Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 11, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

11:00 am
you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11.00am and these are the main stories this morning. a royal navy ship has intercepted three iranian boats that were harassing a british oil tanker in the gulf. senior labour figures say they're appalled by allegations that close allies ofjeremy corbyn tried to interfere in anti—semitism cases. there is obviously some participation in these disciplinary cases from the leader's office, which means they are responsible for dealing with the rebuilding trust in the jewish community. six tourists have been killed and at least 30 others injured in a violent storm that swept across northern greece. an independent report into bullying at westminster has found a "significant problem" with the way some staff of mps are treated.
11:01 am
fruitjuices and fizzy drinks are linked to increased chances of getting cancer, according to a major new study. the french parliament approves a new tax on technology giants that could provoke retaliation from the united states. crunch time as england take on australia at edgbaston — the winners will play new zealand in the final at lord's on sunday. dream start for england. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. three iranian boats have tried to intercept a british oil tanker near the island of abu musa in the strait of hormuz in the persian gulf, a strategically important passage in the oil and gas trade.
11:02 am
the uk's ministry of defence said the iranian boats, believed to belong to the revolutionary guards, asked the oil tanker to stop in iranian waters close by, but withdrew after a british warship was positioned between them and the oil tanker, and a warning was issued. iran has denied any encounter between its forces and foreign ships in the last 2a hours. relations between iran and the uk, us and other western countries have become increasingly strained in recent weeks. on the 13th ofjune two oil tankers were attacked while sailing through the gulf of oman. the us and uk have blamed iran, and iran issued a denial. the following week, on the 20th ofjune, iranian forces shot down a us military surveillance drone, claiming it was in its airspace — something the us denies. then, last thursday, the royal marines helped the authorities in gibraltar seize an iranian oil tanker, because of evidence it was heading to syria in breach of eu sanctions. in response, an iranian official said a british oil tanker should be seized if the detained
11:03 am
ship was not released. today, the ministry of defence confirmed iranian boats tried to stop a british oil tanker near the gulf before being driven off by a royal navy ship. the president of iran hassan rouhani issued this warning to the uk. translation: you, britain, are the initiator of insecurity and you will realise the consequences later. now you are so hopeless that when one of your tankers wants to move in the region, you have to bring your frigates to escort it because you are scared. a ministry of defence spokesman issued a statement on the incident this morning. he said: "contrary to international law, three iranian vessels attempted to impede the passage of a commercial vessel, british heritage, through the strait of hormuz. hms montrose was forced to position herself between the iranian vessels and british heritage and issue verbal warnings to the iranian vessels, which then turned away.
11:04 am
we are concerned by this action and continue to urge the iranian authorities to de—escalate the situation in the region. our reporter simonjones has been outside the mod this morning. he explains why the tensions are there. the warnings had come quite clearly from iran that there were going to be consequences in relation to what happened last week. that was when an iranians supertanker was intercepted off the coast of gibraltar. royal marines were involved in that. british authorities said the reason they intercepted that supertanker was because they believed it was heading to syria, carrying oil. that would be in breach of the eu sanctions. after that happened, to iran was saying it was completely unacceptable. they described it as piracy and they said they would be some kind of retaliation for that but interestingly this morning, we are getting a very different version of events in terms of this latest
11:05 am
incident from tehran. they don't accept that iranian boats were trying to intercept the british tanker. they have described the version of events given by the ministry of defence as meaningless. they say that the british are telling these stories to ratchet up tension in the region and they are denying this confrontation, there was this aim behind it, to try to see this british tanker as a message of retaliation. let's talk now to former british ambassador to iran, sir richard dalton whojoins me now via webcam. thanks so much for talking to us. it is an increasingly complex situation, sounding increasingly fraught. what is your analysis? iam fraught. what is your analysis? i am encouraged that the iranian ministry of foreign affairs has sought to disown this affair. i don't think it was a serious attempt to seize the british tanker. i think it was a political demonstration
11:06 am
against us, given that in the circumstances of the seizure by gibraltar with british help of the iranian cargo in a panamanian tanker in gibraltar, they were bound to ta ke in gibraltar, they were bound to take a tough line. the important thing now is for britain to move fast to solve the problem of the tanker detained in gibraltar. it is a valuable cargo and britain, along with its eu partners, has no objection to iran selling its oil in overseas market, provided the oil doesn't end up in syria. secondly, the iranians must realise that further escalations in the persian gulf waters are highly risky as tensions are high and it could lead, before long, to loss of life and
11:07 am
then to an uncontrolled escalation and that must not be allowed to happen. obviously, what happened with this particular vessel was stopped because hms montrose it was in the vicinity. do you think there is a message to the royal navy that they do need to be protecting british tankers? they certainly do, and britain has had a presence in the persian gulf since the 1980s for this reason. fortu nately, since the 1980s for this reason. fortunately, shots haven't needed to be fired on this or previous occasions, but that is the nature of the strait of hormuz, it is a narrow waterway and the iranians have a point when they say that given that
11:08 am
in contravention to un security council resolution that endorsed the nuclear deal, given that they are unable to trade freely, why should others be allowed to? this is a serious diplomatic problem and involves the united states. it is time for international diplomacy to get a time for international diplomacy to geta grip time for international diplomacy to get a grip of it. fortunately, the french are currently leading an initiative, with the backing of president macron, to try to de—escalate the situation, and everybody should be willing them on and wishing them well. you have set out some of the complexities in terms of the nuclear deal. in terms of some of your former colleagues in the foreign office and advising the prime minister and ministry of defence, there are other complex issues in terms of this strategic remix queue because we've now got a very significant diplomatic row with the united states. the us has taken a
11:09 am
different view from the uk and the eu on the nuclear deal of 2015. the uk is trying to exit the eu. so as a former british diplomat, how would you be advising your colleagues now to navigate all of this? well, to carry on doing what they are doing. i believe the foreign office is involved with de—escalation efforts. i know that they are thinking beyond the stage of de—escalation to how to achieve a long—term stabilisation of the situation and to re—establish authority of the nuclear agreement, but that does require the cooperation of the us and u nfortu nately cooperation of the us and unfortunately the united states, which is at the root of the crisis, is not showing any interest in anything other than exerting maximum pressure on iran and also, contrary to international law, try to prevent
11:10 am
countries which wish to observe that un security council resolution from continuing to do so. so, yes, it is ha rd continuing to do so. so, yes, it is hard in the current circumstances to influence the united states, but my collea g u es influence the united states, but my colleagues are working on it and we are going to have to continue to do so with the support, i trust, of any british government wants it is in place. your mention of maximum pressure reminds me to ask you before i let you go another question about a situation of maximum pressure exertion or however you choose to describe it in terms of donald trump as micro interventions regarding a former colleague of yours and his ambassadorship in washington. what is your reflection on that today? well, i'm very sad that this malicious leak in london has led to the early termination of his very substantial services to the uk and
11:11 am
us relations. it is important that a highly qualified person be selected as soon as possible and i know from what i read in the press that it is on theresa may's desk in order to have the least possible hiatus in our conduct of business in washington. thank you so much forjoining us this morning, sir richard dalton. senior labour figures have expressed anger and alarm at claims that some ofjeremy corbyn‘s closest allies tried to interfere in disciplinary processes involving allegations of anti—semitism. a bbc panorama investigation that aired last night heard from a number of former officials who worked in the party's disputes team. labour rejected any claim that the party was anti—semitic. here's our political correspondent, jessica parker.
11:12 am
e—mails leaked to panorama suggest that labour's general secretary, jennie formby, attempted to interfere in the selection of a disciplinary panel and later that she deleted the correspondence on her official labour party account. the correspondence also shows that jeremy corbyn‘s own personal e—mail was copied in. labour said that she temporarily stopped using her party e—mail because of concerns that a political opponent had access to it, and the e—mails were about ensuring the panel was held accountable for the length of time they take to hear cases. the man who was in charge at party hq for years is iain mcnicol. the e—mails that you've shown me are really important. the issues that are raised within them should ring alarm bells across the party. i resigned my membership. i felt that i had tried as hard as i possibly could to do my bit to fight this, this sickness. and to me, it's getting worse. i knew the atmosphere was bad,
11:13 am
but it kept building up and up. i felt a bit complicit, actually. in what? in the labour party not dealing with anti—semitism properly. chant: shame on you, shame on you! labour has said the former staff making claims are disaffected and the party insists it is implacably opposed to anti—semitism. we will do all we can to make it very clear to anybody who thinks that they can have those abhorrent views in our party and in ourfamily that they are not welcome. there has already been considerable pressure onjeremy corbyn around allegations of anti—semitism in the party. now, signs that that pressure could only increase further. jessica parker, bbc news. our assistant political editor norman smith is at westminster for us. where does this go from here, norman?
