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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 11, 2019 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a royal navy warship confronts iranian gunboats in the gulf after they try to stop a british oil tanker. fruitjuices and fizzy drinks are linked to increased chances of getting cancer, according to a major new study. half a million faulty tumble—dryers are recalled nearly four years after issues were first raised that they could cause fire. whirlpool says safety is its top priority. welcome to edgbaston — where the stage is set for england to try and make it to their first cricket world cup final in almost 30 years. they play australia
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in the semis today. talking of rain, edgbaston may see a shower today as good wimbledon although it is an outside chance. there are showers in the forecast, the heaviest from lincolnshire northwards. it's thursday the 11th ofjuly. our top story. iranian boats have tried to intercept a british oil tanker in iranian waters but reportedly withdrew after a british warship trained its guns on them. the incident happened in the strait of hormuz — a strategically important stretch of water between the persian gulf and the gulf of oman, bordered by iran and the united arab emirates. let's get more details now from simonjones who is outside the ministry of defence for us this morning. —— peter bowes. growing tensions in the gulf of. a
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british oil tanker should be seized, steady run, if the iranians ship is not released. it was expected of carrying oilfrom not released. it was expected of carrying oil from iran not released. it was expected of carrying oilfrom iran to not released. it was expected of carrying oil from iran to syria not released. it was expected of carrying oilfrom iran to syria in breach of eu sanctions. you will realise the consequences, said the uranian president. translation: u, britain, are the initiator of insecurity and you will realise the consequences later. now you are so hopeless that when one of your tankers hopeless that when one of your ta nkers wa nts to hopeless that when one of your tankers wants to move in the region you have to bring a frigate to escort it because you are scared. less tha n escort it because you are scared. less than one week later there has been a confrontation in the persian gulf that looks like retaliation. five armed iranians boats attempted to seize a british tanker before backing off when confronted by a warship. no shots were fired. in a statement, the defence department said it was aware of reports of
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harassment and attempts to tamper with the passage of the ship. it added that threats to international freedom of navigation required an international solution. there have been growing calls from around for reciprocal action after the detention of its supertanker of gibraltar. last month, two oil tankers, one norwegian owned and the otherjapanese tankers, one norwegian owned and the other japanese were attacked tankers, one norwegian owned and the otherjapanese were attacked in the gulf of oman. the us planned around. this latest incident will only intensify the strain on anglo uranian relations. —— iranian. it is an interesting time. can you explain what the latest is? we had a statement from the ministry of defence this morning and they say they are deeply concerned about the events that happened and they are also calling for a deescalation of
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tensions in the region. they tell us that this british tanker was on its business in waters near iran when it was approached by these uranian boats, three of them according to their ministry of defence. at that point this vessel from the royal navy had to come between the iranians boats and this tanker and then reportedly, according to reports from the united states, at that point the royal navy frigate turned its guns towards the iranian boats and the iranian boats beat their retreat. and the tank was able to continue its journey. their retreat. and the tank was able to continue itsjourney. but their retreat. and the tank was able to continue its journey. but talking of these tensions, this does seem to be linked to events last week off the coast of gibraltar when royal marines step in and intercepted and iranians supertanker. that was because, according to the british, the supertanker was going to be taking oil to syria which would be against eu sanctions. that is why
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they stepped in but iran, for its pa rt they stepped in but iran, for its part is said that this was piracy on the seas. they promised revenge and it looks like the events we are talking about this morning appear to be that retaliation from the iranians. certainly did concern here and calls for the situation to bd escalated. —— to be deescalated. people who consume a lot of sugary drinks, including pure fruitjuice, could have a higher risk of developing cancer, according to a new large—scale study. it looked at 100,000 people in france over five years, with doctors now calling for further research as lauren moss reports. bottles of pop and sugary drinks are often at the centre of the debate about healthy living and obesity. now a study by scientists in france suggest they are significantly associated with the risk of cancer. researchers looked at 100,000 people for five years. the average person drank around two
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cans of sugary drinks a week. but the study found if they consumed two more cans on top of that, around 100 millilitres a day, there was an 18% risk of cancer. the study did not find any cancer links with artificial sweeteners, and it could not determine whether sugary drinks do cause disease but health campaigners say the findings are another indication that intake should be limited. the fact that they did find a link regardless of weight, that is interesting. and potentially concerning. but we need more research on this. in the meantime there is already lots of reasons to cut down on these drinks. since last year, uk manufacturers have been paying a levy on high sugar drinks. tory leadership candidate borisjohnson provoked criticism from health officials last week by vowing to review what he called sin taxes when he becomes prime minister. consuming many sugary drinks can lead to weight gain and obesity
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is a known cause of cancer. but this study says that is not the full story. soft drinks are safe as part of a balanced diet, but this research will feed into the continuing discussion about how we can lead a healthier life. we will talk about that later in the programme so we will talk about that later in the programme so do send us your thoughts. senior labour figures have expressed anger and alarm at claims that some ofjeremy corbyn's closest allies tried to interfere in disciplinary processes involving allegations of anti—semitism. a bbc panorama investigation that aired last night heard from a number of former officials who worked in the party's disputes team. labour rejected any claim that the party was anti—semitic. here's our political correspondent, jessica parker. e—mails leaked to panorama suggest that labour's general secretary, jennie formby, attempted to interfere in the selection of a disciplinary panel and later that she deleted the correspondence on her official labour party account. the correspondence also shows that jeremy corbyn's own personal e—mail
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was copied in. labour said that she temporarily stopped using her party e—mail because of concerns a political opponent had access to it, and the e—mails were about ensuring the panel was held accountable for the length of time they take to hear cases. the man who was in charge at party hq for years is iain mcnicol. the e—mails that you've shown me are really important. the issues that are raised within them should ring alarm bells across the party. panorama spoke to seven former officials from labour's disputes team. i resigned my membership. i felt that i had tried as hard as i possibly could to do my bit to fight this, this sickness. and to me it is getting worse. i knew the atmosphere was bad but it ke pt i knew the atmosphere was bad but it kept building up and up. i felt a bit complicit
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in the labour party not dealing with anti—semitism properly. chant: shame on you, shame on you! labour has said the former staff making claims are disaffected and the party insists it is implacably opposed to anti—semitism. we will do all we can to make it very clear to anybody who thinks that they can have those abhorrent views in our party and in ourfamily that they are not welcome. there has already been considerable pressure onjeremy corbyn around allegations of anti—semitism in the party. now signs that that pressure could only increase further. jessica parker, bbc news. a man has been arrested for climbing over a fence onto the forecourt of buckingham palace while the queen was in residence. the 22—year—old is being held on suspicion of trespass. it's understood he scaled the barrier to the side of the building in the early hours of wednesday. scotland yard say the incident is not being treated
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as terror—related. the french parliament is expected to approve a new tax on the world's biggest internet and technology firms such as google and facebook. the measure, which will raise around 360 million pounds a year initially sets a precedent that's being closely watched by governments around the world. president trump has already ordered an investigation into the french plans. the former liverpool striker, daniel sturridge, has been reunited with his dog after it was reported stolen from a house where the footballer was staying in los angeles. in a post on instagram, the 29—year—old thanked his followers for helping him find his pomeranian, called lucci, after his appeal, complete with a 30,000 pound reward went viral. they are reunited. he was desperate to get that dog back. less him. they are reunited. he was desperate to get that dog back. less himm is ten minutes past six. it's a huge day for england's cricketers who play australia
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in the semi—finals of the world cup at edgbaston. mike is there for us this morning. good morning. iam right by good morning. i am right by the boundary. this is a great occasion at edgbaston, 25,000 fans will be packed in here from 10.30, cheering on the teams as england try to make some history, for the first time in over a generation. they have not played in a semi—final knockout game since 1992. all those years ago. they have a chance today against the reigning ‘s champions, australia. they have won four out of the last five times but they are vulnerable because they lost their last group game against south africa while you feel that england may be on a roll after suffering a few wobbles in the group stage. they had to win their last two games against india and new zealand and they did that. so ended up zealand and they did that. so ended up feeling —— englanderfeeling
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co mforta ble. i'm joined by steve elworthy, managing director of the men's cricket world cup, and tracy ritchie who's head of national programmes for the england and wales cricket board. let's start with you, steve. as a whole, how has this tournament gone for you and the relief that england managed to get out ofjail and make the semifinals. how important was that? it has been an incredible journey and when you think of how long we have been planning the tournament and we are down to the last two games. it has been incredible. for me, the cricket has done a lot of the talking. it has been unbelievable cricket and obviously the vibrancy of the crowds we have seen has been fantastic but today will be a huge game for the tournament. how well has been received in terms of tv and crowds and engaging the next generation? has this been a tournament that is help the nation fall in love with the game again? i think so. the stadiums have been a sellout which is fantastic more importantly for me
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we have engaged a million children with the schools programme and clubs of phone open their doors to new children and more children than ever are taking part in our entry—level programme. it has been a fantastic summer programme. it has been a fantastic summerfor programme. it has been a fantastic summer for the sport. how important would it be if england could go all the way on sunday and win the world cup for the first time? what would that do? it gives us a platform to raise the plat —— profile of what we're doing even more. we have a few huge he is coming up with investment and focus on women and girls. gives us and focus on women and girls. gives usa and focus on women and girls. gives us a chance to amplify everything we do even more. in terms of bringing it to the nation, sky tv have said they will make the final three to whether if england make it. from a tournament point of view that would be outstanding and fantastic that the nation can see it. and we have the nation can see it. and we have the ashes to come but this is a 1—off the ashes to come but this is a 1-off 50 the ashes to come but this is a 1—off 50 overs a side. and you can
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sum up how in one day cricket even though australia are the reigning champions, anything can happen. though australia are the reigning champions, anything can happenm has always been like that. your form pre— tournament does not necessarily mean success during the tournament as we have seen in some of the results we have seen. yesterday 100 overs over two days and we had to use a reserve day for the first time ina number of use a reserve day for the first time in a number of tournament and incredible aim of cricket sitting on the first day thought that maybe new zealand were out of it but then to come back was incredible. and we have another tasty head up today. thank you very much. it was an incredible day yesterday and an incredible day yesterday and an incredible day yesterday and an incredible day to come. we had a shower earlier but it is drying up now and the forecast is not too bad. don't forget you can follow this on the bbc sport app for highlights. thank you. people will be interested
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in carol's verdict on the weather. carol is at wimbledon for us with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. good morning, everybody. mike ‘s rate. there was a little shower. there could be another little shower at edgbaston as we go through the day. cloud with some sunny as we go through the day. cloud with some sunny glimmers. here at wimbledon it is dry. if we take a look at the outside courts these are the courts 14—17, centre court is on one side of them, number one court one side of them, number one court on the other. it was in 1980 that we saw a sizeable change at wimbledon as those four new courts were brought into action. once again placing centre court in the centre of proceedings. the forecast for wimbledon today is not dissimilar to that for edgbaston. we are looking ata that for edgbaston. we are looking at a mostly dry day. there will be some sunshine around. quite a humid feel to the day as well with highs up feel to the day as well with highs up to about 25 degrees. but we can rule out the chance of a shower ——we
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can't rule out. the forecast for the uk as can't rule out. the forecast for the ukasa can't rule out. the forecast for the uk as a whole has some showers on it, particularly across parts of scotla nd it, particularly across parts of scotland and north—east england. those could be potentially heavy and thundery was that we could have as much as 20—30 millimetres from them, especially in scotland, in one hour. this morning you can see where we have the showers draped across parts of wales, scotland, and eastern england. although showers are going to be drifting eastwards through the course of the day. we still have them at nine o'clock across scotland and parts of england, northern ireland will be into sunny skies by then. ahead of them there is quite a bit of cloud around. there will be some breaks in that cloud. we will see some sunshine as well full top the best of the sunshine today for the best of the sunshine today for the longest will be in the channel islands. as we had on through the day you can see how the first batch of showers goes stop as temperatures rise in the afternoon scotland and northern england, anywhere from
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lincolnshire north to the east of the pennines. the heaviest will be in scotland. temperatures today, 30 in the north, 25—26 as we push down into any sunshine in the south. many of the showers will tend to feed. there will be quite a bit of cloud around. we will also see clear spells developing. it is not going to bea spells developing. it is not going to be a particularly cold night. we will see a change in the wind direction. overnight lows roughly 10- 16 direction. overnight lows roughly 10— 16 degrees. tomorrow, a dry day in prospect than it will be today for most of us. fairly cloudy across northern ireland and scotland. for england and wales you will see more sunshine. but from the wash northwards, but east coast, we could see quite a few showers. not as heavy as today, but the odd rumble of thunder. the wind changing direction to more of a north north—westerly, it will feel fresher, although temperatures will
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be similarto fresher, although temperatures will be similar to today. we have mentioned quite a few sporting fixtures. for the british grand prix at the weekend it is looking like it will be dry as high pressure extols its virtues across us. will be dry as high pressure extols its virtues across us. steph will be dry as high pressure extols its virtues across us. steph and charlie. carol, thank you very much. a professional take on the weather. it is 18 minutes past six. let's take a look at today's papers. the daily mail leads with another of our top stories this morning, after a study has found fruitjuice and fizzy drinks could significantly raise the risk of cancer. according to the paper, the equivalent of a small glass a day increases the odds of the disease by 12%. talking to experts, actually, a dietician later on. the guardian reports that borisjohnson is under mounting pressure after sir kim darroch resigned as british ambassador to washington yesterday. critics of mrjohnson accuse him of throwing sir kim "under the bus". the metro leads with the same story and the comments made by the former british ambassador who says it has become "impossible" for him to carry on in the role.
