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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 15, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's ham and these are the main stories this morning. after england's astonishing victory in the world cup final fans prepare to hail their heroes at the oval in south london. the men's team lifted the trophy after beating new zealand with the final ball of the tournament. a fresh bid to stop the iran nuclear deal unravelling. the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt joins eu counterparts to discuss ways to respond to recent tensions. well, it isn't dead yet and we are totally committed to keeping the middle east denuclearised. senior democrats accuse president trump of racism, after he tweeted that four congresswomen should "go back" to where they came from.
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new figures from the mayor of london show what he says is a clear link between poverty in the capital and rising youth crime. and 50 years after the moon landings, we ask neil armstrong's sons and granddaughter how he felt, seeing the earth rise from the lunar surface. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm a joanna gosling. england's men's cricket team will this morning celebrate winning the men's cricket world cup for the first time, after an extraordinary finish to a tense final at lord's. the main match ended in a tie which meant the game went to a "super over" to decide the winner, and it went down to the very last ball, a run out, another tie and england winning on the number of boundaries they'd scored.
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the queen sent her warmest congratulations to the team after a thrilling victory. she also sent commiserations to the runners—up new zealand who she said competed so admirably throughout the tournament. meanwhile, the new zealand prime ministerjacinda ardern posted on instagram to congratulate england, joking about how "as a nation, we all aged a year in that super over". and the audience peaked at 4.7 million viewers just before 7.30 last night. our sports correspondent john watson is at the oval in south london this morning. in the historical centre of a global sport, the cricket world cup had come as the song goes, finally come home. but what a staggering journey over a match that stretched everything. when england were bowling at all seems pretty straightforward. three wickets for liam plunkett, 14 years after his england debut. 241, a winning score for new zealand. it seemed unlikely.
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but england's chase flopped. england required controlled aggression. ben stokes. this would push you to the edge. to the boundary. trent boat caught the ball but watch his step. instead it was six. unusual? you've seen nothing yet. nine needed off three balls. the ball rebounds off his bat. a glorious accident, two i’u ns his bat. a glorious accident, two runs plus four more. two needed from the last ball. they dived and made one. scores were tied. what now? super over. england scored 15 of their six extra balls. new zealand back to back. from the last ball of the super over, from the last moment of the most momentous match, they needed two to women. the throne, the stumps, they are run out. even the super over was tied by virtue of
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scoring boundaries in the game, by the tiniest margin in sport, the imagination, england had one. at the fan zone in trafalgar square, they understood that it was all that was needed to be known. it was a victory after so much tension. they are released. everywhere. this world cup has been shared by many nations, all are linked with a love of cricket. but in england, cricket passion, where is the passion? england!” thought we had lost it. i thought it was all over. i had my hands in my head. that is the greatest cricket match of all time. there's no words at the moment. gutted. honestly, i'm so at the moment. gutted. honestly, i'm so gutted. only respect between these two sides, only one winner. fortune favours the brave, well, that's the word which has defined england's journey. joe wilson, bbc news, lords. let's bring you a tweet
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from the school attended by ben stokes, the kids at cockermouth school have said everyone at the school is proud of our former students, from promising schoolboy to world cup winner. well done. there is a picture of him when he was at the school, fresh faced boy on the left, and the man celebrating that amazing victory yesterday and there will be celebrations at the oval today. john watson is there. it's an open celebration, if you are someone it's an open celebration, if you are someone who plays cricket and you have got a cricket uniform, cricket kit, you can get into the oval to join their celebrations with the england team. we will be withjohn watson at the oval shortly for a sense of the atmosphere. european union foreign ministers are gathering in brussels today to consider how to stop the international nuclear deal with iran from unravelling, amid heightened tensions in the gulf. in a statement published yesterday evening, the uk, france and germany have made a joint
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appeal to president trump and iran's leaders to ease their standoff over iran's nuclear programme, saying the deal reached with iran could unravel further and everyone involved should consider the consequences of their actions. in the statement, prime minister theresa may, french president emmanuel macron and german chancellor angela merkel say, "we believe the time has come to act responsibly and seek a path to stop the escalation of tensions and resume dialogue". it goes on to say, "the risks are such that it is necessary for all stakeholders to pause and consider the possible consequences of their actions." this morning, foreign secretary jeremy hunt said the deal could still be saved, as he arrived in brussels to his eu counterparts. it isn't dead yet and we are totally committed to keeping the middle east de—nuclearised. if iran acquires nuclear weapons, then other countries in the region will acquire nuclear weapons and it becomes a very toxic
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and dangerous situation. so, we are looking to find a way to preserve the nuclear deal, which we think is the best way of keeping the middle east as a whole nuclear weapon free. iran is still a good year away from developing a nuclear weapon. we think there is still some closing but small window to keep the deal alive and that's what i'm here to talk about. jeremy hunt, who has gone to brussels for those talks, initially the plan was that a junior representative from the foreign office would go, butjeremy hunt has said he is going because of the importance of those talks. we would have the latest from our correspondent in brussels shortly. president donald trump has been accused of racism after suggesting a group of ethnic—minority congresswomen, should "go back" to where they came from. in a series of tweets, the president said they should fix the "catastrophic" governments in their countries of origin instead of criticising the us.
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three of the congresswomen were born in the united states, while another came to the country as a young child. let's see what the us president said. he began — "so interesting to see ‘progressive' democrat congresswomen, who originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe, the worst, most corrupt and inept anywhere in the world, if they even have a functioning government at all, now loudly, and viciously, telling the people of the united states, the greatest and most powerful nation on earth, how our government is to be run. why don't they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came? then come back and show us how it is done. these places need your help badly, you can't leave fast enough. i'm sure that nancy pelosi, the democrat house speaker, would be very happy to quickly work out free travel arrangements!"
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i'm joined via webcam by professor scott lucas from the university of birmingham. what is your reaction to what he has said here? well, at one level, it is not a surprise. donald trump in the past has had very suspect views on race, he supported white supremacist for example over the violence in virginia 2017, he is called people of colour migrants, animals, has called various countries around the world a derogatory name i won't use here. and i think we can focus if we wa nt to here. and i think we can focus if we want to do on the fact that this is a specific racist tweet but what's interesting here are the politics. that is this is not a one—off tweet but part an election tactic by donald trump and his advisers to set up donald trump and his advisers to set up the democratic party, taken over by these progressive congresswomen who are radical lists, extremists, and that means this election tactic,
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which is not only bringing up a race, but also you will note that donald trump is aiming at women, this will continue all the way until november 2020, so that's one part of this but the other part which is important to highlight today is what is the response to this and the response from these congresswomen and supporters has been almost if he goes low, we go high, and that is we continue to raise issues of education, issues of health care, issues of economicjustice, issues about american foreign policy, about climate change, and i think that's going to set up, is it donald trump brand of politics all this progressive alternative in terms of not only policies but in terms of language that begins to take hold of america as we go into the election. when he goes low, we go high, was said by michelle obama when donald trump spoke about barack obama and repeatedly claimed during the election campaign he was not born in
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the united states. how do you expect the united states. how do you expect the reaction to be this time around? and how that strategy might fare? what the trumpet people are gambling as this will cause so much discord amongst democrats they will fight amongst democrats they will fight amongst themselves, —— trump people. but democrats have united around these congresswomen. nancy pelosi, these congresswomen. nancy pelosi, the house speaker, who is different from his congresswomen on how to approach the anti immigration policy by donald trump, gave herfull support. i think, by donald trump, gave herfull support. ithink, as by donald trump, gave herfull support. i think, as i said, this will be the most important election, not just for democrats will be the most important election, notjust for democrats but will be the most important election, not just for democrats but for all americans next year, the most important since 1945, because is it his twitter politics, his continued attempt to combine anti—immigrant, anti—migrant approaches with this type of rhetoric that prevails or do we have americans beyond being
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republican and democrat who say this is not the values we had and it certainly isn't a discussion of issues we deserve. i can't tell you what the outcome will be, but i can tell you that this is going to be something which is not going to de—escalate. donald trump is never backed away in being called a racist. and he won't back away this time and the question is, can people respond with decency and tolerance? even as he gets more and more agitated? thank you very much indeed for joining agitated? thank you very much indeed forjoining us and giving us your perspective on this, professor scott lucas, thank you. an update on the headlines. we will update on headlines. we will update on headlines in a moment. the extraordinary when my england over new zealand taking the cricket world cup for the first time ever and it couldn't have been closer. let's get the thought ofjohn watson at the oval, which is where the england tea m oval, which is where the england team are going to be and there will be celebrations. john, what happening there? well, the england
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tea m happening there? well, the england team will be making their way down, fa ns team will be making their way down, fans and schoolchildren from the area will be here to see england emerge and we are expecting them in an hourorso, to emerge and we are expecting them in an hour orso, to be emerge and we are expecting them in an hour or so, to be out on the field behind me with the trophy. what will be a celebration of their achievements obviously yesterday and that incredible, dramatic final as england came out on top winning the world cup for the very first time. a real problem for new zealand. nothing to split the two teams after their respective 50 overs, the scores we re their respective 50 overs, the scores were tied and went to a super over and nothing to separate the two teams. the scores were level once again. but it all came down to a crucial number of boundaries that england managed to score throughout that match with their 20 — 17 scoreline, so england came out on top. it has been an incredible few days for this england side. they
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will arrive here and we are expecting fantastic celebrations after what they completed yesterday. you wonder, of course, how much sleep they have all had. famously, 2005, when they won the ashes, they all arrived at number ten downing st looking a little worse for wear and obviously cricket hasn't had many moments in a spotlight since, but this world cup triumph, the first in the team's history, is a hugely significant achievement. eoin morgan himself said he did not dare to dream he would ever lift the world cup for the welcome he can now and of course andrew strauss calling him the greatest cricket player in history. it's up there with one of the greatest sporting moments and you can imagine the england players when they arrive here will have plenty of smiles and celebrations because it's a moment to savour.m could not have been closer. you've got to think how we would be feeling if we had lost the match like that. new zealand are responding in a very
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sportsman like way. the new zealand premiere paying tribute to what the england team did there. yes, i think that's been one of the standout things to come out of the match, the way the game was played, the spirit it was played in, and there was a huge amount of mutual respect from these two teams. eoin morgan, good friends with brendon mccullum, former captain, it is really, in many ways, him who helped to shape this team. they are great friends and obviously, as we know, that attacking brand of cricket, the way england have chosen to play this game, the way they have improved over the last four years, has been modelled on eoin morgan, partly the friendships and relationships he has within the game, and it has been fantastic to see from new zealand because it must be such a sickening defeat when you consider that, for new zealand, country of their size, they really have been overachievers in the game, having made five of the last six cricket world cups, beaten