11:14 am
there is now huge pressure onjeremy corbyn to act, but what has been most striking i think in response to the panorama programme last night is the panorama programme last night is the ferocity of the reaction so far from team jeremy corbyn, who have turned on the bbc, accusing the bbc of presenting a malicious and misleading picture. they question the integrity and impartiality of the integrity and impartiality of the reporter, john webb, but above all have turned on the former labour party staff members who contributed to the programme, in effect accusing them of being disaffected individuals who are againstjeremy corbyn who have a personal and political agenda against him. that in turn has prompted uproar amongst many labourmps, in turn has prompted uproar amongst many labour mps, dismayed at that sort of response, including from the party deputy leader, tom watson who said this morning he deplored that sort of response and said he hoped
11:15 am
that last night's programme might be a turning point in how the party addressed anti—semitism. a turning point in how the party addressed anti-semitism. we have been improving our procedures but as many have said, we have been too slow in doing that. for me, that was a watershed programme. to see those young members, young members of staff, many of whom have come from different wings of the party, supporters of jeremy corbyn different wings of the party, supporters ofjeremy corbyn or not, it must have taken them great courage to blow the whistle and for them to call this is deplorable that we would just dismiss them in some way, sort of disaffected. they obviously feel very, very concerned that the procedures were not working and they have felt it for some time. i cannot walk by on the other side and let them shoulder the responsibility for calling this bad behaviour out. there around jeremy corbyn have gone
11:16 am
into defensive mode, among them shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell who was asked this morning if he thought the party had done enough to put in place procedures to address anti—semitism. i think it has, and the new system has been put in place, speeding up the process of claims and dealing with them more effectively. i think i've always said at the very beginning it was too slow, not ruthless enough and i think that has improved dramatically. in light of the programme last night and what i've seen, let's see what the bbc says in response to the complaints that were put in because what we've got is ex—staff making accusations against existing staff and the existing staff have challenged those complaints so it does need an objective look at. well, one of those who appeared in the programme last night was the labourmp the programme last night was the labour mp louise ellman. you have just written a letter to jeremy corbyn along with a couple of others, saying what? this is a crisis of leadership. we are asking jeremy corbyn to show
11:17 am
leadership and as a first step set up leadership and as a first step set upa leadership and as a first step set up a completely independent process to look at complaints. a process well away from the interference of the leader up as macro office. that is the first thing he could do to try to establish some kind of credibility that the labour party is an anti—racist party. critics would say he has had three yea rs critics would say he has had three years to do this and he hasn't done it, so what hope do you have that anything is going to change? jeremy corbyn has failed to act. the problem started after he became leader of the labour party and he has failed to deal with the rising tide of anti—semitism within the labour party. the party is now in a situation of crisis and he think he recognises it is no good at lashing out against the bbc and panorama. last night's programme documented cases we have known about for some time. ifjeremy corbyn is a real leader, he must know that it's now
11:18 am
time to act. many of your colleagues take the view that the problem stems from jeremy corbyn in that following his leadership and expansion of the party, many individuals who have joined have views which previously would never have been acceptable in the labour party and he has tolerated an attitude towards israel which has allowed what tom watson calls a permissive culture towards anti—semitism. is there any prospect of this being resolved as long as jeremy corbyn remains leader? ido jeremy corbyn remains leader? i do agree with tom watson, that this problem has leapt underjeremy corbyn and the people from the far left have come to dominate the labour party since he became leader but even at this late stage, surely jeremy corbyn recognises the damage he is doing to the labour party as an anti—racist party, and i hope he can stand back and realise some of his friends are complicit in this and take the required action. maybe he can't do it and it's too much for
11:19 am
him but may it's he can't do it and it's too much for him but may its decision time so let's see if he is ready to face this challenge. shouldn't you add others cut to the chase and say the only reason to resolve this is getting rid of jeremy corbyn or those around him like harry murphy or seamus helm? the key figures who are guiding jeremy corbyn were put there by jeremy corbyn were put there by jeremy corbyn were put there by jeremy corbyn himself and he relies on them. in one sense the problem comes not just from jeremy corbyn but from those figures who have been put in great positions of power and they now seem to be dominating him. can he realise this is a challenge to him? he sees the weight of evidence against him and the party's failure to deal with anti—jewish racism? can he separate himself from those people and show real leadership? let's see. thanks for your time. an investigation is under way by the equalities and human rights commission. we had some ideas about the sort of measures and some labour
11:20 am
fog want to introduce. one idea that has been mooted, as we havejust heard, and independent complaints process. tom watson suggested that should also have representatives of the jewish community on should also have representatives of thejewish community on it, and also there should be an automatic exclusion for people when they make anti—semitic remarks. some of the ideas being kicked around to try to tighten up the party's disciplinary procedures. before you go to the headlines, alan duncan has been on his feet answering an urgent question on the resignation of sir kim darroch as the washington ambassador. he has been very outspoken on the subject and the reason we are going to it now is to point out he has failed to rule out the current prime minister, theresa may, appointing a new us ambassador or ambassador to the us
11:21 am
before she leaves office. the shadow foreign office minister had asked whether the foreign office would ensure a new ambassador was appointed before theresa may leaves, and whoever succeeds and takes over, borisjohnson orjeremy and whoever succeeds and takes over, boris johnson orjeremy hunt, and whoever succeeds and takes over, borisjohnson orjeremy hunt, and she was adding that we should still have one representative willing to speak truth to power. it was a dig to borisjohnson who did not rush to defend sir kim darroch in the television debate. this morning, sir alan said the next ambassador will be appointed in the usual way with the approval of the queen. he did not deny or rule out that this might happen before theresa may leaves, which of course is going to happen in the next few days and is a matter of speculation in this morning's newspapers. we will keep an eye on that and let you know. the headlines on bbc news.
11:22 am
a royal navy ship has intercepted three iranian boats that were harassing a british oil tanker in the gulf. labour rejects accusations that senior members ofjeremy corbyn's team interfered in investigations into alleged anti—semitism. the french parliament has approved a new tax on the world's biggest internet and technology firms such as google and facebook. and in sport... england's bowlers have made the perfect start to their cricket world cup semi—final against australia at edgbaston — taking their first three wicketsforjust14 runs. a place in the final against new zealand awaits the winners it's women's semi—finals day at wimbledon — former world number one simona halep and seven—time winner champion serena williams are both in action today as they look to seal a place in the final. and former newcastle united boss sam alla rdyce says he's turned down a return to the club. newcastle are looking for a new manager to replace raf benitez, who left last month. sheffield wednesday boss steve bruce is the current favourite for the job. i'll be back with more
11:23 am
on those stories later. an independent report has found that mps' staff face an "unacceptable risk" of bullying and harassment — including sexual harassment at westminster. let's get more from our political correspondent chris mason(read on) correspondent chris mason. gemma white qc has been looking into the employment conditions for staff working for mps, in the latest of investigations following revelations in the last couple of years from members of staff working in the palace of westminster and the essence of this report drills down to the oddity, if you like, of the employment conditions for mp staff, which is they are working for a particular mp directly even though they are paid for by the taxpayer.
11:24 am
gemma white qc concludes there must bea gemma white qc concludes there must be a fundamental shift away from regarding members of parliament as 650 small businesses with near com plete 650 small businesses with near complete freedom to operate in relation to their stuff. i willjust bring you some of the anonymous testimony which she collected, speaking to 220 people as she was compiling this report. she said that mp's compiling this report. she said that mp‘s staff are in a uniquely vulnerable position because they are directly employed by mps and too many directly employed by mps and too ma ny staff directly employed by mps and too many staff were telling her that the existing procedures that have been adopted pretty much in the last year, relatively recently, to try to provide some oversight, are not good enough because too many staff fear that using those mechanisms would amount to career suicide. she said by far the most common form of offending behaviour described was mps who shout at, demean, belittle and humiliate their staff on a
11:25 am
regular basis, often in public. she goes on to say sexual harassment is also a problem, with staff being subject to unwanted sexual advances often accompanied by touching, sometimes four. she said there was an unacceptable level of sexual ba nter an unacceptable level of sexual banter and unwanted discussion of intimate sexual detail. we are going to have to leave that they are, but thank you for the detail. siobhan endean, national officer for the union unite joins me now from salford. i think as a union either represent many of the staff involved, facing these difficulties. that's right. and the staff who work for mps that's right. and the staff who work formps in that's right. and the staff who work for mps in parliament are really dedicated employees. they will make sure that the casework is dealt with, they will write speeches and policy advice, working really long hours ina policy advice, working really long hours in a highly pressurised environment and it is really important that mps make sure that staff members are treated with
11:26 am
dignity and respect, and we as a union, our union reps across the country in constituencies and parliamentary offices, spend a lot of their time dealing with cases of bullying and harassment and trying to resolve those issues. this is a campaign that our parliamentary branch have raised over the last five years to say that we need really strong, robust dignity at work policy is for those working in parliament. was there anything in the report that we have just had chris explain, was there anything in the report that surprised or shocked you, or given the stories you have been hearing over the years, is it all com pletely hearing over the years, is it all completely predictable? it is absolutely predictable. we have been raising these issues for a number of years now and we are well aware that bullying and harassment in the houses of parliament are rife. it is critical that parliamentary authorities work with trade unions. we would like to see
11:27 am
acas involved in this as well. we wa nt acas involved in this as well. we want people to feel confident that they can raise the issues and get them resolved. cani them resolved. can i press you on that one because chris was saying that, you know, even despite the mechanisms that have been put in place in the last couple of years, staff are saying that they are afraid to use them because it would constitute career suicide. i think that is right and it is a concern that a lot of our members have. in the main theyjust want the behaviour to stop. we need a massive culture change in parliament to make sure that people are treated with dignity and respect, whether you are a staff member or a member of the public, and other mps as well. i think a culture change is needed but if you are going to have it, they must be strong procedures and a commitment to confidentiality to make sure that you can get the issue resolved. cani resolved.
