and disappointed. the planet and its peoplelj enjoying fashion but also protecting the planet and its people. i think we arejust the planet and its people. i think we are just looking at some heather mills says she feels pictures. i have my back to the screen but i think it might have vindicated after settling her phone been kylie in the very visor that hacking case against the news people are now able to buy. it is of the world, receiving the largest obviously awareness is growing single court payment. around this issue, people after my separation in 2006, the hounding anecdotally are donating money to charity shops and shopping more in them. you said nothing that goes to oxfa m them. you said nothing that goes to oxfam ends up in landfill. candy shops cope with donations —— can the shops cope with donations —— can the shops cope with donations —— can the shops cope with donations of people donate in a large number? we can cope. at the moment, these statistics are stunning. we are saving, just oxfam alone, as part of the second—hand system, ecosystem thatis the second—hand system, ecosystem that is evolving, we are saving 47 million items of clothing from landfill every year at the moment and we can increase that, we of
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course can only resell the very highest quality items because customers have standards and we get that, so what we are doing at the moment is developing our systems so that the staff that is a little below optimum quality can be pulped and made into mattress fillerfor example. we are trying to improve and that all the time as new technology becomes available but really what we need to do any long term is to get people to change, not just their behaviour but the way they are approaching their purchases. if you buy quality items, then they can last longer and once you‘re bored of them, someone else can enjoy them and they can really have a full life. we need to switch from throwaway fashion and we need to do it pretty quickly. cordelia, thank you, i love shopping in charity shops and nothing gets people have not even one before they‘ve donated. thank you very
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much. we have got some chains there at the moment but further north it is cloudy with outbreaks of rain affecting northern ireland. throughout the week it will be changeable with sunshine at times, also a bit of rain with temperatures average for the time of year. rain across northern ireland is light and patchy,itis across northern ireland is light and patchy, it is moving its way across the irish sea. plenty of sunshine in the irish sea. plenty of sunshine in the north east of scotland, sunny spells for southern england and wales and maximum temperatures today of 17 to 22 celsius. rain becomes heavier pushing eastward. further south, it is dry but quite cloudy. overnight temperatures ten to 15 celsius, nowhere near as cold as last night in parts of scotland. tuesday, unsettled again across northern areas, rain at times.
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further south it is drier and brighter with temperatures similar in the high teens to low 20s. goodbye for now. hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: heather mills, the former wife of sir paul mccartney, settles with the news of the world for a "substantial sum" over the phone hacking scandal. after my second peroration in 2006, the hounding by the media was incessa nt. the hounding by the media was incessant. —— after my separation. for a long time i was a prisoner in my own home as reporters camped at my own home as reporters camped at my road for two years. british airways is facing a record fine of £183 million over a data breach involving hundreds of thousands of customers. donald trump hits back at the uk‘s ambassador to washington, after leaked emails described his presidency as
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as "inept and dysfunctional". families who‘ve lost loved ones to dangerous drivers say they‘ve been let down by broken promises to introduce tougher sentences. the united nations is urged to take stronger action to protect christians facing persecution around the world. time for a spot update. hello. good morning to you. the start of of the second week at wimbledon is always called manic monday, every match in the last 16 in the men‘s and women‘s draws, due to be completed today. it is set fair as well and the club. the world number one ash barty is already on court. these are live pictures from court two, where she is playing the american alison riske. it‘s still early in the opening set. she is 4—1 up. riske serving to go sell— two. —— 4—2.
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barty took over from naomi osaka at the top of the rankings when she won the french open last month — and she‘s raising australian hopes of a first wimbledon singles title since 2002 — that was lleyont hewitt. there is only one british player left in the singles — and that‘sjohanna konta. she‘s second up on centre court, and it‘s going to be tough for her against the two—time wimbledon champion petra kvitova, who last won the title back in 2014. it is only the second time hunter has made it into the second week. her match is sandwiched between the appearances of rafa nadal and roger federer. and anyone with a ticket for court one today is in for a treat. as well as serena williams and novak djokovic, the 15—year—old coco gauff will be bidding for a place in the quarterfinals, but in her way is sthe former world number one simona halep. joe lynskey reports. on friday night on centre court, a 15—year—old from atlanta was refusing to go home. coco gauff‘s run at wimbledon is still going.