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finalists on course four years ago to the hosts, australia, and then again to england and the manner of that defeat, it must be a really tough pill to swallow, but, still, they have been very complimentary about the england side, commending them on their victory which obviously could be very difficult for them when you consider the history that they have and the disappointments, as well, they have had. yes, it has been one of the standout things, to see the way that new zealand have spoken so fondly about england and i think they have played the game on the right spirit and that is what cricket is all about and, as we know, they would have been thousands watching back in new zealand as the game was played through the night. i'm sure pubs applied for late licences so people could watch their team and i was there, it was one of those i was there, it was one of those i was there moments and that's been one of there moments and that's been one of the most memorable things of this match, the fact it was on free to airtv, families, match, the fact it was on free to air tv, families, the country gathering around to watch. we know
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how many hits the bbc sport website has had. so many people drawn to see those clips, and all of the reaction as the drama unfolded yesterday and it's been quite a magnificent moment, notjust for cricket it's been quite a magnificent moment, not just for cricket but for sport as a whole. thank you very much. we can see some kids on the pitch behind him and the england tea m pitch behind him and the england team will be there in the next hour 01’ so. team will be there in the next hour or so. we will come back and check in when it happens. we'll see how they react when their sporting heroes show up in front of them. now over to sheffield colleagiates cricket club — where cricketing greats michael vaughan and joe root began their careers — to speak to katie stewart and liz longley. liz longley, a player at sheffield cricket club and katie, the coordinator of the women's softball cricket team. welcome both of you. well, what did you think? how was it watching it? what a day. we weren't watching it? what a day. we weren't watching it? what a day. we weren't watching it during the afternoon
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because we had our own much going on so we are because we had our own much going on so we are quite a new team and we play women's softball and we had a couple of matches going on on that pitch so the hordes of crowds u nfortu nately went pitch so the hordes of crowds unfortunately went there to watch us but they were all in the bar watching the world cup. it was really, really a special day.” mean, you couldn't have predicted obviously there was hope that england might win, but you never know. but even if we had predicted a win for england, no one would have predicted it would have this way. no, it was incredible. the atmosphere was absolutely fantastic. we came off the page with seven overs to go so we we came off the page with seven overs to go so we were we came off the page with seven overs to go so we were all in the bar watching, absolutely incredible, it was like a roller—coaster. one minute we thought we had it in the bag and the next minute we thought, oh no, maybe not. it was, at times, it was too much to watch.”
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oh no, maybe not. it was, at times, it was too much to watch. i know that you only started playing softball women's cricket quite recently. this all sorts of ways to get people interested in the game, so get people interested in the game, so will there be a greater boost than that match yesterday? what impact do you think that will have? i think impact do you think that will have? ithink and impact do you think that will have? i think and hope it will inspire people, if there is not thought about cricket before, to get involved. we are lucky here we have a surge of interest, particularly in women and girls cricket. since april, we've had about 20—30 women joining and getting involved, so this can only mean more of that hopefully. the women's cricket team already won the world cup. absolutely, so we've already got that inspiration and role models. we are hoping the women's section increases. we got plenty more matches to be played. and, you know,
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we've got role models starting to build through the club as well so that's brilliant and i think with a soft ball that's brilliant and i think with a softball cricket commits a way of getting into it. very accessible and you don't need to worry about padding, it'sjust something anyone can have a go at. and obviously you can have a go at. and obviously you can build from that into more advanced games. your club has got a history already with michael vaughan and joe root starting out there. yes, the joe and joe root starting out there. yes, thejoe root connection is very helpful for us. we've got our own connections with the family and my husband used to teachjoe root and i'm good friends with his mum helen, who also plays with us sometimes. you have got your connections to. my dad actually played a match with joe root about 15 years ago. joe must have only been 14. he asked my dad for some advice before he went out to bat. what advice would you give me? my dad said, enjoy it, keep your eye on the ball and get stuck in. very proud. we've got children up played through the club now who are
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completely inspired by michael vaughan and joe root. it'sjust brilliant. i love it. you feel like your dad has had an impact. onjoe root. yes, maybe a small role. i'd bet he dines out on that a lot. it is good advice. thank you very much. ben stokes parents live in new zealand, and have been speaking this morning about their son's triumph yesterday. sometimes it's not the only time we do see him. on television. we have skype calls and things like that but that's all around the grandchildren really. it's great seeing him play. i love watching him play. from the time he was knee high. what got you through it? red bull. one of his
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sponsors, so through it? red bull. one of his sponsors, sol through it? red bull. one of his sponsors, so i got to say that. what's the best part about watching him play, do you think?” what's the best part about watching him play, do you think? i love his enthusiasm for the game and i love the way that he just doesn't stop and he was like that as a kid. he just always wants to do well. he is a really, really big team man. and you can see it all the time but he ta kes joy you can see it all the time but he takesjoy in you can see it all the time but he takes joy in his job. you can see it all the time but he takesjoy in hisjob. it's fantastic. do you commentate from here? i generally have something to say. if i do bring it up in conversation, he just goes, what do you know really? ben stokes' pa rents, you know really? ben stokes' parents, that extra element you couldn't make out was the fact his pa rents a re couldn't make out was the fact his parents are new zealanders and he was born in new zealand. much more
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reaction to that cricketing triumph a little bit later. let's go back to that meeting of the eu foreign ministers in brussels. we can now speak to our brussels correspondent adam fleming who's monitoring today's meeting of eu foreign ministers for us. this meeting are seen as absolutely pivotal in what happens next with a run, adam. what are the expectations there? the expectations are we will get a press conference this afternoon when the meeting ends around 430 uk time. then we will find out what the 28 foreign ministers have agreed should be the next steps. it may be that the issue some more words where they can damn iran has! some more words where they can damn iran has i have done for breaching the terms of the nuclear terms and then the us, for pulling out of the deal and precipitating iran is a breach of the deal. that was the message we were hearing from foreign ministers arriving in brussels this morning. the french foreign minister said this was a bad decision by iran to breach the deal but caused by a
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bad decision by the usa to pull out of it. jeremy hunt, the foreign secretary, taking a break from the tory leadership campaign to speak to his counterparts from across europe today, saying the deal were still alive, not dead yet. he said there was a small but closing window to keep it alive. he said the reason for keeping it alive was if this deal dies, you see a potential nuclear arms race in the middle east, something everyone wants to avoid and something which could be pretty dangerous come in his view. jeremy hunt is there. originally a junior foreign office minister was going to go in his place, but he is there because of the importance of this, breaking away from his leadership campaign here. yes, this is one of his signature foreign policy things if you like. he has a lwa ys policy things if you like. he has always been very clear in his support for the nuclear deal in iran and, yes, he's taking time away from the campaign trail to speak to the eu. there is a question about what the eu's role is in all of this
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because their sponsors of the deal but the big players on the european side are the uk, france, and germany. and the nuclear deal, the jcp 08, as it's called, has its own dispute resolution system set up in the deal which has a whole series of bodies, committees, advisory bodies, and a whole series of deadlines which kick in if one side or another decides it's been a concrete breach of the deal and that could ultimately end up at the un security council and could see parts or all of the deal suspended but it would have to take the eu to take the step of triggering that mechanism, and it's not clear they would take that step today, so we need to wait for a few hours before we get the final written set of conclusions from the meeting at a press conference with eu foreign policy chief. it's worth pointing out, though, up until now, the eu, as a group of 28, its focus has been on what mechanisms can be put in place to protect european
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companies from the side effects of this us sanctions being reimposed on iran. that's been theirfocus alongside the diplomatic activities as well, to keep the deal afloat. thank you very much indeed, adam. the person who is going to be on the front of the new £50 notes has been announced. you can see a news conference with a governor of the bank of england mark carney and the picture there is of alan turing, the second world war code breaker, the next person to feature on the £50 note. he is famous for having helped crack the wartime enigma code and also pioneering the modern computer. there was a list of around 1000 scientists looked at in deciding who would be the new face of the £50 note and in the end, this is the person who was chosen, the mathematician in a recognition of his role, not just mathematician in a recognition of his role, notjust in cracking the
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enigma code but also the impact of his persecution for homosexuality after the war. he was jailed, prosecuted for homosexuality in 1952 and the inquest after his death concluded his death from cyanide poisoning two years later was suicide. well, announcing the decision to pick alan turing, mark carney has said he was an outstanding mathematician whose work has had an enormous impact on how we live today, as the father of computer science and artificial intelligence, as well as a war hero. his contributions we are far ranging and heartbreaking. he is a giant on the shoulders upon which so many now stand. south africa's former presidentjacob zuma is giving evidence to an inquiry which is looking into claims he oversaw widespread corruption during his time in office. he arrived at the hearing in johannesburg a couple of hours ago. he denies being part of a network
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which gave government business to three wealthy brothers, the guptas, in return for bribes. our correspondent milton nkosi is johannesburg for us milton, just take us back and remind us of what this is about. so, this enquiry which is led by the deputy chiefjustice of south africa was set up to look into corruption allegations involving government and business people who were getting lucrative contracts through corruption. and president jacob lucrative contracts through corruption. and presidentjacob zuma has been mentioned in many of those allegations. one of those allegations. one of those allegations was brought by who was in president zuma's administration, deputy minister, mrjonas. he told
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south africa that president zuma's private family friend invited him to their home and offered him a post of being finance minister so he could look after their interests one sees in that post. president zuma is here today to deny all those allegations. there are many others that have been brought by a lot of people who went with jacob zuma. he says there's been a conspiracy to try to remove him from power since the end of apartheid, dating back over 25 yea rs. apartheid, dating back over 25 years. tell us more about the guptas, those three wealthy brothers and how they fit into this. so, the guptas brothers, president zuma has described them publicly as his family friends. they were in business in partnership with one of jacob zuma's suns, and had many other businesses in media, mining,
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and so on. and a lot of their work was from government departments and many people were complaining that they were getting those contracts because they were close to president zuma and, of course, some ministers knew that they were going to be appointed into different cabinet positions through the guptas before president zuma had even instituted a reshuffle, so there are many allegations hanging over the former president, which he is here today to answer. he is sticking to his point, he says he has been a victim of a conspiracy to remove him when he was chief of intelligence of the anc. thank you very much. time now for a look at the weather. we have had a quiet start so far this morning. for the first couple
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of days of this week, dry and bright and sunny spells. later on this week, wetter and windier. for many of us, sunshine. some cloud for eastern england. that will thin and break up to give sunny spells. elsewhere, dry weather with sunshine. maybe the chance of an isolated shower in wales and the south—west of england. up to 24 celsius. a little bit fresher further east, 18 to 21 celsius. overnight, showers to come. elsewhere, dry tonight. patchy mist and fog tomorrow morning. for most of us on tuesday, a dry day with sunny spells. temperatures up to 25 celsius. showers for scotland and northern ireland. goodbye for now.