11:28 am
can ijust resolved. can i just ask you about these issues of bullying and harassment more generally? many of our viewers will be sitting watching you, listening to you and thinking, i face that in my workplace or i know somebody who faces that in my workplace. what would be your advice to anybody who faces these problems? i think it's really important that if you are facing bullying or harassment in work, you need to make sure you have a full record of what's sure you have a full record of what‘s happening— sure you have a full record of what's happening— who, what, when, where, how and why? if you are in a union, join the union and make sure you co nta ct union, join the union and make sure you contact the union rep. there is usually a policy that deals with dignity at work and bullying in the workplace. if the issue is not resolved to your satisfaction, it is important that you get the issue more formally. if it is related to an equality background you have, if you are being harassed sexually or racially, it is important you are
11:29 am
able to take a legal case if that is what is necessary to resolve it. it is really important that we just make sure that all employers are addressing the issue of harassment. a lot of employers do have strong dignity at work policies and it is best when they are working with their trade union or employees to make sure people feel like they have a voice at work. thanks very much forjoining us, siobhan. the french senate has approved a new tax on the world's biggest internet and technology firms such as google and facebook. the measure, which will initially raise around £360 million a year sets a precedent that's being closely watched by governments around the world. president trump has already ordered an investigation into the french plans. our correspondent hugh schofield is in paris for us. hue, it is a fascinating initiative. tell us more about it, why it came about and what it will achieve. it came about because the french failed to get a similar measure
11:30 am
adopted by europe. the plan last year was to get the european union to agree to a tax on google, apple, facebook and so on— the real giants of the tech industry. but fail because of opposition from the usual countries. they needed unanimity and they didn't get it. they decided to have their own version of the law. they think it will be pretty ineffectual because these taxes need to be applied across the board by all countries but at least france will be showing the way and hopefully other countries will follow. more to the point, it will hasten the negotiations which are going on anyway at the oecd to create a framework for some kind of new taxation system which all countries, and indeed the companies themselves except as necessary. there is a feeling, accepted by google and facebook, that the world has changed and there has to be some
11:31 am
new form of taxation which recognises how data is what add value, but they deplore the way the french have gone it alone. the french have gone it alone. the french say they are doing that because they want to hasten the process and make this multilateral deal more likely. time for a look at the weather. there showers.
11:32 am
hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines... a royal navy ship has intercepted three iranian boats that were harassing a british oil tanker in the gulf. senior labour figures say they're appalled by allegations that close allies ofjeremy corbyn tried to interfere in anti—semitism cases. an independent report into bullying at westminster has found a ‘significant problem' with the way some staff of mps are treated — it comes a day after similar
11:33 am
findings in the house of lords... a study in france suggests people who have a lot of sugary drinks — including pure fruitjuice — are at a slightly higher risk of developing cancer. the french parliament approves a new tax on tech giants, which the us says unfairly targets american companies. sport now. england have made a brilliant start to their semi final against australia at the cricket world cup. having been sent into field by the aussies, they've taken three early wickets at edgbaston. will parry is there for us. will, superb bowling from england early on? hello, what a start by england. two crucial wickets. archer took the wicket of the australian captain, in
11:34 am
french. that takes us to clear of england's record wicketkeeper, ian botham, back in 1992. shortly after that david warner, between finch and warner, they have had 145 runs so a huge partnership for the stray and batting line—up. his home ground here, warwickshire, caught in the slips byjohnny here, warwickshire, caught in the slips by johnny bairstow. here, warwickshire, caught in the slips byjohnny bairstow. shortly after that, the world cup debut for khawaja who was bowled. he survived a review in the third over but was gonein a review in the third over but was gone in the fourth. the winners of this match will be in the final at lord's on sunday. england wanted to go into bat first, the won the toss,
11:35 am
eoin morgan said that but it is going really well for them so far. keep up—to—date with the website. but as it stands 36—3. highlights on the bbc sport website. thank you very much. it's women's semi—finals day at wimbledon — with former world number ones serena williams and simona halep both in action. last year's french open winner simona halep plays the eighth seed elina svitolina first up on centre court at1 o'clock. after that williams will continue her quest for an eighth wimbledon title and a record—equalling 24th grand slam against the unseeded barbora strysova. in the men's draw, roger federer and rafael nadal will meet at wimbledon for the first time in more than a decade after both came through their quarter finals. federer came from a set down to beatjapan's kei nishikouri in the quarters — in doing so he became the first man to win 100 matches at one grand slam. he's going for his
11:36 am
ninth wimbledon title. while nadal had a relatively easy ride against american sam querrey, winning in straight sets. the last time he and federer met at wimbledon was that epic final in 2008 which was eventually won by nadal after a five set thriller. whilst all the attention's on rafa and roger, novak djokovic is quietly going about his business. the world number one beat belgium's david goffin in straight sets to secure his place in the semis, where he'll play the spaniard roberto bautista agut. the arsenal club captain laurent koscielny has refused to travel on the club's pre—season tour of the united states. the 33—year—old has a year left on his contract, but is understood to want a move away this summer. arsenal have put out statement saying they're "very disappointed" by koscielny‘s actions, which they say are against their clear instructions. former england boss sam allardyce says he turned down
11:37 am
the chance to return to newcastle united as the club's manager. the former england boss was in charge at stjames' park from 2007 to 2008 and was considered as a replacement for rafael benitez, who left last month. current sheffield wednesday boss steve bruce is now the favourite to take over. stage 16 of the tour de france is underway. it's a 177 kilometre loop around nimes. defending champion geraint thomas is currently seventh overall, 45 seconds behind race leaderjulian alaphilippe. follow it live via the bbc sport website and app. that's all the sport for now. some breaking news from the old bailey. tommy robinson has been jailed for nine months for contempt of court over the video he broadcast
11:38 am
on facebook, which featured defenders in a criminal trial. you can see and their arriving at the old bailey this morning in a black t—shirt, emblazoned convicted of journalism. he would different t—shirt apparently inside court. i reported inside the courtroom said thejudge and justice reported inside the courtroom said the judge and justice conducted the sentencing. that is alive short outside the old bailey. then victoria in reading the sentence said at the sexual grooming trial that stephen lexi reported on was an important trial with a long list of vulnerable victims of rape and trafficking. she said while that this pixel did not prejudice the trial, there was a substantial risk of impediment process. tommy
11:39 am
robinson has 11 convictions of public order displacements as —— disobedience is. thejudge said there was no doubt the threshold has passed and the mean penalty is deterrent and the aim of the court is to uphold the rule of law. a nine—month sentence for contempt of court. three months for canterbury court, the year before. there is a deduction for time served. the sentencing practice and thence to 19 weeks. he will be released on licence after ten weeks. this is the scene outside the old bailey. our reporter will be out in a minute and we will talk to him then. the number of people waiting for hospital treatment in england
11:40 am
has hit a record high of 4.39 million, nhs figures show. it comes amid an escalating row between the government and doctors over pensions. meanwhile, the annual survey of gp patients in england has shown growing numbers of people are struggling to get through to their doctor on the phone. our health correspondent nick triggle is here to explain more. this row over pensions has been brewing but we see it as contributing to longer delays on surgery? yes, it has raised the fact that this is a factor in this record waiting list. hospitals rely on doctors to do overtime shifts, especially in areas such as routine surgery. earlier this week it emerged that some doctors are refusing to do overtime because of the changes in pension arrangements which meant they were getting higher tax bills if they went over a certain threshold. certain figures today add more evidence to what is a growing problem for the nhs. tell us
11:41 am
about the gp patient survey. this is the annual survey, the biggest survey of its kind, nearly 800,000 patients have taken part. there are lots of good news. the trusting gps understaffed as above 90%. people's experience of general practices over 80% but there are problems with access. one in the patient report problems of getting through to the gp on the telephone. one in 52012, a similar numberare gp on the telephone. one in 52012, a similar number are complaining about getting appointments at the time they need. —— one in five for 2012. some people have complained about queueing outside to get an appointment. nhs england says it is appointment. nhs england says it is a way of the problem and will carry a way of the problem and will carry a review out to deal with the problem. at the moment we have a big leadership battle going on, there will be a new prime minister and presumably a new cabinet with a new
11:42 am
health secretary possibly? yes. with the nhs and social care, with brexit and the leadership campaign, there are and the leadership campaign, there a re lots of and the leadership campaign, there are lots of policies which are on hold, stuck in the department of health and social care. months passed by and the pressure is growing on the front line. going back to these quite nuanced and difficult political problems that have to be sorted out, the co nsulta nts, have to be sorted out, the consultants, how is that to be sorted out? that is a very tricky one. the pension support across the economy, not just one. the pension support across the economy, notjust doctors, obviously doctors are well—paid. there are two thresholds, and annual allowance which is £40,000 and a lifetime allowa nce, which is £40,000 and a lifetime allowance, doctors built up a pension over £1 million, to get his high rates of tax bills. one of the things the government is looking at is to create more flexibility with
11:43 am
the pension to allow doctors to opt out of the pension for the number of yea rs out of the pension for the number of years and create flexibility like that. that would allow them to continue working shifts. thank you so much for coming in. two graves in a small vatican cemetery have been exhumed as part of an investigation into the disappearance of an italian schoolgirl more than 30 years ago. emanuela orlandi was just 15 when she went missing in rome in 1983, in a case that gained huge attention at the time. this morning the vatican announced that it had found no remains after searching the two tombs. the order was made after her family received an anonymous letter with a photo of the tombs in march. a man has been arrested for climbing over a fence onto the forecourt of buckingham palace while the queen was in residence. the 22—year—old is being held on suspicion of trespass. it's understood he scaled the barrier to the side of the building in the early hours of yesterday. scotland yard say the incident is not being treated as terror—related.