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with three opponents down, today she plays for a quarterfinal place. in that third—round win, she was the top trend on the internet, and to see what it means, just look at her parents. her mum candi‘s celebrations have been impossible to ignore, on court and online. speaking of your mum and being focused, she is going a little bit viral. please tell me she's a meme. i saw her doing something like this after. i didn't tell her, but she's going to go viral, i know. gauff‘s opponent today brings a new core quality. earlier this year, simona halep was world number one. she is a grand slam winner. but on the grass, gauff has been a match for everyone, and already here, the best are on alert. big fan, actually. i‘m so excited for her — love her family. gosh, i just couldn‘t feel — more proud. like, obviously this moment is an incredible moment, and i'm still excited that i get
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to keep living it. so i kind of try not to think about it as my destiny, or whatever, because i feel like if i do think about it like that, then my head's going to get bigger. there have been teenage champions before. martina hingis was 15 herself when she won the doubles. should gauff go all the way, she would be well in front of 17—year—old maria sharapova‘s title. for now, though, those dreams are on hold, as this level—headed star goes for the top, one game at a time. you can follow all the tennis today across the bbc. you won‘t miss a match. after the usa‘s victory in the women‘s world cup final, their captain meghan rapinoe says that progress has to be made when it comes to equal pay for the women‘s game. she scored in their 2—0 win against the netherlands in lyon, she says it‘s now time to sit down and get to work. and take the converstaion about pay in the women‘s game to the next level. the fifa president gianni infantino was booed at the final yesterday
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and there were chants of "equal pay" from large sections of the crowd. britain‘s tyson fury says his highly—anticipated rematch with wbc heavyweight champion deontay wilder will take place on 22nd february next year. their original fight in december ended in a draw, but fury was convinced he‘d won. in his only bout since then, he stopped german tom schwarz in round two last month. wilder is due to defend his belt against luis ortiz but beating the cuban would allow the rematch with fury, who said the deal had been confirmed and signed. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. see you later. thank you. with little over a fortnight to go until the new leader of the conservative party is announced, we‘re looking at the policies being flagshipped by the two candidates. tomorrow we‘ll hear about what borisjohnson is planning to do if he becomes prime minister, but today it‘s the turn ofjeremy hunt.
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with me now is our reality check correspondent, chris morris, to take us through some of the foreign secretary‘s campaign pledges. hello. obviously it dominates, the topic of brexit. he has shifted around a bit. he has a bit. the policies of mr hunt and mrjohnson at that do similar. the main part of mr hunt‘s brexit policy is he wants to change their withdrawal agreement, unsurprisingly. he wants to create a new negotiating team, including tory brexiteers randy aig, including tory brexiteers randy aig, including members of the democratic unionist party in northern ireland, and wants to create an alternative brexit deal within a few weeks to replace theresa may‘s deal. how he feels he can solve the irish border issue is the technological issues. there is technologies out there that can make
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borders more seamless, whether it be bar codes on numberplate recognition, the trouble is everyone accepts that the technology to make the body are completely seamless as it is now doesn‘t exist at the moment. it can improve things but it can‘t simply wash away the problem, especially when you think there is about 30 different government agencies that operate on anybody. the other thing, of course, if that doesn‘t work is what happens about no deal. mr hunt said he would go for a new deal with a heavy heart. one thing that him from mrjohnson is he has been asked what would happen if we got close to the 31st of august and was close, he would accept as a short extension. money. we are hearing lots of candidates.
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you have to pay for it somehow, if you don‘t decrease spending or increase taxes, you have to borrow more money which isn‘t tory policy. he wants to cut corporation tax. it is currently 19%, due to fall to 70% next year. he wants to cut it a 12.5%. the institute for fiscal studies, independent think tank, reckon that would cost about $13 billion a year in the short term. it isa billion a year in the short term. it is a significant amount of money. another one of his tax proposals, more of a local thing, is to make sure that 90% of the tax paid on business rates, 90% of businesses, rather, don‘t pay business rates which is the tax you pay to use a building for anything other than domestic purposes. to take 90% of businesses, high street and the
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lights, would cost about £1 billion a year. there are big tax reduction schemes there which you have to find the money for, but he also wants to spend more money. his most eye—catching pledges on defence spending. mr hunt says he wants to increase defence spending over the next five years to 2.5% of national income, about £15 billion a year which is a big commitment and a historic reversal of the trend of defence spending going down a bit. another thing he said he wants to do on spending is, this is a no—deal brexit pledge, if you like, is to put aside £6 billion for fishing and farming because those industries that could struggle in the event of an idea brexit. farmers for example, sheep farmers might be faced with 40% tariffs if they wanted to continue to export lamb into europe. he said he will put aside money to
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help them. tax proposals there, spending proposals there, but we should emphasise these our campaign pledges, they are not party ma nifesto pledges, they are not party manifesto pledges in an election, and all of them will come up against the reality of the parliament he has got to deal with, things you can through parliament, particularly when it comes to things like an idea brexit where many mps say they will do anything they can to block a no—deal brexit. do anything they can to block a no-deal brexit. we may see some movement on that later because moves are afoot potentially in the commons later to to avoid parliament being suspended in october. thank you very much, chris. we are back tomorrow with mrjohnson. thank you very much. it is more than 30 years since the world‘s worst nuclear disaster took place in ukraine. an anniversary that‘s been given greater prominence by a hit tv series about the disaster. one of the most memorable, and horrifying, episodes is when soviet soldiers go around the exclusion zone shooting the pets of the people who‘ve been evacuated. the series leaves the impression
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that they managed to get every dog, cat and cow, but the truth is very different. it was given unprecedented prominence on the news bulletin. the soviet government sent in the military to cull the population of pets that lived in the 30 kilometre exclusion zone. however, they were not completely successful and so there are nearly 1000 stray dogs in there are nearly 1000 stray dogs in the zone when we started this programme and they are all descendants of these abandoned pets. right now we have two daughters, head of animal control, trying to dart two dogs in this area. we have the local people keeping them in one place and then the darting team goes m, place and then the darting team goes in, applies the anaesthesia and then
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as soon as they led us no, we come in with some kennels, leading into the kennels and take them to the clinic. they are checking how much radiation the animal has been exposed to. i handle these dogs as much as i would a dog at home in my clinic. i am not worried about radioactivity. they don‘t glow—in—the—dark. these dogs may have a piece of grass with a high radiation on them but it is not internal radiation that kind of hangs out and sticks with them. it is as simple as shaving it off, giving them a hose down and they are radiation free.