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the picture there is of the duchess of sussex and cambridge with their babies in arms. and the front of the telegraph quotes julian lewis, the conservative party chairman of the defence select committee and an ally of borisjohnson, who is said to have expressed concern that mrs may could be tempted to appoint sir kim's successor before she leaves post. and have a look at some of the inside pages. victoria is with us as well. hello. good morning to you both. this one here, i don't know if you saw this story. this was what was going on in gatwick in the south of england yesterday. they actually closed down the airport for a few hours. at least 57 departures were delayed by three hours or so. 40 flights cancelled. this is all to do with air traffic control and a fault which is, at the moment, unknown. we don't know any details but flights
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apparently are back and working. passengers are being advised to check the status of their flights before flying or even travelling to the airport. you might remember last year gatwick was in trouble again... with drones. also only one air traffic controller turned up one day. loads of planes were delayed because they did not think to get anyone on the rotor. super dry. turnaround apparently two years away. it falls in profits. and here, this is the founder of the company, julian duncanson, who is returning to the brand to turn it around. he says three things are important with fashion, it is the brand, the shape, and the fabric. he says they have been getting all those things wrong. so they will return to what he thinks are the core values i'm surprised he did not say price. part of his strategy is to launch this
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superdry premium range. of his strategy is to launch this super dry premium range. the call customer is not like that at all. judging £270 for a code. whether or not that strategy will pay off i don't know. and there is another one i think is quite interesting. this box ticking idea. this one here. this is emma warmsley, glaxosmithkline's boss. there are only seven female bosses in the ftse 100. there is a report saying summer britcher's biggest companies are recruiting female directors for their symbolic value rather than to advance the boardroom. many of them are leaving earlier, they are not promoted anymore. a disproportionate amount of white as well. lots of criticism. we'll be talking about that and the glass ceiling at ten to eight. you have a picture? i have. this one is basically he has launched himself of the extinct
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volcano above edinburgh. it is the first time someone has parachute jump first time someone has parachute jump off it. he is 39. an ex— serviceman. he landed safely among watching spectators. can you imagine if you didn'tjump off far enough or if... orlanding amongst if you didn'tjump off far enough or if... or landing amongst the spectators. why would panic if they was a spectator as well.|j spectators. why would panic if they was a spectator as well. i am trying to picture arthurs seat and it does not seem like it would have enough ofajump. not seem like it would have enough of ajump. he did it not seem like it would have enough of a jump. he did it and not seem like it would have enough of ajump. he did it and he is not seem like it would have enough of a jump. he did it and he is fine. good, that is the main thing. we will see you a little bit later on, victoria. it is 6:22. the last timejordanne whiley won wimbledon she was three months pregnant. today she returns to sw19 following maternity leave with the ambition of once again being the grand slam wheelchair champion. whiley has brittle bone disease. she's been speaking to breakfast‘s graham satchell about becoming a mother and why despite her success, she wouldn't want any of her children to live with the condition.
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hello. you doing an interview? what are you going to say? jordanne whiley's life changed forever 18 months ago with the birth of her first son. can you see mummy? jackson's cheeky and hilarious and a massive poser. hello! it has changed my life a lot. ididn't hello! it has changed my life a lot. i didn't know if i'd be able to come back after having him because they had a lot of injuries in the past and they did not know how they both would affect my disability —— i did not no. jordanne was born with brittle bone disease. she has had 12 operations, broken her 26 times. she first picked up a racquet when she
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was just three. by 14 she was national champion and, to date, has won ten grand slams, including four wimbledon title. as a kid i was in the hospital a lot, a lot of operations, a lot of breaks. it was tough, but i've found tennis at quite a young age, when i was three. it changed my life. it may be socialise with other people who are like me. and physically as well as changed me and made me healthier and gave me more confidence. osteo genesis is a hereditary condition. jordanne got it from her dad, himself a medal winning champion. there is a 50—50 chance it can be passed the next generation. there is a 50—50 chance it can be passed the next generationlj there is a 50—50 chance it can be passed the next generation. i really did not want a child with that. it is difficult because i have had an amazing life and i wouldn't change the fact that i have osteo genesis, but i don't want my children to go through what i have been through, so much pain and exclusion from
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society. i want them to be able to do everything i could not do. jordanne had a test when she was three months pregnant with jackson which showed he did not have the condition. but she wants more children and knows she may face a heartbreaking choice in the future. it's something that isn't really spoken about, because they know at the moment termination of pregnancy is quite a big thing in america and i think there is no right or wrong, it's down to the parent and i do wa nt it's down to the parent and i do want a big family and they know that... i feel am making want a big family and they know that... ifeel am making the right decision for my children. does mackay feel like i'm. jordanne salsa wimbledon campaign later today. her son jackson will wimbledon campaign later today. her sonjackson will be watching —— makes her. it is really interesting
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hearing her think out loud about her own personal experience and how it colours what she may or may not do in the future. we thank you for sharing her story with us. it is worth saying as well that she will be on court 14 on wimbledon. we think after 11 o'clock this morning. that is the quarter—finals of the ladies wheelchair singles. we will watch with interest and wish her luck. and carol is there for us again with all the weather. we will get the later on. it is time to get the news, travel, and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london news. i'm charlotte franks. a man has died after being stabbed in south—east london. police were called to tellson avenue in greenwich just before three o clock yesterday afternoon. a man believed to be in his early 20s was found with a number of stab wounds and later died in hospital. no arrests have yet been made.
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a new registration scheme for drone flyers has been described as too expensive, and that it won't stop criminals. the plans to test and licence up to 170,000 people have been drawn up by the civil aviation authority. it's after gatwick airport was closed by alleged drone sightings. the £16.50 fee has been defended by the transport minister. but one mp thinks it's unfair. you shouldn't let the activities, the illegitimate act 70s of the very few spy what has become a widespread and enjoyable and technological advance that many people will be using for good in years to come. it's the 160th anniversary of big ben's first chimes across westminster. the great bell began striking the hour onjuly11th 1859. but the chimes won't ring out today to mark this anniversary, as the elizabeth tower, which houses big ben, is currently halfway through a major restoration project. it should be finished in 2021.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning but minor delays on tfl rail. on the trains there is disruption and also delays for southern and thameslink services on the east croydon/uckfield/ east grinstead line following signal problems near woldingham. onto the roads: the m25 is closed clockwise from j9 leatherhead to j10 a3 wisley following a multi vehicle collision. in tulse hill, norwood road is closed northbound from elmcourt rd to the south circular for emergency water works. now the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. aftera hello, good morning. after a warm and humid night last night we start the day today with temperatures in the day today with temperatures in the mid to high teens. there is the chance of seeing one or two showers, but there will be some sunny spells around as well. so a warm start this
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morning. temperature is already around 17 degrees celsius. showery rain first it also some sunny spells. into the afternoon it is looking mostly dry with some areas of cloud, some bright and sunny spells, and the small towns of one or two showers. temperatures at a maximum of around 25 celsius. overnight it will become dry with some clear spells. again, we are looking at a mild night, overnight lows around 14— 16 celsius. tomorrow brings more anyway of sunshine. there will be some patchy cloud around, particularly through the morning. of seeing some odd isolated showers in the afternoon. a slightly fresher field of things they north—westerly breeze and highs of 24 celsius. some areas of cloud but also some sunny spells. temperatures falling a little closer to average as we move through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to steph and charlie. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt.
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still to come on breakfast: it's a massive day for england's cricket team as they prepare to clash with australia — we'll ask if they are on course to make it to their first world cup final for 27 years. a potential fire risk in people's homes. whirlpool recall half a million faulty dryers. find out what you need to do if you own one. the acclaimed author of the cherub books, robert muchamore will tell us how a hospital stay inspired him to write about protest and flawed leadership. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. a royal navy warship has driven off three iranian vessels after they tried to stop a british oil tanker. the ministry of defence says hms montrose positioned herself between the tanker — british heritage — and the iranian boats
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and issued verbal warnings. the mod says the iranian vessels then turned away. the incident happened in the strait of hormuz — a strategically important stretch of water between the persian gulf and the gulf of oman. it comes almost a week after british royal marines boarded an iranian tanker off gibralter. —— gibraltar. let's get more details now from our correspondent peter bowes. in the last 15 or 20 minutes, the ministry of defence here in the uk have provided some details and i know there are details coming from the us as well. take us through the sequence the us as well. take us through the sequence of events. the mod confirming that this ship, the british tanker was approached by three iranian boats and they essentially tried to intercept it. but it was carried along by a frigate, a warship that essentially pointed its guns at those iranians boats and issued a warning to back
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off and at that point they did pack off and at that point they did pack off and at that point they did pack off and now the british ship has carried along its way. this comes at the back drop of what happened a week ago with an iranians supertanker seized with the help of british marines lived to be taking oilfrom iran british marines lived to be taking oil from iran to syria which would have breached eu sanctions and ever since then some very strong words from the iranians pointed at the british authorities saying that essentially reciprocal action should happen against a british ship and it seems as if what has happened in the last 24 hours is an attempt at that reciprocal action. people who consume a lot of sugary drinks could have a higher risk of developing cancer, according to a new study. the research, which looked at 100,000 people in france, found those who drank two extra cans of fruitjuice or fizzy pop a week saw an 18% increased risk of cancer. however, the study did not establish a direct link, and experts say more
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information is needed. a man has been arrested for climbing over a fence onto the forecourt of buckingham palace while the queen was in residence. the 22—year—old is being held on suspicion of trespass. it's understood he scaled the barrier to the side of the building in the early hours of wednesday. scotland yard say the incident is not being treated as terror—related. the french parliament is expected to approve a new tax on the world's biggest internet and technology firms such as google and facebook. will the measure, which will initially raise around 360 million pounds a year sets a precedent that's being closely watched by governments around the world. president trump has already ordered an investigation into the french plans. dust from car brakes and tyres will continue to pollute the air even after all vehicles become electric. that's the warning from the government's air quality advisors. their report shows fragments of microplastics from tyres,
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road surfaces and brakes will also flow into rivers and the sea. ministers say they want action to improve the standards. a public memorial will take place in hong kong later to remember marco leung, who became known as "the man in the yellow raincoat" after he fell to his death while protesting against the territory's controversial extradition bill. he died last month after unfurling a banner on the side of a shopping mall. the bill, which would have allowed extradition to the chinese mainland sparked weeks of unrest in the city. the us singer taylor swift has been named the world's highest earning entertainer for the second time in her career. the 29—year—old topped forbes' celebrity 100 list after earning 148 million pounds over the last year. singer—songwriter ed sheeran was the highest placed british star and fifth in the world after he raked in 88 million pounds in 12 months.