11:44 am
more on today's main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... tommy robinson has beenjailed for nine months at the old bailey for contempt of court. a royal navy ship has intercepted three iranian boats that were harassing a british oil tanker in the gulf. labour rejects accusations that senior members ofjeremy corbyn's team interfered in investigations into alleged anti—semitism. now for the business news. a no—deal brexit would cause the pound to plummet and be worth the same as the dollar, virgin boss sir richard branson has said. in an interview with the bbc
11:45 am
he said, this would be "devastating" for virgin, and force the group to shift investment out of the uk. more in a moment. retailers should remove plastic—backed fridges and freezers from sale, according to a consumer group, as new, tougher manufacturing rules come in. the testing standard has changed, making the manufacture of plastic—backed appliances far less likely. now which? wants to see such products still on sale removed from the shelves as it sayes they pose a fire risk. us president donald trump has ordered an investigation into france's planned tax on tech giants — a move that could result in retaliatory tariffs. his trade representative said the us was "very concerned" that the tax "unfairly targets american companies". sir richard branson has warned that his companies will spend a less money in britain if the country leaves the european union without a deal. the founder of the virgin group has been telling the bbc‘s transport correspondent, tom burridge that he thinks the pound would collapse in a disorderly brexit. a very stark warning today
11:46 am
from sir richard branson about britain leaving the eu without a deal. it would be devastating to many virgin companies. we would be spending a lot less money in britain and putting energies into other countries. he has always opposed brexit and believes his airline alone would lose hundreds of millions of dollars through no deal. the pound will collapse to parity with the dollar if there is a hard brexit. all our costs are in dollars in maintenance, plane parts, the bottom line hit to that was $100 million us. a hard brexit will result in the freight we get from europe that we put on virgin atlantic going to america disappearing. we will not get any of that freight. that would be another 100 million down the drain. virgin trains are set to largely disappear from our railways in march. in a dispute over pensions,
11:47 am
its bid to keep running services like this one from birmingham to london has been disqualified by the government. sir richard says operating a train company in britain has become harder. nowadays, the department of transport in their wisdom, they give you a massive long list of dos and don'ts and it is very, very difficult to be entrepreneurial and i think that is sad. the government has commissioned a review of the railways. the expectation is that it will recommend radical change. more business now. the british consumer goods giant reckitt benckiser has reached a $1.4bn settlement with the us authorities. it's over claims that its former subsidiary indivior illegally tried to increase sales of a drug used to treat opioid addiction.
11:48 am
the company maintains it has done nothing wrong but says a settlement is the best way to draw a line under the issue. the chief executive and co—founder of norwegian air shuttle, bjorn kjos, has stepped down after 17 years in charge at the airline. under the leadership of mr kjos, norwegian air developed from a small domestic airline into europe's third biggest low—cost carrier. after a tough few days the pound has strengthened slightly this morning. worries over the prospects of a no—deal brexit contributed to a fall in the currency earlier in the week, and it hit a two—year low at one point. however, sterling has gained today, partly due to a weakening of the dollar, after federal reserve chairmanjerome powell hinted that a us rate cut could be on the cards. that's all the business news for now. people who consume a lot of sugary drinks, including pure fruitjuice, could have a higher risk of developing cancer, according to a new large—scale study.
11:49 am
it looked at 100,000 people in france over five years. doctors are now calling for further research, as lauren moss reports. bottles of pop and sugary drinks are often at the centre of the debate about healthy living and obesity. now a study by scientists in france suggests they are significantly associated with the risk of cancer. researchers looked at 100,000 people for five years. the average person drank around two cans of sugary drinks a week. but the study found that if they consumed two more cans on top of that, around 100 millilitres a day, there was an 18% increased risk of cancer. the study did not find any cancer links with artificial sweeteners, and it could not determine whether sugary drinks do cause disease, but health campaigners say the findings are another indication that intake should be limited. the fact that they did find a link, regardless of weight, is interesting. and potentially concerning. but we need more research on this.
11:50 am
in the meantime, there is already lots of reasons to cut down on these drinks. since last year, uk manufacturers have been paying a levy on high sugar drinks. tory leadership candidate borisjohnson provoked criticism from health professionals last week by vowing to review what he called "sin taxes" if he becomes prime minister. obesity is a known cause of cancer, and consuming many sugary drinks can lead to weight gain. but researchers say this study shows that is not the full story. the british soft drink association says soft drinks are safe as part of a balanced diet, but this research will feed into the continuing discussion about how we can lead a healthier life. more now on our top story this morning. the ministry of defence have confirmed that three iranian boats have tried to intercept a british oil tanker near the island of abu musa in the strait of hormuz in the persian gulf, a strategically important passage
11:51 am
in the oil and gas trade. believed to belong to the revolutionary guards, the boats ordered the oil tanker to stop in iranian waters close by, but withdrew after a british warship was positioned between them and the oil tanker, and a warning was issued. iran has denied any encounter between its forces and foreign ships in the last 24 hours. with me is now is our reporter daniel amir from bbc monitoring... thanks for dropping in. the prime minister's spokesperson has said britain's concern about the action by iranian vessels, calls for de—escalation so as far as london is concerned, this is an official action by iran. iran however is denying any involvement. we had the conversation this morning, firstly by the elite revolutionary guard who said it was not then. we have had a couple of short comments by the
11:52 am
foreign minister calling the reports worthless. designed to create tension in an already tricky region to cover up tension in an already tricky region to coverup uk tension in an already tricky region to cover up uk weakness in the region. it is important to look at the contexts in the gulf, the british seizure of an onion boat in gibraltar last week. iran threatened last week to retaliate? the british seizure of the boat in gibraltar which was thought to be carrying oil to syria was kind of an embarrassment for iran. since then we have had an uptake in iranians rhetoric. first of all the president rouhani called it a childish move. then more bellicose tones from the revolutionary guards saying britain will regret it. despite denying the understandable why iran would want a limited —— limited show of strength
11:53 am
in the area. so iran speaking out of both sides of the mouth? yes, we still have strength in the area but we wa nt still have strength in the area but we want to recalibrate. it is important for years to understand that these are very short sea trips that these are very short sea trips that these are very short sea trips that the boats have to make to get to oil tankers because the passage is so short. indeed. the straits of hormuz are at 40 kilometres at their narrowest point. 20% of global oil passes through here and it is a key flash point for any of these tensions. can you eliminate something which is not clear to me, the extent of freedom of expression in iranfor the extent of freedom of expression in iran for social media, for people to have different views on what the brits or other europeans, the united states are doing. this complex situation with the nuclear deal and sanctions in place, us threats to
11:54 am
iran etc# sanctions in place, us threats to iran etc # a lot of social media platforms are banned in iran, twitter for example is banned. yet, we have had some reactions, a lot of it from pro establishment users. they refer to it as the old folks, the old imperial monikers. it is too early to say what they social media reaction will be but we will monitor it. -- -- reaction will be but we will monitor it. —— —— old fox.. reaction will be but we will monitor it. -- -- old fox.. thank you very much. the pop singer — taylor swift — has been named the world's top—earning celebrity. she was number one in the famous forbes 100 list for the last year — earning more than 180 million dollars.
11:55 am
most of the money came from her reputation tour — described as the highest—grossing in us history. tim allman reports. # i promise that you'll never find another like me—e—e! # i'm the only one of me. # baby, that's the fun of me... she may have recently lost the rights to her back catalogue, but taylor swift certainly hasn't lost the capacity to make lots, and lots, and lots of money. nearly $200 million of it, in fact. well, once the taxman took his share. and she made most of it by putting on a show. she toured like crazy. she did about a quarter of a billion dollars gross on her latest tour. we measured over the past 12 months and we caught most of that tour, and it's good business when you can gross $5—6 million a night on the road. coming in second with a positively paltry $170 million was social media sensation and cosmetics billionaire kyliejenner. her brother—in—law kanye west came third, scraping by on a measly $150 million. as for taylor swift, she's releasing a new album next month and there is speculation that
11:56 am
another tour may follow. if any financial obstacle gets on her way, she will, presumably, just shake it off. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. hello there. we've got quite a messy picture weather—wise today. lots of cloud around at the moment and outbreaks of rain for many of us but the focus throughout the afternoon will be on thundery showers across the east of scotland and the north—east of england. elsewhere, a few shares could pop—up but mostly dry with sunshine across
11:57 am
england and wales. into the north—east of england and eastern scotla nd north—east of england and eastern scotland that showers will develop. maximum temperature is about 19 to 26 celsius. but monkey feel will kick off the storms across the east of scotla nd kick off the storms across the east of scotland and of england. the greatest risk of catching these showers, across eastern midlands and east england. the audit isolated shower will develop through this evening. tonight, temperatures no lower than 7 degrees, quite a warm evening for most of us.
11:58 am
these showers on the east will be isolated, maximum temperatures on friday, once again getting into the low to mid 20s. into the weekend, high pressure in the west will continue to build so by sunday it will be across the uk. that will settle things down so there will be dry weather with sunshine. by saturday, a few showers over higher ground down to central and southern areas in england, otherwise a dry day for most. a little bit cooler compared to today and tomorrow. temperatures in london, 24 degrees. elsewhere high teens and low 20s. similar conditions on sunday. largely dry. into next week, the fine weather continuing with sunny spells, mostly dry weather and temperatures not bad for this time of year.
