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tv   BBC News  BBC News  July 14, 2019 8:00pm-8:31pm BST

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hello this is bbc news. the headlines: a thrilling end to the cricket world cup as england defeat new zealand to become world champions for the first time. this is bbc news. jubilant england fans watched the game in trafalgar square —— the headlines at 8... and around the country. a thrilling end to the cricket world cup as england defeat more leaked memos from britain's former ambassador new zealand to become world to washington suggest champions for the first time. president trump scrapped the iran nuclear deal to spite barack obama. jubilant england fans watched the game in trafalgar square and around the country. a man is charged with the murder of kelly mary fauvrelle — the 26—year—old who was 8 months pregnant when she was fatally stabbed at home. i'mjohn watson i'm john watson live at lord's where we'll be reflecting on that dramatic result with the tournament settled with a super over for the very first time. more leaked memos from britain's former ambassador to washington suggest president trump scrapped the iran nuclear deal to spite barack obama. a man is charged with the murder of kelly mary fauvrelle — the 26—year—old who was 8 months pregnant when she was fatally stabbed at home.
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storm barry makes landfall in the american state of louisiana, where there are warnings of life—threatening floods. after more than five hours on court, novak djokovic beats roger federer to retain his wimbledon men's single title. his fifth in his career. good evening. welcome to bbc news. england has triumphed over new zealand in the cricket world cup at lords, their first ever victory in the competition. in an extraordinary nail—biting finale, the game was played to a tie, before being decided by a so—called super over between the two sides. let's talk to john watson who is at lord's. it was a real edge of your seat
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finish. couldn't have been any closer. absolutely. how are your nerves after that one? extraordinary scenes and an extraordinary finish to what has been a dramatic world cup, one that england, as you say, have one for the very first time in their history. it was a sickener for new zealand. they would never have envisaged that it would have been settled in the manner in which it was with the scores tied at the end of regulation, normal play. new zealand having made 241 for eight of their overs. in reply, england could only reach 241 as well. taking the match to a super over. it was down to joss butler and match to a super over. it was down tojoss butler and ben stokes who went out to face those final six balls of the match, making 15 runs and in reply, new zealand could only make 15 themselves, and it means that england wind the tournament on the basis of having scored more boundaries throughout the entire
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match. it seems unfair almost that thatis match. it seems unfair almost that that is what it takes to split these two tea ms that is what it takes to split these two teams because new zealanders will have never won this title before and they play the game in a brilliant way, a brilliant spirit having beaten india in the secondly mac semifinals. they prove that was not the peak for them as they pushed england close but as we know, this was the big incentive for england. so many resources, so much focus. they prioritise this tournament, prioritise this very competition and that was the aim four years ago when england were knocked out all of the world cup at the group stage. eoin morgan in that team then. masterminding a change, a change in direction, prioritise and white ball cricket and it certainly works for england, despite that dramatic finish and the celebrations, as you can imagine, continuing in the lords right now. tens, nerve—racking, but a thrilling finish. let's not
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forget, in light of what you seen the womeni world cup, the netball world cup to come, the football world cup to come, the football world cup, cricket needed its moment. obviously with cricket no longer being on free to air television, it was shown live today on channel 4, sky permitting channel 4to on channel 4, sky permitting channel 4 to show this alive and for the ecb and the tournament organisers, they will be delighted that they have had their moment. whether or not you will see that reflected the new viewing figures... but as they want to make cricket more accessible, more people playing the game, attracting more diverse audience, they've brought it to that audience and i'm sure many will have been watching for that armchair moment at home. a brilliant end to this world cup and one that nobody would have ever seen coming. thank you very much. novak djokovic has defended his title in the longest singles final in wimbledon history. he beat roger federer in five sets in a match which lasted