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it isa it is a tough one. you wish you could bring them home and have them all the perfect home like minded but we release them back into the community. these dogs are community dogs and they are taking care of but ina much dogs and they are taking care of but in a much more loose sense than we would take care of our personal pets. she is going to have a better life. let me bring you some reaction from theresa may to those leaked comments from the british ambassador. to washington, describing donald trump‘s administration as dysfunctional. the premise said those leaked memos are a matter of regret. she says contact has been made with the trump administration setting out our view that we believe the leak is unacceptable. it is, of course, a matter of regret. that this has
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happened. theresa may‘s spokesperson has told reporters. the number of dog attacks on postmen and women has gone up almost 10% over the last year. new figures by royal mail show there were nearly 2,500 attacks across the country in the last year, they‘re issuing new guidelines to dog owners, encouraging them to keep their pets out of the way when the post arrives. with me is dr shaun davis, global director of safety, health and wellbeing at royal mail, and also i‘m joined by tine o‘toole, a postworker who was recently attacked. welcome both of you. what happened to you? i was on a round that i had been on for two weeks. i went up to a house that i knew had a dog than. i had never seen the dog before. i went through the gate, delivered the mailand asi went through the gate, delivered the mail and as i was leaving the house, got to the gate, and the dog came running and biking from the back of
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the house, took a big bite and a chunk of skin from my right calf. what sort of dog was it? it was a staff era terry of some sort. was it a single bite and you manage to get the dog off? what happened? it was a single bite, although it went for me twice. i was panicking and obviously ina lot twice. i was panicking and obviously in a lot of pain. i was fumbling for the gate lock so i could get out of the gate lock so i could get out of the gate. i managed to get out and thenit the gate. i managed to get out and then it looks down at the wound. it had actually gone through my trousers, there was blood seeping out everywhere. i pulled my trouser leg up and could see what damage it had done. i wasjust leg up and could see what damage it had done. i was just absolutely hysterical. then some neighbours across the road actually took me into their property and phoned an
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ambulance. did the dog owner get involved at any point? he just was in the garden but i actually went to the neighbours instead. i didn‘t really wa nt the neighbours instead. i didn‘t really want to be anywhere near the house itself. this is happening more and more often. it is something that isa and more often. it is something that is a perennial thing that gets talked about. what is going on? it is disappointing we have seen a 9% increase, nearly 2500 attacks this year. we have seen a steady decrease year. we have seen a steady decrease year on year year. we have seen a steady decrease yearon yearand year. we have seen a steady decrease year on year and this year we have seen this increase. it is a worry for us. i think it is important that we do protect our people and the vast majority of our customers are very supportive and work with us but when we do have an attack like this is important we get to the root of it and understand what happened to make shop we are protecting our people. what would you say to somebody with a dog? do peoplejust not take it seriously enough? if a
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dog is reacting to somebody coming to the door, it could be something that could be quite predictable. to the door, it could be something that could be quite predictablem is. we offer advice to our customers, we have a range of low cost, no cost options. perhaps keeping the dog in another part of the house, perhaps feeding it, giving it a treat. other things out if your dog gets excited by the letterbox, making sure that you take that into account, you might want to fit a cage on the back of the door to catch the mail or an external postbox. we are about the pro responsible ownership membership. we reinforce the deed, not the breed. we don't want there to be a negative association with a particular dog. we are appealing to all dog owners to be responsible. the people ever get prosecuted for this? they do. the police take the lead on this. we work with our internal teams and
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with the police and with the victims of the dog attack to support a prosecution if it is appropriate. what are the worst instances that you have come across?” what are the worst instances that you have come across? i have personally dealt with some horrific incidents as you have just had one from tina. fingers and thumbs bitterness. lower injuries, but x. a postman was knocked to the ground and part of his nose bitten off. permanent life changing injuries. it is not dennis the menace, comedic peace. these are serious injuries. thank you very much both of you for joining us. since the giant telescope was installed over 60 yea rs telescope was installed over 60 years ago the bank has been. it has been awarded unesco world heritage site status. placing it amongst the ra nks site status. placing it amongst the ra n ks of site status. placing it amongst the ranks of the taj mahal and the great
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wall of china. first we looked with our eyes and we could only dream of what was beyond the night sky. but the bank took radio waves which couldn‘t be seen to create an entirely new science and unlock the secrets of the universe. it is a vision which began with this man. i think my proposal for the telescope was referred to one or two astronomers who said they knew nothing about the subject and wouldn‘t it be better to build in brick anyhow, rather than steel. it was incredible that was the state of knowledge about the site. it simply didn‘t exist. jodrell bank, cheshire, the greatest radio telescope in the world is nearing completion. bernard lovell‘s vision was to build the world‘s biggest telescope in a quiet corner of cheshire. not even he could dream of the discoveries which followed. jodrell bank tracked every moment of the space race from the very beginning. it discovered pulsars, quasars — even identified the fading
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glow of the big bang. it has transformed our understanding of the universe, a journey of space exploration which its creator once said would never end. i thought 20 years ago that we knew all that we wanted to know about the structure and evolution of the universe, and now we know almost nothing. in a moment we‘ll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. )heather mills, the former wife of sir paul mccartney, settles with the news of the world for a "substantial sum" over the phone hacking scandal. british airways is facing a record fine of £183 million over a data breach involving hundreds of thousands of customers. donald trump hits back at the uk‘s ambassador to washington, after leaked emails described his presidency as "inept and dysfunctional".