11:59 am
12:00 pm
you're watching bbc newsroom live — these are today's main stories. downing street calls for a de—escalation after a royal navy ship intercepts three iranian boats harrassing a british oil tanker in the gulf. obviously very concerning developments, but also i'm very proud of the royal navy and the role they played in keeping british assets, british shipping safe. we are continuing to monitor the situation very, very carefully. tommy robinson has beenjailed for nine months at the old bailey for contempt of court. senior labour figures say they're appalled by allegations that close allies ofjeremy corbyn tried to interfere in anti—semitism cases. what we've got is ex—staff making accusations against existing staff and those existing staff have challenged those complaints, so it does need an objective look at.
12:01 pm
an independent report into bullying at westminster has found a "significant problem" with the way some staff of mps are treated. fruitjuices and fizzy drinks are linked to increased chances of getting cancer, according to a major new study. the french parliament approves a new tax on technology giants that could provoke retaliation from the united states. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. three iranian boats have tried to intercept a british oil tanker near the island of abu musa in the strait of hormuz in the persian gulf — a strategically important passage in the oil and gas trade. the ministry of defence said the iranian boats, believed to belong to the revolutionary guards, asked the oil tanker to stop in iranian waters close by, but withdrew after a british warship
12:02 pm
was positioned between them and the oil tanker, and a warning was issued. iran has denied any encounter between its forces and foreign ships in the last 24 hours. relations between iran and the uk, us and other western countries have become increasingly strained in recent weeks. on the 13th ofjune two oil tankers were attacked, while sailing through the gulf of oman. the us and uk have blamed iran, and iran issued a denial. the following week, on the 20th ofjune, iranian forces shot down a us military surveillance drone, claiming it was in its airspace — something the us denies. then, last thursday, the royal marines helped the authorities in gibraltar seize an iranian oil tanker, because of evidence it was heading to syria in breach of eu sanctions. in response, an iranian official said a british oil tanker should be seized if the detained
12:03 pm
ship was not released. today, the ministry of defence confirmed iranian boats tried to stop a british oil tanker near the gulf before being driven off by a royal navy ship. the president of iran hassan rouhani issued this warning to the uk. translation: you, britain, are the initiator of insecurity and you will realise the consequences later. now you are so hopeless that when one of your tankers wants to move in the region, you have to bring your frigates to escort it because you are scared. in the past few minutes the foreign secretary and conservative leadership contenderjeremy hunt has been giving his reaction. obviously very concerning developments, but also i'm very proud of the royal navy and the role they played in keeping british assets, british shipping safe. we are continuing to monitor the situation very, very carefully.
12:04 pm
a ministry of defence spokesman issued a statement on the incident this morning. he said: "contrary to international law, three iranian vessels attempted to impede the passage of a commercial vessel, british heritage, through the strait of hormuz. hms montrose was forced to position herself between the iranian vessels and british heritage and issue verbal warnings to the iranian vessels, which then turned away. we are concerned by this action and continue to urge the iranian authorities to de—escalate the situation in the region. simonjones has been outside the mod this morning. the warnings had come quite clearly from iran that there were going to be consequences in relation to what happened last week. that was when an iranians supertanker was intercepted off the coast of gibraltar. royal marines were involved in that. british authorities said the reason they intercepted that supertanker was because they believed it was heading to syria, carrying oil. that would be in breach of the eu sanctions.
12:05 pm
after that happened, tehran was saying it was completely unacceptable. they described it as piracy and they said they would be some kind of retaliation for that but interestingly this morning, we are getting a very different version of events in terms of this latest incident from tehran. they don't accept that iranian boats were trying to intercept the british tanker. they have described the version of events given by the ministry of defence as meaningless. they say that the british are telling these stories to ratchet up tension in the region and they are denying this confrontation, there was this aim behind it, to try to see this british tanker as a message of retaliation. a neill a neil i and coming in from bp, confirming that the tanker belonged to them. they said, our top priority
12:06 pm
is safety and security of our crews and vessels. while we are not commenting on these events, we thank the royal navy for their support. let's talk more on this now with sidharth kaushal, a research fellow on sea power at the royal united services institute. your assessment of the situation today? well, i mean, it sits very well with iran's pattern of calibrated ambiguous escalations. there was the placement of limpet mines on vessels in the persian gulf. it was not meant to destroy the vessels because it was placed above the water line and iran denied involvement, but it sent a coercive massive chew. this isa sent a coercive massive chew. this is a pattern we have seen in 2007 by the seizure in 2016 of american sailors and their subsequent release from a patrol vessel. essentially,
12:07 pm
iran has perfected the art of what might be called grey zone escalations. sufficiently escalating to send a message without the blowback of full—scale conflict. interesting. where do you think it goes from here? is the grey zone moving to black or is it moving back to clear? i think the response from the government has been broadly de—escalate array. that would suggest that iran's gamble that it could take a calculated coercive step has paid off. an interesting question is what the iranian revolutionary guard vessels were trying to achieve here because while the mod has said that they are to impede the passage of the tanker, some reports suggest they were trying to divert it towards iranian waters where it could be seized. this is something the irg sea has done before in 2015 with a danish
12:08 pm
cargo container. it also fits with calls from ultraconservative figures like the former commander called for a british ship to be seized. that would be much more escalator a and we have seen so far and it would suggest, as he said, a willingness to ta ke suggest, as he said, a willingness to take risks on the part of iran. how do you think all of these various powers how do you think all of these various powers can emerge how do you think all of these various powers can emerge from this and set up a virtuous circle rather than a vicious one? well, i think iran's calculation so far is by causing calibrated disruptions in the strait of hormuz, short of killing or maiming individuals, it can send a message to interested parties in europe and the wider world that president
12:09 pm
trump's strategy of maximum pressure on iran is a problem for them, driving up insurance rates on shipping and producing uncertainty on the oil market. this is tied with ongoing negotiations between iran and the e3 on payment mechanisms and the demand on mr and's part that europe lives up to its obligations, as iran sees them, to deliver the economic effect that was promised as return for signing on to the z poa. i think central to this will be an effort on your‘s part to find a mechanism if it is possible to deliver the benefits. this behaviour we are seeing is a symptom of the underlying cause. fascinating to hear your analysis. stephen yaxley—lennon — who is also known as tommy robinson has been given a nine month jail sentence for contempt of court.
12:10 pm
the ex—english defence league leader — seen here arriving at court this morning — was found guilty last week of interfering with the trial of a sexual grooming gang at leeds crown court in may 2018. two high courtjudges said a facebook live broadcast of defendants in the criminal trial had encouraged "vigilante action". our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani has been following proceedings and joins us from outside the old bailey. this has been a terribly long and complicated saga involving the formerfounder of the complicated saga involving the former founder of the english defence league, stephen yaxley—lennon, who goes by the name tommy robinson. it is part of his campaigning against islam and various other causes which he says are of concern to forgotten people. in short today he has been jailed for nine months for it to contempt is over the course of a year. the first in canterbury in 2017, the second in leeds was the more serious one in may 2018. the complete gating factor here is although it's nine months in practice he will only serve around ten weeks in jail because of time already served when
12:11 pm
he was initially jailed because of time already served when he was initiallyjailed for all of this last year. before the court of appeal released him for the whole case to be reheard. they victoria sharp, the most senior criminal judge in england has been looking after this case and she said while stephen yaxley—lennon's facebook broadcast outside of the court had disrupted their trial of nine men who were facing sexual grooming gang allegations, it had not prejudiced the jury. however, it allegations, it had not prejudiced thejury. however, it impeded the trial and disrupted the proceedings and the only option open to her was and the only option open to her was a custodial sentence because of her duty to uphold the rule of law. we learned last week when she found stephen yaxley—lennon in contempt, following his facebook broadcast, which was watched by around a quarter of a million people, some of the defendants try to get the trial stopped on the basis they can no longer have a fair hearing by that
12:12 pm
jury longer have a fair hearing by that jury and one of the defendants eventually took his case to the court of appeal on that point, so although those applications didn't go anywhere, there was clearly a serious risk that his actions could have derailed the trial of these nine men on very serious sexual charges, including rape. they were ultimately denied justice to these men. part of a gang from huddersfield grooming young women into sexual trafficking, effectively passing them around. appalling strategies. restrictions were lifted late last year. he wore a t—shirt saying, convicted ofjournalism. he feels as though he is a free—speech warrior. his supporters believe it is and establishment stitch up
12:13 pm
involving journalists and the judiciary. he said that his sentence, which was ten months, most of which will probably be sent in segregation, effectively amounts to a death sentence because people are out to kill him. eight wink and a smile to his friends and supporters in the public gallery and for now he is back injail. thank you for the conference of analysis, dominic. very useful. we will see you later. senior labour figures have expressed anger and alarm at claims that some ofjeremy corbyn's closest allies tried to interfere in disciplinary processes involving allegations of anti—semitism. a bbc panorama investigation that aired last night heard from a number of former officials who worked in the party's disputes team. labour rejected any claim that the party was anti—semitic. here's our political correspondent, jessica parker. e—mails leaked to panorama suggest that labour's general secretary, jennie formby, attempted to interfere in the selection of a disciplinary panel and later
12:14 pm
that she deleted the correspondence on her official labour party account. the correspondence also shows that jeremy corbyn's own personal e—mail was copied in. labour said that she temporarily stopped using her party e—mail because of concerns that a political opponent had access to it, and the e—mails were about ensuring the panel was held accountable for the length of time they take to hear cases. the man who was in charge at party hq for years is iain mcnicol. the e—mails that you've shown me are really important. the issues that are raised within them should ring alarm bells across the party. panorama spoke to seven former officials from labour's disputes team. i resigned my membership. i felt that i had tried as hard as i possibly could to do my bit to fight this, this sickness. and to me, it's getting worse. i knew the atmosphere was bad, but it kept building up and up.
