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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 9, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: president trump says he will no longer deal with the uk's ambassador to washington as the diplomatic row ramps up over leaked emails criticising him and his administration. two weeks from today, we will have a new prime minister. tonight, the two contenders will debater for the first time head to head live on tv. and is it getting harder to have a happy childhood? a major new study says younger people are feeling under more social pressure than ever. half of all shopping will move online in the next decade, i'll be looking at what it
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means for retailers. here at wimbledon, another fine performance from johanna konta takes her past a former champion and into the quarter—finals — she'll be back on court again this afternoon. and it will be fully cloudy here at wimbledon today. just a small chance ofa wimbledon today. just a small chance of a shower. some sunny intervals. the heaviest rain is likely to be gci’oss the heaviest rain is likely to be across the north. we will be back with more later. it's tuesday 9th july. our top story: president trump has stepped up his attack on the uk's ambassador in washington, saying "we will no longer deal with him". in a series of tweets, mr trump also said that theresa may had made a "mess" of brexit, adding he was thankful that the british people would soon have a new prime minister. the remarks follow a leak of emails written by sir kim darroch, describing the trump white house as "inept" and "dysfunctional". downing street says sir kim has the government's full support. andy moore reports. shortly after president trump
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criticised mrs may and her ambassador, downing street issued a statement saying sir kim darroch continued to had the full support of the prime minister. the leak was unfortunate, the statement went on, but the special relationship would endure. on his twitter feed, president trump said: "i have been very critical about the way the uk and prime minister theresa may handled brexit. what a mess she and her representatives have created. i told her how it should be done but she decided to go another way. i do not know the ambassador but he is not liked or well thought of within the us. we will no longer deal with him. the good news for the wonderful united kingdom is that they will soon have a new prime minister. while i thoroughly enjoyed the magnificent state visit last month, it was the queen who i was most impressed with." there are reports that the ambassador has already been frozen out from a diplomatic event in washington overnight but it's unlikely the uk will bow to american
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pressure and bring him home. i will just say this. that you only bring an ambassador out or expel an ambassador when something very serious has gone wrong between two countries and not two close friends and allies. it would be pretty unprecedented for the idea that the president of the united states should push the man out simply for doing hisjob. the hunt for the source of the leak has only just begun. the british foreign secretary is reported as saying it's a possibility it could be the act of a foreign hostile state. andy moore, bbc news. let's get the latest on this now from our political correspondent nick eardley who's in westminster. nick, president trump's state visit seems a long time ago now, how much of a blow is this to the special relationship? this is extraordinary. even by donald trump's standards. we have gotten used to him and his unique standards of diplomacy on twitter but even by his standards, it was a pretty jawdropping but even by his standards, it was a prettyjawdropping moment. the big question in the uk is how much
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damage this does to the so—called special relationship. in one sense, it is maybe not the end of the world. theresa may is off in just over two weeks‘ time and the ambassador himself is due to leave thatjob in ambassador himself is due to leave that job in january anyway. ambassador himself is due to leave thatjob injanuary anyway. so he will be being replaced then. there is also a feeling within a lot of people in government that they don‘t wa nt to people in government that they don‘t want to be seen to bow to us pressure on this. just because donald trump has decided he is unhappy about this, they don‘t want to feel like they are making split decisions to get rid of the ambassador so as you heard in andy‘s report there, it is unlikely that anything is going to happen immediately. downing street is saying last night they still have a full confidence the said kim —— they still have full confidence in sir kim darroch. what can we expect tonight when the two candidates go
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head—to—head? tonight when the two candidates go head-to-head? jeremy hunt is a foreign secretary and borisjohnson was. they will be asked about these e—mails. brexit rumbles on and on and on. everybody wants to know how the two are going to deliver their plans. it is worth pointing out that a lot of tories have started voting already. on twitter, hundreds have been saying they have voted for their preferred candidate already. jeremy hunt wanted this to take place a bit earlier so that he could try and claw back some of the ground that boris johnson try and claw back some of the ground that borisjohnson has opened up as a lead over his rival. whether tonight‘s a game changer, we will have to wait and see. hong kong‘s chief executive carrie lam has declared a controversial bill which would allow extradition to china is now "dead". the government had already suspended the bill, which had caused weeks of unrest.
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some protestors remain unhappy with ms lam‘s statement. they‘re demanding she withdraws the proposed legislation completely. bullying, exam pressure and social media — some of the things having a negative impact on modern day childhoods in the uk, according to action for children. it‘s published a major report this morning that calls for the creation of a national childhood strategy, to better protect young people. john maguire reports. i felt ifelt more i felt more stressed and more pressure. . . i felt more stressed and more pressure... what do the three generations of the same family think about a modern—day childhood? harvey has just finished his exams but earlier in the year struggled with anxiety. for a teenager these days, pressure comes in many forms. anxiety. for a teenager these days, pressure comes in many formslj think with social media and stuff, people my age now grow up with oh, this is what you need to be, this is how you need to act and now not so much of that happens at school, it happens at a school and then when you get home, it is not really something you can escape. when i was 16, it was kind of like, well, you
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go and do what you do and if it comes off great, if it doesn't, it doesn't. now there is that much emphasis on the fact that there's only a fewjobs and you have got to be the best of the best in order to get those jobs. right from an age, the school is more full on and life is more full on. peer pressure is much more full on. they worry so much more full on. they worry so much about their peers are thinking. whereas i think we were just more, we are what we are. the charity action for children have spoken to thousands of families across the uk and its report speaks of childhood in crisis. 62% of grandparents, 60% of pa rents in crisis. 62% of grandparents, 60% of parents and 34% of their children said childhoods today are getting worse. bullying was highlighted as the main concern exacerbated by
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social media issues and the charity is calling on the government to better protect youngsters by creating a national childhood strategy. in response, the education secretary says a youth charter is in development to give young people a voice in the issues they care about such as combating serious violence and knife crime, addressing mental and knife crime, addressing mental and physical health challenges, and concerns about the environment and climate change. john maguire, bbc news, worcestershire. get in touch with us about that. offering the hpv vaccine to boys could result in 29,000 fewer cancers among men over the next 50 years, according to new research. the jab, which protects against the human papilloma virus, will now be given to 12— and 13—year—old boys from september. girls of the same age have already been eligible for the immunisation for a decade. new drugs have been approved for use by the nhs in england which can treat a debilitating disease which was once thought untreatable. the new form of medicine,
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called "gene—silencing", will be used to reverse amyloidosis, a disease which causes nerve and organ damage, and can be fatal. heavy rainfall has caused flash flooding across parts of washington dc, taking out roads and leaving commuters stranded. many of the capital‘s subways were left with dangerous levels of floodwater, which also found its way into the basement of the white house and the national archives building. staff said despite the flooding, historical documents, including the declaration of independence and the american constitution, remained safe. good news, got to keep those protect it. -- good news, got to keep those protect it. —— protected. the national farmers union is demanding clearer long—term commitments from the government on how they will support food producers after brexit. the sector received 5.5 billion pounds in eu subsidies last year — and a report by the national audit office found that four in ten farms rely on the grants to remain profitable.
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defra says funding will remain the same until the end of this parliament. and asian couple claim a californian clinic left them pregnant with the wrong children. they were supposed to give birth to two boys that were not of asian descent and dna tests we re not of asian descent and dna tests were not related to the couple or to each other. the fertility clinic has not commented on the allegations. have you washed sure noble? not commented on the allegations. have you washed sure noble ?|j not commented on the allegations. have you washed sure noble? i have watched some of it because of your recommendations. —— chernobyl. if you‘ve watched the series chernobyl, about the nuclear power plant disaster in ukraine, you‘ll know that, as well as the huge human cost, hundreds of pet dogs in the area were culled by the soviet military. but some of them managed to evade their hunters and now their descendants are being offered medical care. volunteers are humanely trapping strays within the exclusion zone before washing, vaccinating and sterilising them. most are released back into the wild
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but some of the younger pups are being taken in as pets. what a story. there you go. and yes, have started watching it because of you. the best bit is at the end when they run you through the statistics. i won‘t ruin it for you. stuff that they still claim is the official death toll. right, compared to what it might be. and i say might because of what it could be. let‘s go to wimbledon! it was a manic monday. joe contact, well done. —— johanna konta. manic monday. joe contact, well done. ——johanna konta. yes, a great day forjohanna konta yesterday. there is a sense that she is playing well and her head is in the right place. you are right. a great game
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for her. she has made it through and into the next round. she could reach the semifinals for the second time in three years today. she will face barbora in three years today. she will face ba rbora strycova less in three years today. she will face barbora strycova less than 2a hours after knocking out the two—time champion petra kvitova. but the dream run is over for 15—year—old coco gauff. she was stopped by the former world number one simona halep, who‘s now the top seed left in the women‘s draw. federer, nadal and djokovic all went through. the cricket world cup is back this morning with the first of the semi—finals. india take on new zealand at old trafford. and geraint thomas lost time on two of his main rivals on stage three of the tour de france. julian alaphilippe won it, and now wears the yellow jersey as they head towards the mountains. a really tricky stage for them coming up. i promised you some good headlines. this is my favourite one. i wanted to say this at six o‘clock but i didn‘t dare because it would be stealing four. do you like this?
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jk rowling! get it? she is on form at the moment and doing really well. __jk at the moment and doing really well. ——jk rolling. back page of the guardian, something to shout about. she had a good old shout when talking about that much was a little story down here i want share with you. there is an interview about phil neville. this is one of those situations where they have taken a quote from the interview, saying that phil neville is not the best coach. that he made england a better side because of its almost a bit like a backhanded compliment. she is saying he admitted that tactically he may be needs to learn more but actually, he was to create relationships with players, fans, staff and he has really done that. that has helped to drive us on at the tournament and become a better team. ican the tournament and become a better team. i can tell you, the lionesses,
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they will be here. they will be here and we will see them and i‘m sure that of fans will be delighted to see them here at wimbledon. lucky them. how do you get into that royal box? it is what me and carol have tried to find out. 0h, box? it is what me and carol have tried to find out. oh, come on. i can‘t believe you haven‘t found out yet! every day we trifles of every day we try. i put carol in front of me, i hide behind her. still, no chance. i am concerned about the grey clouds behind you. yes, carol will tell you more. iam regretting my choice of clothing today because ididn‘t my choice of clothing today because i didn‘t listen to carol yesterday. it is quite cold today. if carol really wants to get into the royal box. if you were watching yesterday, carol and that dog ruby. follow on from ruby. get ruby to
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ta ke follow on from ruby. get ruby to take you into the royal box.|j follow on from ruby. get ruby to take you into the royal box. i can't believe even carol can‘t get into the royal box. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. let‘s look at the front pages. president donald trump‘s reaction to uk diplomatic memos describing his administration as "inept" leads several of the papers. the times says mr trump severed relations with sir kim darroch after the emails leaked. the photo is of snowball, the dancing cockatoo, who has amazed animal behaviour experts by showing off 11! distinct moves. including the head bang. the mail reports families have paid £15 billion in the last two years caring for relatives with dementia. that‘s their main story. the front page also features photos of jo konta, who‘s doing well at wimbledon, and beside her is 15—year—old coco gauff, who has been knocked out of the competition. she was beaten by simona halep yesterday. the sun reports that love island contestant amy hart has quit the show after fellow contestant curtis pritchard broke off their relationship. the article says her decision comes
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amid increasing concerns about the wellbeing of participants on reality tv programmes. and finally, the daily telegraph leads on a promise by tory leadership candidate boris johnson, a columnist for the paper, to resolve the pensions dispute that is causing hospital waiting lists to rise. jo konta features on that front page too. i‘ve seen absolutely nothing of love island. i haven't had my update, steph and i normally have one. we've distracted each other! something was going around on social media... let‘s talk about what has happened. one of them thought barcelona was in rome. there's so many different chats and then people pull them up for something. that is a big one! i know it is! if they broadcast what we said 2a hours a day, we would save some pretty silly things! that‘s why i don‘t sign up to it! thus three and three quarters hours!
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i have been watching a bit. amy hart, she seems to be heartbroken, i thought i met my first love, the one, turns out i haven‘t. we haven‘t had an update, because it all gets filmed one day and then it goes out the next night. why would you go in that place? thinking that you would actually find a long—term relationship! i'm sceptical about that, holiday romance at best but a couple who won it a couple of years ago are married now. backup that cynicism! you have converted me! on the other end of the news... a lot of the business news this morning is talking about the fallout from deutsche bank. this is germany's largest bank, and they announced they were laying off 18,000 staff around the world yesterday. then there were various stories coming out through the day about how they were told about the
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job losses. there was talk of people being told to clear their desks within a few hours in the london office. basically there's lots of analysis of that, saying shares have falle n 5% analysis of that, saying shares have fallen 5% as a result. this is all because they've had various problems with their revenue and the costs have been going up and they've had misconduct scandals as well. something i mentioned earlier this morning in the headlines, shopping. some research has come out saying nearly half of all shopping will go online in the next decade. talking about the pressure it will put on traditional retailers. logistically, how will that work, if everyone is getting things delivered, what will that look like on the roads? that is a good point! they are linking this to some retail figures out, saying retailers have suffered a 1.3% fall in sales over the last month. they might be delivered by drones, but is that realistic? is certainly there.