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more than five hours. it meant that federer — who is thirty—seven — narrowly missed out on becoming the oldest player to win a grand slam singles title in the professional era. djokovic has now won sixteen grand slams — he said this final was one of the greatest matches of his career. well, i think this was, if not the most exciting and thrilling final i was of a part of then definitely top two or three in my career. against one of the greatest players of all time, roger, who i respect a lot. u nfortu nately time, roger, who i respect a lot. unfortunately in this that make these kind of matches, one of the players has to lose and, as roger said, we both had our chances. and we will be appearing in a extended sport sport and in ten minutes. the uk, france and germany have made
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a direct appeal to donald trump and iran's leaders, to end the escalating tension over iran's nuclear programme. theresa may, president macron and chancellor merkel say they‘ re concerned that the deal reached with iran could unravel further. it comes as more leaked diplomatic cables are published — this time revealing that britain's former ambassador to washington believed president trump pulled out of the iran deal to damage the legacy of his predecessor — barack obama. our diplomatic correspondent james robbins reports. little more than one year ago, boris johnson as foreign secretary was urging mike pompeo, donald trump's secretary of state, to persuade his boars not to abandon the hardline international agreement with iran, restricting its nuclear capability. it is very far from perfect but it is the best thing that we have at the moment. for months, mrjohnson has been working very closely with britain's ambassador sir kim darroch, and a leaky cost him his job. the new material published shows a circuit making clear his view the president was determined to
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pull out of a nuclear deal mainly as an act of spite against barack obama. the administration, he wrote, has set up on an act of diplomatic vandalism seemingly for ideological and personality reasons. it was obama's deal. all this matters now because britain and the united states disagree profoundly over policy towards iran. both have warships in the gulf and want to prevent iran shutting down the vital sea lanes, but only the us seeks to destroy iran's economy by ever tightening sanctions. the leaks throw vivid light on those splits. whoever becomes next prime minister now faces a huge series of tasks, trying to keep secret secret, trying to restore and rebuild confidence and morale here at the foreign office and hardest of all, trying to wind, not to lose influence in washington. at the moment, the relationship is not satisfactory for significant reasons that are actually much more important than
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these leaks, actually much more important than these lea ks, namely actually much more important than these leaks, namely the middle east policy. the policy which the united states is adopting. and the deep transatlantic disagreement over how best to contain iran was a nuclear programme has been highlighted again this evening. the leaders of britain, france and germany have appealed jointly to both united states and iran to stop the escalation of tensions and resume dialogue. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30pm this evening in the papers — our guests joining me tonight are chief sports reporter at the sun — martin lipton — and ruth lea who is economic adviser at arbuthnot banking group. the shadow foreign secretary, emily thornberry, has criticised her party's response to the bbc panorama programme, which made allegations about the way labour handled claims of anti—semitism. the party described former officials who had acted as whistle—blowers as "disafffected" and said they had "professional and personal axes to grind". ms thornberry told the bbc‘s
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andrew marr show that it was important labour addressed the problems raised by the programme. i think that the labour party has to deal with this issue, and frankly, i welcome the fact that the... i mean, it's a shame and a disgrace that the equalities and human rights commission have been brought in to look at the labour party but they have, and i think we should now welcome it. i think we should open — wait a minute. we should open our doors up and we should say to them, "right, we have been trying to improve our processes. clearly, it's still not working. can you help us?" a 25—year—old man has been charged with the murder of a pregnant woman in south london, and the manslaughter of her baby son. kelly mary fauvrelle was eight months pregnant when she was attacked at her home in south london two weeks ago. navtej johal reports. kelly mary fauvrelle was eight
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months pregnant when she was fatally stabbed at her home in croydon in an attack last month. her son, who was delivered by paramedics at the scene, also died a few days later in hospital. police were called to her house in the early hours of the morning, where she was in cardiac arrest, and died at the scene. herfamily, including her mother and baby nephew, were all at home at the time of the attack. today, police have charged aaron mckenzie with her murder and manslaughter of her child. 25—year—old has also been charged with one count of possession of offensive weapon. he is one of three men arrested over the deaths. 37—year—old was released with no further action by the 29—year—old has been bailed until next month. aaron mckenzie is due to appear in front of magistrates tomorrow.