12:15 pm
i felt a bit complicit, actually. in what? in the labour party not dealing with anti—semitism properly. chant: shame on you, shame on you! labour has said the former staff making claims are disaffected and the party insists it is implacably opposed to anti—semitism. we will do all we can to make it very clear to anybody who thinks that they can have those abhorrent views in our party and in ourfamily that they are not welcome. there has already been considerable pressure onjeremy corbyn around allegations of anti—semitism in the party. now, signs that that pressure could only increase further. jessica parker, bbc news. our assistant political editor norman smith is at westminster for us. well, the reaction from team jeremy corbyn has been forthright, to say
12:16 pm
the least. they have basically gone to war with the bbc, the presenter of the panorama programme and perhaps more tellingly, the former staff members who contributed to the programme, describing them as disaffected former staff members, clearly hostile to jeremy corbyn disaffected former staff members, clearly hostile tojeremy corbyn and seeking to undermine him. as for those around the labour leader and the labour leader himself, they have refused to directly answer any questions or undertake any interviews. this morning jeremy corbyn left home as is his habit without answering any questions but there was frankly an utterly bizarre situation where he seemed to send out one of his friends first to harangue the waiting media pack in spanish. i kid you not. speaks spanish
12:17 pm
are you concerned about the anti—semitism? all of which has done absolutely nothing to dampen the criticism of jeremy corbyn, including from his own deputy, tom watson, who this morning turned on party officials who have so long busted those who contributed to the programme. he described the young former party staff is very, very brave for speaking out. he suggested jeremy corbyn had creative a permissive culture towards anti—semitism in the labour party by his own very critical attitudes towards israel, which have in turn allowed more extreme views to flourish by people
12:18 pm
who take a conspiratorial anti—semitic view. and that he now needed to act and that only he could put an end to the anti—semitism crisis. this is what he said. we have been changing our procedures but as many have said, we have been too slow in doing that. for me, that was a watershed programme. to see those young members, young members of staff, many of whom have come from different wings of the party, supporters ofjeremy corbyn or not, it must have taken them great courage to blow the whistle and for them to call out this is deplorable that we would just dismiss them as in some way sort of disaffected. they obviously feel very, very concerned that the procedures were not working and they have felt it for some time. i cannot walk by on the other side and let them shoulder the
12:19 pm
responsibility for calling this bad behaviour out. asi as i said, the response from jeremy corbyn and his team so far seems to be to hunker down in the bunker and the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell, when he emerged this morning, seem to want to play down the controversy, suggesting if anything it was an issue for the bbc. i think it has, and the new system has been put in place, speeding up the process of claims and dealing with them more effectively. i think i've always said at the very beginning it was too slow, not ruthless enough and i think that has improved dramatically. in light of the programme last night and what i've seen, let's see what the bbc says in response to the complaints that were put in because what we've got is ex—staff making accusations against existing staff and the existing staff have challenged those complaints so it does need an objective look at. while all this has been rumbling on, three prominent labour female mps have written to jeremy corbyn,
12:20 pm
calling for a shake—up of the complaints process, suggesting it should be entirely independent and one of them is labour mp louise ellman. this is a crisis of leadership. we want a completely independent process of looking at complaints, a process well away from the leader's office. that is the first thing he could do to try to establish some kind of credibility in the labour party as an anti—racist party. that is the one thing that critics agree on, it is about him because onlyjeremy corbyn can send out a signal to the party that this has got to end. the headlines on bbc news... number 10 calls for deescalation
12:21 pm
after a royal navy ship intercepts three iranian boats harassing a british oil tanker in the gulf. tommy robinson has beenjailed for nine months at the old bailey for contempt of court. labour rejects accusations that senior members ofjeremy corbyn's team interfered during investigations into alleged anti—semitism. sport now. a brilliant start for england. will is at edgbaston. superb bowling from england early on. a really good stop from england but in the last half hour, australia have recovered from 14—3, and the 100 isjust have recovered from 14—3, and the 100 is just up for the aussies. after 25 overs. archer in the second
12:22 pm
over, getting the wicket of aaron finch, the captain, for a golden duck. unsuccessfully reviewed by australia. chris woakes on his home ground took the cricket of david warner, a big wicket. at that stage they were 10—2 and shortly afterwards, they got another wicket. on his world cup debut. 40—3 and as i say they have recovered to 100—3 in the 25th over and they will go on to face new zealand, the winner of this one, at lord's on sunday. keep up—to—date on test match special and radio. there will be highlights on their website. then to wimbledon where it is women's semifinal today. john, a huge day coming up. perhaps not the semifinal line—up we were expecting but we shouldn't be surprised of course to see serena williams in there once again, and she hopes to
12:23 pm
reach an 11th wimbledon singles final. she played the player who upsetjoanna final. she played the player who upset joanna contest. at final. she played the player who upsetjoanna contest. at the age of 33, she is the oldest grand slam semifinalist. she is really finding form in this latter stage of her career but she faces a formidable opponent against serena williams. her time opponent against serena williams. hertime in opponent against serena williams. her time in the doubles with andy murray has clearly helped her. the other semifinal, hard to split the seventh and eighth seeds. elina svitolina and halep. this will be an intriguing match. they will be on centre court in half—an—hour. all eyes after that will be on serena williams as she pursues her 24th grand slam singles title.
12:24 pm
that is all the support for now and i will have more for you in the next hour. ajudge has said greater manchester police are to blame for the death of a man shot dead by police in cheshire in 2012. judge thomas teague qc was particularly critical of senior officers who failed to plan the operation properly. he said the force was guilty of a "catastrophic series of failings and errors." anthony grainger died from a single shot as he sat in a stolen car in culcheth in warrington. neither he nor his two companions were armed. but thejudge said the officer who shot mr grainger did not act unlawfully because he honestly but mistakenly believed that mr grainger was armed. i have concluded that greater manchester police is to blame for the death of mr granger because it failed to authorise, plan or conduct the firearms operation in such a way
12:25 pm
as to minimise records to the use of lethal force. firearms command as to minimise records to the use of lethalforce. firearms command is authorised and planned the operation incompetently and in breach of national guidance. they failed to maintain contemporaneous records of their decisions, reconstructing their decisions, reconstructing their official logs afterwards in their official logs afterwards in the light of hindsight. they briefed the light of hindsight. they briefed the firearms officers with inaccurate information and failed to keep the mission under review. they authorised the cs dispersal canister, a device which greater manchester police had procured some yea rs manchester police had procured some years earlier without the approval of the home secretary and in flag ra nt of the home secretary and in flagrant breach of national guidance. four of the officers involved in the operation, including two of its commanders and a tactical adviser, lacked the necessary degree
12:26 pm
of professional competence. although anthony grainger and his companions we re anthony grainger and his companions were in the area for an unlawful purpose, they were unarmed and no intelligence existed to suggest otherwise. contrary to the expectation of police investigators, the men were probably not intending to commita the men were probably not intending to commit a robbery that day. i have concluded that the officer who shot anthony grainger did not act unlawfully because the honestly believed he was reaching for a gun. in fact, anthony grainger was probably trying to get out of the car. the main reason the officer jumped to the wrong conclusion was the misleading way in which his superiors had briefed him beforehand. i have made a number of recommendations that i hope will reduce the chance of such a catastrophic series of failings and errors ever being repeated.
12:27 pm
let's now hear from the family and their representatives outside court. this enquiry has concluded that anthony died as the result of a calamitous combination of errors and blunders by the greater manchester police. in finding that the police operation failed to satisfy article two of the un convention of human rights, the report has ruled that anthony was unlawfully killed by the gmp. the damning report catalogues dishonesty and corruption at the highest levels of the greater manchester police. senior officers have provided evidence to obscure the truth. and have reconstructed evidence to deflect personal criticism. they have displayed a
12:28 pm
cavalier approach for public safety, the failings extend to the very top of the gmp to the assistant chief co nsta bles, of the gmp to the assistant chief constables, criticised for giving misleading evidence. the chairman described serious problems with threat assessment, a fundamentally flawed tactical approach and planning of the operation that was incompetent and dangerous. anthony died because of these failings by the greater manchester police. anthony's family have referred the matter today to the cramp as service —— the crown prosecution service to start proceedings against senior officers. they will ask the cps to
12:29 pm
consider bringing criminal proceedings as a result of anthony's unlawful killing. anthony's family call for urgent root and branch reforms of the greater manchester police generally and their firearms unit, and particular to avoid the public being put at risk. the family would like to think the judge, the chairman and his team for their thorough report and in their conduct of this enquiry. can you step a bit further forward, please? can you step a bit further forward, please ? thank you. four sevenths years we have fought forjustice for anthony. it has been a very long, emotional roller—coaster to the truth. as a family we have been shocked at the
12:30 pm
dangerous levels of incompetence on the part of gmp. the enquiry has revealed staggering levels of ineptitude way beyond what was expected. the operator and the post—incident conclusion. we are therefore pleased with the chairman's findings of unlawful killing and we welcome the involvement of the crown prosecution service and the independent office of police conduct in considering criminal charges to be brought against these officers responsible for anthony's death. we want lessons to be learned. no mum should have to face that knocked on the door to be told the police had shot and killed her son. we are devastated by the death of antony and have gone through hell. we only hope that this outcome serves as a lesson to greater manchester police so that others do not have to go through what we have been through. also, i
12:31 pm
would like to thank all my legal team, justice team and everybody that has been with me and the press as well. thank you very much. that was marina schofield, the mother of anthony grainger who was shot dead with that single short when he sat on a car in warrington in 2012. before marina schofield we heard from the qc who was representing the family. obviously extremely shocked and angry and determined, talking about criminal proceedings against some of the officers, senior officers, involved. we will return to that. we have a reporter at liverpool court. time now for a look at the weather.