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that is one of those stories where you have to check you have the figure correct because it is so much. 148 million?! but they worked hard. yes, but many people work hard. yes, but many people work hard. letter to sport now and it is a big day for the cricket world cup. mike is at edgbaston. england and australia always has a special ring to it and at the semi—final stage it is evenjuicier. to it and at the semi—final stage it is even juicier. absolutely. what are some of this is for england australia rivalry because the ashes is coming up at first this 1—off 50 overs aside game to decide who goes through to the final to meet new zealand at lourdes on sunday. look at the access we have today, right by the boundary. the grass is a little wet but look how near the wicket seems. when the crowd isn't here, everything seems so much
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smaller, like i could almost hit a four myself, take a boundary catch. you have the grandstands there with nearly 25,000 people to be packed in here, since that they will be watching the incredibly intense atmosphere. this is a chance for england to make history because they have not been to a final law played ina semi—final have not been to a final law played in a semi—final since 19 92, nearly 30 years ago. and they are against the reigning champions, a team that has won this competition four of the last five times. england go into the match on the back of two victories against new zealand and india and their tails erupted in they lost three games in the group stages, and one of those was against the australians. more confident than we we re australians. more confident than we were three games ago. i think we are a different team that played for games ago and three games ago. i think the loss against sri lanka hurt us. that was an overhang to the lords game and then we came here and
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produce something similar to the cricket we have been playing over the last four years. we are full of confidence. england have been the front runners in world cricket over the last four years, the way they have changed the game, theirgameplan in the way they have changed the game, their gameplan in particular has a very aggressive, taking it to the opposition. for us, we know how to play and they know how we play, we have met a lot of the last few years. it will be a matter of if they can hold their nerve. and the winners will play new zealand in sunday's final at lord's. that's after they beat india by 18 runs in a thrilling semi final at old trafford yesterday. a —— few people saw that coming. to wimbledon, it's women's semi—finals day today and in the men's draw roger federer will play rafael nadal in the semi—finals tomorrow — the first time they've met at the all england club in more than a decade. federer came from a set down to beat japan's kei nishikori in the quarterfinals. federer is now 37 years
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old but looks to be getting better this year. he's going for his ninth wimbledon title. rafa nadal had a relatively easy ride against the american sam querrey. he won in straight sets to set up the semi with his great rival federer. the last time these two met here at wimbledon was that epic final in 2008 which was eventually won by nadal. it is great. difficult to imagine to bea game it is great. difficult to imagine to be a game in that situation. but here we are. excited about the victory of today now but of course excited to play against roger again here in wimbledon after such a long time. we had a lot of information on him and he does about us. so we can dive into tactics and all that sort of stuff for two days orjust say that it is grass court tennis and we want
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to come out there and play and attacking tennis and if he can defended, good for him, if you cannot, good for me. whilst all the attention's on rafa and roger, novak djokovic is quietly going about his business. he's the number one seed and beat belgium's david goffin in straight sets to secure his place in the semis. he will play roberto bautista agut to. it's a tough call — you're meant to be in ibiza for your stag do, but suddenly you find you've got a wimbledon semi—final to play! the 31—year—old continued his run to his first grand slam semi—final by beating guido pella on wednesday. he's now preparing to play novak djokovic. all his friends are flying over from my beef where they were waiting for him for his dad do that i am sure wimbledon will be a great place, as long as they all behave. andy murray and serena williams' run at sw19 is over. it may be revived again one day.
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the memorable mixed doubles run with andy murray is over though after the pair were beaten by top seeds bruno soares and nicole melichar. murena, as they like to be collectively called, lost the third round match by two sets to one. murray has already said it's unlikely he'll play singles at the us open. i get to sit here and just look at my thing. i want to stay focused and not look like i'm daydreaming. but it is nice because i love him having all the attention. it is so good. such a relief. honestly i hadn't given it much thought, to be honest. how is your body? it feels good. thanks. will you be able to play? i don't know. i need to train and get stronger. i'm not sure. don't forget you can watch all the tennis from wimbledon on the bbc today, following the match from 1030 here
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and don't forget those in play action lips as the match goes on on our sport website and app. it is dry at the moment and i'm told that the covers could come off at about seven o'clock which will be nice, you can see the wicket in all its glory. the grass is still a little slippery and wet but i hope that despite the rain clouds over edgbaston, i have looked at the forecast, there is only a 10% chance of rain so if you are coming along you may need an umbrella but hopefully it should stay dry. we have some great guests coming up at 8.30 when the crowd start coming in. and later on, carole will be here with the sport. good. i know she is good at that to. should we tell mike that she said it will probably rain there again? can sugary drinks cause cancer? that's the question being asked by researchers after a study found a link between the two.
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scientists in france looked at the diets of 100,000 people and found those who consumed two extra cans of fruitjuice or fizzy pop a week saw an increased risk of cancer. here with us is dietitian, nichola ludlam—raine thank you forjoining us. can you explain what this research found and how the link between cancer and sugar works? the headline sounds scary and although we have known for a while that consuming too much sugar is not good for us, the way this study is designed cannot say that sugar causes cancer it is just associated. something else that the paper showed is that people who were consuming sugary drinks were also consuming sugary drinks were also consuming more calories as well as salt. so for example the people who had sugary drinks may have been having more things like fast food at the offence —— expense of healthy meals with fibre and vegetables which protect us against cancer. so it is hard to isolate these drinks,
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specifically, to what they are doing because the general diet otherwise may also be contributing? studying nutrition is hard. in this paper they did ask what people were having over a three—day period but what with these people drinking the rest of the week and over the course of the year? it comes to sugar we already know that sugar is not good for our teeth. too much causes weight gain and sugar does not provide any nutrients. as a nation we should be cutting down on it. they make some conclusions in this research and say that, essentially, it is essentially four sugary drinksa drinks a week to increase chances of cancer. that does not sound like a lot. and people who consume fizzy drinks on daily basis should be encouraged to swap. we know that the
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sweeteners contained in diet drinks are safe for human consumption. diet drinks are not as good as plain water but we must be realistic. getting people to choose a diet alternative first and then water.“ you're wondering what is behind us, thatis you're wondering what is behind us, that is a wall of sugar cubes. what is your personal experience, as a dietician, of peoples consumption? on one side, people don't realise just how much sugar is in a can of fizzy pop, for example. and in comparison to the guidelines, a can of fizzy pop is well over a whole day ‘s worth of sugar and that does not include the sugar already found in things like chocolate and biscuits. on the other side you have misconceptions that the diet drinks are bad for us or the diet drinks are bad for us or the diet drinks are worse. what this paper shows is that diet drinks are a little better, not as good as water but sugary drinks we should cut down on. the point that steph made about some
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people consuming an awful lot more of these drinks, have you had people come to you whose consumption is many come to you whose consumption is any come to you whose consumption is many many times this? regularly. i might see people consuming a two litre bottle of coca—cola day so for those people it is about making small changes and getting them to reduce the amount and swapping to the diet alternative as well as the sugar, though, you need to take into account the amount of caffeine in drinks and the amount of acid that causes dental erosion. can i say something about the difference between fruit juice and fizzy something about the difference between fruitjuice and fizzy pop. is the impact the same? when it comes to comparing a can of coke and a glass of fruit juice, comes to comparing a can of coke and a glass of fruitjuice, fruitjuice provides fibre as well as vitamin c however the guidelines have been around for a while now to limit fridges consumption to one small glass a day. so there are three ta keaway glass a day. so there are three takeaway messages, really when it comes to fizzy drinks choose diet, when adding sugar to tea and coffee,
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reduce it and limit your fruit juice. orjust drink water. perfect. thank you for coming into talk us. to get in touch with us. on that note, i will take a big slip of my coffee. with sugar? no sugar. just copy. and, carole, give us the weather. i thought i would give us the sport. there is lots of sport this weekend. you can see over court 18, the cover is still on. the logo in the top, hand—painted by a company in cheshire. court 18 has hawkeye. it was introduced in 2018. built from a network of ten cameras all around the court. and they are high so they capture 60 high—resolution images per second —— high—resolution. they cover every
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single bounce of the ball. hawk—eye collect data for every shot taken in the match and notjust for the close calls. i am sure you have heard hawk—eye been called in on many occasions during the games, sets, and matches. it is a human start to the day. the forecast is a dry one. but there is an outside chance of a shower —— humid start. more cloud around. but we will still see sunny spells. there are showers in the forecast for parts of the uk, particularly across scotland and northern england. and particularly the north—east of england. anywhere from lincolnshire northwards. this morning we have a fair packet of showers, moving from the west towards the east. some of them are heavy. you can see them draped across scotland and also parts of northern england. for northern ireland this morning we're looking at sunny spells. then as we come south across england and wales there
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are still a few showers around. a fair bit of cloud. the best of any sunshine today, for the longest, is across the channel islands. through the day watch how the first batch of showers clear as temperatures rise. don't forget the humidity as well. more showers will develop across scotla nd more showers will develop across scotland and north—east england. north of lincolnshire. some of those showers will deposit 20—30 millimetres of rainfall in one hour. the met office has a yellow weather warning out for this and it could lead to some disruption. move away from that and we have the cloud at the moment we will see breaks develop as we will hear at wimbledon. highs 25 in lengthy spells of sunshine, or 26. the north we are looking at perhaps 10—13. as we are looking at perhaps 10—13. as we head through the evening and overnight many of the showers will fade. there will be quite a bit of cloud left behind. there will also be clear spells as well with overnight lows falling between roughly 9— 16 degrees. so tomorrow,
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well, a grey day in prospect than today. for scotland and northern ireland you will see cloud around, with some brightness here and there. for england and wales better chance of seeing some sunny intervals, but still some showers in the forecast for you, particularly from the wash right up the east. temperatures tomorrow similar to today. one thing you will notice is the wind direction will have changed. it will feel that bit fresher. steph, charlie. thank you very much, carole. we've talked about faulty whirlpool tumble dryers quite a bit on the programme over the past few years, today a further recall‘s been announced. there is a potentialfire risk. a known fire risk. good morning. whirlpool has issued a recall of half a million faulty tumble dryers.