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hello, this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines... after england's astonishing victory in the world cup final — fans prepare to hail their heroes at the oval in south london. the men's team lifted the trophy after beating new zealand with the final ball of the tournament.
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we did it. oh, jof delivered! jofra delivered! england — world champions! a fresh bid to stop the iran nuclear deal unravelling — the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt joins eu counterparts to discuss ways to respond to recent tensions. well, it isn't dead yet and we are totally committed to keeping the middle east denuclearised. senior democrats accuse president trump of racism, after he tweeted that four congresswomen should "go back" to where they came from. the second world war code—breaker, alan turing, is to become the face of the bank of england's new £50 note. new figures from the mayor of london show, what he says, is a clear link between poverty in the capital, and rising youth crime. and coming up — we ask the family of astronaut alan bean, the fourth man on the moon, what it was like to
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watch the landings unfold. sport now and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre. england's cricketers are heading to the oval this morning where they'll do a lap of honour after winning the men's world cup for the first time. john watson is there for us ahead of that celebration. and john it's such an incredible achievement, do you think it'll take a while to sink in? yes, absolutely. ithink yes, absolutely. i think the amount of media gathered here it goes to show what a momentous achievement it was from england. we are expecting the team out on the pitch behind me in the next couple of minutes. there will be given a hero's welcome. the captain was at lord's this morning for some photographs before joining up for some photographs before joining up with his team. they will be here with local schoolchildren. this is it, isn't it, inspiring the next generation. that is what england wa nt to
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generation. that is what england want to build upon after the success. winning the world cup for the first time in history. they will be hoping that having, of course, put the match on free to air television in the first time in 14 yea rs, television in the first time in 14 years, it will help to reconnect a nation with cricket once again. they haven't been many moments for this game since what we witnessed in 2005. it is going to be a very special morning. i think the england cricketers will certainly feel the love of a nation when they arrive here, as they bask in their success yesterday evening. thank you so much, john. novak djokovic says his wimbledon win over roger federer was his most "mentally demanding" match. in an astonishing day of sport, the men's final went to a fifth set, then 12 games all and then to a tie break. it was djokovic who eventually beat federer in an extraordinary final, which lasted longer than any other in the tournament's history — almost five hours in total.
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federer actually had two championship points but couldn't get over the line, leaving djokovic to win his 16th grand slam title. the netball world cup is into the second round in liverpool. kate gray is there for us. all the home nations in action today kate including england against jamaica — what can we expect from that one? we can expect a huge match for england versus jamaica. they were not expecting to play the second seed so early on in the tournament. england have had a fairly easy first three opening matches, winning all three opening matches, winning all three of them. now they face jamaica and that is because yesterday in a thrilling match, we saw south africa beat jamaica, which was thrilling match, we saw south africa beatjamaica, which was a bit of a surprise. south africa are fifth in the world and jamaica are number two in the world. they did not find any rhythm and south africa pulled away in the first—half, jamaica came back at them the second, but south africa
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we re at them the second, but south africa were able to hold on. jamaica are facing a tough team in this phase and england want to win, they are unbeaten so far and they want to continue that great run. it will be one to watch this afternoon at three o'clock. there has also been other home nation action this morning. we saw a northern ireland unfortunately lose to malawi. they were only two behind the african nation for the majority of their match. their shooting stats were not quite on it today and malawi turned out to be the stronger team. disappointment for northern ireland but they will focus on their next matches in the tournament. scotland are in action later on today. they will play south africa. you can follow all of the netball here across the bbc. the england match will be on bbc two today. thank you, kate.
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and day 10 of the tour de france is under way. france's julian alaphilippe still has the leaders yellowjersey, defending champion geraint thomas is in fifth. you can follow it live on the bbc sport website and app. that is it for now. back in one hour with the rest of your sport. lovely, see later. thank you. the government was "too slow" to respond to "mob" protests outside primary schools in birmingham triggered by lessons that include lgbt plus topics. this is according to the woman tasked with challenging extremism. in an exclusive interview with panorama, sara khan said the department for education should have done more to support head teachers. the government says it's been clear from the outset. sima kotecha has this report. chanting. protesters outside schools in birmingham have been campaigning against the use of storybooks featuring same—sex couples. parts of programmes teaching about equality. most pupils at the schools are muslim. the protesters say their religion doesn't accept homosexuality.
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she comes home and says, "why do they have two mummies? why do they have two daddies?" how am i meant to explain that? small children like that, it's brainwashing them, it's confusing them. now the lead commissioner for countering extremisms, sara khan, has described what she is seen in birmingham as a mob who are chanting and shouting and engaging in intimidating behaviour. she's accused the government of being too slow to act. the dfe could have done so much more. i think they were too slow to respond and to be able to provide support to head teachers who are experiencing something that's really quite traumatic, but also clarifying what is actually being taught to pupils in school. in 2020, the government wants all schools to teach lgbt content as part of new compulsory relationship and sex education. the guidance was changed because the world has changed. we want children to grow up understanding that some people are different, some relationships different from what they may have experienced but all are valuable sara khan says
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she is now concerned what might happen next. i'm worried that when rse comes formally into the curriculum in 2020 that this will escalate even further. panorama has spoken to other religious groups around the country who are looking to build campaigns of their own. sima kotecha, bbc news. tell us more about what has been going on with these protests. since february, we have seen a lot of protest in birmingham outside two schools. parents have been protesting over the use of books, story books, that show pictures of same sex couples. these protests have been escalating over the last six months or so. what we have learnt through this panorama is the woman who is tasked with challenging extremism has said the government has not done enough to support the head teachers of the schools and
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that she feels that ministers haven't been clear enough as to what the guidance that is coming into force in september 2020 actually sets. she thinks that there needs to be more clarity around that and she feels the need to be more descriptive of what teachers need to do in terms of going forward with the story. and she said she is concerned about escalation. do the head teachers have many options around this? we have been speaking to people of many faiths around the country, people who arejewish, catholic, and what they are seeing is watching these protests in birmingham, they feel their campaigns have been energised and in some cases they have been inspired. they are looking to do something similar because they do not feel traditional values are at the heart of the new guidance. however, the government is saying that they want children to be exposed to diversity
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in society and they want head teachers to decide when it is age appropriate for them to be taught about same—sex relationships. appropriate for them to be taught about same-sex relationships. what does she say she thinks should happen? she is saying she wants more clarity from the government. that is at the forefront of what she is saying, she thinks her teachers need to have more support. she has also done her own research into what she saysis done her own research into what she says is extremism. she actually says a lot of what she has been seeing in birmingham outside the schools she considers as extremism. she says the protesters, she has described them as being a mob. she says there is to be more clarity, more support and she will be disclosing the findings of her report in the days and weeks to come. thank you very much. and panorama: sex education: the lgbt debate in schools will be shown on bbc one this
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evening at 8.30pm. let's go back to our main news. world cup for the national team — but what does it mean for the future of the sport? tim muffett has been at a school in south—west london this morning where one charity is trying to raise interest in the sport. this school in south west london, they are having a cricket themed day in celebration of the world cup victory. chance to shine is the charity which runs cricket in state schools, and the hope is that it will inspire young people to carry cricket through into their adult lives. guys, quickly, did you watch the match yesterday? yes! are you glad england won? yes! just checking! adam, you're from chance to shine, the charity which runs this event. how big a deal is this victory? it's a massive moment for the sport. you know, 1966, 2003, 2019. it's huge for cricket. we, as chance to shine, we're going to work to really capture this moment, capture the enthusiasm of the children that you see
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here today, and make sure that kids can really get the opportunity to play cricket. we work with around half a million children every year, many of whom have never had the chance to play the sport before, so we think it's so important we can give them the opportunity to play it, capture that enthusiasm, that excitement that they saw yesterday and really enjoy playing the sport. adam, thanks very much indeed. let's have a quick chat to some of them. i'm going to interrupt your game, if i may. how exciting was it to watch the match yesterday? i found it really exciting and it was amazing. is it going to inspire you to play cricket more and more as you get older? yes, definitely. making friends and all that. it is so competitive, i love it. how tense was it when you watched the end of the match? oh, my god! the one point that let them win... it isjust an inspirational game. it made me want to be a better cricketer and always dream on to do cricket. some skills on display this morning are mightily impressive. you guys have been doing very well. thanks very much indeed. you might recognise this former critic cricketer here, gladstone small, no less. former england player. you were in the world cup squad back in the day. how important is it that england won
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and that kids take that and play cricket in the future? it's terrifically important. notjust for the whole... the players yesterday, as youngsters, they would have probably grown up watching me lose a world cup final and they have gone one better, which is great to see. i wasn't going to bring that up, but, you know...! it's great to see. just here this morning with these youngsters and they‘ re very keen and they're good, they're talented. it's good for them to see that and to see, yes, you can be successful, but more importantly, you can get involved. that's what chance to shine are doing in schools throughout the country during this whole world cup. they've visited over1 million schools and schoolchildren to give them a taste of what it is like to be involved and sportsmanship, togetherness, making friends. i finished playing 20 years ago and i've still got friends in the game. and it was good to see yesterday, i was watching the game with mates, and they are not great cricket fans