12:32 pm
hello there, most places dry this afternoon, and of sun and showers. then pause today, especially across scotla nd then pause today, especially across scotland and a chance as well for north—east england. it could deliver 23 millimetres and an error. the chance of a few thunderstorms for the east midlands. outside of these areas, you could catch a shower although many places will remain dry. these disruptive thundery downpours will gradually fade as we go into tonight. still a few showers in northern scotland, elsewhere clear skies. humid today as it will be tonight. tomorrow, a few charitable through eastern scotland, eastern england, one or two heavy and thundery. many places will avoid the rain. there will be sunshine occasionally and it will feel a touch fresher as well. sorry for
12:33 pm
breaking in, we are going back to liverpool. we will hear from the former partner of anthony grainger. this should have been prevented. the inquiry has also exposed that even now in 2012, the greater manchester police is unfit to control firearms operations. this is a scandal which places other people's lives at risk. we have waited seven years for an apology from the chief constable and we are still waiting. the home secretary set up this inquiry and a shocking report demands his immediate attention. you need to expend to the public what he's going to do to make the armed police, make it safer and pleased to be deployed on the streets of manchester. i now ask the home secretary to sit down
12:34 pm
with me and other bereaved families and explain what he's going to do to make it safe. thank you. good afternoon, i am tony murphy and diana solicitor for the family of anthony grainger. this is a landmark report for armed policing in this country. the scale of institutional incompetence by this inquiry, within greater manchester police, reveals evidence of corporate manslaughter in relation to the fatal police shooting of anthony grainger. we therefore call on the director of public prosecutions to urgently review this evidence with a view to instituting criminal proceedings against greater manchester police, asa against greater manchester police, as a body corporate, for manslaughter. this evidence is already being reviewed by the independent office of police conduct with a view to making a decision on gross misconduct proceedings against the shooter and other senior gmp
12:35 pm
officers. anthony will never be forgotten. thank you, that is only have to say for now. i think we are going to leave it there from liverpool but as you can tell, the family of all those bereaved by then in 2012 still angry and as we heard from anthony grainger‘s former partner, she said we have waited seven partner, she said we have waited seve n yea rs partner, she said we have waited seven years for an apology, we have waited till today for an apology from greater manchester police. her solicitor, tony murphy, talking about an urgent review from the director of public prosecutions to ta ke director of public prosecutions to take criminal proceedings against greater manchester police. they are complaining of the scale, as they put it, of institutional incompetence and evidence of corporate manslaughter. so that is a story which is going to develop over
12:36 pm
the next couple of hours and we will go to the next couple of hours and we will gotoa the next couple of hours and we will go to a reporter as in as we can in liverpool. let us move on. the number of people waiting for hospital treatment in england has hit a record high of 4.39 million, nhs figures show. it comes amid an escalating row between the government and doctors over pensions. meanwhile, the annual survey of gp patients in england has shown growing numbers of people are struggling to get through to their doctor on the phone. our health correspondent nick triggle said the figures are fresh evidence of the growing problem facing the nhs. hospitals are short of staff so they rely on doctors to do overtime shifts, especially in areas such as routine surgery. earlier this week it emerged some doctors are refusing to do overtime because of the changes in pension arrangements which meant they were getting higher tax bills if they went over the certain threshold. the figures today add more evidence to what is a
12:37 pm
growing problem for the nhs. telus about the gp patient survey. this is the annual survey, the biggest survey of its kind, nearly 800,000 serving —— my patients took part. there is lots of good news. the trusting gps and their staff is above 90%. people's experience of general practice is over 80% when you get to see the gp but that is problems with access. one in three patients report problems getting through to their gp on the telephone which is up on one in five in 2012. asimilar number which is up on one in five in 2012. a similar number complain about not getting the appointment times they need. sometimes they have to get up early in the morning to queue outside the gp to get urgent appointments or meet —— with many weeks for an appointment. nhs england says it is a bit of the problem and will carry out a review. one of the problems that we have a big leadership battle going on, there will be a new prime minister
12:38 pm
and presumably a new cabinet which means a new health secretary possibly? yes. the thing with the nhs and social care, but brexit and the leadership campaign, there are lots of initiatives which are on hold, stuck in the department of health and social care. all the time goes on, months and months pass by and pressure is growing on the front line. going back to these quite difficult political problems that have to be sorted out, the co nsulta nts, have to be sorted out, the consultants, how does that to be sorted out? that is a tricky one. the pension reforms have occurred across the economy, notjust doctors. obviously doctors are well paid. there are two thresholds, and annual line switches £40,000 and a lifetime allowance, if doctors build up lifetime allowance, if doctors build upa lifetime allowance, if doctors build up a pension of over £1 million then they get these high rates of tax bills. one of the things the
12:39 pm
government is looking at is to create more flexibility with the pension to allow doctors to opt out of the pension for a number of years and create a bit of flexibility like that. that would allow them to continue working shifts without being penalised. an independent report has found that mps' staff face an "unacceptable risk" of bullying and harassment — including sexual harassment at westminster. our political correspondent chris mason has the latest. the essence of this reportjill stein into the oddity of mp staff. the working for a particular mp directly, even though they appear for by the tax. gemma white qc concludes there must
12:40 pm
be a fundamental shift away from regarding members of parliament as 650 small businesses with near complete freedom to operate in relation to their stuff. —— staff. i willjust bring you some of the anonymous testimony which she collected, speaking to 220 people as she was compiling this report. she said that mp's staff are in a uniquely vulnerable position because they are directly employed by mps and too many staff were telling her that the existing procedures that have been adopted pretty much in the last year, relatively recently, to try to provide some oversight, are not good enough because too many staff fear that using those mechanisms would amount to career suicide. she said by far the most common form of offending behaviour described was mps who shout at, demean, belittle and humiliate their staff ona regular basis, often in public. she goes on to say sexual harassment is also a problem, with staff being subject to unwanted sexual advances
12:41 pm
often accompanied by touching, sometimes forceful. she said there was an unacceptable level of sexual banter and unwanted discussion of intimate sexual detail. back now to our top story this morning. iran has denied trying to seize a british oil tanker in the strait of hormuz. the ministry of defence says three boats tried to obstruct the vessel but were warned—off by a royal navy ship. taraneh stone — a bbc digitaljournalist who monitors iranian current affairs — joins me now. we have a lot of ambiguity, what you think? iran has firmly denied it. first it was the revelation regard he said these were claims by the us and the absolutely denied it. —— the revolutionary guard. the foreign
12:42 pm
minister called it claimed by the uk and called it worthless. on the other hand, they continue to say that the uk will regret the gibraltar incident. so making threats but denying they have anything to do with the actual accident which means outlets are coming through? yes, exactly. what they are seeing is the incident of oil tankers that happen to well ago, iran was accused by the uk and us, it said that if had done it, it would see it proudly. but an incident a few weeks back injune, the incident was not calculated to sink the tanker butjust send a little message? yes. a big message.
12:43 pm
that incident, iran completely denied it and it is the same here. iran denies it but they said we will respond, uk will regret it. just today one of the top generals has said that uk will regret the gibraltar incident, just after they had denied the incident today. thank you much. the french parliament approves a new tax on technology giants that could provoke retaliation from the united states.
12:44 pm
six tourists have been killed and at least 30 other people injured in a violent storm that swept across a region of northern greece. gale—force winds and hailstorms lashed halkidiki late on wednesday. a czech couple died when their caravan was blown away, and two romanians and two russians were also killed. the storm followed a spell of very hot weather in greece. a state of emergency has now been declared in the area people who consume a lot of sugary drinks, including pure fruitjuice, could have a higher risk of developing cancer, according to a new large—scale study. it looked at 100,000 people in france over five years. doctors are now calling for further research, as lauren moss reports. bottles of pop and sugary drinks are often at the centre of the debate about healthy living and obesity. now a study by scientists in france suggests they are significantly associated with the risk of cancer. researchers looked at 100,000 people for five years. the average person drank around two cans of sugary drinks a week. but the study found that if they consumed two more
12:45 pm
cans on top of that, around 100 millilitres a day, there was an 18% increased risk of cancer. the study did not find any cancer links with artificial sweeteners, and it could not determine whether sugary drinks do cause disease, but health campaigners say the findings are another indication that intake should be limited. the fact that they did find a link, regardless of weight, is interesting. and potentially concerning. but we need more research on this. in the meantime, there is already lots of reasons to cut down on these drinks. since last year, uk manufacturers have been paying a levy on high sugar drinks. tory leadership candidate borisjohnson provoked criticism from health professionals last week by vowing to review what he called "sin taxes" if he becomes prime minister. obesity is a known cause of cancer, and consuming many sugary drinks can lead to weight gain. but researchers say this study shows that is not the full story.