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i talked to the tesco boss last week and he said people might not want the technology yet, and you also need regulation. even the other day i thought i need some insulation tape and some screws, i could have got it delivered. normally you go down the hard way shop and buy those. even stuff like that you could get online. what were you doing with it? yellow the iron chord has... you are fixing the iron! excellent, you‘re not only doing that but saving the environment as well. i slave over the hot iron so often that i have frayed the cord. well. i slave over the hot iron so often that i have frayed the cordlj love these stories. delia smith, she talked about how... frozen mass potato was a good thing, now nadia hussain is talking about potatoes saying think how long it takes to peel and boil them —— mashed potato.
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she feels ten potatoes and then baked them in the oven. quite controversial, some people are quite upset. i can imagine people getting furious. i have never used attend potatoes yet! you should try them! we used to have ten potatoes and tinned ham. nothing wrong with tinned ham. nothing wrong with tinned ham! two victories to finish off with, 16 sausage dogs altogether. this fella owns all these dogs. first of all, they are incredibly obedient. an animal management expert and his mate at him he couldn‘t do it. it took him eight minutes and he used a squeaky tennis ball to get them all in. one more daft one, this is doing the rounds, a steak that apparently looks like vladimir putin. the headline is steak and kidney putin.
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do you think of that? it does! that has been shaped, hasn't it? artistic! i like your cynicism! you are probably right! someone has gone into a shop and try to make it look like vladimir putin? they have got on the tv, they are in the paper!|j have on the tv, they are in the paper!” have fallen for it! we know there are clouds on the way at wimbledon. carol is at wimbledon for us this morning with a look at the weather. there are clouds and a bit of dampness in the air but the forecast for wimbledon today is actually mostly dry. a lot more cloud around than yesterday. there will be some sunny intervals but there the risk ofa sunny intervals but there the risk of a shower. really, it‘s trying to rain right now. top temperature today, 22 degrees. for all of us today, 22 degrees. for all of us today, more cloud around and the best of the sunshine will be in the south—west and we‘ve got rain as
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well, the heaviest of which is in the northern half of the uk. starting at 9am, zooming into scotland, quite a bit of rain with two bands moving through. in northern ireland, the first one has left you, the second is on its way coming in from the west through the morning, but it will be showery and in northern england, we‘ve got a lot of cloud with rain moving through. coming south of that, it‘s a fairly cloudy start to the day whichever way you look at it and some of this cloud is thick enough for some spots, as we are seeing here at wimbledon. the brighter skies are likely to be, and are currently, across somerset, devon and cornwall, but in the west, generally we‘re looking at and hail mist locally. through the day you can see how the rain moves from the west to the east, we hang onto the cloud, cloud thicken off for some showers and the sunniest skies will be the channel islands, devon, cornwall and somerset and the highest
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temperatures in decent sunshine will be 23. through this evening and overnight, once again the northern half of the country will hang onto the rain on and off as we go through the rain on and off as we go through the course of the night. further south, there will be some clears spells and the temperature range tonight, high single figures to low double figures. some might not fall lower than 13 or 14. that leads us into tomorrow. tomorrow once again, scotla nd into tomorrow. tomorrow once again, scotland and northern ireland will see the heaviest of the rain and potentially thundery. down the east coast of england, again some showers around and some of those are also likely to be heavy. as we come south to southern counties, around the south—east for example, back into the sunshine and again the forecast for wimbledon tomorrow, can‘t rule out a shower but the chances are it will stay dry with highs of pointy for. you will notice through the day today that it will turn humid once
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again —— 24. today that it will turn humid once again -- 24. thanks, carol, we will see you later! when william wordsworth came across a host of golden daffodils in the lake district 200 years ago, he famously wrote a poem about it. nowadays he‘d be more likely to take a quick picture and share it on instagram. reaching a new generation of tourists means getting to grips with social media, and that‘s why some of our most ancient visitor attractions are making more effort to be instagram—friendly. our north of england correspondent danny shaw has taken his selfie stick and been to find out more. visit somewhere special while living life through the lens. the power of social media is seeing a different generation heading to those special spots to prove they‘ve been there. after all, the camera never lies. so we‘ll after all, the camera never lies. so we‘ ll start after all, the camera never lies. so we‘ll start in york, which has lots to see and loads of history. they took to the tower... john has
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started a bespoke instagram tour of the city with the specific aim of getting in the right place for the best pictures. i think it is really changing the way people want to consume, and the way people want to visit a city and particularly ca ptu re visit a city and particularly capture it very much in the present and share their adventure and share and share their adventure and share and create stories about what they‘re doing with people. and create stories about what they're doing with people. having that tour that takes you to those locations where you can take those types of pictures is really, kind of, like, the goal. everyone wants to see them, my families are waiting for them, you get calls all the time asking where i am, nice to be able to see them. the name instagram, instant, the moment we are there they get to experience it too. a few miles down the road at castle howard, there‘s a frame to help you get the right picture. no knowing the audience is key here. it's absolutely essential we engage with younger markets. places like castle howard are the lifeblood of the
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country‘s history and how we make it releva nt for country‘s history and how we make it relevant for younger markets is really important. this was also the venue really important. this was also the venue for a taiwanese pop star‘s wedding reception and that‘s brought in thousands of visitors. saw the picture from a popstar, a famous ty warren popstar from his app. his instagram? instagram. and he got married here? yes. and he saw the pictures? that's how we know castle howard. over at the unesco world heritage site in the late district, there‘s a more cautionary note. everyone wants to ta ke more cautionary note. everyone wants to take photographs and get them straight on social media so they can show their friends where they‘ve been. you've got to get high to get the top shots, and mountain rescue teams are worried. many people have fallen to their death or major injury. all you need is a gust of wind when you‘re taking that photograph and you can be over the
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edge stop you need to be careful and know what‘s around you when you‘re taking selfies. one big question when taking selfies is to have a selfie stick or not to have a selfie stick. my stick. my daughters tell me that these are not very cool, and that‘s apparently because when you do use one you get far more of the view and less of the pouting human. good to know that you‘ve done it and remember you‘ve done it and also be able to showcase it through your social media as well. sharing instantly where you are with your friends is here sharing instantly where you are with yourfriends is here to sharing instantly where you are with your friends is here to stay, sharing instantly where you are with yourfriends is here to stay, and it‘s proving to be good thing for british tourism. danny savage, bbc news. ruh selfie stick user? i'm not, i'm really technologically challenged. i canjust really technologically challenged. i can just about to a selfie! a bit of panorama action? no? time now for the news, travel and weather where you‘re watching. good morning from bbc london news.
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a £20,000 reward is being offered to help solve the murder of a teenager in south london last year. 16—year—old john ogunjobi was stabbed to death in a fight in tulse hill in november. police believe more than one person attacked him and there are likely to be witnesses. a teenager from wapping is about to undergo major surgery after years of bullying because of the way he looks. joshua oyebola is one of only two people in the world with a rare type of facial disfigurement. he‘s endured years of people staring and is now is trying to change perceptions. i think it‘s the way people look at me and judge me straightaway. like, it‘s kind of like, instant. let‘s just say i‘m walking down the road, i see people looking at me and i can just see in their face the way, they‘re like, judging me. i don‘t
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wa nt they‘re like, judging me. i don‘t want it to be like that. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on most tube lines this morning, but there are severe delay on the northern line. the gatwick express is suspended between victoria and gatwick airport and there is disruption to southern services between victoria and clapham junction due to the derailment of an engineering train. turning to the roads. on the a4 great west road into town, there is no access to the hammersmith gyratory due to a burst water main. seven sisters road is closed in both directions near manor house tube station due to a police investigation. there are temporary traffic lights and roadworks on denmark hill at the junction with love walk. expect delays. eversholt street remains closed in both directions between euston station and grafton place due to water main repairs. now the weather, with sara thornton. hello, good morning. certainly not a
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chilly start this morning. plenty of cloud overnight, keeping our temperatures right up in the low to mid—teens. we‘ll keep that cloud through a good of the day—to—day, brightness will be fairly limited. mostly dry but later we could see a stray shower and actually a bit of drizzle here and there through thick cloud first thing. dominantly dry through the day—to—day. temperatures about what we‘d expect for the time of year, no great shakes, 2i celsius, 70 fahrenheit. through the evening and overnight, cloudy at first but then the cloud pulls away leaving warm air behind it, so temperatures holding right up tonight. a muggy feel as well. the odd shower tomorrow morning and those showers will continue to attract east through the morning and then you couldn‘t rule out another in the afternoon, but actually a not of dry weather, brighter than today and warmer too, 25 celsius, 77 fahrenheit. brightness returns through week with the odd stray shower breaking through. i‘m back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. you at the usual address. can also find more stories on bbc you can also find more stories on bbc radio london. now though it‘s back to breakfast. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we‘ll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: as boris johnson and jeremy hunt prepare to go head—to—head for the first time, we‘ll be live on set looking ahead to what tonight‘s tv clash might bring. we‘ll be asking whether children today have it harder than previous generations, as a major new study suggests they do. one small step for man, one giant lea p one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. and 50 years after man first walked on the moon,
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audio from the astronauts has been used in a stunning new drama—documentary. we‘ll talk to the director and one its stars, just before 9:00. good morning. here‘s a summary of today‘s main stories from bbc news. president trump has stepped up his attack on the uk‘s ambassador in washington, saying "we will no longer deal with him". in a series of tweets, mr trump also said that theresa may had made a "mess" of brexit, adding he was thankful that the british people would soon have a new prime minister. the remarks follow a leak of emails written by sir kim darroch, describing the trump white house as "inept" and "dysfunctional". downing street has said sir kim has the government‘s full support, despite mr trump‘s comments. the two tory leadership contenders will take part in their only scheduled head—to—head debate this evening. boris johnson and jeremy hunt will appear on itv before a live studio audience in the north west of england. party members are voting on which of the two men should succeed theresa may as prime minister. the winner is due to be announced
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on the 23rd ofjuly. hong kong‘s chief executive carrie lam has declared that a controversial bill, which would have allowed extradition to the chinese mainland, is now "dead". the government had already suspended the bill, which had caused weeks of unrest. some protestors remain unhappy with ms lam‘s statement. they‘re demanding she withdraws the proposed legislation completely. bullying, exam pressure and social media — some of the things having a negative impact on modern day childhoods in the uk, according to action for children. it‘s published a major report this morning that calls for the creation of a national childhood strategy, to better protect young people. the government says it is currently developing a youth charter to give a voice to young people on issues that matter to them. offering the hpv vaccine to boys could result in 29—thousand fewer cancers among men over the next 50 years, according to new research. the jab, which protects against the human papilloma virus, will now be given to 12— and 13—year—old boys from september.
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girls of the same age have already been eligible for the immunisation for a decade. the national farmers union is demanding clearer long—term commitments from the government on how they will support food producers after brexit. the sector received £3.5 billion pounds in eu subsidies last year — and a report by the national audit office found that four in ten farms rely on the grants to remain profitable. defra says funding will remain the same until the end of this parliament. an asian couple who gave birth via ivf claim a california fertility clinic left them pregnant with the wrong children. a lawsuit filed by the couple claims they were shocked to give birth to two boys who were not of asian descent, and it adds that dna tests confirmed the children, who have now been given up, were not related to the couple — or each other. the fertility clinic has not commented on the allegations. instagram has got a new message for trolls.
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in a new feature to combat bullying, the app will ask "are you sure you want to post this?" it‘ll pop up when a user is typing something unpleasant. bosses say tests have shown the message encourages some people to undo their comment, and share something less hurtful. its the old classic. my mother used to say if you don‘t have anything nice to say... don't say it. its different to the modern way doing things. what have i got to say to sally? a great day yesterday, not looking great for the weather but great tennis! i agree, we only have lovely things to say at wimbledon this morning to stop i‘m on court 14. i'm this morning to stop i‘m on court 14. i‘m going to remind you of the moment when someone unexpected lost their head on this very, very caught. the first ever player to be disqualified from wimbledon was disqualified from wimbledon was disqualified on this court. ——
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court. mild—mannered tim henman back in 1995. he hit a ball girl court. mild—mannered tim henman back in 1995. he hita ball girl in court. mild—mannered tim henman back in 1995. he hit a ball girl in the head and was of course modified by the whole thing and apologised. that‘s part of the history of this court. last week, kate middleton, duchess of cambridge, was here, watching the women‘s tennis. yes. a little pa rt of watching the women‘s tennis. yes. a little part of history. we are moving about but as you said, a great day yesterday. the tactic performance from johanna konta. she will actually play again this afternoon so not much rest for her. of course, yesterday, lots of attention was on 15—year—old coco gough as joe attention was on 15—year—old coco gough asjoe lindsley reports. british tennis have waited for decades for a champion. wins like this make you believe. your anaconda goesin this make you believe. your anaconda goes in on the back of a battle. —— johanna konta. she lost a few —— the
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first set against petra kvitova. two near—perfect sets have johanna first set against petra kvitova. two near—perfect sets havejohanna konta bearing down on the semifinals. the same rounder she reached two years ago. today she plays against an unseeded player, barbora strycova. but as the pressure increases, she is keeping things in perspective.” feel tremendously grateful to be here so i am just happy to be here and playing the best players in the world and playing tough matches. there is not much more you can ask for is a professional tennis player. the fairytale is over for coco gough. three matches last week on top of three rounds of qualifying have taken a toll on the 15—year—old. while others were swept away by the teenaged talent, simona halep was digging in. the world number seven is another top seed left at coco gough has won a nation over. you don't really expect this kind of support when you are in another country. not your own country. i really did feel like i was playing in new york somewhere.