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per se, but they just want to be involved. that is what it is about. it was good to see. thank you so much indeed. i see you're joining in today. what a brilliant thing for the kids to have a former international such as yourself here. they are showing me things... demonstrate some skills for us. it's too low for me! oh, it's too low, don't worry about it! there you go, kids here, hopefully some future stars, certainly inspired by what they saw. certainly gripped by what they saw. but, hey, weren't we all? breaking news. the reaction from theresa may by those tweets from donald trump, him being accused of racism after he attacked for congresswomen and told them to go back from where they come from. theresa may says the tweets are com pletely theresa may says the tweets are completely unacceptable. he has tweeted, and you can see here the tweets, talking about what he says,
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the progressive democrat congresswomen. . . the tweets have triggered a wave of criticism. the four women he is referring to, three of them were born and raised in the united states. the fourth went to the us as a refugee at the age of 12. we have all called the president racist and they have been backed by members of they have been backed by members of the democratic party and theresa may now seeing those tweets are com pletely now seeing those tweets are completely unacceptable. and separately, she has also said an invitation has been given to the england cricket team to celebrate their amazing when later this
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evening. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... after england's astonishing victory in the world cup final — fans prepare to hail their heroes at the oval in south london. a fresh bid to stop the iran nuclear deal unravelling — the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt joins eu counterparts to discuss ways to respond to recent tensions. senior democrats accuse president trump of racism, after he tweeted that four congresswomen should "go back" to where they came from. now the business news. shares in mike ashley's sport direct have fallen sharply after it delayed its results, blaming uncertainty over trading at house of fraser. it bought the chain last year but has described market conditions as extremely challenging. the results were due last thursday but say they may now be delayed until the end of august.
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two million low—paid workers could receive statutory sick pay for the first time as part of reforms to support people with health conditions. at the moment, employees must earn at least the equivalent of 14 hours on the minimum wage to qualify. but the government is looking at whether to extend eligibility to those earning below 14 hours. china's economy grew at its slowest pace since the early 1990s over the last three months, according to the latest officialfigures. the economy grew 6.2% from a year earlier, but in line with forecasts. authorities in china have been propping up the economy though extra spending and tax cuts. good morning. let's get more on that delay to sports direct results — that were due on thursday. the delay has been enough to send the firm's shares down sharply. why? well, it's related to its purchase of house of fraser last year — and the tough conditions on the high street. you might remember, sports direct boss mike ashley paid £90 million for house of fraser
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in august of last year. he's also been trying to get his hands on high street department store debenhams, but in march he was thwarted by the firm's board who opted to enter into administration to restructure the firms debts. he also tried but failed to take over the ailing music retailer hmv and pulled out of the bidding for patisserie valerie when it face well documented financial woes. but his ambition has surprised many, given that just before christmas, he described conditions on the high street as "the worst on record, unbelievably bad". what happens next? george macdonald is editor of retail week. good to see you, as always. let's talk about these delayed results, we might get them up until the end of august. what does it tell us about what is going on at the farm?m tells us that is quite a lot of
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uncertainty about house of fraser. we have not had an update about it since the end of last year. at that time, it had lost more than £30 million injust 11 weeks. we are several months on now. high—street conditions very difficult. you have just got to wonder how sensible that acquisition was, how far he has made progress with his strategy with it, whether or not he is justjuggling too many balls and getting involved in rows with the likes of debenhams, where he managed to oust some members of the board and where he spent quite a bit of time demanding a lie detector tests when he was trying to get control of it. you do wonder if he has spent enough time on the sports direct business. when you talk about conditions on the high street being unbelievably bad, you would wonder why he would want to have such a big stake on it. he
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got house of fraser and he has got other companies, all these firms under his belt, but he says it is tough out there. what does he feel he can do differently? he is undoubtably a great entrepreneur. amidst all of this challenge, i think he sees opportunity. he has been buying up big swathes of the high street. he has often got very advantageous property deals. if he can really manage the costs and bring those costs down, he thinks he has got a good chance of making money on these businesses he has bought. some of them which are probably quite complementary to others that he owns. and when we look at the state of the high street, and what everyone is trying to do right now is get everyone back through the doors, give people a reason to go to the high street. it is not just about reason to go to the high street. it is notjust about giving the cheapest, it is about service, isn't
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it? it is more than just stuff. selling products was what retail was traditionally about. we do not have to look very far now to see it is all about new types of service, as well as services. today for instance, pets at home, the retailer, it bought a dog sitting farm. retailers are increasingly looking to other areas that are a good fit for their businesses, but it is not just good fit for their businesses, but it is notjust all about cost. it certainly needn't be, although the retailers costs themselves that they are bearing, like business rates, are bearing, like business rates, area are bearing, like business rates, are a real problem for the entire industry. aren't theyjust? george, thank you for that insight. really tough times out there on the high street and it does show you the nervousness that many people have. the shares on your screen right now. they have fallen sharply on the news.
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other news to tell you about today... the bank of england has announced who will be the face of the new £50 note. eligible characters had to come from the world of science. a short time ago, the governor of the bank of england, mark carney unveiled the note's new design. it's my great pleasure to announce that the scientist that will feature on the £50 note is alan turing. applause alan turing to be the face of the £50 note. the bank had thousands of nominations but it was narrowed down to 12 different options. the final decision was made by mark carney from the shortlist of 12. the new note will enter circulation by 2021.
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keep an eye out for those, you will have many, like me, in your wallet. in other business news. vueling airlines is the least punctual major airline flying from airports in the uk according to new figures. the spanish carrier's uk departures were delayed by an average of 31 minutes last year, according to analysis of civil aviation authority figures. thomas cook also performed poorly, with average delays of 24 minutes, followed by wizz air on 23 minutes. the uk is to hire new trade negotiators — after warnings of a shortage iamjust i am just going to stop my phone ringing in my pocket. the training scheme is open to applicants from all backgrounds and levels of qualifications — with the first recruits ready in two years. the liberal democrats have dismissed the plans as a "last—minute scramble". i will show you what is happening on the market board. the ftse 100
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i will show you what is happening on the market board. the ftse100 is back up. what is important about this season is we will get an indication of what decisions the firms are making. sports direct, their confirmation of what we told you at the start, down by nearly 9.5%. at some point over the month we will get them, they have not confirmed the specific date yet. add in your political uncertainty too. keep an eye on that. the ftse100, pretty volatile. we will get the crucial inflation figures this week. a big week for corporate and economic data in the uk and around the world. you are up—to—date with all the business news. thank you very much. we cannot get more from the cricket celebrations. let's go back to the oval. there are lots of kids waiting to meet their heroes. we have been looking at pictures of
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jofra archer signing autographs. the whole of the england team will be there. jofra archer has been speaking about the quick chat he had with ben stokes ahead of what he did in the match. stokes came over and told me, win or lose, today will not define me as a player. it was a morale boosting chat, jofra archer who was a late addition to the squad. our correspondentjohn watson is there. what is the atmosphere like they are this morning?m is there. what is the atmosphere like they are this morning? it is fantastic. you are saying you saw the pictures of jofra fantastic. you are saying you saw the pictures ofjofra archer and his team—mates. he was already seeing how important it was to inspire the nation. he said it was a great night
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last night, some players stayed out later than he did. regarding the special moments with his team—mates after the match. it is astonishing to think he was bowling that super over, that key moment in the match, the scores were finished tied for the scores were finished tied for the second time in the match. just three months ago he was not eligible to play for england and here he is now as a world cup winner, just three months on. it is his introduction into the team that has made the big difference. he has offered so much with his bowling, extra pace, and it has helped england at this world cup. great to get his thoughts on that special moment. hopefully we will be speaking to more of the cricketers as they come through. a very special day here already. a huge number have turned out to welcome them to the oval. a huge number of local schoolchildren are here as well. it has been so wonderful to see players
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out on the pitch here giving them advice and coaching. this is what england will one now, they will want to build on this and connect with grassroots cricket, inspire young children to take up the game. as i was saying earlier, they have not been many moments watched by millions over the years in cricket, we remember the ashes back in 2005, one of the great moments in cricket, this ranks alongside it, winning the world cup for the very first time. and inspiring the next generation, that will be what england will want to build on. and it starts, as you can see, today. for the uninitiated into cricket, it is a notoriously difficult game to understand. but as you say, they will be a whole new generation of people who will be inspired from what the site yesterday, because you don't need to understand the rules to understand this was a brilliant story and an extraordinary outcome that nobody
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could have possibly predicted. absolutely. people say cricket is boring. if they get that, nothing boring. if they get that, nothing boring about that match last night. it is no wonder people were saying it was the greatest cricket match in history. andrew strauss saying that himself. it really was a special moment. to think the score of the time, when you think we have played seven weeks of cricket, 48 matches across the tournament, the two finalists, england and new zealand, could not be split. the plate and they were level and after the super over, the scores were level. it was an unbelievable result, unbelievable turnaround for england as well when you consider the very nearly did not make it out of the group stage. a great moment forjofra archer, bowling that super over, as england came out on top, onlyjust.