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that is across the uk. what you need to rememberfrom that is across the uk. what you need to remember from this story is if you think this is affecting you all you think this is affecting you all you need to do is contact whirlpool, get a replacement for free, and they will take your old one away. as you said, we have known about this is 2015, as has the company. at the time, the company thought there were 3.8 million units at risk and started making modifications to them. ijust started making modifications to them. i just want to show you this. this is what can happen. they don't think that is the right picture. we are seeing them. it is a firedamaged caused by these. we know at least 54 fires started as a result of this. it is fluff that gets caught in the heating elements and it is a bit like kindling that causes a fire inside the machines. they have modified 1.7 million but are being forced to do a proper recall of this. there have been criticisms
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about the modifications in some case. the company says the modifications were but some people say we still have problems with our tumble dryer. you are absolutely right. there have been some concerns that even the modified versions of these tumble dryers can get into problems as well. we don't want people to worry too much about this. these are some of the brands involved. you might think whirlpool, i don't have one of these. if you have one of these in your machine was made between april 20 —— 2004 and september 2015. the advice is to stop using it immediately, unplug it, and contact whirlpool. you can do it online or via the phone and they will tell you whether or not your machine could be involved in this and whether or not you are likely to get a replacement. this and whether or not you are likely to get a replacementm isn't all models. but in order to find out you need to contact them stop what you need to contact them, exactly. the big issue is why hasn't this been done before? we have known
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about this since 2015. why haven't they done anything? the government has urged whirlpool to raise his game on this. they told them to issue the recall. we spoke to which they said that while paul has been dragging its heels. the recall of whirlpool‘s faulty tumble dryers is long overdue. we have concerns that the manufacturer won't effectively identify and swiftly deal with the fa u lty identify and swiftly deal with the faulty machines are still in people's homes. it has continued over the last three and a half years to put its company above its customer safety and the government must now keep a close eye on how whirlpool deals with this recall going forward. the government also needs to really establish whether modified machines are also safe so that people can be confident that any whirlpool tumble dryer they have in their homes will keep them in theirfamily say. whirlpool says safety is their top priority. they are also launching a public awareness campaign in the
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next month so everyone knows. but over this time period we know that 5 million units were sold in the uk. so we think there are about 500,000 machines affected the need to come back that's a lot of machines. machines affected the need to come back that's a lot of machineslj machines affected the need to come back that's a lot of machines. i am sure there are people watching who will be interested in that. to get in touch if you have been one of those people with one of those models. it is 6:53. tonnes and tons of black plastic are being removed from the bed of a river in cumbria in what is thought to be one of the most significant river restoration projects in the uk. around 20 years ago, the river keekle was lined with the material in an attempt to keep it away from some old mine works. now it is breaking up and being washed downstream and has caused flooding and blockages as alison freeman reports. at first glance, the river keekle looks like any other, but take a closer look and you can see its dark secret. reams and reams of black plastic. this plastic was used to
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line the river to protect it from contamination from a nearby disused mine. but over the past two decades it has deteriorated and it's become the pollutant itself, as well as an eyesore. there's been such a knee—jerk reaction to worry about what the river will do once the coal mines had finished, it's a natural thing, let's just constrain the river, put it in plastic, and then we can walk away and it will be fine. well, in only 20 is the plastic has started to degrade. rivers go to the sea. this potentially would end up in the sea. what's happening here is thought to be the biggest river restoration of its kind in the uk. the summer's project is a pilot with plastic being led from a 200 metre stretch. next year the rest of the 2.5 kilometres will be restored, costing more than £1 million. it will benefit wildlife as well as people. the plastic is just a share plate to
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the water going down very quickly, there is no boulders and cobbles to stop that water. the what is pushing downstrea m stop that water. the what is pushing downstream into an area where there are some homes. what are the improvements we will see when the plastic is gone it will be a fully functioning river. it will be meandering, it will work properly, it will shift its gravel as rivers like to do. and we will get much more wildlife, there will be more fish spawning. at the moment there are hardly any fishing here because there is no spawning habitat for them. and people will be able to enjoy much more. catherine and her family lived nearby. they welcome the project. the benefit of getting this back to nature for us as a community is that we will be able to spend more time here safely and we will be able to enjoy more wildlife, because when the river is restored, obviously the wildlife that lives in it will be increased as well. there will be a better habitat, a more natural habitat for the wildlife. dogs can paddle and there will be so much wildlife and kids can paddle in
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it. it isjust going to be amazing. more rivers have been re— naturalised in cumbria than anywhere else in the uk. but the river keekle is the most challenging by far. allison freeman, bbc news. we will get more that story later on, growing —— going live to the river itself. good morning from bbc london news. i'm charlotte franks. a man has died after being stabbed in south east london. police were called to tellson avenue in greenwich just before 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon. a man believed to be in his early twenties was found with a number of stab wounds and later died in hospital. no arrests have yet been made. a new registration scheme for drone flyers has been described as too expensive — and that it won't stop criminals. the plans to test and licence up to 170,000 people have been
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drawn up by the civil aviation authority. it's after gatwick airport was closed by alleged drone sightings. the £16.50 fee has been defended by the transport minister. but one mp thinks it's unfair. you shouldn't let the activities, the illegitimate activities of the very few spoil what has become a widespread and enjoyable recreation and a technological advance that many people will be using for good in years to come. it's the 160th anniversary of big ben's first chimes across westminster. the great bell began striking the hour, onjuly11th1859. but the chimes won't ring out today to mark this anniversary, as the elizabeth tower — which houses big ben — is currently halfway through a major restoration project. it should be finished in 2021. let's take a look at
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the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning but severe delays on tfl rail. on the trains there is disruption and also delays for southern and thameslink services on the east croydon/uckfield/ east grinstead line following signal problems near woldingham. onto the roads: the m25 remains closed clockwise from j9 at leatherhead to j10 at wisley following a multi vehicle collision involving a jacknifed lorry. the m25 is also down to three lanes anticlockwise towards j23 at south mimms following a collision, with tailbacks to j24 at potters bar. now the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. after a warm and humid night last night we start the day today with temperatures in the mid to high teens. there is the chance of seeing one or two showers, but there will be some sunny spells around as well. so a warm start this morning. temperatures already
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around 17 degrees celsius. inafew in a few spots. showery rain first it also some sunny spells. into the afternoon it is looking mostly dry with some areas of cloud, some bright and sunny spells, and the small towns of one or two showers. temperatures at a maximum of around 25 celsius. overnight it will become dry with some clear spells. again, we are looking ata mild night, overnight lows around 14—16 celsius. tomorrow brings more in the way of sunshine. there will be some patchy cloud around, particularly through the morning. chance of seeing some odd isolated showers in the afternoon. a slightly fresher field of things they north—westerly breeze and highs of 24 celsius. some areas of cloud but also some sunny spells. temperatures falling a little closer to average as we move through the weekend. bye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a royal navy warship confronts iranian gunboats in the gulf after they try to stop a british oil tanker fruitjuices and fizzy drinks are linked to increased chances of getting cancer, according to a major new study more women in the top jobs at uk companies. is big business finally changing its attitude, or are companies just ticking boxes? welcome to edgbaston — where the stage is set for england to try and make it to their first cricket world cup final in almost 30 years.
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the covers are coming off and the tannoy is being tested. but england are facing australia in the semifinals. good morning from wimbledon. the flowers havejust arrived, they are replaced every day. there could be a shower today but a small chance of showers in the forecast and some will be heavy and foundry. i will tell you where in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 11th ofjuly. our top story. a royal navy warship has driven off three iranian vessels after they tried to stop a british oil tanker. the ministry of defence says hms montrose positioned herself between the tanker — british heritage — and the iranian boats, before issuing verbal warnings. the mod says the iranian vessels then turned away. the incident happened in the strait of hormuz — a strategically important stretch of water between the persian gulf and the gulf of oman.
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last week an iranian supertanker was seized by british royal marines off gibraltar. let's get more details now from simonjones who is outside the ministry of defence. the ministry of defence put out a statement this morning. tell us what the latest is. officials here are telling us they are deeply concerned about what happened and they are calling on the authorities in iran to de—escalate tensions in the region and to show you how tense they are, let's talk through what happened. we had a british tanker sailing on watersjust happened. we had a british tanker sailing on waters just off the coast of the round when it was confronted by three iranians ships. the iranians were trying to get the tanker to change its course and come toa tanker to change its course and come to a halt but the british tanker, reduce heritage, was being accompanied by a royal navy frigate and at that point the royal navy stepped in. according to reports
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from the united states, the royal navy trained their guns on these three iranians boats and made it clear, in no uncertain terms, that these iranians boats had to get out of the way and the iranians at the point you to buy those orders and they sailed off. to give you a sign of the tensions, it is believed this is linked to an incident that happened around one week ago when royal marines were involved in seizing and iranian supertanker off the coast of gibraltar. according to the coast of gibraltar. according to the british authorities, that supertanker had oil in it which was destined for syria which would be against the rules of eu sanctions but iran was furious and it accused the british of piracy. it said there would be a price to pay for this and iran threatened some sort of retaliation and it appears that what happened in the golf is some sort of return revenge for that and that is why there is so much concern here
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and a call for deescalation of the situation. people who consume a lot of sugary drinks, including pure fruitjuice, could have a higher risk of developing cancer, according to a new large—scale study. it looked at 100,000 people in france over five years. doctors are now calling for further research, as lauren moss reports. bottles of pop and sugary drinks are often at the centre of the debate about healthy living and obesity. now a study by scientists in france suggests they are significantly associated with the risk of cancer. researchers looked at 100,000 people for five years. the average person drank around two cans of sugary drinks a week. but the study found if they consumed two more cans on top of that, around 100 millilitres a day, there was an 18% increased risk of cancer. the study did not find any cancer links with artificial sweeteners,
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and it could not determine whether sugary drinks do cause disease but health campaigners say the findings are another indication that intake should be limited. the fact that they did find a link regardless of weight, that is interesting. and potentially concerning. but we need more research on this. in the meantime there is already lots of reasons to cut down on these drinks. since last year, uk manufacturers have been paying a levy on high sugar drinks. tory leadership candidate borisjohnson provoked criticism from health professionals last week by vowing to review what he called sin taxes when he becomes prime minister. obesity is a known cause of cancer, and consuming many sugary drinks can lead to weight gain. but this study says that is not the full story. soft drinks are safe as part of a balanced diet, but this research will feed into the continuing discussion about how we can lead a healthier life.
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senior labour figures have expressed anger and alarm at claims that some ofjeremy corbyn's closest allies tried to interfere in disciplinary processes involving allegations of anti—semitism. former labour officials told bbc panorama in a programme that aired last night that members of the labour leader's top team attempted to interfere in their inquiry into the issue. the party strongly rejects the claims, saying they have been made by "disaffected" former employees. a man has been arrested for climbing over a fence onto the forecourt of buckingham palace while the queen was in residence. the 22—year—old is being held on suspicion of trespass. it's understood he scaled the barrier to the side of the building in the early hours of wednesday. scotland yard say the incident is not being treated as terror—related. sir richard branson has warned that his companies will spend a less money in britain if the country leaves the european union without a deal. the founder of the virgin group has been telling the bbc‘s transport correspondent, tom burridge that he thinks
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the pound would collapse in a disorderly brexit. a very stark warning today from sir richard branson about britain leaving the eu without a deal. richard branson about britain leaving the eu without a dealm would be devastating to many virgin companies. people are spending a lot less money in britain and putting energies into other countries. he has always opposed brexit believes his airline alone would lose hundreds of millions of dollars through no deal. the pound will colla pse to through no deal. the pound will collapse to parity with the dollar if there is a hard exit. all our costs are if there is a hard exit. all our costs a re in if there is a hard exit. all our costs are in dollars in maintenance, plane parts, the bottom line hit to that was $100 million us. a hard exit will result in the freight we get from europe that we put on virgin atlantic going to america disappearing. we will not get any of that freight. that would be another
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100 million does down the drain. virgin trains are set to largely disappearfrom our virgin trains are set to largely disappear from our railways virgin trains are set to largely disappearfrom our railways in march. ina disappearfrom our railways in march. in a dispute over pensions, its bid to keep running services like this one from birmingham to london has been disqualified by the government. so richard says operating a train company in britain has become harder. nowadays, the department of transport in their wisdom, they give you a massive long list of dos and don'ts and it is very, very difficult to be entrepreneurial and i think that is sad. the government has commissioned a review of the railways. the expectation is that it will recommend radical change. veteran crooner julio iglesias is the" biological father" of a 43 year old man whose mother had a brief affair
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with the grammy award—winning singer in 1975. the court based the ruling in parts on the fact that the men looked like each other. the rule your —— ruling was also based on testimony after the singer refused to take a dna test. the paternity claim was begun three decades ago. the verdict of the court, in the absence of dna testing, was that there was enough physical resemblance so the judgement was made.|j physical resemblance so the judgement was made. i always get told i resemble people though. later we will be at wimbledon for the weather but first, england and australia at the cricket world cup.