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in the business news: deutsche bank has made the first of the 18,000 job cuts announced on sunday as part of a radical reorganisation. teams of share traders in tokyo and other offices in asia were told this morning that theirjobs were going. shares in deutsche bank were down nearly 2% by mid—morning as investors reacted to the shake—up. discount supermarket chain lidl will open 12 new scottish stores creating around 500 jobs. the chain already has 98 shops across scotland, with construction already under way on sites in dumbarton, dundee, east kilbride, cowdenbeath and larkhall. kylie minogue, sheryl crow and lewis capaldi are among the glastonbury stars to give clothes to oxfam in support of a campaign against throwaway fashion. the artists gave some of their clothing to the charity during the festival in somerset, with the aim of encouraging fans to buy second—hand fashion.
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good morning. let‘s get more on the news that british airways is facing a record fine of £183 million for last year‘s breach of its security systems. it fell victim to a serious fraud. the airline, owned by iag, says it was "surprised and disappointed" by the penalty from the information commissioner‘s office. a record fine coming from the information commissioners office. at the time, ba said hackers had carried out a "sophisticated, malicious criminal attack" on its website. we are going to talk more about that a little later, but a significant fine. not as much as the ico could have imposed. it is 1.5% of turnover. but a significant fine for ba of £183 million. much more for you online as well and we will talk more on that in a moment. in other business news,
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six of britain‘s skyscrapers produce as much carbon dioxide as 3,000 cars, a report in today‘s times suggests. it says that the london landmarks produce more than 12,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide every year. more bad news for british airways. it will begin talks with its pilots on monday to avert a potentially damaging summer strike. pilots have rejected a pay increase worth 11.5% over three years, which the airline says is "fair and generous". however, the british airline pilots‘ association says its members deserve a better offer, as ba has been making healthy profits. flyadeal, the low—cost saudi arabian airline, has cancelled an order for 30 boeing 737 max aircraft. the decision follows the crashes of two 737 max jets, the first in indonesia in october followed by one in ethiopia in march, which killed 346 people. since then the aircraft has been grounded and boeing has been working on a fix that will satisfy regulators.
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you are up—to—date with the business. more on that ba business diary at the top of the hour. thank you very much. a south african who won the chance to be the first black african in space has died in a motorbike accident before attempting to turn his dream into reality. 30—year—old mandla maseko from pretoria died on saturday. in 2013, the south african air force member beat a million entrants to win one of 23 places at a space academy in the us. malta has said that all 65 migrants on board a german—flagged rescue ship will be allowed onto the island. the vessel, alan kurdi, arrived off malta‘s coast after it was denied access to italian ports. the maltese prime minister said that following discussions with the european commission all of the rescued migrants would be relocated to other eu member states. a so—called ‘free climber‘ has been seen scaling the shard in london.
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he was spotted climbing the skyscraper — one of the tallest in europe — at around quarter past one of the tallest in europe — at around 5:15 this morning. police said he then entered the building, where he was spoken to by officers but not arrested. time for the weather. it will be u nsettled. time for the weather. it will be unsettled. rain towards the end of the week but temperatures around the average for the time of year. today, northern ireland and the south west of scotla nd northern ireland and the south west of scotland and seen rain. further north—east of scotland we have sunshine. sunny spells across england and wales, there is will continue across the south. a few showers developing later on. maximum temperature is about 17 to 22 celsius. showers isolated across southern areas through this evening. more rain spread through northern ireland come into scotland, northern
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england and north wales. not as cold as last night, temperatures stay up at ten to 15 celsius. tuesday, northern parts have rain at times, quite cloudy here, temperature 17 to 20 celsius. further south it will be drier with sunny spells. temperatures around average for the time of year, 21 to 23 celsius. goodbye.