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how does it feel? it must be a special feeling? yes, how does it feel? it must be a specialfeeling? yes, it's sunken in a little bit more this morning. it wasjust a really, really a little bit more this morning. it was just a really, really great day yesterday, especially sharing it with the lads. how does it feel, this reception today? amazing. the kids are here. you know, hopefully we can inspire some kids who would like to turn professional because someone like to turn professional because someone will have to do it one day, and hopefully it can be somebody here today. how was it bowling that final super over? probably a little bit nervous but probably after the ball got hit for six, a little bit of confidence came back. three months ago, did you ever think this would be possible? no, not at all,
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to be honest. the rules changed this year, so i was thinking if i qualified it would be another three or four years, but qualified it would be another three orfouryears, but i'm qualified it would be another three or four years, but i'm glad to have had the opportunity to be selected and qualified. even being here right now tops it all off. a big night last night? went back to the hotel, saw our family last night? went back to the hotel, saw ourfamily and last night? went back to the hotel, saw our family and friends. it was worth it. so there we go. fantastic seems already and we seenjoe root over my shoulder. a little bit disappointed with his batting performance yesterday but he's been integral for england at this world cup, england's highest run scorer. we all know about his talents, of course, not just in one—day cricket but test
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cricket, as well. as he came to the crease yesterday, everyone was hoping a big performance from him would have steadied the ship for england. just a bit of disappointment from him but as we know, that impressive partnership between jos buttler and know, that impressive partnership betweenjos buttler and ben stokes, the partnership of 110, it gave england the momentum they needed to close down and chase new zealand's total because it's very, very difficult at lord's throughout this tournament, we know teams who have batted first, and they'd gone on to win that match. a lot of pressure was on england yesterday of course with new zealand batting first with that scoreboard pressure and it certainly told at times as new zealand bowled with great discipline and of course really pegged england back at times on a perch at lord's which was very, very difficult to score runs on. “— which was very, very difficult to score runs on. —— pitch. that helped to study england as they proved that they can chase down a total. that
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big result in a semifinal of course against australia was one of the real turning point for them, wasn't it? as we know, it was then that they chase down the total. after disappointment in the group stages it looked as though england may not make the knockout phase, but they did so, beating australia, winning that first knockout match in a cricket world cup and, in doing so, booked their place in the final and proved they can chase down a total. just as they did at the semifinal, they did so yesterday. certainly drew level. they demonstrated that they could get close to that target and then, of course, going on to win it in the most dramatic of scenes. we are trying to bring a few people over. joe root over my shoulder. it has been a wonderful moment for english cricket because so many near misses over the years. england have made three world cup finals
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recently, the most recent 27 years ago in 1992. could england do it this time? there has been a shift in cricket, the way the game has been played. certainly as far as england are concerned, in the last four yea rs. are concerned, in the last four years. england went out in the very early stages of the last world cup, they went out in the opening round and it was an ambition of the ecb, the england and wales cricket board, as andrew strauss and the director of cricket came in and prioritised white ball cricket with the sole aim of winning this world cup. we saw trevor bayliss come in, a specialist in white ball cricket, who enjoyed success with sri lanka, taking them to the semifinals of the world cup previously and of course eoin morgan as well who stayed with a side. one of five players who played in that world cup four years ago. the ecb stuck by him. he says he remembers after they went out of that world cup that he got a call from andrew strauss to say you will still remain
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as the captain, you will still be the go to man in this team and that support has really helped eoin morgan mastermind this change in english cricket in the shorter form of the game in one—day cricket. it has been a breathtaking performance from england over those four years to get to the top of the world rankings which they did. the number one ranked team coming into the world cup playing exciting, attacking, entertaining cricket. of course, there were questions over the way england played the game, certainly with those group defeats, should they change tactics, change their approach? eoin morgan said no, i'm sticking to the principles, to the way we play, despite critics like michael vaughan and kevin pietersen suggesting england need a plan b but eoin morgan said he would stick to the way they play and it certainly proved to dividends as they have won this world cup. that transformation in the way they have played has seen them reap the
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rewards here, winning this tournament for the very first time. as we know, here we go, massive disappointment for new zealand. having come so close, at this tournament, making it to the final, just as they did four years ago. a huge frustration for england, for new zealand. beaten in melbourne four years ago when they lost to the holders, australia, and back—to—back world cup defeats. new zealand. they've certainly played the game in a fantastic spirit, been sensational throughout. kane williamson their captain has been one of the standout performances for new zealand and it will be a tough one for them to take. ashley giles as well as at the moment. we are live on bbc news. ashley, fantastic to speak to you. what a moment this is for not only
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the england team, the victorious england team, but all of these fans have turned up to give them a heroes welcome today. yes, a fantastic day. great for our players on the back of yesterday, which was the most incredible game of cricket you've seen, but to come down now and share it with these kids, it's pretty loud, there a few headaches flying around, but part of our strategy was inspiring future generations. if these kids aren't inspired by what they see here, something is wrong. cricket hasn't had too many moments to inspire this generation but we know the ashes 2005, the success, this is better than that and the way the nation was gripped by what they saw, there is no doubt about it, looking at the crowds here, and the reaction after yesterday's victory, it has gripped the nation once again. this process over four years of the team coming together, playing the game of cricket they have, it's been bubbling up, and we felt the
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nation behind the team. some of the scenes around the country, trafalgar square for example, watching the end of that game, it gives you a real nice buzz inside that people do care about the cricket team. it's been a big four years for england, a lot of attention placed on winning this world cup. how tough a four year period has been for england with the pressure coming? as a result of being the favourites coming into this tournament? really tough. there we re this tournament? really tough. there were times yesterday when perhaps we thought we had lost it. i have been seven months now, before me andrew strauss did a fantasticjob of focusing on cricket. we've never won the world cup, and we have now and thatis the world cup, and we have now and that is down to andrew strauss, trevor bayliss and eoin morgan. bringing injoe trevor bayliss and eoin morgan. bringing in joe root trevor bayliss and eoin morgan. bringing injoe root quickly. how do you feel after yesterday? feeling pretty good. how was it for them last night? i wonder what it must have been like as they woke up this
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morning. i think it was a late night. they are a fantastic group. played some great cricket. they thoroughly deserved to be world champions. is this going to be the perfect boost now to go into win the ashes? we know there is a summer of cricket ahead. will this be the launch pad for further success this summer? we hope so. we got good momentum going to the ashes. a double this summer would be fantastic. the celebrations will continue and i gather they will be a reception at ten downing st this evening? yes, tonight, so we'll polish them up and make sure they look smart. no andrew flintoff falling off the bus this time. i don't think so. best of luck for the summer don't think so. best of luck for the summer ahead and congratulations to you for all you have done in masterminding this success. the nation is revelling in it. it's not only the success of the result and winning the tournament but the manner in which they have done it.