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the chancellor philip hammond has said the uk will not be able to control key elements of a no—deal brexit. speaking to bbc panorama, just days left before he's expected to leave the treasury, the chancellor says the eu will control most of the process if the uk leaves without a deal later this year. private business is an important player in this, and the eu 27 control many of the levers. for example, we can make sure that goods flow in through the port of dover without any friction. but we cannot control the outward flow into the port of calais. the french can dial that up or down, just the same as the spanish for years have dialled up or down the length of the queues at the border going into gibraltar. we cannot control what no—deal brexit would be like? we cannot, because many of the levers are held by others — the eu 27 or private businesses. we can seek to persuade them, but we cannot control it. philip hammond speaking to the bbc‘s panorama programme. you can watch the full programme, britain's brexit crisis on bbc one
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this coming thursday, july 18, at 9pm. meanwhile, the work and pensions secretary amber rudd says she's changed her position on a no—deal brexit. she had previously been opposed to the idea, but has told the andrew marr programme that the possibility had to be kept alive in order to succeed in the negotiations(tx —— to be kept alive in order to succeed in the negotiations. i maintain my position that a no—deal brexit is bad for this country, and will be difficult to handle. to be fair, even brexiteers say that at the very least it will have adverse consequences. i am very clear that we need to be frank but the british people but no deal is not easy, it will be something that will challenge ur, but if we have to do it, it has to be a backstop, by the end of october, but i know longer say that i will lie down in front of the bulldozers if it arrives. french police have detained more than 150 people, including two yellow vest leaders, during violent clashes in paris. they're accused of staging
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an unauthorised demonstration at the annual bastille day parade. protesters tried to occupy the boulevard in the city's centre using metal barricades — with police firing tear gas in an attempt to disperse them. the demonstrators booed president emmanuel macron as he was driven down the champs elysees during the parade. police have used batons and pepper spray against demonstrators in hong kong as thousands of pro—democracy campaigners took to the streets again today, as they try to keep up the momentum of recent mass protests. scuffles broke out between officers in riot gear and the anti—government protesters, who built barricades in the street. this evening, thousands remain on the streets and have been facing off against police. our correspondent stephen mcdonell has been in hong kong this evening. it's a pretty tense mood. this is the situation right now as i'm sure you can see behind me, there are
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hundreds of riot police who have come with their larger shields, baritones, with their helmets and there are rows behind me, and the reason they are here, i will show you, is that as we go to air, the march which was legal today, which was given permission to go ahead has now reached the end of its official permission time. from this moment on, what i'm going to show you is an illegal gathering. this has now become the pattern. you have a large march where people have now gone beyond just calling for this extradition bill and now they see that they are defending hong kong was like broader freedoms and that they are defending hong kong was like broaderfreedoms and even calling for one person, one boat democratic elections. we will move down to the other end and i'm sure you can start to see this is how the protesters have responded to that right police presence. this is their
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front line if you like. they've put up front line if you like. they've put up barricades. they are double layered if you like. there are umbrellas as well. they are designed to repel tear gas and pepper spray. they are also symbolic of the umbrella movement protests. if you come ina umbrella movement protests. if you come in a bit close as the rain comes down, you can see how these have been put together with pliers to try and secure them and at some point, the police are going to come through and have to clear this but it does show the seriousness of what has now become the new normal in hong kong. every weekend, we have these rolling protests now and at these rolling protests now and at the end of it, these demonstrators are prepared to have a showdown with the police, so behind these umbrellas, they've all got helmets like this one. they know tear gas
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and pepper spray is coming and somehow both sides have got to find an end to this crisis but there is nonein an end to this crisis but there is none in sight. the headlines on bbc news... a thrilling end to the cricket world cup as england defeat new zealand to become world champions for the first time. more leaked memos from britain's former ambassador to washington suggest president trump scrapped the iran nuclear deal to spite barack obama. a man is charged with the murder of kelly mary fauvrelle the 26—year—old who was eight months pregnant when she was fatally stabbed at home. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. have you ever seen anything like it in your life? england have won the cricket world cup and the most dramatic fashion as they beat new zealand in an all—time classic final. it went to a super over