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you‘re watching bbc newsroom live — these are today‘s main stories: heather mills, the former wife of sir paul mccartney, settles with the news of the world for a "substantial sum" over the phone hacking scandal. after my separation in 2006, the hounding by the media was incessant. for a long time, i was a prisoner in my own home as reporters camped at the end of my road for two years. british airways is facing a record fine of 183 million pounds over a data breach involving hundreds of thousands of customers. the foreign secretary reacts to leaked emails from the uk‘s ambassador to washington, which describe donald trump‘s presidency as ‘inept and dysfunctional‘. we are going to have a leak enquiry and hopefully get to the bottom of
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it. and of course there will be very serious consequences if and when we find out who is responsible. families who‘ve lost loved ones to dangerous drivers say they‘ve been let down by broken promises to introduce tougher sentences. performers from this year‘s glastonbury festival — including kylie minogue and sheryl crow — have given items of clothing to oxfam, to campaign against cheap ‘throwaway fashion‘. and coming up in sport, a big day at wimbledon — with 15—year—old coco gauff, facing her biggest challenge yet, against former world number one simona halep. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the businesswoman and former wife of sir paul mccartney, heather mills, has received an apology and substantial damages after settling her case against the news of the world over phone hacking. in a statement outside the high court in london,
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she said she feltjoy and vindication — and criticised what she called "the targeted smear campaign waged against her" and other victims by news group newspapers. our news correspondent keith doyle explained what had happened in court. this marks the end of this privacy case between news group newspapers and heather mills. it has been settled with that apology in court and an undisclosed level of settlement funds. we do not know exactly how much that is what heather mills says this was the largest settlement of its type, and this case was brought covering a nine year period between 1999 and 2008 when around 140 stories appeared in the news of the world where heather mills claimed that she had been hacked, there is no other way the stories could have got out and one of the stories is thought to have been a row between her and paul mccartney over a wedding ring. she said the stories were leaked and
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caused a seriously corrosive effect on her relationships with their friends and family, it affected her work with a landmine charity and outside court she made the statement. after my separation in 2006, the hounding by the media was incessant. for a long time, 2006, the hounding by the media was incessant. fora long time, i 2006, the hounding by the media was incessant. for a long time, i was prisoner in my own home as reporters camped at the end of my road for two years. in court, a newsgroup newspapers made a statement saying, ifi newspapers made a statement saying, if i can read a short bit of it to you, they offer their sincere apologies to ms heather mills and miss fiona mills for the stress caused to them by the invasion of the provision by individuals working for or under half of news of the world. newsgroup newspapers accept that activity should have taken place. as i say, that marks the end of this particular case. so far, hacking cases have cost newsgroup newspapers have £1 million and that could double to £8 billion as many
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more places the iraq cases are in the pipeline. —— as many more cases are in the pipeline. british airways says it plans to appeal against a record fine it‘s facing — of 183 million pounds — over a data breach involving hundreds of thousands of customers. ba says it‘s "surprised and disappointed" by the penalty from the information commissioner‘s office which is the first under new european data protection rules. customers‘ personal and financial details were stolen after british airways‘ security systems were breached last august. joining me now is emily taylor, ceo of the cyber intelligence company oxford information labs. thank you very much forjoining us. what is your reaction to the amount of that fine? £183 million. the highest yet from the information commissioner was my office. it's a big fine and much bigger than the previous biggest fine ever levied under the old law which was only
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half a million. so there is really just highlights the sharp teeth of the new data protection laws and it will be a wake—up call to all the businesses who have been trying to implement suitable security practices and information security practices and information security practices to make themselves compliant or perhaps putting off the evil owl because they do do not really wa nt evil owl because they do do not really want to see what they are risking. is a so difficult to be compliant with the new rules? is the information commissioner points out, when these companies are handling sensitive personal data, that people are inputting onto their websites or wherever, it is so important that they protect that. it is very important for companies to act responsibly and one of the interesting aspect of this case is that ba are really a victim of crime, along with all the many millions of customers who were
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affected, or the thousands of customers who were affected. but this is not really a question of bad faith. ba announced that they had had a breach, they‘d very quickly discovered it and were compliant, they cooperated with the information commissioner all through the investigation, that shoot tend to mitigate the sort of fines so i think this is partly a way for the information commissioner signalling that this is new laws, a new environment for businesses. obviously the impetus is wanting companies to change behaviour as you have said, what are the lessons that can be learned from this? businesses need to take a information security very seriously. they need to make sure they have got appropriate processes that they have certifications, that they are complying with all sorts of the
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rules and regulations that make their data more secure, that they are separating the data into different parcels so if it is compromised, it will not be too bad. but they would consider encryption weather at rest or in transit, and they have monitoring systems in place so that if the worst happens and there is a breach, they know about it quickly. news said ba was effectively a victim of crime, too, but presumably if you were compliant with all of the things we have just described, they would not have fallen foul of this, is that right? were they basically not doing the things you‘ve just said they should be doing? there is a very limited statement at the moment but it does point to poor security practices and soi point to poor security practices and so i think one of the big changes of the new law is that it was a lot more burden onto businesses to ramp up more burden onto businesses to ramp up their information security and their cyber security. this has been a challenge for businesses for the