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it has been quite a magnificent tournament. who would have thought, after seven weeks of cricket, it would have finished in the way it has. indeed, john watson, thank you very much. we will be back at the ovalfor very much. we will be back at the oval for what's happening there, very much. we will be back at the ovalfor what's happening there, the england team arriving, and some of the players, talking to the young cricketing fans, so we will go back there shortly but for now i want to talk to my studio guest, an english cricketer who played in the 2005 world cup. welcome and thanks for joining us. notjust the fact england won, which is great for the nation, but the manner in which it was won, which means this match goes down in sporting history. it really was one of the most dramatic finishes to any game i have ever witnessed, not just finishes to any game i have ever witnessed, notjust cricket, but any sport. the atmosphere was just electric at lord's. sport. the atmosphere was just electric at lords. i was pitch side for the super over, which was just
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played out in incredible circumstances. you know, half an hour before the end of the game i was thinking new zealand have got this. 30 from 15 deliveries, new zealand have definitely got this, and then there was a six, overthrows going forfour, they and then there was a six, overthrows going for four, they tie the game, going for four, they tie the game, go through to the super over, you think 15 is enough after that first over from think 15 is enough after that first overfrom england, think 15 is enough after that first over from england, and think 15 is enough after that first overfrom england, and then archer bell is a wide and gets hit for six. all of a sudden, you think this is new zealand's's game and england managed to do it. it was extraordinary scenes and something i don't think we will witness again. what does it say about their determination and resilience that they could do that because, of course, when you are down, you feel down and fighting back is very difficult. tremendous resilience. write to throughout this tournament, you know, they had their backs against the wall at one stage, one game away from being out of the tournament, and they came together after they lost to sri lanka and in
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australia, and came together as a group and got their psychologist in, david young, and they were very honest with their feelings. everyone spoke on the meeting and they turned it around straight after that, came back to win against india, who are titans of cricket at edgbaston, and then significant victory against new zealand, pretty much pushing them out of their way. and then the com plete out of their way. and then the complete game against australia, so to do it in these circumstances, we knew it was not going to be easy. the black caps have the underdogs tag and they performed under those circumstances. but the fact it got so, so close, it's a real sign of character from all of the team and right throughout this tournament we saw performances from each and every individual within that squad of players and that's why they ultimately left the world cup, because it has been a team performance led by a fantastic captain in eoin morgan. thank you
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very much forjoining us. for now we will say to viewers on to, goodbye. by by die. let's go back tojohn watson at the oval. talk us through the shape of the celebrations today because we know that the england team have been invited to downing street later to a reception by theresa may. there was a picture of her yesterday celebrating the win. it all starts here at the oval today with the team, young cricket fans have been told they can just show up and meet the team to celebrate. yes, i've got a couple of them with me now, joanna, who were enthralled with yesterday. how was it today meeting of the england cricket team? yesterday. how was it today meeting of the england cricket team7m yesterday. how was it today meeting of the england cricket team? it felt
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exciting. are you absolutely delighted that they have managed to win the world cup for the first time? yes. then, how about yourself? he does not want to chat to us. have you enjoyed the tournament? yes, very much. do you think you will play more cricket now? do you want to play a bit more now you've seen england do what they have done?” really like playing cricket. my favourite part is bowling. really like playing cricket. my favourite part is bowling! really like playing cricket. my favourite part is bowling. a bit like jofra archer favourite part is bowling. a bit likejofra archer perhaps? favourite part is bowling. a bit like jofra archer perhaps? the men's tea m like jofra archer perhaps? the men's team have emulated the women's team' achievements. there are so many fantastic role models in sport. do you have a favourite player?” fantastic role models in sport. do you have a favourite player? i think i like all of them. do you prefer bowling or batting? batting. did you all watch it yesterday? yes, the
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kids thought i was going slightly mad, which is no problem at all, so it was tremendous fun and we stayed up it was tremendous fun and we stayed up late and we are a bit sleepy this morning but it's all good. did you envisage it would finish in the manner it did? with england and cricket, those two things together, you never know, let's face it, so after ashes 2005 anything is possible. i think we held on and ke pt possible. i think we held on and kept everything crossed, and it was absolutely brilliant. you've watch clips online and on the bbc sport website. how special is it a family can watch it on free to air tv. do you think that's important? we rely on listening to test match special, and that makes it quite accessible but the tv is so important. and i think for children in particular, because it's something they can easily find, i think yesterday was brilliant, great for the country to be able to watch. the scenes from
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trafalgar square showed that, as well. i presume this isjust the start and now we can win the ashes, as well? absolutely, why not? it's going to be a fantastic summer of cricket. thank you for speaking with us. enjoy the rest of your day as the celebrations continue. i know we have held you up there and you are clearing the outfield as the celebrations continue. we are expecting the team to lift the trophy at some stage but as we know, they will no doubt be doing more interviews throughout the day before they have the reception at downing street a little bit later on. as the celebrations continue for what has been a landmark moment, special moment, an enthralling match, and you wonder if we'll see the like of it again. john, thank you very much. let's talk more to the former player who played and won in the women's england world cup. we heard john
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talking about can they win the ashes? that is what is going to happen now, are they invincible now they've done this under the most testing of circumstances?” they've done this under the most testing of circumstances? i don't think they will rest on their laurels against australia and will hurt badly. joe root and his men because it's a different captain out for the test matches, they will absolutely enjoy this because it only comes around once in a life time and then it will be back to work because the ashes is approaching, 1st of august at edgbaston, for that first test match. she is appointment for kane williamson, who, iwoke match. she is appointment for kane williamson, who, i woke up this morning feeling quite sad for new zealand because they played such incredible cricket, and it's almost like they didn't deserve to be on the losing side, but those are the rules and eoin morgan ends up lifting the trophy and it was quite phenomenal stuff but, yeah, they've got a job to do later on for the
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men's ashes because they will want to regain those back for sure. that moment you're talking about, waking up moment you're talking about, waking up the day before, the dawning realisation. new zealand, it was not good but for the england cricketers waking up this morning it must‘ve been a moment of did that really happen? absolutely, it will be a blow for them at the moment. it is a blurfor me. i can't comprehend blow for them at the moment. it is a blur for me. i can't comprehend what happened in the last hour of that game. i think i'm going to go back and just watch it fully, you know, in the comfort of my own living room, to kind of put it to bed and get some closure on it, but it is something so special. those guys worked so hard in the last four yea rs worked so hard in the last four years and taken themselves to the number one team in the world. they came into this as the favourite, number ones, and have lived up to the hype and expectation which we don't necessarily see from england
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teams generally. generally we prefer the underdog tag but the fact they have come in as favourites and delivered a something quite special. put it into context for non—cricket fans. what happened was exceptional. evenif fans. what happened was exceptional. even if you don't like cricket, you can appreciate the incredible story that unfolded yesterday. absolutely. they would have gone into that game in the final as favourites. that they are not batting first. they are batting second on a pitch that is difficult to bat on. new zealand kept coming at them, one of the best bowling attacks in the tournament. and, you know, new zealand posted 241 , and, you know, new zealand posted 241, which we thought was quite a good score on that pitch. and in a world cup final. in a bilateral series when you play a number of games against an opposition team, you think england can chase that down pretty well. they've been great at chasing the last few years or so,
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and have scrapped teams aside, but in this tournament have stumbled in chase's and they have delivered against australia with jason roy and jonny bairstow, the best opening pair who have ever been in one—day cricket around the world, but you just felt a couple of wickets and all of a sudden new zealand are in the game and that's exactly what happened. ben stokes and jos buttler, you felt that would see england over the line, that partnership, and they scored a century partnership together butjos buttler got out and wickets kept tumbling, and it got so close towards the end and under the pressure that you face in that situation and the magnitude of what it would do for english cricket in this country, the fact it was watched by millions and you are thinking to yourself, notjust the fa ct thinking to yourself, notjust the fact england are going to lose, but there is an opportunity wasted there. so the fact they have managed to do it and inspired so many kids,
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boys and girls, who want to be the next ben stokes, i think that's the real message. it's what it's done for cricket as a sport in this country. there are lots of kids at the oval waiting to meet their cricket heroes. we've heard from some of them. we were hearing from jofra archer earlier. thank you for joining us and let's catch up with some more reaction in the sports news. away from the cricket...novak djokovic says his wimbledon win over roger federer was his most "mentally demanding" match. in an astonishing day of sport, the men's final went to a fifth set, then 12 games all and then to a tie break. it was djokovic who eventually beat federer in an extraordinary final, which lasted longer than any other in the tournament's history — almost five hours in total. federer actually had two championship points but couldn't get over the line, leaving djokovic to win his 16th grand slam title. the netball world cup is into
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the second round in liverpool. kate gray is there for us. all the home nations in action today kate including england against jamaica — what can we expect from that one? yes, it's going to be a huge match for england against jamaica. yes, it's going to be a huge match for england againstjamaica. most people tipped it would be the final match up of this tournament. england being the home favourites and jamaica seeded number two in this match, but following a disappointing loss forjamaica against south africa, the number five loss forjamaica against south africa, the numberfive seeds yesterday, they now find themselves against england this afternoon. it will be a must win match forjamaica if they want to make sure they progress through to the semifinal but also england will want to continue their winning run of this tournament. they've already won three matches and want to make it four out of four, and it will take the pressure off their final match against south africa on thursday before they move through to the semifinal. you can watch that from 2:45pm on bbc two today. northern
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ireland, they have suffered another defeat here in liverpool. they lost to malawi, for — 47. we knew it would be difficult but it means they are now out of the top eight placings and will leave this tournament disappointed. scotland against south africa and you can find all of the - here at find all of the action here at liverpool across the bbc platforms. thank you very much, crate. and steve bruce has resigned from as manager of sheffield wednesday, amid reports he's in line to take over at newcastle united. he only took over at hillsborough injanuary, guiding them to a 12th placed finish in the championship. he's the overwhelming favourite to take over from rafael benitez, having already held talks at newcastle — the club he supported as a boy. and day 10 of the tour de france is underway. france's julian alaphilippe still has the leaders yellow jersey, defending champion geraint thomas is in fifth. you can follow it live on the bbc sport website and app. that's it for now. i will be back in