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i‘m just happy that someone believes in me. coco gough will go up nearly 200 places in the world rankings. —— coco gauff. in the men‘s it is all about the big three. roger federer, rafa nadal and djokovic, try telling nadal that he is the weaker of the three. the crowd went along with him. that is whatjohanna konta will do when she gets back on centre court. this weekend wimbledon is where it intensified. sojohanna konta is the big british draw today — but we‘re also going to see andy murray back in action. he and serena williams continue their partnership in the mixed doubles — and it seems there‘s disagreement between the two, about what the duo should be called, murray suggested serandy on twitter but
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williams isn‘t so sure. he did a tweet serandy. i like murina. the cricket world cup comes to a conclusion this week. england don‘t face australia in their semi—final until thursday but today, india take on new zealand at old trafford. india are the favourites after they topped the pool stage, losing just once — to england. you can follow the match on 5 live sports extra and the bbc sport website. the lionesses are due here. —— lionesses. momentum is picking up in the women‘s game. some of the games are going to be played at premier league grounds. geraint thomas lost
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a few seconds on stage three. that was won byjuliean alaphilippe, who‘ll be wearing the yellow jersey when they head into the mountains today. and tyson fury has named a provisional date for his rematch against the deontay wilder. he says the two will meet again in las vegas on the 22nd february next year. their original fight in december ended in a controversial draw. one more little thing to note about this court, court 14. this is known in wimbledon turns as the northern quarter. it is the northern end of wimbledon. maybe that‘s why it is a little bit colder! i think that's to do with the cloud, sally. we will see you a little later. its been very nice sunshine for the last few days was not it couldn‘t last for the full two weeks, could it? back to our top story now, and the row over leaked emails from the uk‘s ambassador in washington describing the trump administration as ‘inept‘ and ‘dysfunctional‘ has ramped up.
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in a series of tweets, donald trump stepped up his attack on sir kim darroch, saying the white house would ‘no longer deal with him‘, while downing street said it was standing by sir kim. let‘s talk to the political analyst eric ham in washington now. we would love to know what is going on in the minds of the men in the centre of this. thanks for talking to us. one of the most important things we need to try and clear up is when donald trump says "we", is that the royal "we" or will he individually not deal with sir kim darroch? it is clear when he says "we" he means his entire administration. this means the entire administration so this will, this could be very difficult for both the uk and the us going forward. it interesting to know in terms of the reaction to this. in two weeks‘ time, the uk has another
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prime minister. either borisjohnson orjeremy hunt. the president is essentially throwing the ball into their court are saying right, well, this is obviously a very important relationship, how will you deal with this because we won‘t work with this guy? yes and the president is also saying for potential trade talks when the uk removes itself from the european union and of course we do know president trump will drive a really, really ha rd know president trump will drive a really, really hard bargain and expect the president to play ha rd ball expect the president to play hardball and expect the president to play hard ball and use this expect the president to play hardball and use this as a tool as pa rt hardball and use this as a tool as part of those negotiations. it will be difficult to see how those talks will emerge. is also interesting because essentially sir kim darroch is doing hisjob and briefing the uk government and officials back here on what he observes during his time in washington. it seems strange to come underfire. in washington. it seems strange to come under fire. surely the in washington. it seems strange to come underfire. surely the people that lead to that information other people that should have the finger
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pointed at them rather than the man who is doing hisjob. pointed at them rather than the man who is doing his job. sure and is also important to note that these types of cables are sent on a regular basis and they always include sensitive information. one of the interesting notes about president trump is we know this is a man who does not read his daily presidential briefings, his national security breeze, so he might not even be aware of these types of sensitive documents that go back and forth. —— national security briefs. this could take the president by surprise and make him now aware of something that perhaps he should know, that most countries are actually involved in this type of sensitive information about countries. how do you think either jeremy hunt or borisjohnson should deal with this situation. how will they deal with it in a couple of weeks‘ time? it needs addressing as soon they take the job, isn‘t it?
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that‘s true. it is also important to note that one of the president‘s hallmarc ‘s and particularly internally with his base in the united states... hallmarks because of this is a president known for shaking up norms and institutions and his relationship with not only the uk but other european partners, it has been a very rocky thing since his administration was inaugurated. i suspect this will continue and of course this is going to be a very, very high climb for the next leadership to actually address the deal. its very uncomfortable because essentially a foreign leader can‘t fire another country‘s ambassador, as we were saying, for doing his job and if the uk was to say —— were to say, yes, we will withdraw him and bring him back, this sounds like a capitulation for somebody who has just started a newjob. capitulation for somebody who has just started a new job. absolutely, and there‘s also this issue of the very close relationship and what it
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will mean for the uk when they‘re seeking a bilateral trade agreement with the united states, and we know how thin—skinned president donald trump can be. i expect this will be an issue he will use as a battering ram against the uk when those talks begin. again, this is a very difficult issue and it‘s also important to note that president donald trump still has yet to name a number of high—level ambassadors to countries very sensitive to the united states, so this may be an area where president donald trump simply does not prioritise this role. eric, always good to talk to you. eric ham, thank you for staying up you. eric ham, thank you for staying up late for us again. always interesting to get his assessment of what‘s going on across the water. there‘s quite a view high—level ambassadorial roles yet to be filled in america. fascinating to how that pans out, because it is on the top five jobs as soon as you take over.
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how do you resolve that? who is going to leave —— he was. how do you resolve that? who is going to leave -- he was. yes, if you months. —— a few months. carol is at wimbledon for us this morning with a look at the weather. we saw doom and gloom and clouds, what‘s occurring? we saw doom and gloom and clouds, what's occurring? much cloudier than it was yesterday. in fact, for much of the tournament, the championships. the odd spot of rain but we‘ll come to that in a jiffy. we are alongside court 16. yesterday we talked about the longest match ever played on court 18, this saw the shortest match ever played in 2012. play was stopped after bad light and after warming up the next day, one of the players did a double fault, ending play injust under two minutes. the opposite end of the scale. lo was talking about the weather at wimbledon, today the forecast is much cloudier than it has been —— lou. the odd sunny
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spells but cloudier than yesterday and we can‘t rule out the odd shower —— spell. some light rain this morning, it has stopped and that‘s how we will continue through the day rain especially in the northern half of the country and the brightest skies will be in the south—west. here we will see the highest temperatures. this morning, a wet start across scotland at 9am. the rain on and off for you through the day. for northern ireland, by 9am the first act of rain will have gone through, there will be a bit of a lull but the next batch will be on its way. in northern england, cloudy to start the day —— first batch. misty conditions on the coasts and hills in the west and the brightest quys hills in the west and the brightest guys will be somerset, devon, cornwall and the channel islands.
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through the day, you can see the progress the rain makes in the northern half of the country. we hang onto a lot of cloud. some sunny intervals coming through that cloud and the best of the sunshine in the south—west and english channel. here we will see the highest temperatures. in any decent sunshine, we could hit 23 or 24, but widely once again we are looking at the low teens in the far north of scotla nd the low teens in the far north of scotland to the high teens or low 20s as we progressively move southwards. through this evening and overnight, once again it‘s going to bea overnight, once again it‘s going to be a wet night across scotland, northern ireland, northern england, possibly into north wales as well and a cloudy one as well, but again, the further south you travel, the more likely you are to clear skies with temperatures falling between roughly again 9—i2, i3 with temperatures falling between roughly again 9—i2, 13 or 14 degrees. tomorrow where we‘ve got clear skies, that‘s where we‘ll see the sunshine and tomorrow also we have heavy rain in scotland and northern ireland, some of that will
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be thundery. heavy showers in the east as well, but for the rest of us, variable amounts of cloud and some sunshine and in the sunshine, temperatures could once again get up to 24 and the weather for the rest of the week remains changeable, although settling down a touch at the weekend. thank you very much and we will see you later. looks like it‘s going to be a busy day for the covers! it looks like they have multiple rooves these days! centre court and court i. steph is here to talk about home ownership and in particular the problems with leaseholds. rooves over your head! a particular story about leasehold, so let mejust a particular story about leasehold, so let me just explain this. i‘m sure lots of you know this... when you buy a property, you either buy it with a freehold where the property is completely yours, or with a leasehold, where you own the property, but only for a fixed period of time, normally this will last for decades. the leasehold homes have come up against some criticism because they can often leave homeowners with huge annual costs.
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we spoke tojo darbyshire, who bought one near bolton. we were told at the time we bought it that it was leasehold. we were told that the ground rent was £295, and that the ground rate every ten yea rs. and that the ground rate every ten years. i! and that the ground rate every ten years. 11 months later, the freehold was sold on an offshore investor, and the financial consequences of that for us were dire. i think the first time when i had that kind of penny drop a do i not only the ground the house sits on but i don‘t actually own the house because i didn‘t understand what a leasehold was. i felt physically sick. at no point when we bought the house did the salesperson or the conveyancing solicitor we use, he was recommended by the developer, told us it was common practice to sell freehold ‘s on. it doesn‘t feel like my home. i have a big mortgage on what is a wasting asset. for me
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it has kind of sucked all the joy out of having this beautiful house because it‘s not mine. not one single brick is mine. lots of points raised there. so how did this happen? i‘m joined now by mark hayward. he‘s from the estate agents trade body. lots of questions based on what she said, but how common are leasehold properties? leasehold is quite common in terms of established housing. there are houses many hundreds of years old on leasehold, but the issue is on newbuild houses where there are tens thousands of properties that have been built and sold, and where the owner, or they think they are the owner, assumes they are freehold but actually they are leasehold. the research we did last year showed over 60% of people who bought a new leasehold house, brand—new, used the lawyer and financial adviser the developer recommended. was that independent
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advice? 40% of people who agreed to buy one of these houses didn‘t know it was leasehold until they started talking to a lawyer. that's what jo said there. who owns it when it is a leasehold? the freeholder owns the property. as you just said, you occu py property. as you just said, you occupy it for a specific period and in effect you are renting it. the freeholder then can do with the property, all the land on which it stands, what it wishes. it seems new homes developers are selling the freehold on almost immediately that the lease is commencing, so they‘re taking a profit on that. then there‘s additional issues to do with ground rent. everybody understands ground rent. everybody understands ground rent, but buried in the small print is the fact ground rent is escalating, and in some instances is doubling every five years so once it‘s doubled for five times it becomes quite a sizeable sum. that‘s
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an affordability issue and lenders are seeing that and being discouraged from lending. your finding people like the interviewee who is in effect trapped in that property stop obviously a great concern from her. we've heard the government say they want to ban it on newbuild homes. labour have said they want to see it on all homes that aren‘t leasehold. how do you do it, it's that aren‘t leasehold. how do you do it, it‘s hard to do it retrospectively. it is hard because you have to acquire the freehold. it might remain with a developer in this country or overseas. difficult to buy it back unless you bring legislation in. i know the minister ofjustice is legislation in. i know the minister of justice is looking legislation in. i know the minister ofjustice is looking at this at the moment, but it‘s a huge issue... how do you fund and legally acquire the freehold? what is interesting from what you and jo said is the idea of people not knowing. we‘ve had the
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regulator, the competition markets authority, are looking into whether this could be a potential mis—selling scandal. what are your thoughts on that? the competition and markets authority have teeth and the government wouldn‘t have instructed them to investigate if they weren‘t really concerned. the second issue is how do you stop it? is it second issue is how do you stop it? isita second issue is how do you stop it? is it a mis—selling? from the research we‘ve done, and this was very quantitative and qualitative research, with over 1000 people who had bought a leasehold home over the last ten years, they won‘t made aware. when you buy a house you tend to buy it with your heart. there is a lot of paperwork. when it‘s a new home, the housebuying process is very short, because there‘s no onward to train so you move forward rapidly with it but you need consumer protection from fair trading regulations to be made aware of anything detrimental.
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for people who have a leasehold property watching this, obviously we don‘t want to worry them, what would you say to them? firstly find out the real terms of your lease, go back to the lawyer used and asked for copy of the lease. go through the small print. there‘s a number of action groups out there coming together to see what they can do to remedy the situation but you need to find out more. really good advice. thank you very much. that‘s it from me for now. so many people will be listening with interest, really good advice. if they want to get in touch, they can. still to come this morning, at 8:10am we will talk to the head of the government communications headquarters. gchq. for quite a while they didn‘t even admit they existed and the boss will be here to tell us about anything! if you want to know anything, let us know.