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whole country, our cybersecurity readiness is not what it should be so this is a way of law reaching into companies and saying, improve your processes. that small statement in the announcement makes me think that when they lifted the lid on the security practices, they were not impressed with what they saw but thatis impressed with what they saw but that is simply my speculation. ba made clear it is not happy with this and will be appealing. thank you very much. downing street says theresa may has "full faith" in the uk‘s ambassador in washington, sir kim darroch, after the leak of confidential emails in which he characterised donald trump‘s administration as inept, insecure and incompetent. however, the prime minister‘s spokesman says she doesn‘t agree with all of the ambassador‘s assessment. the foreign office is investigating the source of the leak, as andy moore reports. during last month was my visit to the uk, mrand mrs
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during last month was my visit to the uk, mr and mrs trump met the dutch and duchess of cornwall. —— max the duke and of cornwall. the president could onlyjust be heard above the sound of a helicopter engine... the publication of comments made by the ambassador about the president have prompted an official investigation into the source of the elite. the trade secretary speaking in washington said the leaking was unethical and unpatriotic.” in washington said the leaking was unethical and unpatriotic. i think our diplomats have to be able to give a bit of colour in their views in both directions about how they view the political scene. i think the question here is about the
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behaviour of someone that would leak a document which has a limited circulation for obvious reasons. a document which has a limited circulation for obvious reasonsm the short term at least, sir kim darroch seems safe in his job. the short term at least, sir kim darroch seems safe in hisjob. he is due to retire at the end of the year anyway. meanwhile, the journalist wrote the original story has hinted there might be more revelations to come about what the british ambassador really thinks about president trump. the leader of the brexit party, nigel farage, says the comments of the uk ambassador were irresponsible and he should go as soon as possible. speaking to the today programme earlier, mr farage was asked if he was the man to replace sir kim darroch. well, i‘m not a dap diplomat, i think that is certain. —— i‘m not a diplomat. like mike i think everyone listening, including your supporters, would agree with that. what i would like to do and i‘ve been trying to do for the past few weeks try to find some big uk industrialists and i am talking to a few to start meeting with trompe‘s
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advisors so we could get a blueprint together as soon as the european union realises that we are serious about big, all—encompassing deals with countries like america, it massively straightens strengthens our position. you are not a diplomat but you are a politician and i notice you do not answer that question for that yes or no, if you are offered it, i‘m not going to insinuate that it is going to happen but if you were, would you?” insinuate that it is going to happen but if you were, would you? i do not think i‘m the right man for that job. my right man to try and help forge a better, closer relationship in terms of intelligence, security and trade with an administration that can take us forward? yes, i could be very useful. earlier i spoke to our diplomatic correspondent james robbins. he questioned the timing of the leak. it does seem extraordinary latitude, this particular moment in a political interim, effectively, and you would have to imagine that the lea ker you would have to imagine that the leaker has you would have to imagine that the lea ker has political you would have to imagine that the
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leaker has political motives. after all, it‘s clearly on extreme damage, the fact that ambassadors will be nervous, that may be their private communications to their masters in london are not secure. imagine that every time a highly encrypted message for an ambassador overseas to whitehall, just imagine if every one of those messages was available insta ntly one of those messages was available i nsta ntly o n one of those messages was available instantly on your mobile, and everyone‘s mobile. obviously ambassadors would not given frank assessments, they would write ultra—bland messages to london and be frankly no use to aid policy—making so it is not surprising that liam fox, jeremy hunt, also critical of the leak. it does great damage to the way the system operates. why now? well, i think the leak enquiry if it is able to identify the culprit might make that a little bit clearer. it has to be said that quite a large number of people see these messages. parts of whitehall are meant to be within themselves open, close to our split
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open within themselves so there will bea open within themselves so there will be a distribution list for the sort of telegrams which goes outside the foreign office into other departments, including quite a lot of senior officials, all of whom will have had some sort of security clea ra nce. will have had some sort of security clearance. ministers and in some cases ministerial staff, so there will be quite a lot of people who would have dealt with these telegrams and it will be important for that for them to have a joined up for that for them to have a joined up conversation. you said damaging to the system, what about the impact on relations? clearly in the short term it is not good. donald trump jumped on it, was if you like pretty critical of kim darroch, the ambassador to whom i do not think any blame attaches in london because he was doing hisjob but any blame attaches in london because he was doing his job but the president likes to dish out insults, he does not like receiving them. he is known to be pretty thin—skinned so he would have not like this at all. because of the frankness of kim darroch‘s assessment, this is a
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dysfunctional administration riddled with faction fighting, with a policy on iran that cert came the is chaotic. that level of criticism makes it not surprising that donald trump took a very dim view of it and in the short term at least, it is clearly going to be a hindrance to relations. we understand that might not be the end of it, that might be more to come. exactly, is there more? greece has sworn in its new prime minister, kyriakos mitsotakis of the new democracy party. mr mitsotakis was signed into office at the presidential mansion in athens. who won a strong mandate in a snap general election. he‘s promised to lower taxes and boostjobs. the prime minister—elect of greece, kyriakos mitsotakis, has been given a resounding mandate to form a new government after his centre—right new democracy party decisively won a snap general election. mr mitostakis has been signed greece‘s prime minister elect,
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the headlines on bbc news... heather mills, the former wife of sir paul mccartney, settles with the news of the world for a "substantial sum" over the phone hacking scandal. british airways is facing a record fine of 183 million pounds over a data breach involving hundreds of thousands of customers. donald trump hits back at the uk‘s ambassador to washington, after leaked emails described his presidency as ‘inept and dysfunctional‘. sport now, here‘s olly. the start of the second week at wimbledon is under way. it‘s always called manic monday, this monday. every match in the last 16 of the men‘s and women‘s draw is due to be completed today. john watson is at the all england club for us, have a nice rest day yesterday i would