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one hour. thank you very much indeed. let's show you the pictures live at the oval where we are expecting the england cricket team, the world cup winning team, to come out and raise the trophy. you can see there's a lot of media there, of course, and also cricket fans as well, who showed up this morning for this moment when the world cup win, that amazing when that unfolded when both teams scored 241 from 50 overs, culminating in a super over. the first time ever the world cup has been decided in that way, based on a tie—break which tied with itself, so it was all decided in the end in england's favour, and they are going to be holding the trophy aloft at the oval cricket ground in south london shortly. there is a lot of
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media there waiting to cover that and a lot of young cricket fans, who will no doubt have been inspired by what they saw yesterday. 4.7 million people watched the match live yesterday which started quite sedately, i suppose you could say, and then it grew and grew into a real nailbiter. john watson is at the oval for real nailbiter. john watson is at the ovalfor us. and real nailbiter. john watson is at the oval for us. and we will be checking in with him shortly but for now, in the studio, let's talk to isa guhar. she knows herself, you area isa guhar. she knows herself, you are a commentator now, but you know the absolute joy of winning the world cup because you did it with the england women in 2009. how do you think they will be feeling? you mention the word invincible. you feel like that, on top of the world, you feel like you can do anything, and we were in australia when we won the world cup but we were fortunate enough to win the world cup back in
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england a couple of months later at lord's england a couple of months later at lords and there's nothing that can describe it. because of all the hard work you put into it, for us, with the one—day world cup, it was seven yea rs of ha rd the one—day world cup, it was seven years of hard work building up to that point of everyone getting into their best position in terms of their best position in terms of their cricketing ability, their fitness, their mindset, and we almost became a family. we knew each other‘s roles as much as our own, and that really kind of helped us in those pressure situations on the pitch and when you eventually do it, it's like relief, elation, you think about everyone who has helped you along the way and that's exactly what the boys will be feeling now. each individual within that group of players i got their own story to tell. but they have been bonded by
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this. i mentioned yesterday on commentary they are a band of brothers now and that will last forever. nothing can take that away from the boys because it truly is one of the most incredible things you can ever do. the fact that the man have never done it before, they got close in 1992, hence the sky—blue kit they were wearing in this tournament, and they have former players around them telling them about their kind of experiences at world cups and how close they got but they were not quite able to get over the line and that will have come to their minds during the game. we have got to do it for all of those past players who were not able to, so yeah, incredible moments and i think, to, so yeah, incredible moments and ithink, in to, so yeah, incredible moments and i think, in a game like yesterday, when it becomes so tight, because sometimes you win a match and it is so sometimes you win a match and it is so one—sided you get to the end of
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it and you are like, that wasn't as bad as i thought it was going to be, as tough as i thought was going to be, but the fact they fought right to the end as hard as they did, that's an experience. that will make it even more sweet. thank you very much, we are waiting to see that moment when the trophy is held aloft at the oval and will be back there for that but for now, let's take a break and catch up with the weather. thank you very much, joanna. good afternoon to you. the weather in decent shape this week. don't get so used to it because there are some changes ahead. this afternoon, most of us fine and dry with some sunshine. a small chance of a shower across western areas with extra cloud in east anglia and the south—east, on the cool side but elsewhere, those temperatures into the 20s. more weather later and i will go back to joanna. thank you very much. the england
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cricket team. they have got their medals around their necks. and we will see the trophy, as well. not just sweet, of course, to win that world cup in the way that they did, but to win it at lord's as well, that victory on home soil making it an even more precious moment if anything can make what happened yesterday even more precious. there they are with the trophy. and the media and fans are showing up and the media and fans are showing up to meet the cricket team to show their respect and their gratitude for what happened yesterday. the first time the men's cricketers have won the world cup. they went in as favourites but then the prospects for them were thought to have waned,
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but in the most nail—biting finish in the end, the match finishing with a tie. the tie—breaker tying as well. then in the end the decision being taken in a way looked at how many more boundaries were scored in the match, and that where the grounds in which england won that match. new zealand's prime minister paying tribute to the victory they are and new zealand being praised for their response to what was a heartbreaking defeat for them. paying tribute to the england team for the resilience and the strength that they showed in their match yesterday. lets bring injohn watson. he is there for us. they seem a watson. he is there for us. they seem a bit dazed. i don't know whether that is a result of celebrating our night or whether it is quite hard to take in what they have done. i think perhaps there is
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an element of that, sinking in. i think they were so focused yesterday on the match and the effort to get over the line and win the trophy for the first time. i think now they are seeing please support our messages on social media, the text messages they are receiving, and i think it is bound to start sinking in, that element of the sense of achievement. it isa element of the sense of achievement. it is a culmination of four years of ha rd it is a culmination of four years of hard work. it is a hard moment —— make great moment. there are very few moments in sport and that was their moment. it feels as though the achievements are up there as one of those. we note the women's team won the world cup some years ago and you think about bobby moore in 1966 and the rugby world cup in 2003, world cup wins do not happen all that
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often for england. i think the enormity of the situation is sinking in on those players and what they have managed. i think that is only going to grow. as is so often the case with these things. as they lift the trophy they are, what a wonderful moment. it is only as time goes on, that you reflect fully on the achievements. i think this reflection will only continue over the coming days. john, i have been speaking to the commentator and former player herself, part of the women's cricket team that won in 2009, and she was saying that each individual player will have their own stories of the path to victory. just give us a flavour of some of the amazing stories behind what we have seen there and the triumphs of those players. yes, you would have
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to start with eoin morgan, the england captain, growing up on the outskirts of dublin, probably never envisaged he would lead england. it is appointment years ago when he was pa rt is appointment years ago when he was part of that team who lost in the early stages of the previous world cup. yet, he received that call saying, you will still lead this team, you will change how this team plays. a very, very special moment. quite a diverse team, something that is very important. look atjofra archer, only eligible to play for england three months ago. so many different players of different heritage and that is the thing about this team, inclusivity. eoin morgan said as much in his press conference last night, it is a wonderful team and a real bond, real togetherness.
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there are some wonderful stories. it is very special for eoin morgan because he has felt that defeat, that disappointment. it has been so much focus, so much attention on england delivering this world cup. as we know, it was on home soil. it was all there for england to win. we know previously australia when they held a four years ago, they were the winners, four years before that india had it on home soil. there was the pressure of being the home side and attempting to deliver. when you consider the emphasis comically prioritising, there was a lot of pressure on this team to deliver. eoin morgan being one of the four or five players who are part of the tea m five players who are part of the team for orfive five players who are part of the team for or five years ago, they have tasted that disappointment of defeat. they got themselves to the top of the world rankings, an
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impressive feat in itself, managing to do that, travelling the world and meeting the very best teams. to get the top of the world rankings, that is in achievement and its own right. to deliver on home soil at a home world cup, with the eyes of the country watching on in front of packed ground, that is where the tea m packed ground, that is where the team showed their mettle, they have certainly done that. we can see ben stokes, who was instrumental in that england win. he has been the go—to quy england win. he has been the go—to guy for england, arguably the best all rounder at international cricket. noticeable that when it all fell on that super over, he was there, he was the one who was nominated to go out and face those two balls. he is coming over tojoin us now, johnny bairstow, many congratulations. how does it feel? have you come down after the height
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of yesterday? no, iwill never have you come down after the height of yesterday? no, i will never come down from that. it is like when you are retired and really old, that is when it will sink in. what a day. at no point were we ever thinking we would draw the game twice. it was the best game i have ever been involved in. we will talk about the game and a moment. we were saying that you do look a little shellshocked, is the enormity starting to sink in? i do not think it well. it is amazing to see people here. it is so special, to be honest with you. a lot of hard work over a long period of time. people have been through individual stuff, as well as a team. to now say we have won the world cup is exceptional. how do you deal with that pressure? i was saying the main aim, the main focus was to win this world cup and that has certainly been the case
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since the last world cup, how have you dealt with the pressure of trying to deliver the sport's biggest prize on home soil?m trying to deliver the sport's biggest prize on home soil? it goes with the pressure we put on ourselves, the pressure we put on ourselves, the pressure we put on ourselves to get better, to consta ntly ourselves to get better, to constantly push each other into delivering performances over we have over the three—year period. yesterday was a completely different pressure. it has not necessarily beena pressure. it has not necessarily been a power score, it has been to atr to 90. we had some luck along the way. —— 280 or 290. atr to 90. we had some luck along the way. -- 280 or 290. talk us through the match yesterday. nobody in the team which have ever envisaged it would have been how it was. the scores level after 50 overs each, and then going into that super
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over. it was a joke, wasn't it? each, and then going into that super over. it was ajoke, wasn't it? ! nobody will ever come close to seeing a game like that. no one well. that was the special thing about it. it was a once—in—a—lifetime game, really was. we all enjoyed watching it. as a set you up brilliantly for the ashes this summer? in launch pad and continue with this momentum?” cannot wait. we know we will be reeling from losing the semifinal so we will have a tough test. the guys really are looking forward to it. yes. six weeks to go. six test matches and off we popped. fantastic. can you show us your meadow, if you would? there it is. johnny, many thanks indeed. congratulations on a valiant tournament. johnny bairstow, integral in huge scores for england
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at this world cup. a special moment. i think he was seeing they are, the enormity of what they have achieved sinking in, but perhaps neverfully sinking in, but perhaps neverfully sinking in. thank you very much. we can talk more about the impact on what yesterday might have on grass root cricket. thank you very much for joining root cricket. thank you very much forjoining us. first of all, your reaction to what has been described as the most amazing game of cricket ever? it was fantastic, wasn't it? it was a great game to watch. i was actually playing yesterday myself but i managed to catch the end of it and we listen to it on the radio in the car. it was a remarkable game, which hopefully will inspire a whole generation of boys and girls and women and men to get involved in playing the game. yes, it is a brilliant story. so even if you are not interested in cricket, this
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ca ptu res not interested in cricket, this captures the imagination, doesn't it? do you think that will translate to people taking up cricket and watching it more? i think it well. hopefully there will be a spike in terms of boys and girls wanting to get involved and emulating their heroes from the tv they saw yesterday. that is the magic of sport, particularly life—support. it was amazing the game was broadcast on free to air tv, i think that was really important, opening up to a whole new audience. i think you could not have failed to get carried away with the occasion. a tie itself is remarkable in 50 over cricket, but to then have the super over and it to be tied again was incredible. i have been looking at our facebook page this morning and there have been a whole host of interaction and engagement on there, so, like i say, this whole army of young people went to get inspired and access cricket