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bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk is the website. i'm sure there are certain things he won‘t answer! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m alison earle. a £20,000 reward is being offered to help solve the murder of a teenager in south london last year. 16—year—old john ogunjobi was stabbed to death in a fight in tulse hill in november. police believe more than one person attacked him and there are likely to be witnesses. a teenager from wapping is about to undergo major surgery after years of bullying because of the way he looks. joshua oyebola is one of only two people in the world with a rare type of facial disfigurement. he will now have operations to realign his face and is hoping to change perceptions. i think it‘s the way people look at me and judge me straight away.
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like, it‘s kind of like, instant. let‘s just say i‘m walking down the road, like, i see people looking at me and i canjust see in theirface the way they‘re, like, judging me. but it kind of like... i don‘t want it to be like that. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on most tube lines this morning. but there are severe delays on the northern line between morden and camden town due to a signal failure at kennington. the gatwick express is suspended between victoria and gatwick airport and there is disruption to southern services between victoria and clapham junction due to the derailment of an engineering train. turning to the roads. on the a4 great west road into town, there is no access to the hammersmith gyratory due to a burst water main. seven sisters road is closed in both directions near manor house tube station due to a police investigation. there are temporary traffic lights and roadworks on denmark hill at the junction with love walk. expect delays.
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eversholt street remains closed in both directions between euston station and grafton place due to water main repairs. now the weather, with sara thornton. hello there. very good morning to you. certainly not a chilly start this morning. plenty of cloud overnight, keeping our temperatures right up in the low to mid—teens. we‘ll keep that cloud through a good of the day today, brightness will be fairly limited. it‘s mostly dry but later we could see a stray shower, and actually a bit of drizzle here and there through thicker first thing this morning as well. dominantly dry through the day—to—day. temperatures about what we‘d expect for the time of year, no great shakes — 21 celsius, 70 fahrenheit. through this evening and overnight, cloudy at first but then the cloud pulls away leaving warm air behind it, so temperatures holding overnight tonight.
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a muggy feel as well. the odd shower tomorrow morning and those showers will continue to attract east through the morning, and then you couldn‘t rule out another in the afternoon, but actually again a lot of dry weather, brighter than today and warmer too — 25 celsius, 77 fahrenheit. brightness returns through week, with the odd stray shower breaking through. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it‘s back to and dan and louise. bye for now.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: president trump says he will no longer deal with the uk‘s ambassador to washington as the diplomatic row ramps up over leaked emails criticising him and his administration. two weeks today one of these two men will be our next new prime minister — tonight they will go head to head, live on tv for the first time. and is it getting harder to have a happy childhood? a major new study says younger people are feeling under more social pressure than ever. we are at the science museum which is looking back at 100 years of jesse x —— gchq. we will look at later in the programme. ocado results. we get the latest
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figures from the online supermarket ocado in the next few minutes. here at wimbledon, another fine performance from johanna konta takes her past a former champion and into the quarter—finals — she‘ll be back on court again this afternoon. we may well see the odd shower at wimbledon today. heavy rain is in the north. a little bit more later. it‘s tuesday 9th july. our top story: president trump has stepped up his attack on the uk‘s ambassador in washington, saying "we will no longer deal with him". in a series of tweets, mr trump also said that theresa may had made a "mess" of brexit, adding he was thankful that the british people would soon have a new prime minister. the remarks follow a leak of emails written by sir kim darroch, describing the trump white house as "inept" and "dysfunctional". downing street says sir kim has the government‘s full support. andy moore reports.
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shortly after president trump criticised mrs may and her ambassador, downing street issued a statement saying sir kim darroch continued to had the full support of the prime minister. the leak was unfortunate, the statement went on, but the special relationship would endure. on his twitter feed, president trump said: "i have been very critical about the way the uk and prime minister theresa may handled brexit. what a mess she and her representatives have created. i told her how it should be done but she decided to go another way. i do not know the ambassador but he is not liked or well thought of within the us. we will no longer deal with him. the good news for the wonderful united kingdom is that they will soon have a new prime minister. while i thoroughly enjoyed the magnificent state visit last month, it was the queen who i was most impressed with." there are reports that the ambassador has already been frozen out from a diplomatic event in washington overnight but it‘s unlikely the uk will bow to american
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pressure and bring him home. i would just say this — that you only bring an ambassador out or expel an ambassador when something very serious has gone wrong between two countries and not two close friends and allies. it would be pretty unprecedented for the idea that the president of the united states should push the man out simply for doing hisjob. the whitehall hunt for the source of the leak has onlyjust begun. the british foreign secretary is reported as saying it‘s a possibility it could be the act of a foreign hostile state. andy moore, bbc news. let‘s get the latest on this now from our political correspondent nick eardley who‘s in westminster. nick, president trump‘s state visit seems a long time ago now, we were talking to eric ham a few moments ago. it will be interesting to see how these changes the special relationship. is a really difficult situation at number ten. we have gotten used to donald trump‘s unique
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forms of diplomacy but even by his standards, this has shocked a lot of people in westminster. as far as theresa may goes and his criticism of her, she is away in two weeks so perhaps that is not the biggest hurdle. there is a question over the ambassador and what happens in that situation. he is due to be in his job untiljanuary. there is a real question over how effectively he can do thatjob until then. downing street has made clear its not changing its mind and it still has full confidence. there are many in government who say they simply won‘t be forced into a situation where they sack somebody because of the president‘s views. at the same time, president trump is clearly furious and as! president trump is clearly furious and as i say, there is that real challenge for so can get direct now about how he does his job now over the next weeks and months. —— sir tim barrow. it‘s going to be difficult forjeremy hunt and borisjohnson to avoid addressing this tonight when they go head to head in their
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first tv debate? -- sir —— sir kim darroch. i suspect they will be asked some detailed questions about what they do when it comes to dealing with president trump. the tv debate tonight is a big moment in this leadership campaign. they will be a lot of scrutiny over the brexit policies, their spending plans, where they wa nt to their spending plans, where they want to splash the cash if they become prime minister. for boris johnson, it is basically a damage limitation exercise. he wants to try and keep his lead in this race to become prime minister. jeremy hunt, he wants to crew —— scrutinise boris johnson‘s policies. he wanted this debate to happen a lot sooner and thinks his rival has a soft spot when it comes to scrutiny so it is perhaps even his last chance to make up perhaps even his last chance to make up some numbers in the race for number ten. worth pointing out, the number ten. worth pointing out, the number of tories that have already voted in this race. we have seen on
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social media dozens of people who have already made their decision. a big chance tonight to hear more from the two men who want to be prime minister and perhaps a chance for jeremy hunt to try and claw back some ground on borisjohnson. jeremy hunt to try and claw back some ground on boris johnson. thank you for that. that debate is on itv later tonight. bullying, exam pressure and social media — some of the things having a negative impact on modern day childhoods in the uk, according to action for children. it‘s published a major report this morning that calls for the creation of a national childhood strategy, to better protect young people. john maguire reports. it was more in the mocks where i felt more stressed and like there was more pressure... what do three generations of the same family think about a modern—day childhood? harvey‘s just finished his gcses but earlier in the year struggled with anxiety. for a teenager these days, pressure comes in many forms. i think with social media and stuff,
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people my age now grow up with, oh, this is what you need to be like, this is how you need to act to fit in, and now it‘s not so much of that happens at school, that happens at a school and then when you get home, it‘s not really something you can escape. when obviously i was 16, it was kind of like, well, you go and do what you do and if it comes off great, if it doesn't, it doesn't. but now there's that much emphasis on the fact that there's only a few jobs and you've gotta be the best of the best in order to get those jobs. right from an early age, the schooling is more full on and life is more full on, and peer pressure is much more full on. they worry so much about what their peers are thinking. whereas i think we were much more, we are what we are. the charity action for children have spoken to thousands of families across the uk and its report speaks of childhood in crisis. 62% of grandparents, 60% of parents
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and 34% of their children said childhoods today are getting worse. bullying was highlighted as the main concern, exacerbated by online and social media issues, and the charity is calling on the government to better protect youngsters by creating a national childhood strategy. in response, the education secretary damian hinds says a youth charter is in development to give young people a voice in the issues they care about — such as combating serious violence and knife crime, addressing mental and physical health challenges and concerns about the environment and climate change. john maguire, bbc news, worcestershire. let us know what you think about that. we will be discussing that a little bit later on bbc breakfast. hong kong‘s chief executive carrie lam has declared that a controversial bill
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which would have allowed extradition to the chinese mainland is now "dead". the bill has caused weeks of unrest but some protestors remain unhappy with ms lam‘s statement. our south east asia correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes is in hong kong. rupert, why are the protestors not welcoming this development? yes, this is in the legalfine print, you could say it is a splitting hairs. at the detail is important in this dispute and what carrie lam, the chief executive of hong kong, has done this morning, she has come out and said in english it is dead. you would think that is it, it is over, what is there to complain about anymore? but actually, what protesters are demanding is immediate withdrawal of this controversial extradition belt which would allow people here to be sent to mainland communist china for trial. they want her to come out and use that word," withdrawal". and actually submit a withdrawal procedure to the legislature. she
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hasn‘t done that. what she said is, look, i‘ve suspended the bill. i‘m not going to bring it back to top in a yearfrom not going to bring it back to top in a year from now on the current session of the legislator ends, this bill willjust die naturally so you don‘t need to worry, the bill is dead. a lot of people don‘t trust her. they don‘t trust her government and they are saying this is not meeting their demands. they will carry on. they will carry on protesting until they get what they wa nt protesting until they get what they want which is the complete and immediate withdrawal of the bill. 0k, immediate withdrawal of the bill. ok, rupert wingfield—hayes, in hong kong, thank you. offering the hpv vaccine to boys could result in 29,000 fewer cancers among men over the next 50 years, according to new research. the jab, which protects against the human papilloma virus, will now be given to 12— and 13—year—old boys from september. girls of the same age have already been eligible for the immunisation for a decade. a slow—moving rain storm has caused flash flooding across parts of washington dc, taking out roads and leaving commuters stranded during the morning rush hour. many of the capital‘s subways were left with dangerous levels of floodwater, which also
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found their way into the basement of the white house. gareth barlow reports. washington, dc underwater. on the metro where trains normally clatter, water cascaded from the ceiling. on the roads, cars stuck, but is delayed, a city submerged as the slow—moving rain storm brought chaos. as officials declared a flash flood emergency, one resident shared this footage on social media. we used to have a creek and a yard, she posted, now just a used to have a creek and a yard, she posted, nowjust a creek, i guess. the floodwater encroached into the very heart of american identity as water entered into the basement of the white house and closed the national archives building. staff said despite the flooding historical documents including the declaration of independence, the constitution and the bill of rights, remain safe.