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guess but it all gets up going again. i thought —— partly‘s match would be done and dusted by now but it looks like it will go the difference. —— i thought ash ba rtley‘s difference. —— i thought ash bartley‘s match. difference. —— i thought ash ba rtley‘s match. let‘s difference. —— i thought ash bartley‘s match. let‘s go over there now because we know ash party, the world number one, the favourite for the title this year, she raced through the first set against alison riske of the united states winning it 6-3. riske of the united states winning it 6—3. risk in her chair there over on court two but she has hit back taking the second set 6—2. as we can see here with the details of that second set summary, so ash party with some really big work to do if she is going to book a place in the quarterfinals. —— ash barty with work to do. plenty to do with risk hitting back in that second set. all eyes will fall on johanna konta today. the last remaining brit in the singles this year but she faces a tough test in her fourth—round
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match against petra kvitova, the former wimbledon champion. produced a brilliant display to knock out sloane stephens but you will need to draw on all of that for much to go to the semifinals here two years ago if she is to get past give it of who has real pedigree on the grass and these championships. a big match to come for koko golf, one of the stories of this tournament. —— for coco gauff. playing tennis fell beyond her years and of course locked out her last opponent, she wasjumping locked out her last opponent, she was jumping for joy, as locked out her last opponent, she was jumping forjoy, as were her pa rents. was jumping forjoy, as were her parents. brilliant pictures having progressed to the next round. what a story if you can go one step further today. with raff and adele in action, novak djokovic and roger federer as well, it will be a bumper day. —— rafa nadal.
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federer as well, it will be a bumper day. -- rafa nadal. you can watch everything a match across the bbc, bbc sport website, you can pick and choose what ones you want to watch. tyson fury said a rematch with deontay wilder is being agreed, it will take place on the 22nd of february next year. the original flight february next year. the original flight in december ended in something of a contentious drawer. you remember fury was not sparked out, got up in the final round, was convinced he won it. it is only about since then, he stopped former shorts last month. while that is due to defend his belt against lewis ortiz for that comes through that, he will be competing against tyson fury. fury said a contract has been signed for that in february. that is all the sport right now. i will be back at around half past one. waiting lists for routine surgery have risen by up to 50% in england because senior doctors say they cannot afford to work extra shifts. consultants have begun refusing to work
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beyond their planned hours after receiving unexpected tax bills, following new pension rules in 2016. nhs hospitals said delays are becoming increasingly routine as a result. the department of health said it aimed to solve the problem with more flexible pensions. dr tony goldstone is a consultant radiologist who has been affected by these changes — and hejoins us now. thank you forjoining us. tell us how you have been affected. so, i realise that i had my first pension tax liability 18 months ago and that was a five figure sum and then again was a five figure sum and then again was hit by another five figure bill this tax year and it became very clear that due to the setup of the pension scheme and the changes that have been made to pension taxation, that if i do not do something differently, i would be facing similar liabilities every year till i retire and i‘m only in my early 40s. i retire and i‘m only in my early 405. i i retire and i‘m only in my early 40s. i very quickly realised that
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position was not tenable either for me or the department i manage but also for the wider nhs and that this would cause genuine problems that would cause genuine problems that would affect patient safety. just explain it in releasable terms if you can because it is a confusing one. yeh like that you say you had the five figure sum that was an unexpected tax bill for you. how did that amount a crew? it is fiendishly obligated and very few people understand it but basically because we are in a defined benefit scheme, we are in a defined benefit scheme, we have no control over our pension, we have no control over our pension, we do not choose how much goes into it so we only find out after the tax year has closed, six months after, that you have these liabilities and that you have these liabilities and that makes it impossible for people to plan so people have done additional work or over time, they may find they have been paying to go to work. that the amount of payment they‘ve had of overtime has been
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stripped away by the pension tax even though the overtime was not pensionable at all. it was to no benefit of their pension. some are saying it means having to opt out of the nhs pension scheme or take early retirement. of his or there is the option that you‘re talking about reducing hours. which of those are you doing or would you consider?” think it‘s a very individual choice but a recent survey by nhs employers found that some 82% of consultants we re found that some 82% of consultants were either reducing work or considering reducing work because u nfortu nately considering reducing work because unfortunately that was the only choice we were given to be able to control our pension scheme. one of the other problems is that if you come out of the pension scheme, ordinarily, you would be able to get the pension contribution going but only you employers are offering that. part of the solution to the
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problem —— that part of the problem is that if that could come more widespread, people could leave the pension scheme but get the employer contribution which would be cost neutral to the nhs. contribution which would be cost neutralto the nhs. some people would say you‘re well paid, in a good pension scheme, what about your duty to the patients who are having operations cancelled having to wait longer because consultants are saying they will not work because of this pension issue? i completely understand that view, consultants and doctors are well paid compared to the rest of the population and that reflect the fact that it takes more than 15 years to become a co nsulta nt more than 15 years to become a consultant but you cannot expect any type of staff to pay to go to work. ido type of staff to pay to go to work. i do have a time already, the average is around five or six hours of unpaid overtime. not talking about that unpaid overtime, we are talking about doctors already working very owner is an anti—social hours and weekends, but then being
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asked to come in and do additional weekends to try and help out with waiting lists. thank you very much for joining waiting lists. thank you very much forjoining us. more than 160,000 people have petitioned the government to introduce tougher sentences for those who cause death by dangerous driving in england and wales. a debate is being held in parliament today, to discuss the issue. violet—grace ewans was four when she was killed by a man driving a stolen car at 83 miles per hour in a 30 zone. karen morrison has been to meet her parents. violet grace ewan paul violet—grace youens was just four years old when she was hit old when she was hit and killed by a man driving a stolen car. we were shopping for headstones, when all of violet‘s friends‘ parents were shopping for school uniforms for reception class in september. that‘s wrong. aidan mcateer was sentenced to nine years and four months for death by dangerous driving, but he will only serve half of that in prison before being eligible for release. we have a life sentence.