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let's return to our top story. three vessels believed to belong to the revolutionary guard approached a british ship and asked it to stop in iranians waters. let's discuss this in more detail. good morning to you, michelle. we are getting more detail this morning from the ministry of defence about what happened. can you ta ke defence about what happened. can you take us through what you understand we re take us through what you understand were been the sequence of events? what i understand is that the british heritage was left where it was outside saudi arabian port yesterday. the ministry of defence had previously escorted another tankerfrom the had previously escorted another tanker from the region and all we know from the ministry of defence at this stage is that what you have been reporting, that it was requested by the iranians ships to stay there. this comes against a
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backdrop of extreme tension in the region. we have had six tankers attacked since may and of course the escalating tension between the uk and around comes after the seizure ofan iranians and around comes after the seizure of an iranians owned tanker of gibraltar last week. with your knowledge of the industry is case that any british tankers moving in those waters either have to be or are accompanied by a british navy vessel? it appears this way. i think i have checked there have been about 20 british flagged ships in the region in the last 24 hours perhaps six or seven significantly are tankers that would be loading crude oil and refined products. most would head to asia even though they are british flagged but i would say that
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there were calls yesterday by the us for co—ordinated military patrols. that is supported by some of the key shipping organisations and i would say those lands would now be finalised and ready quite quickly in line with what happened today. to be clear, is it conceivable that that security process, in terms of logistics, is it conceivable that all takers can be protected? we understand this british frigate was accompanying that merchant ship as it went through. is that how it will be for this period of time? what we can do is look back to what happened when there was threats of somali pirates ten years ago and their you saw a co—ordinated military effort to have group transits where vessels travelled together alongside military assets in order to prevent them being attacked by somali
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pirates. some sort of plan like that will probably emerge from what has happened to the british heritage. will probably emerge from what has happened to the british heritagem is hard to avoid the question of what may have happened had that triggered not been there. we are told that obviously this appears to have been some kind of retaliatory action from the iranians in relation to what happened in gibraltar. isn't that alarming? the prospect of what might have happened were it not for the navy being there.|j might have happened were it not for the navy being there. i don't think it is helpful to speculate because things are so inflamed they are at the moment. of course you also have the moment. of course you also have the backdrop of usc run tensions and the backdrop of usc run tensions and the sanctions, the unilateral us sanctions on crude and petrol chemical industries which has crippled the country ‘s economy because the only market they have left now is china and syria. so with the uk and iranians tensions, the us
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iranians tensions and then you have this backdrop of commercial shipping being attacked in areas of the waters around around. they said they we re waters around around. they said they were undertaken by unknown state actors but this is been clearly pointed at around. it is a worrying development and something we have not really seen as a threat to commercial shipping since the somali pirates back in 2008, 2009. thank you very much for your time this morning. that was michelle brockman, an expert in shipping analysis. more details are emerging this morning of the confrontation and we will keep you up—to—date through the morning. carol is at wimbledon for us this morning. we saw her helping to unload flowers earlier. where are you now? iam not i am not far away from that. good morning, everybody. the flowers inside are equally spectacular. we
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speak to the florist. good morning. you are responsible for the flowers. we are indeed. lovely to see you again. lovely to see you, too. how do you come up with the ideas? they are always different. we work very closely with the club, especially the chairman and his wife. i am not working with my daughter who is taking over my mantle. we look for different flowers, different varieties of flowers. it is very difficult because it is the same time of the year. with martin folger, you know the had gardener, and all his flowers, so we try to complement each other. you stick with the wimbledon colours, the purples and whites. we do. we like some hot pink and other colours to give it a different dimension. it can geta give it a different dimension. it can get a bit boring if it is always the same thing. and they are refreshed or replaced every single day. they are not replaced every day. they are not replaced every day. we are here every day. we do about three changeovers during the
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championships. they are in tip top condition. you could do a surgical operation on the floor of the time we finish. talking of surgical operations. you have been very ill and it is nice to see you restored back to good health. good to see you join us. the weather this morning, the plants may get a drink outside because there is a little bit of rain in the forecast this morning at wimbledon. that will clear if it arrives and it will be very light rain. the forecast for wimbledon is a mostly dry one. the outside chance ofa a mostly dry one. the outside chance of a shower this afternoon. cloud and sunshine, highs of 25. the forecast for the uk as a whole has showers in it and a lot of those showers, especially across scotland and north—east england will be heavy and north—east england will be heavy and thundery. this morning at nine o'clock you can see the amount of showers draped across the west, the north, and the east. all of those showers will be putting in towards the north sea as we go through the course of the morning. one or two heavy ones. the nature of the
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showers means we won't all catch one. there is a lot of cloud around this morning. northern ireland, for you, something brighter for you. this morning. northern ireland, for you, something brighterfor you. as we think south across the rest of england and wales again the cloud thick enough for the odd spot now and again orthe thick enough for the odd spot now and again or the odd shower. that will tend to clear. sunshine lasting the longest today across the channel islands. all of those showers clear off into the north sea. as temperatures rise through the course of the day more showers will be sparked. the met office has a yellow weather warning for the thunderstorms and they are for scotla nd thunderstorms and they are for scotland and also north—east england. anywhere north of lincolnshire. the heaviest are likely to be across parts of eastern scotla nd likely to be across parts of eastern scotland where we could have between 20 and 30 millimetres of rain in just one hour. temperatures in the sunshine getting up to 25 or 26. widely we are looking high teens, low 20s. through the evening and overnight many showers will tend to fateful top there will be quite a bit of cloud around. but there will be clear skies as well. overnight
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lows are falling to between nine and 16 degrees. another humid feel, but as we go into tomorrow the wind direction changes. tomorrow it will feel fresher than today. for scotla nd feel fresher than today. for scotland and northern ireland quite a bit of cloud around for you. you might see the odd shower out of that but not much more. for england and wales a drier and brighter day was sunny into bills, but showers anywhere up the east coast. temperature similar today with a north to north—westerly component to the breeze it will feel fresher. back to you two. a lesson for us all in how to carry on regardless with the noise behind you. you just carry on. that is the way to do it. what was that banging? i haven't got a clue. i was in the zone. such a professional! the florist 's back as well. there will be a queue of
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people who want to talk with carol. it is 18 minutes past seven. victoria, we will talk about the issue around whirlpool tumble dryers. a real concern. they recall now. good morning to you both. whirlpool tumble dryers and this saga has taken another turn. the company has agreed to issue a recall for around half a million faulty dryers it has yet to modify. a fault which cause some dryers to catch fire was first discovered in 2015. since then the company has been modifying dryers but it will now remove and replace the ones it hasn't yet fixed free of charge. there is a checking service on the website if you want to find out more about your machine to see if you are affected. good news and bad news for gender diversity in business. the top 350 uk companies are on track to hit the government's
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target of having 33% of their board member positions filled by women by next year. however the people that did this research found evidence women were being appointed to symbolic roles and shorter positions. really box ticking exercises. finally, if you're heading off to gatwick airport for a flight this morning: worth checking for any updates with your airline. there are still some delays this morning after flights were suspended for a couple of hours last night due to an air traffic control problem. if you are going on holidays check before you go to the airport. that is it for me. good advice. thank you very much. see you in a bit. claims of anti—semitism within the labour party have dragged on for nearly three years, with key figures criticised for failing to take decisive action. the bbc‘s panorama programme says senior party officials interfered in the disciplinary process of dealing with the accusations. let's speak to the former labour mp luciana berger — she quit the party in february claiming it discriminated against jewish people — which the party strongly denies.
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this is obviously a very personal story to you. how are you feeling hearing what you did from this panorama investigation?” hearing what you did from this panorama investigation? i don't think anyone could have watched the programme last night and not have been incredibly moved and disturbed by what we heard from people who had worked behind the scenes within the labour party over a number of years, who gave their very personal testimonies and spoke with incredible courage, to hear also that these people are being pursued now for being whistleblowers and speaking out for breaking their nondisclosure agreements is particularly concerning. jeremy corbyn's ellyse have rejected the testimony put forward, saying that those who have come forward are disaffected dead. what do you make of that? i find that incredulous that the comments have been made. inferring anyone watch the programme last night they would have heard about the personal impact on all of those individuals, some of whom were
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previously supporters of jeremy corbyn. we had about the impact on those individuals' mental health and how they had worked at the labour party in an incredibly toxic environment and how many of them had to be signed off work. one of whom had contemplated suicide. and on that basis it is an incredibly serious state of affairs and to explain it away as a disaffected or disgruntled former employee rather than to address the duty of care to those individuals, what do they do to look after them? it is incredibly concerning that that has been a response. rather than actually address what has been said, anyway, what has been exposed in this programme people should be sacked, people and members across the labour party should be suspended. and we should see some very serious action. the fact that we now know there is a statutory investigation that has been investigated by the qualities in human rights commission is every reason why this is a very serious state of affairs and rather than
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look at itself and address what has been going on, yet again the leadership of the labour party seeks to explain away and obfuscate. that is simply unacceptable for a political party that is opposed to pride itself on the values of equality and antiracism. given what you have experienced in what has come out of this investigation, how widespread you think this is, because obviously labour sources are suggesting it is only a handful of cases compared to the huge membership of the party. one anti—semite within the labour party ra nks anti—semite within the labour party ranks espousing anti—jewish hatred is one too many. it is a party that is one too many. it is a party that is supposed to be built on the foundations and the values of equality for all and antiracism. but certainly it is widespread. you only have to look at my own twitter timeline to see the breadth and the depth and the toxicity of what has been espoused by people who purported to be labour party supporters and members. it is
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widespread. we know from many other investigations that there are hundreds of cases still outstanding. the list keeps on stacking up because people are not being held to account. members should be suspended. we should be seeing staff being held to account for this. and if they won't resign they should be sacked. and we need to see constituency parties suspended as well. and yet this action isn't forthcoming. time and time and time again there are stories in the press ona again there are stories in the press on a weekly if not daily basis about this horrid stinking issue within the labour party and still it's not been dealt with. and do you think this is something that the party can actually recover from than? how would you ever consider rejoining the labour party, for example, if they do sort out these problems? well, the problem is so widespread and has been going on for so long and has been going on for so long and still, even today, in the wake of this expose these revelations we had about just last night of this expose these revelations we had aboutjust last night the party still isn't standing up and taking
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responsibility for what is going on. i can't see a moment anytime soon where i would even contemplate going back to the labour party when it is still contending with these are very, very serious issues. and i will look very closely to the outcome of the statutory investigation that has been initiated by the equalities in human rights commission. people night but be aware that this has happened on one previous occasion —— people might not be aware. it is going into the party that seeks to hold office and hold the keys to number 10. it is frankly unacceptable. we will see the outcome of that investigation. the fact it has been initiated is because there is so much evidence that has met the threshold which means it could be started. i'll be looking very closely to the outcomes of that. i anticipate in the wake of what we have seen just last night even more evidence that the party will be found to be institutionally anti—semitic and institutionally racist and that is not acceptable for any party that seeks to be in
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charge of our country luciana, thank you for talking to us this morning. luciana berger, a former labour mp. the labour party say we completely reject any claim that labour is anti—semitic. we stand in solidarity with jewish people anti—semitic. we stand in solidarity withjewish people and are taking action to root out anti—semitism from our movement and society. 7:26. this is at birmingham, edgbaston cricket ground. england against australia. the semi—final of the cricket world cup. the scene is set. they start at 10:30 a.m.. all looking quite right now. something tells me a little livelier later on this morning. mike is there for us. we'll catch up with him. time to get the news, travel, and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm charlotte franks. a man has died after being stabbed in south east london. police were called to tellson avenue in greenwich just before 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon. a man believed to be in his early twenties was found with a number
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of stab wounds and later died in hospital. no arrests have yet been made. a new registration scheme for drone flyers has been described as too expensive, and that it won't stop criminals. the plans to test and licence up to 170,000 people have been drawn up by the civil aviation authority. it's after gatwick airport was closed by alleged drone sightings. the £16.50 fee has been defended by the transport minister. but one mp thinks it's unfair. you shouldn't let the activities — the illegitimate activities of the very few spoil what has become a widespread and enjoyable recreation and a technological advance that many people will be using for good in years to come. it's the 160th anniversary of big ben's first chimes across westminster. upsot three seconds the great bell began striking the hour,
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—— the great bell began striking the hour, onjuly11th1859. but the chimes won't ring out today to mark this anniversary, as the elizabeth tower — which houses big ben , is currently halfway through a major restoration project. it should be finished in 2021. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning but severe delays on tfl rail. on the trains there is disruption and also delays for southern and thameslink services on the east croydon/uckfield/ east grinstead line following signal problems. onto the roads: the m25 is now closed clockwise from j8 to j10 following a multi—vehicle collision involving a jacknifed lorry. congestion is back toj6. the m25 is also down to three lanes anticlockwise towards j23 at south mimms following a collision, with tailbacks to j25 at enfield. now the weather with lucy martin. hello, good morning. after a warm and humid night last night we start the day today with temperatures in the mid to high teens. there is the chance of seeing one
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or two showers, but there will be some sunny spells around as well. so a warm start this morning. temperatures already around 17 degrees celsius in a few spots. some showery rain first thing, but also some sunny spells. into the afternoon it's looking mostly dry with some areas of cloud, some bright and sunny spells, and just the small chance of one or two showers. temperatures at a maximum of around 25 celsius. overnight it will become dry with some clear spells. again, we're looking at a mild night, overnight lows around 14—16 degrees celsius. tomorrow brings more in the way of sunshine. there will be some patchy cloud around, particularly through the morning. chance of seeing some odd isolated shower into the afternoon. a slightly fresher feel to things with a north—westerly breeze and highs of 24 degrees celsius. some areas of cloud but also some sunny spells. temperatures falling a little closer to average as we move through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to steph and charlie.
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bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the ministry of defence has confirmed that a british oil tanker was confronted by iranian boats in the persian gulf. three vessels thought to belong to the iranian revolutionary guard approached the ship and asked it to stop in iranian territorial waters close by, but withdrew after a british warship warned them off. the iranian foreign minister is reported to say that the claim is worthless. people who consume a lot of sugary drinks could have a higher risk of developing cancer, according to a new study. the research, which looked at 100,000 people in france, found those who drank two extra cans of fruitjuice or fizzy pop a week saw an 18% increased risk of cancer.
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however, the study did not establish a direct link, and experts say more information is needed. there is plenty of evidence already that sugary drinks, it is a good idea to cut down on them because of the link between obesity and other health issues as well. the fact that this did find a link regardless of weight is interesting and potentially concerning that we do need more research on this. in the meantime there is already many reasons to cut down on these strengths. a man has been arrested for climbing over a fence onto the forecourt of buckingham palace while the queen was in residence. the 22—year—old is being held on suspicion of trespass. it's understood he scaled the barrier to the side of the building in the early hours of wednesday. scotland yard say the incident is not being treated as terror—related. the french parliament is expected to approve a new tax on the world's biggest internet and technology firms such as google and facebook. the measure, which will initially raise around 360 million pounds a year sets a precedent that's being closely
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watched by governments around the world. president trump has already ordered an investigation into the french plans. a public memorial will take place in hong kong later to remember marco leung, who became known as "the man in the yellow raincoat" after he fell to his death while protesting against the territory's controversial extradition bill. he died last month after unfurling a banner on the side of a shopping mall. the bill, which would have allowed extradition to the chinese mainland sparked weeks of unrest in the city. the history of the human race has been re—written following the discovery by researchers of a 210,000—year—old skull in greece. the earliest evidence of modern human fossils outside of africa pushes back the arrival of the first homo sapiens into europe from africa by 150,000 years. the findings are published in the sciencejournal, nature.