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with a month‘s worth of rain in just an hour, the floods soon washed away, the cleanup will take much longer. extraordinary pictures there. national farmers union are demanding clearer declarations from the government. it comes after a report from the national audit office saying that they are relying on... acre after acre of crops growing in the country‘s most fertile soils. 10% of this land has also been handed back to nature. an eu subsidy of £100,000 a year. the government says that those green payments will continue when we leave the eu but only if farmers sign up toa the eu but only if farmers sign up to a new environmental scheme. the eu but only if farmers sign up to a new environmental schemem could be a shakeup of the industry. i think it could be more and more
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consolidation which is less attention to detail and attention to the wildlife and the environment which we are so passionate about. and farms and farmers disappearing? inevitably, inevitably. in total, farmers in the uk received a £3.5 billion in 2018. after we leave the eu, the government will switch to the environmental land management scheme. it places a much later emphasis on the environment. the aim is to sign up 82,000 farms by 2028. the government spending watchdog has wa nt the government spending watchdog has want some may turn that back on the industry was not farmers could go out of business as a result. at this stage, it is perhaps inevitable because at the moment we don‘t know the details of the elms scheme. we don‘t know how much they will pay. the government says the agriculture
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bill is the greatest opportunity to reset the agricultural sector for a new generation of farmers and land managers. breaking away from the eu's managers. breaking away from the eu‘s common agricultural policy. but replacing that funding could change the face of the industry. spencer stokes, bbc news. talking about award—winning tv, you know stranger make things. quite well. -- stranger things. 18.2 million people have already watched the entire series. about 40 million have already started streaming it. it is one of their most popular things. i'm saving it. i haven‘t watched it yet. have you watched series one and two? yeah, yeah. if you‘ve watched the series chernobyl about the nuclear power plant disaster in ukraine you‘ll know that, as well as the huge human cost, hundreds of pet dogs in the area were culled by the soviet military. some of them managed
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to evade their hunters — and now their descendants are being offered medical care. volunteers are humanely trapping strays within the exclusion zone before washing, vaccinating and sterilising them. most are released back into the wild but some of the younger pups are being taken in as pets. it‘s a live interview for the biggestjob in the country, as borisjohnson and jeremy hunt go head—to—head for the first time in front of a tv audience. the conservative leadership rivals will face each other in salford tonight, and nina warhurst can give us a look behind the scenes. good morning, nina. let‘s discuss the leadership race more now, with david cameron‘s former head of strategy laura trott. give us your assessments going into this. is there one clear leader? yes, absolutely, and jeremy hunt has acknowledged as such. this has a lwa ys acknowledged as such. this has always been borisjohnson‘s race to lose and through the contest he‘s been very cognizant of that, he‘s played it very very safe and it continues to be the case, which makes sense for a frontrunner. this
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is their first head—to—head debate, if something went wrong that would change things but otherwise it wouldn‘t? change things but otherwise it wouldn't? balance for the leadership race have gone out to the 160,000 conservative party members, so people have already returned them in large numbers according to sources —— ballots. if there was a bad event, we have intel that some conservative party members are waiting to hand in their ballots. it has the opportunity to change things but i‘m sceptical. has the opportunity to change things but i'm sceptical. what about the tone of the debate, will it be fiery? you would expect some fireworks. andrew neill is a brilliant interviewer and always makes things interesting for the viewers. a we have to hearfrom both candidates, they‘ve done a lot of hustings but we want to hear more on their brexit plan, domestic policies, the shape of the cabinet and the negotiation strategy. there‘s a lot the public need to know and therefore it will be
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illuminating for those watching. strange conundrum, you say the public need to know but they have no vote. it's a very odd system. in a weird way, it is more public than ever before. this used to be decided bya group ever before. this used to be decided by a group of conservative mps in a smoke—filled room. now it‘s more open, it is open to conservative party members, the approximately 160,000 but you‘re right, the next chance the british public will have two vote on the conservative party nominee will be at the general election. whoever wins it, and you have been clear who you think well, do they have a mandate to lead the country if they‘ve not been voted for? presumably they do? as a mandate coming out of the 2016 general election —— 2017. the biggest question is whether they can command a mandate within the parliamentary party. there‘s a lot of talk about whether conservative
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mps would support labour in a vote of confidence if either boris or jeremy try to push a no deal, so the immediate problem will be trying to get things through parliament, let alone the country. let's talk about what they might deal with tonight and the diplomatic row about what the british ambassador has said about donald trump, will they deal with that tonight and how damaging is it? it's incredibly damaging and an incredibly unfortunately. the way government works, these things need to be private and confidential to give unvarnished advice prime ministers and governments desperately need. it‘s a big problem. kim darroch is very respected in washington and its a big headache for the government. he‘s meant to be changed in washington anyway, so the likelihood is he will hang on and the new prime minister will make their appointment when the time comes. laura trott, thank you for your time this morning. thank you. good morning if you havejust
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switched on. carol is at wimbledon for us this morning with a look at the weather. if you‘ve been watching, last week and the start of this week, the weather has been glorious. a bit murky but you‘re indoors again. weather has been glorious. a bit murky but you're indoors again. good morning. you‘re right, it‘s fairly cloudy and it‘s been damned as well. overlooking centre court here, the royal box is covered and the court is still covered and centre court was designed by captain stanley peach. it was opened in 1922 as the brand—new show court for the grounds and the first man to play on centre court wearing shorts was in 1933 when britain‘s bunny austin played in front of his majesty the queen. the first ever colour television transmission to lace from here in 1967 when bbc two showed 4.5 hours of tennis. centre caught it is actually much bigger than court number one. its seating capacity is
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14,979. that is more than two and a half thousand seats than on court number one. as dan rightly said, fairly cloudy and it‘s been trying to rain here this morning. the forecast today is a largely dry one. cloudier than yesterday. a bit of sunshine through the afternoon but equally, we could also see the odd shower. temperatures today getting up shower. temperatures today getting up to about 22 degrees with light breezes. the forecast for the uk as a whole, again, cloudierthan yesterday with rain in the north and the best of any sunshine will be in the best of any sunshine will be in the south—west and also the channel islands. this morning you can see where we do have the rain across scotland, it‘s been raining through the night and the rain moving from west to east and in northern ireland, the first batch has gone through but the second is coming in, more showery, and the rain moving from west to east across northern england. for the rest of england and wales,
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fairly cloudy. a few showers around this morning but brighter skies will be across devon, cornwall, somerset and also the channel islands. so, through the course of the day, you can see the progress the rain makes. on and off through the northern half of the country. the cloud will be with us. here and there we will see brea ks with us. here and there we will see breaks but the south—west and the channel islands will see the most sunshine and indecent sunshine, we could get up to 24 today but for most, we are looking at the low 20s. pollen levels today will be moderate to high in any sunshine that you do see. through the course of this evening and overnight, we hang on to the rain in the country. once again for the southern half, remaining fairly cloudy. clear skies across parts of the south and our temperature range tonight, well, once again we are looking at similar to the previous nights, 9—12, 13 or 14 depending on where you are.
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tomorrow in scotland and northern ireland, we‘re looking at more rain and some of that will be heavy and potentially thundery too. across eastern areas, there will be some showers and some of those will be heavy and there will be quite a bit of around as well but southern counties hanging onto a bit more sunshine. once again, in the sunshine. once again, in the sunshine we could reach 24 degrees in the south, but progressively as we go north, it will be that it fresher. the outlook, lou and dan, it remains fairly changeable and another good word for it is messy! messy, messy, goodness me! thanks, carol! looking at the papers, joe konta is on the front of many papers and coco gauff as well stop in the front page of the mail, dementia, families spend nearly million in the two yea rs spend nearly million in the two years they have waited for ministers to sort social care. that's from the
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alzheimer‘s society. the daily mirror has a picture of antman butlin at wimbledon and the main story is food fraud exposed, saying one in five products aren‘t what they say they are on the packet. shoppers ripped off with meat from cheaper cuts of other animals not listed on the label. i'm trying to find some of the other ones you‘ve got. a bit of an upsetting story here, a warning, a toddler on a cruise ship and her grandfather was playing a game and unfortunately he dropped her. it happened in the puerto rican capital of sanjuan, she was 19 months and she fell from the 11th floor of the ship and plunged to her death after her grandfather was playing a game. truly awful. it made you cast this
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morning when i showed you that. that‘s in quite a lot of the papers this morning, as you understand —— cast. konta‘s the challenge at wimbledon. and also the british ambassador story. and a cockatoo. this is snowball, the cockatoo, who has developed 15 different moves for different songs, saying dancing was an ancient urge, say scientists, linked to socialisation. there‘s videos online of cockatoos headbanging. there will be videos of him later! we were talking about conservative leadership rivals, they will face each other tonight in a head—to—head debate and we were promised a look the studio. very space age! of us a look around! good morning and welcome to the itv studio, all set for tonight, —— give us. what better
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environment for a good old robust little debate! have a look around the camera here. this is where 200 members of the itv audience will be sat ready and poised with their tough questions for the two leadership candidates, and this is the podium where juliet leadership candidates, and this is the podium wherejuliet ingham, the presenter, will be stood and over there we will have our next prime minister. we don‘t know which candidate is going where, but we knowjeremy hunt won the task and opted to go second. i think i would wa nt to opted to go second. i think i would want to go first. the floor will be open to questions and they have 30 seconds to wrap up. itv are being very tightlipped about the questions because they don‘t want the candidates to know. i think there‘s been lots of debate about how fiscally responsible the plans have been. jeremy hunt pledging more investment in social care, wanting to also cut corporate tax. boris johnson wants to have a higher
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threshold to £80,000 for the higher rate of tax and also police cuts. i would be amazed if brexit didn‘t come up. both candidates at the moment saying they would read relu cta ntly leave moment saying they would read reluctantly leave at the end of october with or without a deal —— relu cta ntly. october with or without a deal —— reluctantly. loads of questions about thisjob. julie reluctantly. loads of questions about this job. julie etchingham will be hosting the debate and making sure it is done fairly. boris johnson is ahead at the bookies and in every poll. does it really matter? we haven‘t had a leadership bait like this where things are so public, with a very robust debate like this. lots of candidates from the north—west lots of grassroots activists and members of the conservative party, they say they are yet to make their mind up. almost two weeks to go for members of the conservative party to cast their vote. 12 days is a very long
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time in politics and everything to play for tonight. it is indeed. nina, a very impressive studio, but does it feel intimidating?m nina, a very impressive studio, but does it feel intimidating? it does, especially because it is dark at the moment and these lights, like dan said, very futuristic, aren‘t they? a lot of it will be how they handle that. neither of the candidates performed particularly well in the last tv debate on the bbc, and there will be a 1—to—1 with andrew neil next week so a lot to before the deadline forecasting a vote, a week on monday, and the following day we get our prime minister. back to you. it isa get our prime minister. back to you. it is a big job, that one, tonight! when the tory leader debate was on, there was almost as much written about emily maitlis than what was said. it looks like tron in that studio! it looks excellent! time now to get the news, travel and weather where
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you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m alison earle. a £20,000 reward is being offered to help solve the murder of a teenager in south london last year. 16—year—old john ogunjobi was stabbed to death in a fight in tulse hill in november. police believe more than one person attacked him and there are likely to be witnesses. a teenager from wapping is about to undergo major surgery after years of bullying because of the way he looks. joshua oyebola is one of only two people in the world with a rare type of facial disfigurement. he will now have operations to realign his face and is hoping to change perceptions. i think it‘s the way people look at me and judge me straight away. like, it‘s kind of like, instant. let‘s just say i‘m walking down the road, like, i see people looking at me and i canjust see in theirface the way they‘re, like, judging me. but it kind of like...
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i don‘t want it to be like that. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on most tube lines this morning, but the northern line is part suspended. there‘s no service between camden town and kennington due to signalfailure. the gatwick express is suspended between victoria and gatwick airport and there is disruption to southern services between victoria and clapham junction due to the derailment of an engineering train. turning to the roads. on the a4 great west road into town, there is no access to the hammersmith gyratory due to a burst water main. seven sisters road is closed in both directions near manor house tube station due to a police investigation. there are temporary traffic lights and roadworks on denmark hill at the junction with love walk. expect delays. eversholt street remains closed in both directions between euston station and grafton place due to water main repairs.
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hello there. very good morning to you. certainly not a chilly start this morning. plenty of cloud overnight, keeping our temperatures right up in the low to mid—teens. we‘ll keep that cloud through a good of the day today, brightness will be fairly limited. it‘s mostly dry but later we could see a stray shower, and actually a bit of drizzle here and there through thicker cloud first thing this morning as well. dominantly dry through the day—to—day. dominantly dry through the day today. temperatures about what we‘d expect for the time of year, no great shakes — 21 celsius, 70 in fahrenheit. through this evening and overnight, cloudy at first but then the cloud pulls away leaving some pretty warm air behind it mind you, so temperatures holding overnight tonight. a muggy feel as well. the odd shower tomorrow morning and those showers will continue to attract east through the morning, and then you couldn‘t rule out another in the afternoon,
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but actually again a lot of dry weather, brighter than today and warmer too — 25 celsius, 77 fahrenheit. brightness returns through week, with the odd stray shower breaking through. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. president trump has stepped up his attack on the uk‘s ambassador in washington, saying "we will no longer deal with him". in a series of tweets, mr trump also said that theresa may had made a "mess" of brexit, adding he was thankful that the british people would soon have a new prime minister. the remarks follow a leak of emails written by sir kim darroch, describing the trump white house as "inept" and "dysfunctional". downing street has said sir kim has the government‘s full support, despite mr trump‘s comments.
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the two tory leadership contenders will take part in their only scheduled head—to—head debate this evening. boris johnson and jeremy hunt will appear on itv before a live studio audience in the north west of england. party members are voting on which of the two men should succeed theresa may as prime minister. the winner is due to be announced on the 23rd ofjuly. hong kong‘s chief executive carrie lam has declared that a controversial bill, which would have allowed extradition to the chinese mainland, is now "dead". the government had already suspended the bill, which had caused weeks of unrest. some protestors remain unhappy with ms lam‘s statement. they‘re demanding she withdraws the proposed legislation completely. bullying, exam pressure and social media — some of the things having a negative impact on modern day childhoods in the uk, according to action for children. it‘s published a major report this morning that calls for the creation of a national childhood strategy, to better protect young people. the government says it is currently developing a youth charter to give a voice to young people on issues that matter to them.
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new drugs have been approved for use by the nhs in england which can treat a debilitating disease which was once thought untreatable. the new form of medicine, called "gene—silencing", will be used to reverse amyloidosis, a disease which causes nerve and organ damage, and can be fatal. an asian couple who gave birth via ivf claim a california fertility clinic left them pregnant with the wrong children. a lawsuit filed by the couple claims they were shocked to give birth to two boys who were not of asian descent, and it adds that dna tests confirmed the children, who have now been given up, were not related to the couple — or each other. the fertility clinic has not commented on the allegations. and, birdsjust wanna have fun — at least one headbanging cockatoo does.