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glenn has a life sentence. most importantly, violet has a life sentence. since violet‘s death, other families have suffered. other families have suffered before violet‘s death, and we‘re all being insulted by the current system in place, and that‘s why it needs to change. in england and wales last year, 157 people were found guilty of death by dangerous driving. of those, nine walked free from court with suspended sentences. the average sentence given to drivers who kill was five years, and since 2012, no offender received the maximum sentence of 14 years. in 2017, the government announced that drivers who kill in the most serious cases of dangerous and careless driving would face life sentences. stacey barrows and lucy pygott were both dedicated runners, with county and european medals between them. in 2016, they were hit and killed on the road while out training. stacey‘s father was close by. ijust heard a big thud.
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one of her team—mate's friends, one of their parents, stopped me, and she said...it's stacey. michael casey was drunk, speeding, and went through a red light. he was sentenced to six years, but will serve half that in prison. it‘s looked upon too leniently. that car is a lethal weapon, that car was a lethal weapon, and they should be in prison for life. the ministry ofjustice insists it is committed to changing the law, but victims say it is taking too long. the congolese warlord bosco ntaganda has been found guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity by the international criminal court. judges at the hague ruled that he was guilty of all eighteen charges against him, including rape, murder,
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sexual slavery and recruiting child soldiers. our correspondent anna holligan spoke to me from the hague. so, this is a case in which the persecutor, the persecuted became the persecutor so bosco ntaganda was a child soldier, he had been kidnapped himself and conscripted to fight and then he, too, began conscripting children under the age of 15. the charges were read out again in court today, some of them graphic, so 49 bodies of men, women and babies found mutilated in a ba na na and babies found mutilated in a banana field. a pregnant woman killed while she was trying to protect herself from being raped. this was the trail of horror left behind by bosco ntaganda and rebel forces in the drc between 2002 and 2003, and he was found guilty on all 18 charges. this case is remarkable
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in two respects. aside from the fact that he was actually a child soldier and grew into this career criminal, it is the first case in which a suspect has voluntarily surrendered himself to the icc, so that was march 2013. he actually walked into the us embassy in rwanda and asked to be transferred here to the hague and secondly it‘s the first time that a suspect has been found guilty of sexual crimes, so sexual slavery and rape of women and children, some of whom we heard today as young as nine years old, so that in itself will be seen as a victory of sorts for the prosecutor who has made it her life mission to make rape as a weapon of war recognised by this court, this international court of justice and then really put it on the statute as something that people in the field, these commanders can
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be prosecuted for and we‘ve already heard some response from human rights groups who say this is a measure of justice for the rights groups who say this is a measure ofjustice for the victims and in terms of those victims, more than 2000 were cleared to take part in this trial which has been going on for years now and the next stage will be to work out what kind of sentence he should be given because we know he has been been in icc custody for years. he has 30 days, bosco ntaganda has 30 days to appeal against this guilty verdict and any judges will decide how long should spend behind bars for these crimes if that appeal of course is u nsuccessful. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. good afternoon. a bit more time developing compared with the last few days. spilling of the atlantic
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by the end of the afternoon without rate of rain across northern ireland, just watch out for one or two isolated showers across parts of south—west england into the south midlands, too, but mostly prior to the day, sunshine, on the 80 side, can‘t thickening up. northern ireland, scotland, northern england without to the day, sunshine, on the 80 side, can‘t thickening up. northern ireland, scotland, northern england without recovering developing for many, heavier burst, too, and most of scotland stays dry on the east side. temperatures into the mid teens across southern counties of england where it will be a lot cloudier through tomorrow until the lie still some spells of hazy sunshine. across northern england, scotland, northern ireland, cloud sitting in place, rain coming and going, heavier burst in northern ireland during the afternoon and temperature tomorrow anywhere between 14—16dc in mainland scotland, 23, 24, maybe in 25 celsius in the south. pleasantly warm in the sunshine over the next couple of days. the far north of england, scotland, northern ireland, outbreaks of rain, big thunderstorms on scotland —— make big 01:29:58,280 --> 2147483052:21:44,203 thunderstorms in scotland on 2147483052:21:44,203 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 thursday.
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