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it always amazing that we are still discovering things that are changing our view of history. it feels like a significant moment. history of the human race has been rewritten. that is pretty big. whoever wrote that had a strong coffee this morning. they are still finding out extraordinary things and they are discovered every day. let's had now to edgbaston for mike to tell us about the cricket. it's a huge day here at edgbaston for england as they try to qualify for their first world cup final in almost 30 years. over a generation ago. the scene is set here and there is a hive of activity here now. the covers are coming off and the wicked is
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revealed the others revealed shortly. they are confident about the weather with blue skies i am delighted to say. a strange and exciting game, one day cricket where anything can happen. think about it. england came in as the favourites, the number one team and then they lost three matches and it seemed like it might be a repeat of 1999 when they went out in the group stage. but, no. they fall back on the last chance saloon winning against england here that make india. england are now the form team and the previous form team, india, around. so englander against australia, the defending champions who have won four from five times. to more people who know more about this than i do with us. let's say good morning to the former england batsman, mrk ramprakash — who was until very recently their batting coach. and meljones, former australian international and now commentator. ami
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am i right in saying that england are the team that now have their tails up and australia beware?” are the team that now have their tails up and australia beware? i do fa ncy tails up and australia beware? i do fancy their chances. i am not totally objective but they were on a knife edge and i was surprised when they lost to sri lanka and they lost to australia at lords. i am surprised where they found themselves. it is almost like they tasted death but reacted brilliantly in the two most wins games against india and then new zealand. with that attitude and that they have re—energised the team. absolutely i fa ncy re—energised the team. absolutely i fancy them today. a key thing has been the batting. there has been a revolution since the last world cup in the way they that from the front foot and attack. one day cricket rather than the test form of batting and you were part of overseeing that. how different is it to when you were batting? the game has evolved within the last five years. i was at the last world cup in 2015 and the batsmen were very aggressive in that tournament and the pictures we re in that tournament and the pictures were quite good. england were behind
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but they had opened the batting and times have changed. after that tournament there was an appraisal of things. andrew strauss was put in charge and he had a clear vision along with paul. they picked an attacking group of players and that was a natural game. they wanted to go out and played. i remember the first series here, we were against new zealand we were 206 but they continued to attack. jason roy came in and that series. he did not set the world alight but he had the right attacking attitude and that is what the managers wanted. they stuck through things in the last four yea rs through things in the last four years and we find ourselves with a hugely entertaining brand of cricket played by england as the host nation. we are crossing everything that they can make it through today. well, most of us. yes, apart from the fact that they are facing the reigning champions australia. the
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perennial semifinalists and you know this format at this stage of the tournament so well and one thing about australia is the redemption of david warner after the whole sandpaper gate in the deepest load thatis sandpaper gate in the deepest load that is australian cricket has had. he has been brilliant. a cleansing for him. some people could say that. i think for david warner he has a thick skin anyway and all of australian cricket would have been looking forward to this world cup. was a glitch 12 months or so ago but thatis was a glitch 12 months or so ago but that is where the strength in australian cricket lies, that ability to react and react well to whatever is put before them. and thatis whatever is put before them. and that is the beauty of how they have gone through this tournament. that tournament style play and they found themselves in another semi—. they have never lost a semi—final although they did tie one against south africa in 1999, an historic moment. so i think they will be relishing the opportunity of going one step further. but... a chink in australia's armour, they did lose.
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to south africa. would that have any effect or would theyjust forget about it? like any professional team they will take what they can to make sure they can go one step further again. they will look back at that they have played england twice in this tournament and won both those games. practice games! and it is semifinals time now and this place isa semifinals time now and this place is a cauldron. the crowd will be parochial and they will try to feed off that. and it's going down well with the australian public? absolutely. you just know that people are getting up late at night and making sure that they can use whatever they like, be it coffee or whatever they like, be it coffee or whatever to stay up and be part of it. i would ask for predictions but i know what you're going to say. australia. england. the women
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semi—final day as well wimbledon and in the menstrual we have got roger federer against rafael nadal tomorrow. the first time that has happened in more than a decade which may sound surprising with such familiar names. federer came from a set down to beat japan's kei nishikori in the quarters. federer is now 37 years old but looks to be getting better this year. he's going for his ninth wimbledon title. rafa nadal had a relatively easy ride against the american sam querrey. he won in straight sets to set up the semi with his great rival federer. the last time these two met at wimbledon was that epic final in 2008 which was eventually won by nadal. whilst all the attention's on rafa and roger, novak djokovic is quietly going about his business. he's the number one seed and beat belgium's david goffin in straight sets to secure his place in the semis. where he'll play roberto bautista agut.
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he thought he would be out by now because he qualified for his first—ever grand slam final. now he has a first—ever grand slam final. now he hasa dilemma... first—ever grand slam final. now he has a dilemma... well, not really. he did not expect to get this far and had planned to be on a buck‘s night in ibiza. so instead of heading to the clubs of the white isle, his friends are heading over to the all england club to see him play a semi final. they will have their party around wimbledon instead. andy murray and serena williams have had plenty of fun over the last few days but their run in the mixed doubles in over. murena — as they like to be known — lost in the third round to top seeds bruno soares and nicole melichar. the pair have looked like they've really enjoyed playing together, we'll have to wait and see if they do it again. but murray has said it's pretty unlikely he'll play singles at the us open in september. and the british grand prix is going to stay at silverstone until at least 2024.
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this weekend's race had been due to be its last after silverstone ended its contract because it was too expensive. but after two years of negotiations bosses at the track have finally come to an agreement with formula one, and they've signed a new five year contract. one man who was very happy about this is the australian driver daniel ricardo. i spent time with him this week and he said it is one of his favourite tracks because of its speed and the festival at this fear generated by the crowd. and he is friends with the australian cricket teams are between his duties in the testing he will be doing, he will be keeping an eye on the cricket here which you can do as well. radio 5 live and from 1030 the interplay apps on the bbc sport website. the sun is shining and the wicket is uncovered. we are ready and the
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crowd it be coming in shortly. he does look fabulous then our. thank you, we will see you shortly. and just as carol predicted, the sun is out and carol as there. good morning, everyone. we are in the competitors restaurant and when i said to the crew we are coming to the competitors restaurant they left burn marks on the paving stones to get up we are joined by the head chef. this is yourfirst get up we are joined by the head chef. this is your first you get up we are joined by the head chef. this is yourfirst you doing this. how is it going? it is going so this. how is it going? it is going so well. now this is a private area, not anyone can come in? this is the competitors. we do a lot of great food in his through the day focusing on their nutrition so they can get the best result on court. and what are you cooking now? we have chicken and mushrooms. we go through about a hundred kilos of pastorate dated pastor ticks the boxes and a competitor can come and build their own recipe from the choice in front of us. i like to put a little bit of
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chorizo sausage in there. and in all those in the one hand. and it is all very healthy. how much pastor did you say? 100 kilograms. you can see how popular it is. we have some behind us here and this is rigatoni so behind us here and this is rigatoni so it is like a large tube. you can see how delicious that looks. how do you deal with the different dietary requirements? we have a gluten free as well which is important and when the competitors, but it is about choice they are literally deciding what they want. what time do you have to start had to prepare the soul? from about five a.m.. and we finish the evening. it is me and the tea m finish the evening. it is me and the team and they all work hard. finish the evening. it is me and the team and they all work hardm finish the evening. it is me and the team and they all work hard. it is lovely and smells delicious, we will be back. get some pancakes ready for
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us while we do the weather. the weather is not too bad, the sun is coming out and out wimbledon there is still some cloud but we expect the forecast today to show some sunshine. there is a small risk of a shower and temperatures reaching 25 degrees. there are some showers in the forecast for other parts of the uk, particularly across scotland and north—east england as far south as lincolnshire. this is where the met office has a weather warning out for torrential thundery downpours that could lead to disruption. this morning you can see that we have a lot of showers around. all the showers you can see across scotland and north—west england, north—east england heading off into the north sea through the morning to northern ireland will start on a sunny note and then as we come south through wales there are showers there as well and if you showers in the midlands and eastern england. they head off in the direction of the north sea as well. the nature of showers means that not all of us
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will catch them. the sunshine will prevail the longest across the channel islands. through the day you can see the progress so showers channel islands. through the day you can see the progress so showers are making as they clear off into the north sea. it brightens up a touch and some of us see some sunshine but is temperatures rise that will spark showers that the met office has a warning out for. the heaviest ones are likely to be across eastern scotla nd are likely to be across eastern scotland and here is where we could have some issues with 20, 30 millimetres of rain falling in an hour. temperature wise today we're at the finals of the country, 12 or 13 degrees and in the south, 25, 20 six degrees. heading through the evening and overnight, many showers will tend to fade and there will be still some cloud left behind and we will also see some clear sky as well. temperature wise, it will not bea well. temperature wise, it will not be a cold night. looking at overnight lows between nine and 16 degrees. so tomorrow morning we start off on a cloudy node across scotla nd
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start off on a cloudy node across scotland and northern ireland but a dry day for scotland than today. it may see the odd shower but for england and for wales we are looking at sunshine developing. there will still be some showers, particularly in the east, anywhere from the wash headed north across eastern england and temperatures tomorrow are very similarto and temperatures tomorrow are very similar to today, maybe one of two degrees down. it will feel fresher because the wind direction will be more north for more westerly and only a light breeze. before we go, i wa nt to only a light breeze. before we go, i want to see how my pancakes are coming along. this does not look promising. your pancake is now a pasta dish. we have a lovely tuesday flavour there with all the cream. don't you wish you were here, stephan charlie? i certainly do, i'd tell you what, you are going to float your way around wimbledon. you will be asking the chef what tony finishes ——
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float. in for a pound... we will leave you to it. yeah, it does look nice. it is a 7:46. this is a story we have been looking at quite a bit. women's role in the workplace. are they being treated better more generally? yes. they have looked at what companies have been doing. victoria has the details as well as a lovely gas. good morning. yes. that's right. we're talking about the female ftse board report. it looks at the 350 biggest public companies in the uk. they're the ones listed on the stock market. now, on the face of it there's good news here. they've been doing this research since 1998 and in that time we've gone from just 7% of all the top jobs in the uk being held by women to almost a third this year. and they're on track to hit the government's target of 33% by next year. but — and this is a big but —
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the people who do this research said that they've found growing evidence that women are being appointed to "symbolic" roles or shorter—term positions. they also say women are still far less likely to get promoted. melanie eusebe started her own business and then co—founded the black british business awards. shejoins me now. good morning to you. thank you for having me. my first question to you, do you think that the workplace is getting more meritocratic, fairer was yellow definitely. this is a good new story. the numbers indicate there has been a change, going from 7% to almost 33% is undoubtedly a good news story. however, there are some trends and we need to look under the bonnet and see where the disturbing trends by and what we can do about them. the problem with this is the idea that women are being appointed to symbolic roles and it then devalues the nature of those
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roles, people think that the only reason someone is roles, people think that the only reason someone is doing theirjobs because they a woman. exactly. undoubtedly, in an organisation, there are the more strategic commercial market facing roles, cfo, ceo. the trends are indicating that women's roles are increasing in the non— executive director or more of the support executive roles. what we have to do is really push harder so we're looking more cfo and more senior roles. that is where you see the true power lies in an executive board. it is interesting drinking —— digging down into this data. many women take a career break or go part—time to raise a family at some point during the career, it is surprising that the age gap isn't the other way around, but we are seeing that non—executive roles are being filled by younger women. why do you think that is? are older women being discriminated against? yes. we were just having this conversation and the data is indicating there is a disturbing trend that career breaks, women are
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being penalised for career breaks and for being older. there is something about the discourse around, younger women are being taught how to ask for more and go informal. so we are looking under the bonnet to see what is happening with our older women who are coming back from career breaks, whether maternity leave anything as ——go in for more. what is your sense of what is going on. you have your own business, you see plenty during the businesses that you are looking at with the awards. there is a combination of factors. executive board ships, directorships, they usually long tan is. it will take time to change things. we have done incredibly well to move from 7% to 33%. with non—executive directorships they are easier to fulfil. financial roles, ed stubbs all the way from school, all the way from accountancy training, being co mforta ble from accountancy training, being comfortable with the numbers as well. we are derailing women out of
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stem topics. this is science, maths, that sort of thing. there is a pipeline problem that we are looking at in terms of preparing women for those market facing commercial direction roles in a large organisation. the groenefeld school of management found that one in ten women sitting on these ftse boards we re women sitting on these ftse boards were black, asian, or other minority ethnic backgrounds, is this a separate issue? this is a separate issue and they like to say it is a different lens with which to look at the issue. so this year we partner the issue. so this year we partner the business awards partnered with cranfield to the business awards partnered with cra nfield to look the business awards partnered with cranfield to look at a pipeline of women to watch. women who are in the pipeline being prepared for ftse 100, 250 equivalent roles. because like the cranfield report to 25 yea rs like the cranfield report to 25 years ago, we need to do the same thing and focus on a target area, a target percentage of women that are being underrepresented at the board.