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as promised by louise. snowball became an internet sensation a decade ago, wowing scientists with his head bopping and toe tapping. at the time researchers thought he was just moving to the beat but after going back to study the footage, they‘ve realised he actually has 14 distinct moves! scientists said it proves birds are capable of responding creatively to music. look at him. what an incredible animal. that is my favourite, that the one. i‘ve got a mate that exclusively dances like that. just headbanging to the music. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather from wimbledon. it looks like the covers might be on today. it is not looking good. sally is at wimbledon for us this morning after another day of drama. johanna konta is on the front of the papers. but we have been talking about her struggles on court recently but now she is looking like
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she is going to have a really successful wimbledon. what happened ? opinion is split. some people will say she has had a brilliant year but actually, watching her, at times she really has struggled and at times she has sometimes struggled with the pressure of the game and then that affect on how she plays. she has a new coach. i think mentally she is ina new coach. i think mentally she is in a better place. we were chatting to her here at the weekend and she was incredibly relaxed, happy and cracking jokes which i think going into wimbledon, that‘s a really interesting mental position to be in. she had a great day yesterday. she is to play again later today in the quarter—finals so yeah, we are expecting, we always put too much pressure on them, the british players, but we are expecting more from johanna konta coming through this tournament and yesterday was
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all about coco gauff. the 15—year—old sensation who was really lit up this tournament. british tennis has waited four decades for a champion in the women‘s game. wins like this at wimbledon make you believe. johanna konta goes in to the last date off the back of a battle. she‘d lost the first set against petra kvitova, a two—time champion. but that setback brought a fightback. commentator: she made it. two near—perfect sets have konta bearing down on the semis. the same rounder she reached two years ago. today she plays against an unseeded player, barbora strycova. but as the pressure increases, she‘s keeping things in perspective. i feel tremendously grateful to be here so i‘m just happy to still be in the event, to be playing the best players in the world and coming through in tough matches against them. there‘s not much more you could ask for as a professional tennis player. the fairytale is over though for coco gauff. three matches last week on top of three rounds of qualifying have taken toll on the 15—year—old.
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while others were swept away by teenaged talent, simona halep was digging in. the world number seven is now the top seed left but gauff has won a nation over. you don‘t really expect this kind of support when you are in another country, not your home country, but i really did feel like i was probably playing in new york somewhere. i‘m just so happy that people believe in me. gough will go up nearly 200 places in the world rankings — a playerfor the next generation. —— gauff. the current one in the men‘s game is all about the big three. yesterday nadal, federer, and djokovic all went through with barely a blemish. the seedings say nadal is the weakest of the three. try telling him that. a shot that brought the crowd along with him. just what konta will try and do when she gets back on centre. this second week at wimbledon is where it intensified. joe lynskey, bbc news.
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so coco gauff‘s run is over but what an impression she made — let‘s talk to her coach patrick mouratoglou. he has coached cocoa and of course serena williams. i want to start with coco. she is 15. she has been the sensation of this tournament out of course beaten yesterday, are much too far, simona halep was too much ofa too far, simona halep was too much of a challenge. in your experience, what was she like to coach? she was at your academy, i believe.” what was she like to coach? she was at your academy, i believe. i met her when she was tense up she came to my academy france to have a chance to be in the programme and i discovered someone who was difference. i am looking for talent and there is an incredible physical ability. she really had it in here. we had a one—on—one discussion. the
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difference between a good player and a champion is the mindset. they think different, they process different. i have been lucky enough to work with top champions and i know how different they can be in their personalities and that is how you wind grand slams and definitely saw someone, met someone who was ten, already incredibly focused. a lot of self belief. she really believed she could make it to the top of the game which is rare at that age. i amjust top of the game which is rare at that age. i am just going to share with everyone at home something they may not know about you. this interview that you do at your academy is really famous because you are mean, aren‘t you? the interview where you get to a point and, shall i tell everyone? lots of the players cry. it happens sometimes. i am not trying to be mean at all. but coco didn‘t! trying to be mean at all. but coco didn't! she didn't cry. they always say the same, they want to be number one in the world. it is not enough
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for me. i need to know what is behind, i need to know how much they believe in it, i need to know if they have a plan, have an idea. i am not a mean. i am just going further and sometimes it is too much was not yeah, you are tough! talking of tough, joe contra looks like she is tougher than ever. —— joe joe tough, joe contra looks like she is tougher than ever. ——joejoe konta. element i think she is happier at the moment. she is enjoying what she is doing to stop —— i think she is happier. i like her commitment and her intensity. she has something in her. she is intense, she is doing everything 100% that i think she has a great attitude and i really like how she behaves. everything is open now. i think she will win a grand slam one day. i think she can, definitely. are you sensing a change in the moment? we have had the williams sisters in the game for a
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long, long time. we coco gauff, we are seeing a new generation coming through. tennis used to be a predominantly white persons sport and now the look of the game is finally changing and there is more diversity, not just finally changing and there is more diversity, notjust on the court but off the court as well. you are totally right was up someone has to lead the way and the father of venus and serena, richard williams, was the first black father that showed ina the first black father that showed in a white world they could be like women performing and at the highest level. it made a lot of parents believe they could help their kids achieve. something great in tennis. after that, a lot of coloured people started to play tennis and i think it is exciting now because there is
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much more diversity. very quickly, how can serena do in the tournament? i think she can go all the way was up i think she can go all the way was upi i think she can go all the way was up i hope so. she always thinks she can, ithink up i hope so. she always thinks she can, i think she can but now she is pain—free. she had a lot of physical issues this year. she is pain—free, happy to play. her level is getting better and better, match so of course we believe. thank you very much indeed for talking to us this morning for them and you are not mean, really, are you? i am not at all, i think. mean, really, are you? i am not at all, ithink. s mean, really, are you? i am not at all, i think. s i am struck by this sally,. can we have this as your studio forever? but patrick is very cold. what you didn‘t see is he was jumping up and down to get one before you came to us. thank you very much to you bullying, exam pressure and social media — some of the things having a negative impact on modern day childhoods in the uk, according to action for children. it‘s published a major report this morning that calls for the creation of a national childhood strategy, to better protect young people. their research found that sixty
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percent of parents and grandparents think children today have it harder than previous generations. it was more in the mocks where i felt more stressed —— i think with social media and stuff, people my age now grow up with, oh, this is what you need to be like, this is how you need to act to fit in, and now it‘s not so much of that happens at school, that happens at a school and then when you get home, it‘s not really something you can escape. when obviously i was 16, it was kind of like, well, you go and do what you do and if it comes off great, if it doesn't, it doesn't. but now there's that much emphasis on the fact that there's only a few jobs and you've gotta be the best of the best in order to get those jobs. right from an early age, the schooling is more full on and life is more full on, and peer pressure is much more full on. they worry so much about what their peers are thinking. whereas i think we were much more, we are what we are.
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let‘s get more on this now. we‘re joined by carol iddon from action for children. thank you for coming in this morning. we have asked our viewers to get in touch as well about this. is the case that every generation feels that it is not quite as it was when they were kids? is that part of this research or is this something different? no, i think its this research or is this something different? no, ithink its something different. we were quite interested injust asking the different. we were quite interested in just asking the three generations what they thought about it today. we we re what they thought about it today. we were quite surprised at the level of all generations feeling that actually depresses that young people are under today are very, very different to the pressures they felt when they were children. both pa rents when they were children. both parents and grandparents. things have improved for children in lots of ways but there are very different pressures today and children are much more exposed to things that you could refer to as being adult
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issues. i was just could refer to as being adult issues. i wasjust looking at this. 91% of children say they are worried about adult issues such as exit, poverty, homelessness, the environment, inequality and terrorism. these are big worries to have. absolutely. why is that, do you think? they are social natives. much more exposed to social media and they hear things and they read things. that makes them much more anxious about what their life might be like as adults, coupled with the pressure that they have of exams and doing well in school and looking right. the perfect life which is often pretrade on social media. i think all of those things add additional pressure to young people that perhaps previous generations weren‘t exposed to. in terms of this programme to try and change things, is that the best way to make a difference? we've seen unprecedented reductions in services to children to help them when they need it. we think the government
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needs to wake up and start to think about the impact that brexit and the fa ct about the impact that brexit and the fact that children have been neglected to a certain extent in policy issues for the last couple of yea rs. policy issues for the last couple of years. the focus has been almost entirely on brexit. unless we start to focus on how across government, not just a to focus on how across government, notjust a single department, across government, we actually support children and have a strategy that makes a childhood central, we‘re not going to make the changes we need to make. education secretary damian hinds said they will have a youth charter to give young people a voice, can that help? it's a step in the right direction but youth is only part of childhood. childhood starts at a young age, actually pre— birth, so it needs to be more than just young actually pre— birth, so it needs to be more thanjust young people stop they are important, critically important, but unless we start with young people and allow them to develop themselves, we are just
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building up problems for later on. interesting to see what viewers think a national childhood strategy, may of their own children or they are of the generation that... we know it is chilly in wimbledon. carol is at wimbledon for us this morning with a look at the weather. good morning stop your not wrong, a bit nippy and also very cloudy across wimbledon. we are still in centre court. the seating capacity is 14,979. it is normally pretty packed, but not everyone can stay all day, all evening for that matter, and you‘re encouraged to hand back your ticket so it can be resold and you can buy these tickets if you‘re already in the grounds. this has been going on for 65 years,
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this ticket resale scheme, and it‘s raised more than £3.2 million for local causes and charities. more than 270,000 tickets have been resold since it was founded way back in 1954. you can see the amount of cloud cover that we do have. it‘s been trying to rain this morning, but tha nkfully trying to rain this morning, but thankfully it‘s now stop and for wimbledon today, there‘s still the chance of a shower. there will be more cloud around today than yesterday —— stop. may be a bit of sunshine but the emphasis will be on cloud rather than sunshine with highs up to 22. for the uk as a whole today, the forecast is generally cloudy with rain moving across the north of the country. across northern england, northern ireland and scotland, with a few shower ahead of it. the south—west is likely to see the sunshine for the longest period today, across somerset, devon, cornwall, the isles of scilly and also the channel islands, and here‘s where we‘ll have
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the highest temperature. so as we look at the forecast at 9am, you can see where we‘ve got the rain across scotland, northern ireland and northern england. two bands moving from the west to the east. in between, drier and brighter interludes. when i say brighter, there‘s still a lot of cloud around and you‘re not likely to sunshine if at all in the northern half of the country. further south, a cloudier scenario with still the risk of a fuchsia and the sunshine hanging on in devon, cornwall, somerset, the isles of scilly and the channel islands and we could hit temperatures of 23 or 24. progressively as we go north, feeling fresher. through this evening and overnight, once again it is scotland, northern england, northern ireland, possibly north wales hanging onto the rain. the rest of england and wales fairly cloudy with clear spells in the south with overnight low of between nine and 13 and 14 degrees. the
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charts are romping on without me! tomorrow, scotland and northern ireland will see a lot of rain. heavy, potentially thundering with eastern areas seeing some showers and some of them could be heavy. for the rest of the uk, there will be areas of cloud but in the south it‘s looking drier and brighter and tomorrow once again we could have temperatures up to about 24, but again progressively cooler the further north you travel. worth mentioning if you do see any sunshine, pollen levels in the next couple of days will be either moderate or high. thanks very much. you are wearing roses, i think i am wearing peonies. obviously a flower day. certainly is! very nice and floral. steph‘s looking at online grocery shopping. i meant that... people are laughing in my ears. i don't know who's laughing! people in our ears!
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in the last hour we‘ve had the latest results from ocado. yes, and also with the floral themed shirt. i didn't want to say anything. i don't know what kind of flowers they are. very nice, steph. thanks! act to a bit of serious news! —— back to. almost 20% of all our shopping is done online, but if you look at food it‘s only 6%. ocado‘s the only uk supermarket that doesn‘t have any stores. they are hoping to get more people to buy online. it was founded nearly 20 years ago and it‘s fair to say it‘s had it‘s ups and downs. recently ocado announced a tie—up with m&s, which will means the store‘s food will have a online delivery service. lots of anticipation about that. in february, its factory in andover burned down. so those are the ups and downs. this morning it has announced earnings are down 46%.