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because the match was tied and even that was as close as it could be. our reporterjohn watson was watching england make history at lord's. theirfirst ever watching england make history at lord's. their first ever world watching england make history at lord's. theirfirst ever world cup win. you could not have written a more remarkable script. absolutely. the first time this tournament has been settled on a super over and it really has been a super day and a superfinish in really has been a super day and a super finish in the really has been a super day and a superfinish in the end really has been a super day and a super finish in the end for england, despite there being so little to split these two teams. as you say, 240 148 new zealand started after their 50 overs in reply. england finished on 241 all out, taking this match to a super over. it was up to joss butler and ben stokes to face those six crucial balls bowled by trent bolt. they managed to produce... runs and new zealand could only match them. england are winning this match by virtue of having scored more boundaries over the course of the match. i will talk you through some of the crucial
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moments. it is ben stokes who steadied the ship for england when it looked like they were going to lose this match, well behind the required run rate and having run two, he managed to secure for buys, for overthrows after the ball came back off his bat as he lunged towards it. that was in the final over and that produced a total of six runs, admit that they needed two ru ns six runs, admit that they needed two runs off the final ball to win it. they could only manage one, taking it to they could only manage one, taking ittoa they could only manage one, taking it to a super over. after contributing those 15 runs of six balls from the bowling of trent bolt, one player was run out. they needed to, could only produce one, levelling the match again at 15 runs. they could not be split after that super over and, as i say, england winning it having scored more boundaries throughout the course of the match. incredible scenes, as you can imagine, out on the pitch. eoin morgan, the captain,
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could he have ever imagined that, having been born a few miles outside dublin, he or she would be at the home of cricket winning the world cup for england for the very first time. brilliant scenes, heartbreak for new zealand as we know having never won this tournament themselves in the past, dramatic, dramatic end to what has been a fantastic tournament. after seven weeks of cricket, england of course having at one stage looked as though they might not make it out of the group stage bouncing back with those brilliant wins against india, against new zealand to get themselves into the semifinals, where of course they beat the holders australia before eventually, finally coming past new zealand in such a tight, tight finish to what has been a brilliant world cup. such a tight, tight finish to what has been a brilliant world cupm has. astonishing stuff. thank you. if the excitement at the cricket was not enough, we had one of the greatest wimbledon finals of all
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time is novak djokovic fought back from the brink to save two championship points and beat roger federer in a thrilling final set tie—break. it was 12—12 and after five hours long, it is the longest men's final ever and one that ended with novak djokovic winning his fifth wimbledon title. ollie hamilton was watching the of that unfolds. roger federer called it crazy, he was right, wasn't he? —— mike holly hamilton. it was the final we all hoped it would be. two of the world's greatest players going head—to—head in that final on second court. people already —— on centre people describing it as the greatest final of all time. it was certainly the longest of all time lasting almost five hours. let's get more and second court. people already —— back on centre court. people describing it as the greatest final of all time. it was certainly the longest of all time lasting almost five hours. let's get more on andrew castle who joins me. people are calling is one of the greatest finals of all time. it came down to those fine margins. it was the greatest for you. not quite the greatest for you. not quite the greatest for you. not quite the greatest for me, it was the first time we've seen a tie—break come
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into operation any final set and it looked like that from around 6—607— seven. then it was the match points. roger federer 8—7, match point on his own serve, his serve was fantastic, you look nervous. novak djokovic stayed calm. the crowd also deflated but there were opportunities for both players. where you put it in the greats, i do not know but i know it was a great way for the tournament to end and a novak djokovicjust way for the tournament to end and a novak djokovic just somehow way for the tournament to end and a novak djokovicjust somehow got the job done once again. most people wanted, any crowd, roger two ends of the emotion was that way and novak djokovic to go in there and resist everybody, just say, no, no, no, i'm the top seed, defending champion and to beat roger federer head—to—head on that court, he may be the greatest of all time. that is the big question, everybody wants that. it is not always about individual tournaments, it is about grand slams and he has narrow that gap on both
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rafael nadal and roger federer today. it easy for us to say 16 grand slams, each of them you have to win seven matches against world —class to win seven matches against world—class athletes. we are in a remarkable era, we have enjoyed it so much, watching their expertise and the commitment, motivation just to keep on going. actually, do you know what? beyond that, it is just the beauty of the sport that they produce together because these three quys produce together because these three guys bring out the best in each other and they will be joined by andy murray and the likes. ultimately it is these to you once again. i will tell you what, fedor is going to be absolutely mind blown for a while. —— is going to be absolutely mind blown fora while. —— roger is going to be absolutely mind blown for a while. —— roger federer will be mind blowing for a while. he gave everything. rude hit losing two championship points will be like that. you do not remember the ones where you came back to win, you're a member of the one where you had match points and lost. even if you've done yourfair match points and lost. even if you've done your fair share of winning like roger has over the yea rs. winning like roger has over the years. thank you so much forjoining