12:46 pm
the british soft drink association says soft drinks are safe as part of a balanced diet, but this research will feed into the continuing discussion about how we can lead a healthier life. the headlines on bbc news... number ten calls for deescalation after a royal navy ship intercepts three iranian boats harassing a british oil tanker in the gulf. an inquiry contains the shooting of an unarmed man in manchester. tommy robinson has beenjailed for nine months at the old bailey for contempt of court. let us go back to one of those headlines, a judge saying greater manchester police are to blame for the death of a man shot dead by
12:47 pm
police in 2012. let us go to a reporter at liverpool crown court. what happened ? reporter at liverpool crown court. what happened? it is best to remind of the events back in 2012 when anthony grainger was shot dead by officers from greater manchester police in a car park in the lactation. he was sitting in the driving seat of a red audi, are stolen vehicle which was in a car park. a greater manchester police car swept into the car park, boxed his vehicle in and there were a number of armed police officers. very quickly one officer fired one shot, killing anthony grainger. the debate ever since was she to have pulled the trigger? today are report has been produced seven years on which says that anthony grainger should not have died at the if the
12:48 pm
correct decision—making process had beenin correct decision—making process had been in place. thejudge has strongly criticised greater manchester police for its decision—making process. the judge said the officer who pulled the trigger did not act unlawfully, he made an honest but mistaken decision but that decision was based on a misleading briefing and background information that that officer was given by his superiors. so the officer went into that situation with incorrect information, making certain assumptions by mr grainger and the other men in the car. because of those assumptions that is why he acted that way. the judge went on to make a raft of recommendations and criticisms of greater manchester police which he described as a catastrophic series of errors and feelings which should never be repeated. official logs we re never be repeated. official logs were reconstructed afterwards which
12:49 pm
is one of the strong criticism. some of the office the operation were not qualified to do so. there is a long list of criticism aimed at greater manchester police today. we have heard the family and their qc for the family, they came out, some of the family, they came out, some of the criticism they made seem to refer not so much to the original events but two things that have happened since, their offices still very angry? yes, they are referring to the crown prosecution service to see if there should be any prosecutions to take place now in the week of what the justice has ruled at this public inquiry. they are deeply unhappy and question whether anthony grainger was lawfully killed, david argued he was unlawfully killed so they want the crown prosecution service to look at this. —— they would argue. they're also deeply angry at the culture and the way there greater manchester police handled this inquiry in the
12:50 pm
aftermath. deconstructed the logs of what happened that day with hindsight. it did not keep contemporaneous logs of what happened that day. it is like a textbook of what not to do in armed police operations. they are very critical but it will not bring anthony grainger back, the judge says he wants to make sure this never happens again. the family are angry saying the police colluded with each other over statements and closed ranks over the time which followed to present the whole episode in a certain light when it was not a true light. that is what this inquiry has got to the bottom of, what chilly happened and what was the decision—making process, what incorrect assumptions were needed and that is why the family are so angry. “— needed and that is why the family are so angry. —— what really happened. let us turn to an environmental study. tonnes and tonnes of black
12:51 pm
plastic are being removed from the bed of a river in cumbria in what is thought to be one of the most significant river restoration projects in the uk. alison freeman reports. at first glance, the river keekle looks like any other, but take a closer look and you can see its dark secret. reams and reams of black plastic. this plastic was used to line the river to protect it from contamination from a nearby disused mine. but over the past two decades it's deteriorated and it's become the pollutant itself, as well as an eyesore. there's been such a knee jerk reaction to worry about what the river will do once the coal mine operations had finished. it was a natural thing — let's just constrain the river, put it in plastic, and then we can walk away and it will be fine. well, in only 20 years that plastic has started to degrade. we've got to remember that, we're not just taking a plastic covered river — rivers go to the sea. so this potentially would end up in the sea. what's happening here is thought to be the biggest river restoration of its kind in the uk. this summer's project is a pilot with plastic being cleared from a 200 metre stretch.
12:52 pm
next year the rest of the 2.5 kilometres will be restored, costing more than £1 million. it'll benefit wildlife as well as people. the plastic isjust a sheer plane, so the water's going down the river very quickly. there's no boulders and cobbles and things to stop that water. so the water's whooshing downstream into an area where there is some flooding of some homes. what are the improvements we will see when the plastic‘s gone? it will be a fully functioning river. so it will be meandering, it will work properly, it will shift its gravels as rivers like to do. and we'll get much more wildlife, there'll be more fish spawning. at the moment there are hardly any fish in here because there is no spawning habitat for them. and people will be able to enjoy it much more. catherine and her family live nearby. they welcome the project. the benefit of getting this back to nature for us as a community is that we'll be able to spend more time here safely and we'll be able to enjoy more wildlife, because when the river's restored, obviously the wildlife that lives
12:53 pm
in it will be increased as well. it will be a better habitat, a more natural habitat for the wildlife. it's just going to be brilliant. and dogs can paddle and there will be so much wildlife and kids can paddle in it. it's just going to be amazing. more rivers have been re—naturalised in cumbria than anywhere else in the uk. but the keekle is the most challenging by far. allison freeman, bbc news. researchers have discovered the earliest evidence of modern human fossils outside africa. the evidence comes from a 210,000—year—old skull unearthed in greece. the discovery pushes back the arrival of the first homo sapiens into europe from africa by 150,000 years and rewrites the history of our species. our science correspondent pallab ghosh has this report. in the distant past, the first of our kind evolved here in africa.
12:54 pm
there were also other now extinct species of human, such as the neanderthals and denisovans in europe and asia. our ancestors eventually left the continent and spread across the globe, and quickly took over from the other species. so the theory goes. but the discovery of this human—looking skull in apidima in southern greece has changed this view. scientists used to think that 200,000 years ago, europe was exclusively populated by the neanderthals, whereas our kind, modern humans, remained in africa until 40,000 years ago. but the discovery of the new skull in greece has shattered that view. it doesn't have the flatter, elongated shape of the neanderthal, but rather, it's much more like our own, rounder. so this means that the two species could have interacted for 100,000 years. it had been thought that our ancestors had been prevented
12:55 pm
from leaving africa for tens of thousands of years, perhaps by the other types of humans, or the climate. but researchers are now having to rethink their old ideas. there was nothing to stop modern humans getting out of africa more than 200,000 years ago, and expanding. it potentially means that even places further to the east, there are claims of modern human fossils in china at 130,000 years. i'd been very sceptical about those up to now, but given the evidence from apidima, maybe i should be more open—minded about those early chinese records' claim to be homo sapiens. it is potentially the biggest shift in our understanding of how modern humans left africa. instead of overlapping briefly with neanderthals in europe, our kind may have coexisted with a wide variety of human species across the world for tens of thousands of years.
12:56 pm
in a moment it's time for the one o'clock news with ben brown but first it's time for a look at the weather. hello, most places are having a fine thursday afternoon, next of cloud and sunshine but the chance of some thunderstorms which could give a torrential downpour. low pressure is moving across the uk, needing right across scotland where there is the greater potential for disruptive downpours this afternoon. many places will stay dry but in eastern areas, we will see these torrential downpours. the chance of a few reaching into north—east england as well, parts of the midlands will also see thunderstorms. around ten to 15 millimetres possible in another. especially in scotland, ten to 30 millimetres in a short space of time. into this evening, that
12:57 pm
potential for disruption, of time. into this evening, that potentialfor disruption, even outside the thunderstorm areas, you need the shower but many state —— places will stage i can a warm and muqqy places will stage i can a warm and muggy day there. into the night, thundery downpours gradually fade. so was continuing scotland and the north. temperatures into the upper teens. as for tomorrow, a fine day for most of his, occasional sunshine but againa for most of his, occasional sunshine but again a few showers develop, especially in eastern scotland and eastern england, if you catch when it could be heavy and thundery but most it could be heavy and thundery but m ost pla ces it could be heavy and thundery but most places will not get it. a touch fresher tomorrow, the temperature may be a degree down on the day. there is a chance of catching a shower over the next couple of the a small chance. sunday is looking dry for the men's final. it will turn increasingly settled over the weekend with high—pressure building over the uk. looking at saturday,
12:58 pm
thatis over the uk. looking at saturday, that is the possibility of catching a show in parts of north england and the midlands but most places will have clear blue skies. next of cloud and sunshine. one of the bodies coming into the north sea coast so temperatures may be held then compared with elsewhere. most places reach the low 20s. again on sunday, high—pressure holds on for the start of the week. a few spots warming up a bit more and nudging up into the 20s.
12:59 pm
1:00 pm
drama in the gulf: a royal navy warship warns off three iranian gunboats. hms montrose issued radio warnings to the iranians, who were trying to intercept a british oil tanker. obviously very concerning developments, but also i'm very proud of the royal navy and the role that they played in keeping british assets, british shipping safe. we'll be live with our defence correspondent. also this lunchtime: a public inquiry says this father of two was shot dead after a catastrophic series of failings by greater manchester police. firearms commanders authorised and planned the operation incompetently and in breach of national guidance. labour says whistle—blowers who've made allegations about anti—semitism

138 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on