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we can talk now to miya knights, a retail expert. it seems to be the factory fire has hit them hard with these figures? absolutely. things were going well and they announced the deal to deliver m&s food starting september, 2020. they‘ve signed a number of overseas deals with kro and see no group to build their technology filled warehouses to help them deliver online grocery —— kroger. the fire in andover earlier this year has dented their profitability. looking at the m&s deal, it meant their deal with waitrose went out of their deal with waitrose went out of the window and they would do the food delivery for m&s. what difference do you think this will make? two ocado, it will give them a partner who is really dedicated to breaking the online food market —— to. waitrose already has its own online food delivery, so by working
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with ocado it was competing with itself. m&s doesn‘t have any online food delivering capability at the moment. given its popularity in the food sector of its food, a lot of people are waiting with anticipation to see what the partnership brings next year. it is still small fry compared to the likes of tesco and the other big supermarkets and their online offerings. is there still space for m&s to come into this market? i think definitely. space for m&s to come into this market? ithink definitely. m&s definitely tries to approach the market with a slightly different proposition, slightly different... higher quality... it is posher, isn‘t it, in terms of you pay more for it. exactly, getting those special occasion meals delivered. i expect they will make a killing next christmas, for example. overall, the online sector, there‘s various stories out this morning talking
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about how in the next decade half of our shopping will be done online. what are your thoughts? that is definitely the direction of travel and that‘s where it will top out over the next ten to 15 years. increasingly we want to search for bargains and compare multiple retailers at the same time rather than going shop to shop down the high street, so the convenience of online is winning in that sense. high street, so the convenience of online is winning in that sensem feels like old school talking about this. ocado has been going for 20 years and we‘re still talking about it like it‘s the next thing, but it isn‘t. like it‘s the next thing, but it isn't. not for consumers, but for retailers operationally it‘s taken a huge amount of investment and development around technology in order to meet the demands we are setting them. and all the logistics as well. miya, thank you for coming in. that‘s it from me for now. gchq was once a top—secret organisation, with the government denying its existance for the best part of 60 years. but its intelligence spans a century, from second world war
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code—breaking to combatting modern—day cyber crime. this year it celebrates its 100th birthday, but, farfrom being kept under wraps, a new exhibition is bringing previously unseen artefacts into the public eye. brea kfast‘s graham satchell is with some of them this morning. good morning! morning, louise. what you‘re looking at look like gobbledygook, but if we pan up a little bit you can see that it says from ciphers to cyber security, and that‘s the name of the exhibition here at the science museum which looks back at 100 years of gchq and it starts from the crimean war, if you write one word it means another and q from the bond films would be flapping his arms with geeky enthusiasm with all the kit that goes from the mechanical to the electronic. the devices that made the code in the field. then in the 19605, the code in the field. then in the 1960s, an actual big red phone used
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by harold macmillan when he was talking to jfk in by harold macmillan when he was talking tojfk in the world was holding its breath during the cuban crisis. we can talk to one of the curators. where are we? rice lip in 1961, looked like an ordinary canadian couple but were americans acting as soviet spies and sending british naval secrets —— rice lip. sneaky bits of kit, what are these? lenses used to read microdots, they shrink down lots of information and make it very small. we are going to try to hop very weakly through time from the 19605 to the second world war because a large part of this exhibition is bletchley park. we all know a bit about the enigma machine, but what is this? this is a lorenz machine. enigma was used in the field to send everyday communications, this was much more sacred and complicated. 12 rotors
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equals three or four. much more secret messages for hitler's high command. thank you very much. a lot of the exhibition is... it looks at the challenges gchq faces today. balancing the surveillance of ordinary individuals like what we are doing on our phones. it did go to court, the european, in september last year and was found guilty of violating privacy. balancing that with the need to keep everyone safe and secure against the terrorism threats, cyber threats and things like that. that‘s it from us from the science museum. this exhibition opens on thursday. we will talk to the boss of gchq in ten minutes and also we have a programme about the moon landings, someone has listened to hundreds of hours of audio from michael collins, buzz aldrin and neil armstrong. it's excellent! they
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we re neil armstrong. it's excellent! they were fa ntastically neil armstrong. it's excellent! they were fantastically normal, just like us! we will be live in the studio where the tory leadership candidates will go head to head this evening. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m alison earle. a £20,000 reward is being offered to help solve the murder of a teenager in south london last year. 16—year—old john ogunjobi was stabbed to death in a fight in tulse hill in november. police believe more than one person attacked him and there are likely to be witnesses. a teenager from wapping is about to undergo major surgery after years of bullying because of the way he looks. joshua oyebola is one of only two people in the world with a rare type of facial disfigurement. he will now have operations to realign his face and is hoping to change perceptions. i think it‘s the way people look at me and judge me straight away.
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like, it‘s kind of like, instant. let‘s just say i‘m walking down the road, like, i see people looking at me and i canjust see in theirface the way they‘re kind of likejudging me. but it kind of like... i don‘t want it to be like that. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on most tube lines this morning, but the northern line is part suspended. there‘s no service between camden town and kennington due to signalfailure. the gatwick express is suspended between victoria and gatwick airport and there is disruption to southern services between victoria and clapham junction due to the derailment of an engineering train. turning to the roads. on the a4 great west road into town, there is no access to the hammersmith gyratory due to a burst water main. seven sisters road is closed in both directions near manor house tube station due to a police investigation. there are temporary traffic lights
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and roadworks on denmark hill at the junction with love walk. expect delays. eversholt street remains closed in both directions between euston station and grafton place due to water main repairs. now the weather, with sara thornton. hello there. very good morning to you. certainly not a chilly start this morning. plenty of cloud overnight, keeping our temperatures right up in the low to mid—teens. we‘ll keep that cloud through a good of the day today, brightness will be fairly limited. it‘s mostly dry but later we could see a stray shower, and actually a bit of drizzle here and there through thicker cloud first thing this morning as well. dominantly dry through the day today. temperatures about what we‘d expect for the time of year, no great shakes — 21 celsius, 70 in fahrenheit. through this evening and overnight, cloudy at first but then the cloud pulls away leaving some pretty warm air behind it mind you, so temperatures holding overnight tonight. a muggy feel as well. the odd shower tomorrow morning and those showers will continue
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to attract east through the morning, and then you couldn‘t rule out another in the afternoon, but actually again a lot of dry weather, brighter than today and warmer too — 25 celsius, 77 fahrenheit. brightness returns through week, with the odd stray shower breaking through. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: president trump says he will no longer deal with the uk‘s ambassador to washington as the diplomatic row ramps up over leaked emails criticising him and his administration. two weeks today one of these two men will be our next new prime minister — tonight they will go head to head, live on tv for the first time.
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and is it getting harder to have a happy childhood? a major new study says younger people are feeling under more social pressure than ever. ocado setback: after a factory fire in february — the online supermarket has said its earnings have been hit. but it‘s optimistic its tie up with marks and spencer will be a money making dealfor them. jo konta is on a roll. a great day for her yesterday, and she plays again later this afternoon in the wimbledon quarterfinals. and it looks like it could be dry, it will be claudia at wimbledon today with the risk of a shower. lots of clouds around today, the best of the sunshine in the south—west, wet in the north. we will be back with more later. it‘s tuesday 9th july. our top story: president trump has stepped up his attack on the uk‘s ambassador in washington, saying, "we will no longer deal with him." in a series of tweets, mr trump also said that theresa may
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had made a "mess" of brexit, adding he was thankful that the british people would soon have a new prime minister. the remarks follow a leak of emails written by sir kim darroch, describing the trump white house as "inept" and "dysfunctional." downing street says sir kim has the government‘s full support. andy moore reports. shortly after president trump criticised mrs may and her ambassador, downing street issued a statement saying sir kim darroch continued to had the full support of the prime minister. the leak was unfortunate, the statement went on, but the special relationship would endure. on his twitter feed, president trump said: "i have been very critical about the way the uk and prime minister theresa may handled brexit. what a mess she and her representatives have created. i told her how it should be done but she decided to go another way. i do not know the ambassador but he is not liked or well thought of within the us. we will no longer deal with him.
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the good news for the wonderful united kingdom is that they will soon have a new prime minister. while i thoroughly enjoyed the magnificent state visit last month, it was the queen who i was most impressed with." there are reports that the ambassador has already been frozen out from a diplomatic event in washington overnight but it‘s unlikely the uk will bow to american pressure and bring him home. i would just say this — that you only bring an ambassador out or expel an ambassador when something very serious has gone wrong between two countries and not two close friends and allies. it would be pretty unprecedented for the idea that the president of the united states should push the man out simply for doing hisjob. the whitehall hunt for the source of the leak has onlyjust begun. the british foreign secretary is reported as saying it‘s a possibility it could be the act of a foreign hostile state. andy moore, bbc news. let‘s get the latest on this now from our political correspondent nick eardley, who‘s in westminster. it seems like this row keeps
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rambling on and on. yes, we have got used to donald trump‘s uni, let‘s say, form of social media diplomacy, but what he said yesterday shocked lots of people around westminster. in terms of theresa may, she has gonein in terms of theresa may, she has gone ina in terms of theresa may, she has gone in a couple of weeks, we will have a new prime minister around the 23rd of this month. the fact that donald trump is not too happy with theresa may is not the end of the world. a big question about how the ambassador sir kim darroch does his job. downing street has made clear he still has full confidence in him, i think the government will be relu cta nt to i think the government will be reluctant to move him because they do not want to seem to be pressurised into that decision by president trump, but he is clearly furious and it is hard to see how sir kim will do hisjob over the next few weeks and months until he is due to be replaced injanuary,
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and there is a question for the new prime minister about who they replace him with the approach they ta ke to replace him with the approach they take to the us president. the two conservative party candidates for leadership go head to head for the first time today? i expect the issue of diplomacy with america will come up, and brexit, people want to hear more about boris johnson jeremy hunt‘s pam spurr getting out of the european union. they questions on domestic policy, the money they have promised to spend, how they plan to raise it. jeremy hunt wanted the face—to—face debate to be a lot sooner in the campaign, for boris johnson it is basically a case of trying to avoid any major gaps. jeremy hunt needs to make up some ground on his rival to try to get backin ground on his rival to try to get back in the leadership race. lots of tories have already been voting, they got their ballot papers last week, so some of them will have already made their minds up, but these debates can have a big
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influence on campaigns. jeremy hunt will be trying to use this to claw back some ground. we will be live inside the studio where the itv debate will take place later, with nina. it looks very futuristic. bullying, exam pressure and social media — some of the things having a negative impact on modern day childhoods in the uk, according to action for children. it‘s published a major report this morning that calls for the creation of a national childhood strategy, to better protect young people. john maguire reports. it was more in the mocks where i felt more stressed and like there was more pressure... what do three generations of the same family think about a modern—day childhood? harvey‘s just finished his gcses but earlier in the year struggled with anxiety. for a teenager these days, pressure comes in many forms. i think with social media and stuff, people my age now grow up with, oh, this is what you need to be like, this is how you need to act to fit in, and now it‘s not so much
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of that happens at school, that happens at a school and then when you get home, it‘s not really something you can escape. when obviously i was 16, it was kind of like, well, you go and do what you do and if it comes off great, if it doesn't, it doesn't. but now there's that much emphasis on the fact that there's only a few jobs and you've gotta be the best of the best in order to get those jobs. right from an early age, the schooling is more full on and life is more full on, and peer pressure is much more full on. they worry so much about what their peers are thinking. whereas i think we were much more, we are what we are. the charity action for children have spoken to thousands of families across the uk and its report speaks of childhood in crisis. 62% of grandparents, 60% of parents and 34% of their children said childhoods today are getting worse.
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bullying was highlighted as the main concern, exacerbated by online and social media issues, and the charity is calling on the government to better protect youngsters by creating a national childhood strategy. in response, the education secretary damian hinds says a youth charter is in development to give young people a voice in the issues they care about — such as combating serious violence and knife crime, addressing mental and physical health challenges and concerns about the environment and climate change. john maguire, bbc news, worcestershire. hong kong‘s chief executive carrie lam has declared that a controversial bill — which would have allowed extradition to the chinese mainland — is now "dead". the government had already suspended the bill, which had caused weeks of unrest. some protestors remain unhappy with ms lam‘s statement — they‘re demanding she withdraws the proposed legislation completely. a new form of medicine called "gene—silencing" has been approved for use by the nhs in england.