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now. johnny bairstowjust saying he cannot wait for the ashes now. anyway, the expectation builds, there will be hopes they can keep replicating what they did. is also a sense that nothing can take away from what have done there? so what comes now is like, ok, you have done this, that is the pinnacle.” comes now is like, ok, you have done this, that is the pinnacle. i am not sure. iam this, that is the pinnacle. i am not sure. i am not sure this, that is the pinnacle. i am not sure. iam niotsure how you this, that is the pinnacle. i am not sure. i am nzot sure how you top sure. i am not sure how you top that. you know, it was a ridiculous game of cricket. i think the fact the ashes is coming up so quickly, and the women's ashes are taking pa rt and the women's ashes are taking part now, that test match starts on thursday. there is a feast of cricket at the moment, which is fantastic. i know we talked about trying to capitalise on this once in a generation opportunity that we have at this volume of international cricket and hopefully yesterday as the start of that. it is the responsibility of people like me
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really now to make sure we are supporting that grassroots network and providing the opportunity for people to access cricket any a really quality, welcoming environment. so, yes, it is a challenge and my team are really looking forward to it and hopefully there will be that spike in interest. what is it that has really cemented the success of this england team? i think it has been building, hasn't it? the team have been successful now for the last couple of years. i listen to the south african captain talking about england setting the benchmark. i think they really have over the last couple of years, and it has been timed perfectly with the world cup coming when it does. it feels like they have really peaked. i'm sure there are a lot of people who deserve a lot of credit for that,
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the coach, and andrew strauss started building that. and eoin morgan the captain. itjust feels like a morgan the captain. itjust feels likea number of morgan the captain. itjust feels like a number of things have come together at the right time and produced a bit of a perfect storm for english cricket and thankfully they managed to get over the line in dramatic circumstances. thank you very much forjoining us, martin dobson. thank you. breaking news from the courts. a jury breaking news from the courts. a jury has found a man guilty of the murder of the american businessmen with the overdose. he was also found guilty of charges of administering a noxious substances, in such way to endanger a life. he and another man have been found guilty of a series of theft and fraud. daniel sanford
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has the background to the case. murdered for his bank cards and computer, his mobile phone and some bottle of wine. business executive and part—time actor. he had contacted his killer, picking him up from a homeless hostel and stopping off at sainsbury‘s on the way back to his south london home. that night, he drugged him with a sedative in order to rob him. you give him a fatal dose. his sons described the family grief.” give him a fatal dose. his sons described the family grief. i will never meet anyone like him again in my life. losing him has been like losing a limb. the devastation it causes is unbelievable. especially when he had so much to live for. he was only 54. leaving eric dead in his bed, jerry left in a minicab. in
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the following days, he and an accomplice went on a spending spree, using his life cards. he is —— mackie is a liar, hustler and a thief. he had no regard for their life. he is using a dangerous drug to facilitate their crimes. he had been using the drug to rob people he met on the application for years. he had met more than a dozen people. here they are seen leaving the flat of their targets. the investigations we re of their targets. the investigations were limited. the most extraordinary incident happened at this east london hotel in may, after a dutch businessman who was a guest, here he drugged him and stole all his possessions, including his clothes, laptop, mobile phone and his bank card. he even took the flat screen
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television and the toilet brush from the hotel bedroom. police failed to identify the man who had drugged his victim into unconsciousness, even though it would have been easy to do so though it would have been easy to do so from the account. i do not understand why it wasn't followed up from that time. we may not be where we are today if it was. it is a shame my dad had to die for them to go and find him, basically. the police were aware of the man, he had been convicted of selling drugs to this man. today, we can reveal he had even drugged and robbed him himself, just before stephen port was arrested before for killing four men. prompting this exchange... he responded... this case has
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highlighted how police don't always ta ke highlighted how police don't always take the misuse of this incredibly dangerous drugged serious enough. any allegation anything involving ghb in the future should be taken seriously and investigated every time. the drug to be changed to show just how lethal ghb can be. the government was too slow to respond to ‘mob' protests outside primary schools in birmingham — triggered by lessons that include "lgbt plus" topics. this is according to the woman tasked with challenging extremism. in an exclusive interview with panorama, sara khan said the department for education should have done more to support head teachers. the government says it's been clear from the outset. sima kotecha has this report. protesters outside schools in birmingham have been campaigning against the use of storybooks
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featuring same—sex couples, part of programmes teaching about equality. most pupils at the schools are muslim. the protesters say their religion doesn't accept homosexuality. she comes home and says "why do i have two mummies, why do i have two daddies?" how are you meant to explain that? it is brainwashing and confusing them. now, the lead commissioner for countering extremism sara khan has described what she's seen birmingham as a mob who are chanting and shouting and engaging in intimidating behaviour. she's accused the government of being too slow to act. the dfe could have done so much more. i think they were too slow to respond and to be able to provide support to head teachers who are experiencing something that's really quite traumatic, but also clarifying what's actually being taught to pupils in school. in 2020, the government wants all schools to teach lgbt content as part of new compulsory
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relationship and sex education. the guidance was changed because the world has changed. we want children to grow up understanding that some people are different, some relationships are different from what they may have experienced, but all are valuable. sara khan says she's now concerned what might happen next. i am worried that how, when rsc comes formally into the curriculum in 2020, this will escalate even further. panorama has spoken to other religious groups around the country who are looking to build campaigns of their own. sima kotecha, bbc news. sima kotecha spoke to me about the story. pa rents parents have been protesting over the use of storybooks that show pictures of same—sex couples. these protests have been escalating over the last six months or so. what we have learnt through this panorama is the women who is tasked with challenging extremism has said the government has not done enough to
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support head teachers with these skills and that she feels that ministers have not been clear enough as to what the guidance that is coming into force in 2020 actually set. she thinks there needs to be more clarity around that and she thinks there needs to be more descriptive of what teachers need to do in terms of going forward. she wa nts do in terms of going forward. she wants more clarity from the government, that is at the forefront of what she is saying. she says her teachers need more support. she has also done her own research into what she says is extremism is. she considers what she is seeing outside the schools is extremism, describing the schools is extremism, describing the protesters as being a mob. she says there needs to be more clarity, more support and she will be disclosing the findings of her report in the days and weeks to come. we have been speaking to people of many faiths around the country, people who arejewish,
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catholic, and what they are saying is from watching these protests in birmingham, they feel their campaigns have been energised and in some cases they have been inspired. they are looking to do something similar because theyjust do not feel that traditional values are at the heart of the new guidance. however, what the government are saying is they want children to be exposed to diversity in society and they want head teachers to decide when it is age appropriate for them to be part about same—sex relationships. has the victory sunk in yet? it is great to be part of this experience. it reminds me when we are watching
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the ashes in 2005, around trafalgar square, it was amazing to see those scenes. it is sinking in. to be part of the special group and to win that asa unit of the special group and to win that as a unit is an amazing thing. and just tell us, what was it like last night, the experience of getting the tea m night, the experience of getting the team together after such a successful achievement, it is family orientated. everybody has put in ha rd orientated. everybody has put in hard work, from all the players, families around the world watching them play day in and day out. it is a special unit and only comes in once ina a special unit and only comes in once in a while. i am so pleased to be part of that team. it has done amazingly well. there was some discussion today about whether or not the umpires might have got it wrong with the five runs that were given for the ball that came off ben sto kes's given for the ball that came off ben stokes's back, has there been any
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discussion amongst that? not really, mate. i don't believe in the stars aligning and all of that, but that moment made me feel like that. i would rather the ball was hit out of the park. new zealand argued players, but it would be the same situation for us if we were fielding. it was just meant to be for us. what now for you guys? a big day ahead obviously with this reception at downing number ten downing st. the boys are getting together. take a breath, we haven't really done that yet. it would be nice to sit together and just realise how special this moment is. fantastic. a wonderful achievement. and the ashes to come. i won't be pa rt and the ashes to come. i won't be part of that but i look forward to watching it with you guys. it is a lwa ys
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watching it with you guys. it is always good to watch the ashes. hopefully the boys do well. liam plu nkett hopefully the boys do well. liam plunkett talking to john watson hopefully the boys do well. liam plunkett talking tojohn watson on that amazing victory for the cricketers. more reaction coming up at the knees at one. now for the weather. the weather we get today, as the saying goes, is the weather for the next 40 days. that would mean 40 more days like this. however, ido that would mean 40 more days like this. however, i do not think that is going to happen. there are changes this week. turning wet and windy later on. you can see only picture, clouds are swarming. heading in our direction. as we start the week, high pressure is with us. for most of us, dry and sunshine around. around the area of high pressure, south—east. small
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chance of a shower in some areas. temperatures for many of us in the low to mid 20s. as we go through this evening and tonight, many of us will be dry with clear spells. chilly in some rural spots. up to the north—west, the first signs of change, some splashes of rain into northern ireland and western scotland. as we go into tomorrow, this weakening band of cloud and patchy rain eastwards. some outbreaks which could be quite heavy. it dry and sunny day for the majority tomorrow. slightly warmer than today. 26 celsius in london. as we move into wednesday, another frontal system. this will have more life about it. some heavy and thundery rain across northern ireland and western scotland. more
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cloud across the uk. the sunshine turning hazy. the winds will pick up as well. here at those temperatures dipping away a little bit. where we continue to see spells of sunshine through wednesday afternoon, temperatures up to 24 celsius or 25 celsius. the change gathers pace as we head towards the end of the week. this change on thursday. this developing weather system for friday. not only wet weather, but windy weather as well. things do turn more unsettled as we head towards the end of the week. turning cooler as well.
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jubilant scenes at the oval as cricket fans celebrate england's dramatic world cup win. supporters of all ages turned out to cheer the england team after their victory by the tightest of margins. it is probably sinking in a bit more this morning. just a really great day yesterday and especially sharing it with the lads. we look back and look forward here at the oval as we get cricket pulses racing. and the other main stories this lunchtime. completely unacceptable — theresa may's verdict on president trump's latest twitter outburst, branded racist by critics.

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