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melanie, thank you so much for coming in. thank you. plenty more on this story on the bbc website. go there to find out more. thank you very much, victoria. tonnes and tons of black plastic are being removed from the bed of a river in cumbria in what is thought to be one of the most significant river restoration projects in the uk. alison freeman is near whitehaven for us this morning and can tell us more. tell us where you are. good morning. good morning. i'm next to the river keekle and we're talking about stuff, black plastic. this is only a little bit of the plastic that has been pulled out of the bed of the river keekle behind me. you can see the guys working hard to remove it. it goes to show how our attitudes to plastic have changed over the years. when it was put in around 20 or so yea rs when it was put in around 20 or so years ago it was seen as the solution to an environmental issue.
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but today this black plastic really has become the problem. at first glance, the river keekle looks like any other, but take a closer look and you can see its dark secret. reams and reams of black plastic. this plastic was used to line the river to protect it from contamination from a nearby disused mine. but over the past two decades it's deteriorated and it's become the pollutant itself, as well as an eyesore. there's been such a knee—jerk reaction to worry about what the river will do once the coal mine operations had finished. it was a natural thing — let's just constrain the river, put it in plastic, and then we can walk away and it will be fine. well, in only 20 years that plastic has started to degrade. we've got to remember that, we're notjust taking a plastic covered river — rivers go to the sea. so this potentially would end up in the sea. what's happening here is thought to be the biggest river restoration
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of its kind in the uk. this summer's project is a pilot with plastic being cleared from a 200 metre stretch. next year the rest of the 2.5 kilometres will be restored, costing more than £1 million. it'll benefit wildlife as well as people. the plastic is just a sheer plane, so the water's going down the river very quickly. there's no boulders and cobbles and things to stop that water. so the water's whooshing downstream into an area where there is some flooding of some homes. what are the improvements we will see when the plastic‘s gone? it will be a fully functioning river. so it will be meandering, it will work properly, it will shift its gravels as rivers like to do. and we'll get much more wildlife, there ‘ll be more fish spawning. at the moment there are hardly any fish in here because there is no spawning habitat for them. and people will be able to enjoy it much more. catherine and her family live nearby. they welcome the project. the benefit of getting this back to nature for us as a community is that we'll be able to spend more time here safely and we'll be able to enjoy more wildlife, because when the river's restored,
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obviously the wildlife that lives in it will be increased as well. it will be a better habitat, a more natural habitat for the wildlife. it'sjust going to be brilliant. and dogs can paddle and there will be so much wildlife and kids can paddle in it. it'sjust going to be amazing. more rivers have been re—naturalised in cumbria than anywhere else in the uk. but the keekle is the most challenging by far. allison freeman, bbc news. believe it or not up until this week it has been dry here. so they are much more ahead on this ten week project, it might be finished and six. what we have been talking about his contamination. the lining was put in because there were concerns that the what would get contaminated by nearby mine works. there is no evidence of that. what they are worried about now is that the plastic beads we have so much about our being washed into the water was and that is why it has to come out.
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one good bit of news about this plastic is they are hoping to get it recycled and possibly turned into a boardwalk and that will be turned into a nature trail to run along the river so local people can come your and enjoy the natural wildlife they are hoping will come back and live here. thank you very much. that is quite a project. it is a major project. it is 7:56. time now to get the news, travel, and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. a man has died after being stabbed in south—east london. police were called to tellson avenue in greenwich just before three o'clock yesterday afternoon. a man believed to be in his early 20s was found with a number of stab wounds and later died in hospital. no arrests have yet been made. two men from luton have been convicted of smuggling £1.2 million worth of heroin into the uk via the postal system. sultan mahmood butt and nibeel saghir were part of a group of four people convicted by the national crime agency.
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the agency seized 13 packages at three different uk airports — including sta nsted. the heroin was concealed in boxing gloves, and medical instruments. a new registration scheme for drone flyers has been described as too expensive, and that it won't stop criminals. the plans to test and licence up to 170,000 people have been drawn up by the civil aviation authority. it's after gatwick airport was closed by alleged drone sightings. the £16.50 fee has been defended by the transport minister. but one mp thinks it's unfair. you shouldn't let the activities — the illegitimate activities of the very few spoil what has become a widespread and enjoyable recreation and a technological advance that many people will be
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using for good in years to come. the last leg of a commemorative train trip from vienna to london will be arriving at liverpool street station later today, marking the 80th anniversary of the kindertransport trains. between november 1938 to september the following year, the trains took around 10,000 mostly jewish children out of nazi germany and brought them to safety to london. 18 have made the memorialjourney including four survivors. it's the 160th anniversary of big ben's first chimes across westminster. the great bell began striking the hour, on july 11th 1859. but the chimes won't ring out today to mark this anniversary, as the elizabeth tower — which houses big ben, is currently halfway through a major restoration project. it should be finished in 2021. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning but severe delays on tfl rail.
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on the trains there is disruption and also delays for southern and thameslink services on the east croydon/uckfield/ east grinstead line following signal problems. onto the roads: the m25 is now closed clockwise from j8 to j10 following a multi—vehicle collision involving a jackknifed lorry. congestion is back toj6. the m25 is also down to three lanes anticlockwise towards j23 at south mimms following a collision, with tailbacks to j25 at enfield. let's take a quick look at the weather. there will be sunny intervals at times today. as we get into the afternoon there will be some patchy cloudy developing with just the chance of one or two showers. but overall — a pleasant and warm day, top temperature of 25 degrees celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to steph and charlie.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. our headlines today... a royal navy warship confronts iranian gunboats in the gulf after they try to stop a british oil tanker. fruitjuices and fizzy drinks are linked to increased chances of getting cancer, according to a major new study. half a million faulty tumble—dryers are recalled nearly four years after issues were first raised that they could cause fire. whirlpool says safety is its top priority. welcome to edgbaston — where the stage is set for england to try and make it to their first
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cricket world cup final in almost 30 years. they play australia in the semis today. good morning from wimbledon. we are looking over the members' lohan. the sun is trying to come out. it should stay dry today with the odd shower, but there are some heavy showers in the forecast and i will tell you where in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 11th ofjuly. our top story: a royal navy warship has driven off three iranian vessels after they tried to stop a british oil tanker. the ministry of defence says hms montrose positioned herself between the tanker — british heritage — and the iranian boats, before issuing verbal warnings. the mod says the iranian vessels then turned away. the incident happened in the strait of hormuz — a strategically important stretch of water between the persian gulf
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and the gulf of oman. last week an iranian supertanker was seized by british royal marines off gibraltar. let's get more details now from simonjones who is outside the ministry of defence. take us through what happened. the mod have told us this morning that they are deeply concerned about what happened. they are calling on iran to de—escalate tensions in the region. according to officials, a british tanker was selling just off iran yesterday when it was approached by three iranian boats, who were telling this tanker it had to change course and come to a halt. but the british tanker was actually being accompanied by a figure from the navy. at that point, the frigate positioned itself between the iranian boats and the tanker and reportedly trained its guns on the iranian boats and told it in no
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uncertain terms that the iranians had to leave the area immediately. at that point, the iranians obeyed and left the area. but we are hearing a very different version of events hearing a very different version of eve nts fro m hearing a very different version of events from iran this morning. they have described what the ministry of defence have said is not being the truth and not really what happened. they say britain is simply telling stories to escalate tensions. but the tensions don't need escalating in that region because last week, things flared up when britain stepped in and helped intercept an iranian supertanker off the coast of gibraltar. britain said that was heading for syria carrying oil and would have been against eu sanctions. but at that point, iran said this was piracy. they promised some sort of retaliation, and it appears that that is what we have had in this incident. people who consume a lot of sugary drinks, including pure fruitjuice, could have a higher risk of developing cancer, according
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to a new large—scale study. it looked at 100,000 people in france over five years. doctors are now calling for further research, as lauren moss reports. bottles of pop and sugary drinks are often at the centre of the debate about healthy living and obesity. now a study by scientists in france suggests they are significantly associated with the risk of cancer. researchers looked at 100,000 people for five years. the average person drank around two cans of sugary drinks a week. but the study found that if they consumed two more cans on top of that, around 100 millilitres a day, there was an 18% increased risk of cancer. the study did not find any cancer links with artificial sweeteners, and it could not determine whether sugary drinks do cause disease, but health campaigners say the findings are another indication that intake should be limited. the fact that they did find a link regardless of weight, is interesting.
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and potentially concerning. but we need more research on this. in the meantime, there is already lots of reasons to cut down on these drinks. since last year, uk manufacturers have been paying a levy on high sugar drinks. tory leadership candidate borisjohnson provoked criticism from health professionals last week by vowing to review what he called "sin taxes" if he becomes prime minister. obesity is a known cause of cancer, and consuming many sugary drinks can lead to weight gain. but researchers say that is not the full story. the british soft drink association says soft drinks are safe as part of a balanced diet, but this research will feed into the continuing discussion about how we can lead a healthier life. we've talked about faulty whirlpool tumble dryers quite a bit on the programme over the past few years — today a further recall‘s been announced. victoria's got the details
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on this for us. victoria? good morning. yes. that's right. whirlpool has issued a recall of half a million faulty tumble dryers. the thing to remember is that you can geta the thing to remember is that you can get a replacement for free and they will also take your old one away. this isn't a new problem. we have been talking about this on this programme since 2015. that was when whirlpool first acknowledged that there was a problem. something like 3.8 million units were at risk. so they started modifying the tumble dryers. let me show you a picture as to what the problem seems to be. this kind of damage is caused by fires in the worst—case scenarios. fluff ca n fires in the worst—case scenarios. fluff can collect in the filter and thenit fluff can collect in the filter and then it catches on the heating element and that then causes the fire. whirlpool admitted that they know their fires have been caused by these guys because of this problem. —— they can be caused by the gyres.
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the tricky thing is knowing whether you have got one of these machines. whirlpool own a lot of these brands. if your machine was made between april 2004 and september 2015 and it falls under one of these brands, you could be at risk. in terms of finding out whether or not you have the right model and serial number and stuff, flip open the inside of your dryer and there is a serial information thing which will tell you the model and the serial number. if you're not sure and it hasn't been modified by whirlpool already, stop using it. unplug it, contact whirlpool. you can do it on the phone or online, and they were asked for the serial number inside the washing machine. if you are at risk, they will take your machine away and give you a new one. the big question is, why on earth is it 2019, four
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yea rs is, why on earth is it 2019, four years later, before we are getting a compulsory recall on this? the government has got involved. which, the consumer group, have said whirlpool has dragged its heels over this. whirlpool have said, we have done what we can. safety is our priority. they are launching a public campaign as well this month to raise awareness of the issue. but they know that 5 million machines we re they know that 5 million machines were made and sold in the uk over that timeframe, and they think that 500,000 of them could still be affected. so you flip the door open and inside will be the details and you can contact whirlpool. thanks. a man has been arrested for climbing over a fence onto the forecourt of buckingham palace while the queen was in residence. the 22—year—old is being held on suspicion of trespass. it's understood he scaled the barrier to the side of the building in the early hours of wednesday. scotland yard say the incident is not being treated as terror—related. sir richard branson has warned that his companies will spend a lot less money in britain if there's
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a no—deal brexit. the virgin group founder believes the pound would fall significantly against the dollar if there was no deal. the department for transport says rail firms will continue to deliver benefits, but sir richard says his firms face losing millions. a hard brexit will result in the freight that we get from europe, that we put on virgin atlantic going to america, just disappearing. we won't get any of that freight. that would be another 100 million just down the drain. i could carry on. there is an enormous list when you look at each virgin company. it is obviously going to result in spending a lot less money in britain and putting all our energies into other countries. two graves in a small vatican cemetery are to be exhumed as part of an investigation into the disappearance of an italian schoolgirl more than 30 years ago. emanuela orlandi was just 15 when she went missing in rome
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in 1983, in a case that gained huge attention at the time. the order was made to reopen the graves after her family received a letter with a photo of the tombs in march. a public memorial will take place in hong kong later to remember marco leung, who became known as "the man in the yellow raincoat" after he fell to his death while protesting against the territory's controversial he died last month after unfurling a banner on the side of a shopping mall. the bill, which would have allowed extradition to the chinese mainland, sparked weeks of unrest in the city. the french parliament is expected to approve a new tax on the world's biggest internet and technology firms such as google and facebook. the measure, which will initially raise around 360 million a year, sets a precedent that's being closely watched by governments around the world. president trump has already ordered an investigation into the french plans.