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the drugs will be used to reverse a disease called amyloidosis, which causes nerve and organ damage, and can be fatal. here‘s our health and science correspondent james gallagher. neil and vince nicholas know the pain of amyloidosis. they had toxic proteins building up inside their bodies that were damaging the nerves and weakening their hearts. the disease runs through families and eventually it steadily. —— eventually it deadly. it‘s decimated our family. but they‘ve been given gene silencing medicine that can halt and even reverse the disease. you just hope that someone‘s going to invent a drug. you know, i‘m lucky that i‘m here today and able to talk to you about that. this is how it works. inside ourselves are our genes, they send out messages containing instructions for running our body but in this form of amyloidosis a rogue gene leads to
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a build—up of toxic proteins. gene silencing intercepts the messenger disabling it and restoring the correct balance of proteins. today‘s decision applies in england as choices on which drugs to fund are devolved in the uk. scotland made it available injune. this is huge. this is making a disease that was previously untreatable treatable and has the potential to make patients‘ lives dramatically better. the drug may have saved neil‘s music career, as he was starting to lose feeling in his fingers and his voice, but the implications of this study go much further than the brothers and amyloidosis. experts say gene silencing is an exciting new area of medicine with the potential to work in diseases that are currently untreatable. james gallagher, bbc news. heavy rainfall has
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caused flash flooding across parts of washington dc, taking out roads and leaving commuters stranded. many of the capital‘s subways were left with dangerous levels of floodwater, which also found its way into the basement of the white house and the national archives building. staff said despite the flooding, historical documents, including the declaration of independence and the american constitution, remained safe. an asian couple who gave birth via ivf claim a california fertility clinic left them pregnant with the wrong children. a lawsuit filed by the couple claims they were shocked to give birth to two boys who were not of asian descent, and it adds that dna tests confirmed the children, who have now been given up, were not related to the couple — or each other. the fertility clinic has not commented on the allegations. if you‘ve watched the series chernobyl about the nuclear power plant disaster in ukraine, you‘ll know that, as well as the huge human cost, hundreds of pet dogs in the area
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were culled by the soviet military. some of them managed to evade their hunters — and now their descendants are being offered medical care. volunteers are humanely trapping strays within the exclusion zone before washing, vaccinating and sterilising them. most are released back into the wild but some of the younger pups are being taken in as pets. we will be live at wimbledon soon, sally has the sporty funfair and carol has the weather. —— sally has the support from there. gchq was once a top secret organisation, with the government denying its existence for the best part of 60 years. but its intelligence spans a century, from second world war code breaking to combatting modern day cyber crime. this year it celebrates its 100th birthday but, farfrom being kept under wraps,
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a new exhibition is bringing previously unseen artefacts into the public eye. we have already had a little look around this morning. we can talk now to the head of gchq, jeremy fleming, whojoins us from the science museum in london, ahead of the exhibition‘s opening. thank you forjoining us, lots to talk to you about. it feels very releva nt talk to you about. it feels very relevant talking to you this week. from an organisation which officially did not exist to now opening the doors and showing us this exhibition, i know you have only been there from 2017, but things have changed a lot in that century? it is a century of keeping the country safe, this exhibition is a unique collaboration with the science museum and a chance to bring the public into more of that story, to understand more about how we produce intelligence, the fantastic ingenuity of the organisation but also the brilliant people but have sustained it through its hundred yea rs. sustained it through its hundred years. it is unique, but a great opportunity for the public, too. we
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have looked around with graham satchell, what might somebody learn about your organisation that we did not know before? i think he would see everything from the start of our organisation just after world war i in1919, organisation just after world war i in 1919, rated to the present day. you‘ll see that story around the world war ii and the very famous effo rts world war ii and the very famous efforts at bletchley park to break codes. you will see much more modern day stories around our cybersecurity mission, you will hear some of our people talk about why they do the work they do and you will see some thought—provoking discussion and arguments about the difficult balance as we had to make everyday. talking about modern day cybersecurity, i was listening to a former american ambassador saying with regards to these links sir kim darroch‘s e—mails, he said i had not a clue whether it is a cyber attack and neither does anyone else. what do you know about it and what do you
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think it might be? you would not expect me to get into an investigation, the cabinet office and the foreign office will do that. it is important information is kept secure and gchq ‘s has been to advise the nation on how best to do that. you will see everything from the sir keir telephone that macmillan used to speak to kennedy during the cuban crisis right up to modern data communications and the difficult balances we had to bring. are you investigating? gulp if we are asked to, we will go gulp, but you wouldn‘t not expect me to get into the detail. —— you wouldn‘t not expect me to get into the detail. -- if we are asked you, we will, but you would not expect me to get into that detail. is that the sort ofjob you might be doing in 2019? if we are asked, of
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course we can help. gchq was given by world leading legislation, it helps us to do the things we need to do to keep the country safe, including investigating links if and when we are required. you have spoken about the risks involved with embracing chinese technology, have you now updated that, what would you say to the recent huawei story which we have spoken about a lot on this programme and throughout the media. the rise of china and its role in our technology landscape is one of the biggest challenges we face in the biggest challenges we face in the 21st—century. with our allies we need to get that right, we need to decide where we are happy to have chinese technology, where we need more risk mitigation and where we must just have more risk mitigation and where we mustjust have a more sovereign approach. huawei is only one very small part of that debate. the advice we get the national cyber security centre, which is part of gchq, i5 security centre, which is part of gchq, is to inform the technical
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pa rt gchq, is to inform the technical part of that decision. government will take its decision in the fullness of time and it will bring to bear the economic and and geopolitical issues as well.” to bear the economic and and geopolitical issues as well. i am sure many viewers are aware that lots goes on that we do not see, we have looked about the exhibition this morning and we are aware of some of the amazing work being done by many people over the years to protect us and investigate what is going on around the world. in terms of cybersecurity and away from the huawei story, how much of your work—out gchq is based on seeing what is happening around the world and trying to make sure that the area of cybersecurity, which i know it‘s something we often speak to the government about how important it is to protect that side of things, and how available it is for somebody to look and see what we are doing online, what we are saying, conversations, calls etc. gchq collect intelligence against the ha rd est collect intelligence against the hardest targets, tries to protect
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the nation‘s critical information and then tries to do something with that intelligence, so injuring that it intercepts communications and is governed by what i think it‘s world leading legislation, with safeguards you do not see anywhere else. we are collecting information, we always do it legally, my people always act with integrity apako of what they do and when they select information to look at in more details, they had to meet tests, which are tested by commissioners and judicial authorities and overseen by parliament. the regime enables us to collect intelligence, but carefully and lawfully. jeremy famin, head of gchq, frankie very much. we will go back there later with graham satchell. to look at the spy craft, as they quoted earlier. i know he can‘t go into details, but trying to get to the bottom of the leak of
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e—mails by sir kim darroch, which has had a huge effect on the special relationship, donald trump is tweeting about it and now boris johnson and jeremy hunt had to speak about how they would approach that relationship this evening, it shows that cybersecurity is at the heart of diplomacy. and we got a sense of how many people might have been able to see those messages yesterday. carol is at wimbledon for us this morning with a look at the weather. we have been concerns about the grey clouds, carol? good morning, it is much clarity about yesterday and we have had the odd spot of light rain. iam standing have had the odd spot of light rain. i am standing in front of centre court, looking at the outside courts, courts four to 11. they are almost 100 years old and essentially the original courts from the first championships on this site in 1922. these old records are more stable and predictable in their behaviour, unlike the newer courts which can be
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harder to predict. the courts were built from a base of ash from the spent energy of coal mines, rather than the concrete bases we see now. the courts are being prepared for play later today. the forecast for wimbledon today is generally cloudy. there will be some sunny spells developing their results at the chance we could catch a shower. temperature wise, getting up to around 22 degrees with light breezes. for the uk as a whole, looking at rain in the north, a fair bit of clout as we come south, the best of the sunshine in the south—west of england and also the channel islands. it has been writing this morning across scotland, the rain is moving from the west to the east and it will be on and off for you through the day. it is the same for northern ireland and northern england, the rain is moving from the west to the east. we have a lull before the second band of showery rain follows on. for the rest of england and wales, quite a bit of
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cloud this morning, the best breaks across somerset, devon, cornwall, the isles of city and the channel islands. we will hang on to the sunshade for much of the day. through the course of the day, you can see the progress the rain makes in the northern half of the uk, in the south we will see one or two brea ks the south we will see one or two breaks in the cloud but the emphasis will be on a cloudy day but of late. sunshine hanging on in the south—west on the channel islands and we will get the highest temperatures here, up to 23 or 24 degrees. moving progressively northwards, it will become fresher, feeling cool under the bands of clouds and rain. this evening and overnight we will have rain across scotland, northern ireland, northern england north wales. for the rest of england north wales. for the rest of england or wales, a fair bit of cloud with some clear skies across parts of the south. temperatures falling to between roughly and nine and 13 or14 falling to between roughly and nine and 13 or 14 degrees. tomorrow we start once again with rain across
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scotla nd start once again with rain across scotland and northern ireland, some of that will be heavy and thundery, eastern parts of england are not immune to showers and they could prove heavy. for the rest of england wales, variable cloud, sunshine in the south, it looks like a dry day at wimbledon tomorrow with highs in the south of the 224, but as we move north it gets progressively fresher. if you have a grass pollen allergy, in any sunshine we are looking at the levels being moderate to high. thank you very much, carol. it‘s a live tv interview for the biggestjob in the country, as borisjohnson and jeremy hunt go head—to—head for the first time in front of a television audience. the conservative leadership rivals will face each other in salford tonight, and nina warhurst is going to give us a look behind the scenes. it is very futuristic. it is very cool it is very futuristic. it is very cool. thank you to those on social media who say i look like a game
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show host, i will take that as a compliment. injust show host, i will take that as a compliment. in just a few hours, behind me our prime future prime minister will be stood. —— a la future prime minister will be stood. jeremy hunt won the toss and opted to go second on the opening statement, there will be questions from a studio audience before they have 30 seconds for a closing statement, borisjohnson have 30 seconds for a closing statement, boris johnson opted have 30 seconds for a closing statement, borisjohnson opted to go second. when you stand here you realise how close they will be. face—to—face, two men who have wa nted face—to—face, two men who have wanted thisjob face—to—face, two men who have wanted this job more than anything. the very long time. it is set to be intense. ajob for the presenter, she will have to take the questions from the floor, they have been pre—decided, from audience members, she will have to make sure each candidate gets equal type. she will had to moderate notjust from the floor but make sure it is fair. what
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will the questions be on? itv have not given much away between can expect questions and how fiscally sound both at their plans have been, both making big promises, boris johnson on policing, jeremy hunt and social care, both have pledged tax cuts but does that work out fiscally? brexit will almost certainly come up. how comfortable will this audience from across the north of england to be about the fa ct north of england to be about the fact that both candidates have said they would leave at the end of october without a deal if they had to? there will be bread—and—butter issues, things like education and the nhs, undoubtedly. lots of questions about the extent to which these debates matter. it is very glamorous and glitzy, we have not really seen a leadership debate like this before. they matter, they are 180,000 members of the conservative party, many of whom are yet to cast their vote. although borisjohnson may be running away with it in the polls, lots of the grassroot members
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i have spoken to say they had still not made up their minds, and there are 12 days until the polls close. week on tuesday we get our next pregnancy. it looks a bit like a game show search, and also, do you remember tron from the 805? game show search, and also, do you remember tron from the 80s?” game show search, and also, do you remember tron from the 80s? i am far too young, i do not remember. but lots of people on social media had mentioned tron, and also the chase, which i am familiar with. there will be tory party members and swing voters in the audience? yes, the questions are from a diverse audience, itv and itn asked their viewers to get in touch with questions. they can be members from any party, from any part of the political spectrum, but audience members are either members of the conservative party, had voted conservative party, had voted conservative in the past oral swing voters who might be pulled one way or the other by these candidates. two or are swing voters. they want
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to avoid the slips where there were people who were members of other political parties and they were things they wanted to avoid. but that does not mean it will be any easierfor the that does not mean it will be any easier for the candidates on the presenter. the hour—long debate will be on itv at eight o‘clock tonight. and i know you are familiar with the chase, dan? i filmed and i know you are familiar with the chase, dan? ifilmed an and i know you are familiar with the chase, dan? i filmed an episode, let‘s not talk about it! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello there, good morning. the rather unsettled weather continues today and in fact we are going to see a north—south split across the uk. for many northern areas it is cloudy, there will be some
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outbreaks of rain. further south, a little drier and bright but whatever you are it will still feel fairly warm. you can see the rain across the northern half of the uk, a few showers for the wales, the midlands and eastern england but speaking to the south it‘s drier, some sunshine in the far south—west of england and in south—west wales the rain could be quite heavy at times across scotland. temperatures here about 14—20dc up to about 24 degrees, perhaps. the best of the sunshine in the south—west. through tonight, we will continue with some of that rain, mainly across northern areas, but even across central parts they but even across central parts there could well be a bit of rain into wednesday morning. overnight temperatures getting down to around about 13—15dc. so, wednesday, more rain in the forecast. again, it is mainly across northern and eastern areas that we will see that rain. there will be some sunny spells developing across england and wales before more showery rain spreads into northern ireland and across scotland. quite a warm day again, temperatures in the high teens, low 205, up to 25 celsius in the south—east of england. and then into thursday, this area of low pressure moves its way in from the west. many more of us are
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likely to see some showers, or longer spells of rain on thursday. the showers could be quite heavy across the north. some thunderstorms mixed in with that, particularly around scotland, the far north of england. some uncertainty in the exact detail on that. further south, there will be some sunny spells and again feeling like a warm day, temperatures 23—24dc, even in scotland and northern ireland, temperatures into the 20s. by friday and into the weekend it becomes a bit more settled, so drier and brighter with some sunny spells and again, feeling quite warm really with temperatures for many in the low to mid 20s. bye— bye.
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this is business live from bbc news with ben thompson and sally bundock. facebook‘s face—off. a privacy activist in europe takes on the social networking giant in a bid to protect your data. live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday 9july. the challenge to facebook — at the eu court ofjustice — it could rewrite data—privacy laws, with major implications for how your personal data is transferred around the world. also in the programme — the latest tariff fallout? japan‘s nintendo switches part of production of its gaming consoles

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