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us. certainly this will be a final that will be remembered for being the longest match in history here at wimbledon but it will be remembered as well for being one of the greatest. utterly brilliant. holly hamilton, thank you. lewis hamilton hasn't won a record sixth british grand prix, starting from second on the grid behind his mercedes team—mate bottas. saw the british racer go in for a pit change for his tyres. vet all picked up a ten second penalty for shunting a max of a stamp on's red ball. —— vettel got a penalty for hitting max verstappen's red bull car. lewis hamilton stretched his lead to 39 points. an epic
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sundae of sport. that is all your support for now. back to you, martin. —— back to you, martine. this week marks 50 years since man first landed on the moon, and if it wasn't for a ground—breaking british invention, we may never have got there. a scientist at cambridge university developed the fuel cell which provided the electricity to power part of the apollo 11 space craft. here's our science correspondent richard westcott. tucked away on board apollo 11, just behind neil armstrong is a small device without which president nixon said they would not have reached the moon. and here is one part of it. it does not look much. this is a classic example of an object that looks so simple on the outside, incredibly complex on the inside and actually change the course of history. it's an electrode from a bacon fuel cell. a prototype because the original was left in space. as we can see from the old manual,
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30 of those discs combined into a cell that provided the electricity for apollo 11. it consumes hydrogen and oxygen to water and produces electrical energy. he makes it sound simple but the inventor cracked a huge scientific problem — to turn the theory of a fuel cell into a practical working device. it seems to me that this is almost as revolutionary as the discovery of steam traction. would you agree? i would like to think so but remember, i am an enthusiast perhaps you should have that confirmed by someone else. professorjohn davidson knew tom bacon well. he was always very polite. he would ask you what your interests were and if they had any bearing on the fuel cell he was deeply interested. but if they did not, he switched off. but why was the fuel cell quite so good? and how does it work? new students in bacon's
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old cambridge department showed me. so this is where we do our blue peter. you are on television. looked down the lens and tell everybody what we have here. we have a small pot of soapy water here and a balloon filled with hydrogen gas. what we will do is generate a layer of hydrogen bubbles on top of the water and then we will ignite it and you shall see a small—scale explosion. the cell used hydrogen and oxygen that were already on board apollo as rocket fuel. when combined, they create energy. which can generate electricity. even better, the only by—product was water. which the crew drank. it is safer, lighter, it is smaller, quieter and, above all, more efficient. the bacon fuel cell. the small british invention that
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made the moon landings possible. now it's time for a look at the weather with alina jenkins. hello, we start this forecast with some warmth and sunshine for many, we will end it with some rain. more on that any moment. back to the year and now, high pressure across the uk. that will bring a mainly dry and quiet night, mixed spells, variable amounts of cloud but we could see some low cloud feeding in two parts of northern scotland and eastern england. that will bring some mystical murky conditions in places. maybe patchy drizzle as well but for most it is a largely dry night. abbott between 9—13dc, as low as 7-8dc. we abbott between 9—13dc, as low as 7—8dc. we start the week with some warmth and sunshine and it stays dry. gradually turning wet and windy
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as the week wears on. on monday, the theory of high pressure. centred across the uk and four are now keeping these atlantic front at bay. good deal of sunshine to start the day, particularly the further west you are. more cloud across east anglia and south—east england, quite stubborn to go, maybe not until the afternoon we see a few bright or sunny spells coming through. elsewhere, after a sunny start, the crowd tends to build. a dry day, pleasa ntly crowd tends to build. a dry day, pleasantly warm, 20—24dc for most. cooler for some pleasantly warm, 20—24dc for most. coolerfor some on the pleasantly warm, 20—24dc for most. cooler for some on the eastern coast. on tuesday, a weakening front to deal with. that will be across northern ireland and scotland, pushing drizzle, showery outbreaks of rain across northern ireland and into scotland. cannot without one or two showers into scotland. cannot without one or two s howe rs a cross into scotland. cannot without one or two showers across northern england, north wales but for much of england and wales, it is a dry, warm day. good spells of sunshine through the morning, fairweather cloud in the afternoon, devitt is between 20—25dc but more like high teens, low 20s
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for scotland and northern ireland. for the middle part of the week, we got this more active front arriving and from the atlantic which will bring persistent rain across northern ireland and eventually into scotland, some windier conditions starting to pick up as well bother england and wales, holding onto some warmth and light winds so another fine day across england and wales, some strong sunshine, light winds. something was different across northern ireland and scotland, with rain pushing its way eastward through wednesday. the winds will be strengthening as well, holding onto these light winds across england and wales. temperatures potentially getting up to 25—26dc but all of us by friday. goodbye. —— mike oliver 00:29:42,550 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 seeing some rain by friday.
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