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it's a huge day for england's cricketers, who play australia in the semi—finals of the world cup at edgbaston. they're looking to reach their first final in 27 years. mike is there. iam right i am right by the boundary and look at this, a magnificent scene. the sun is shining on the edgbaston wicket, which has been uncovered in the last hour. it is so busy now, with all the ground staff making sure the wicket is perfect, a lot of lawn mowers going on. they are uncovering the sponsors' logos. the spectators will be in the ground within the next 20 minutes at 8.30, nearly 25,000 of them. what an atmosphere it will be, so intense. it's a one—off, 50 overs a side. it is to decide who goes through to the world cup final against new zealand on sunday. england are trying to become the first england side to make a final since 1992, when it was in australia. they lost to pakistan,
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but they haven't been in the semifinals for nearly 30 years, so a chance to set the record straight. for a while in this competition, it seemed that they might not even get out of the group stage, like in 1999, when they also hosted the world cup. but then thankfully, they found their form again world cup. but then thankfully, they found theirform again in the world cup. but then thankfully, they found their form again in the last chance saloon here against india the other weekend and then against new zealand to book their place in the semifinals. so they are the team that have momentum now. one day cricket is so much about momentum and peeking at the right time. if there is a chink in australia's armour, they may have won this competition five times and been the reigning champions, but they did lose their last round—robin game against south africa, so maybe they have already peaked. that is what england will hope anyway. thank you very much. we will have the weather with carol a bit later. cruel and shameful — that's how campaigners and some mps have described the rules that restrict benefits payments for the terminally ill. now the work and pensions secretary
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amber rudd says wants an honest evaluation of the system, to ensure people get the help they need. she's in our westminster studio. it is with outline for people who are not familiar with the restrictions as they stand, what are they? at the core of it, we have a system whereby if you have a terminal diagnosis, you can go to special rules, which means you will quickly get access to additional financial support if you have had the sort of devastating diagnosis that we know about. people typically get additionalfunds that we know about. people typically get additional funds within six days. the system as it is is working well. but my concern is that it doesn't support other types of illnesses, and other types of diagnosis where people can live for longer but still have a devastating deteriorating disease. i want to ta ke deteriorating disease. i want to take a fresh look at it. i want to
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look at what is working and i want to find out, working with charities and other organisations, to see what needs to be improved. it is myjob as secretary of state to make sure that when people get this diagnosis, they get as much financial support and easy access to it as possible. so as it stands, there is this six month to live rule. i know that is not what it is called, but that is effectively what it is. if you get a diagnosis of a terminal illness and your doctor says you have six months to live, a very specific length of time, in those circumstances you can be fast tracked. but if it is a terminally ill diagnosis without that timeframe, you are excluded. that is what you are looking at? the special rules element is about that six—month diagnosis, you're correct. there are other elements of our benefit system which help people
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with illnesses and disabilities. but my concern is particularly around the sort of devastating diagnosis that people have, notjust cancer, but for instance, motor neurone disease. today i am hosting a roundtable were different organisations like marie curie and macmillan were becoming to talk about what we can do to improve that. obviously, it is not entirely straightforward for the medical profession. they want to work with us to find how else they can be clear about what sort of diagnosis entitles people to what sort of benefits. i want to work with clinicians to make sure that when we ask them to sign somebody off, having had this diagnosis they can be comfortable as well. so it is working with them and working with charities, but it's all about getting better outcomes for the people at the end of the day.”
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understand there is a solution the scottish government has undertaken, which is that you could change it immediately so that the six—month rule does not exist. the reluctance to do it? you know from personal experience that this is the most difficult of times. so much in a family's life is changed entirely. the one thing you don't need is a problem around your access to benefits. so why not change it immediately and take away this specific six month timeframe? you're right, when people have the sort of diagnosis we are talking about, it's not just about the physical difficulties they have, but the other elements around it, their house, theirfamily, other elements around it, their house, their family, supporting people. i want to make sure that system is as clear and easy to access system is as clear and easy to a ccess as system is as clear and easy to access as possible. the scottish government have said they want to go down a different route. they haven't set it up yet. they are now doing their own analysis to work out how
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to do it. they will also encounter the same challenges that i am talking about in terms of engaging with the clinicians who have to make a diagnosis, which is difficult, and conclude whether somebody needs this additional support or not, which is why it is important to work with them. the scottish government are also collecting evidence. it has to be about what is going to work for people and the doctors, because they are such an important part of it. but i am committed to getting this right. often, when you try to make a change in policy, people say, why don't you just do it? because we have to get it right. if we are going to get it right, i want to work with the experts around this area, which tend to be the sort of organisations we all know that our friends and family may have had to encounter, like my millen, who i visited yesterday, and then hopefully we can get it right —— like macmillan. i suppose what is
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different about this decision is that there will be families today who already have this terminally ill diagnosis hanging over them, for whom your process of analysing and listening to people will be meaningless if their loved one dies in this space of time. this is time sensitive, isn't it? that is a council for never trying to improve things. i want to make sure that in my department, we continue to make improvements. but i recognise the importance of not only getting this right, but doing it at pace, which is why today, i'm starting on that work with my officials. and the right, thank you for your time. —— amber rudd, thank you. carol is live on centre court for us with a look at this morning's weather. i'm in the players' restaurant. between 12 and three, only the players and coaches can come here and use the facilities, but they
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have a spectacular view over the members' lawn. the members can enjoy their lunch before heading off to watch tennis. on the other side of thatis watch tennis. on the other side of that is the players' lawn. there there is a beautician and a hairdresser. you can book theatre tickets, make travel arrangements, it's all going on. wimbledon is like a self—contained town. there is a creche here the players' children. stjohn ambulance is here as well. the other day, they said the life of a spectator who had a heart attack. she is now in hospital and on the road to recovery. so much goes on behind the scenes that you don't even think about when you come for a day out or just even think about when you come for a day out orjust to watch the tennis here or on the telly. the forecast for wimbledon today is a mostly dry one. we will also see some sunny spells, as we currently have. but there is an outside chance that we could catch a shower, but that is about it. but there are showers in
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the forecast today, particularly across scotland and north—east england. the met office has a yellow weather warning at those, because we could see some humdinger is in a short amount of time which could lead to disruption. more on that in a jiffy. this morning, we have a few showers around. they have been moving from the west to the eastern coast overnight and will across scotland, eventually clearing into the north sea. they will continue across northern pushing into the north sea. for northern ireland, you are off to a bright start and you will see sunny intervals. in wales, there are some showers. they were also clear into the north sea. the brightest skies will be across the channel islands today. here, we will see the high temperatures. you can see how those showers push into the north sea through the course of the day. as temperatures rise and it is quite humid, we will
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see those thunderstorms that. in scotla nd see those thunderstorms that. in scotland and north—east england, north of lincolnshire, that is where we are looking at. that is where we will have the heaviest ones. but eastern scotland is particularly favoured for heavy ones. temperatures are generally in the high teens into the low 20s. this evening, many showers will fade. there will still be quite a bit of cloud left behind and some clear skies. temperatures are not falling particularly low. tomorrow, a drier prospect compared to today. for northern ireland and scotland, there will be quite a bit of cloud at times and some brightness. for england and wales, more sunny intervals, but there will still be showers anywhere from the wash up the eastern counties of england.
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temperatures tomorrow are similar to today, but the breeze will be coming from the north, so it will feel a tad fresher than today. and what number breakfast are you on now?m must be 12! see you in a bit. the last time jordanne whiley won wimbledon she was three months pregnant. today she returns to sw19 following maternity leave with the ambition of once again being the grand slam wheelchair champion. whiley has brittle bone disease. she's been speaking to breakfast‘s graham satchell about living with the condition and family life. hello. you doing an interview? what are you going to ask me? jordanne whiley's life changed forever 18 months ago with the birth of her first son. can you see mummy? jackson's cheeky and hilarious
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and a massive poser. hello! it has changed my life a lot. i didn't know if i'd be able to come back after having him because i had a lot of injuries in the past and i didn't know how the birth would affect my disability. jordanne was born with osteogenesis imperfecta, better known as brittle bone disease. she has had 12 operations, broken her legs 26 times. she first picked up a racquet when she was just three. by 14 she was national champion and, to date, has won ten grand slams, including four wimbledon titles. so as a kid i was in the hospital a lot, a lot of operations, a lot of breaks. it was tough, but i found tennis at quite a young age, when i was three. it changed my life. it made me socialise with other people who are like me. and physically as well, it changed me and made me healthier and gave me more confidence.
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osteogenesis is a hereditary condition. jordanne got it from her dad, himself a medal—winning paralympian. there's a 50—50 chance it can be passed on to the next generation. i really didn't want a child with osteogenesis. it's difficult, because i've had an amazing life and i wouldn't change the fact that i've got osteogenesis, but i don't want my children to go through what i have been through — so much pain and exclusion from, like, society. and for me, ijust wanted them to be able to do everything i couldn't do. jordanne had a test when she was three months pregnant with jackson which showed he didn't have the condition. but she wants more children and knows she may face a heartbreaking choice in the future. it's something that isn't
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really spoken about, because i know at the moment termination of pregnancy is quite a big thing in america and i think there's no right or wrong, it's down to the parent and i do want a big family and i know that... ifeel like i'm making the right decision for my children. jordanne starts her wimbledon campaign later today. her sonjackson will be watching. graham satchell, bbc news. such a powerful personal story, so thanks to jordana such a powerful personal story, so thanks tojordana wiley such a powerful personal story, so thanks to jordana wiley for talking to graham —— thanks tojordanne. we wish her all the best of luck. a dark secret lurks beneath the banks of the river keekle in cumbria — reams and reams of plastic. a major project is now under
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way to deal with it. alison freeman is there and can tell us more. yes, you are talking about this stuff, plastic, loads of it, tonnes of the stuff, which has been pulled out of the river keekle beside me. you can still see the guys this morning working on it, still trying to re m ove morning working on it, still trying to remove it. when that plastic was put into the riverjust over 20 yea rs put into the riverjust over 20 years ago, it was put there to solve an environmental issue. they were worried about contamination from a nearby mind works. that hasn't happened and instead, this plastic has become the problem. it has started to degrade. it is washed downstrea m started to degrade. it is washed downstream and there are worries about beads of plastic going further into the environment. once it is removed, it will create a much better environment for wildlife, fish and people. more on that later. now it's time for the news where you are.
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good morning. quite an messy picture, a lot of cloud around. this afternoon showers developing in northern and eastern areas. low pressure moving into the north of scotland, quite messy with these weather fronts across the uk. some patchy rain across england and wales, generally clearing away to be replaced by further showers into the afternoon. limited brightness for england and wales but some sunny spells down to the south—east. eastern scotland is where we will see heavier showers with maximum temperatures getting up to 20—25. it's these showers across the north
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that will be potent throughout this afternoon and into this evening. some torrential rain with some lightning and thunder. those showers and thunderstorms will move further eastwards for the rest of the night and elsewhere there will be some clear spells going into friday morning. temperatures getting down to about 12—15. on friday, a bit quieter with high—pressure starting to move in from the west. still a weather front and eastern areas giving us a bit of cloud. this area of high pressure will move in particularly over the weekend. on friday, sunny spells developing across a good part of england and wales with a few showers down the eastern side of england and eastern scotland, which could be quite heavy. they will be fairly isolated. maximum temperatures on friday up to about 19—23. into the weekend, largely dry with a fee showers dotted around. some sunny spells on
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sunday and into next week looking largely settled with maximum temperatures in the low to mid 20s. goodbye.
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this is business live from bbc news with maryam moshiri and sally bundock. taxing the tech giants. france looks set to introduce a new ground—breaking digital tax, which could lead to a fresh trade war with the us. live from london, that's our top story on thursday the 11th ofjuly. the tax will hit the likes of google and facebook, and has received little support on both sides of the atlantic, with the trump administration concerned about its potential impact. also in the programme — south korea prepares for the worst, as it puts $250 million aside to deal with escalating trade

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