Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 16, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

11:00 am
you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's 11 am and these are the main stories this morning. the number of people in scotland dying from taking drugs has jumped by a quarter, giving scotland a higher drugs death rate than the united states and any other eu country. four american congresswomen attacked by president trump say he's using racism to distract from his failing policies. he is launching a blatantly racist attack on fort duly elected members of the united states house of representatives. all of whom are women of colour. this is the agenda of white nationalists. some people think it's controversial. a lot of people love it, by the way.
11:01 am
the woman nominated to head the european commission says she'd be willing to extend the brexit deadline. i stand ready for further extension of the withdrawal date. should more time be required for a good reason. facebook launches a new tool to target scammers and encourage the reporting of fake adverts. that's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind. the words of neil armstrong as he took his first steps on the moon, the mission launched 50 years ago today. we'll be at the national space centre in leicester to mark the anniversary. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live.
11:02 am
iamjoanna i am joanna gosling. the number of people who've died in scotland because of drug use has risen to over 1,000 in a year, for the first time, according to new official figures. it means the country's drug death rate is now nearly three times that of the uk as a whole, and is higher than that reported for any other eu country and the united states. 1,187 drug deaths were recorded in scotland last year. that's a 27% increase on the year before, according to the national records of scotland. it marks the largest number of drugs deaths ever recorded in scotland. 0ur correspondent james shaw reports. when i think of all the drugs i've taken over the years, there's no crying left. i've run out of tears. an open mic event for drug users in dundee. sylvia fox started taking drugs at the age of 1a. now she only uses the heroin substitute methadone, and recognises that her addiction
11:03 am
caused a lifetime of risk—taking. once, i was found in the street, just in the middle of the road. i must‘ve just been walking and collapsed. and the other time i was in the house and i had again injected, i think it was morphine at that stage, and i had 0d'd. last year, dundee had the highest rate of drug deaths, but the problem affects all scotland's major cities. in areas like this piece of waste ground in the centre of glasgow, the chaotic nature of drug use does start to become apparent. the boss of one organisation which supports drug users is a former deputy chief constable, and now wants some decriminalisation. enabling some of the things that at the moment we cannot do around drug testing, around indeed treatment centres, and the like, would be sensible, progressive measures that would enable us to have a more
11:04 am
effective approach to drug harms than we are currently able to do under the current framework. that may be a controversial view, but demands for change are likely to become harder to ignore. we can talk to james now in glasgow. james, these figures are shocking, apparently? they are extremely alarming, disturbing figures for anyone who is involved in helping people who are using drugs in scotland. the worst that we've ever seenin scotland. the worst that we've ever seen in this country. in one of the organisation is deeply involved in policy on drug use and also training people to help drug users is the scottish drugs forum. i am joined by a representative. kirsten, first of all, what is your immediate reaction to these figures?
11:05 am
i guess the immediate reaction is that there are literally no words to describe the faces behind the numbers, and while this is a day where a lot of attention is on the figures, ultimately, family, friends, communities and the general population are living with that toll every day, so it is horrific for a small country to have over 1000 preventable deaths every year. it is just terrific. and this is only the tip of the iceberg, the deaths. it does not include the lives affected, the families, as you say. this is touching a lot of people in scotland 110w. touching a lot of people in scotland now. for sure. we saw a really tragic tale in the news yesterday, some of these stories from people across scotland, the amount of loss they face in their lives from losing close family members and friends. it isjust huge. we are talking about generations, arent we? we are talking about parents who use drugs and their children are using drugs as well. this could become
11:06 am
intergenerational, three or possibly four generations? absolutely, and everybody who has lost to somebody's mother, father, son or daughter. huge repercussions, and ultimately awful. so why is it so bad in scotland? it is a really complex issue. people are using multiple substances. what we see now is that people over 35 are likely to have a huge amount of health related problems, and that increases their risk of a drug death, so the drug gas report that came out today highlights that again, that people over 35 think there is an increase, but ultimately, there is an increase in those deaths as well. lots of physical and mental health conditions and social factors can contribute to this picture we are seeing today. you hear international comparisons. we have apparently the worst figures in the whole of the european union. there is also the suggestion it may even be worse than
11:07 am
the united states, which is recognised as perhaps the developed country with the biggest drug problem. they talk about the opiate crisis in the united states. is that what we have in scotland? are useful comparisons to be made?” what we have in scotland? are useful comparisons to be made? i don't think it is all that useful to compare to other countries, because the way that data and information is collected can be different, but ultimately, doesn't really matter about which country is worse? this isa about which country is worse? this is a huge issue in scotland, over 1000 people dying of preventable causes year. i think what they are seeing in those countries is a powerful opiate called fe nta nyl, that we have not thankfully seen yet in scotland, but it would be naive to think that we won't see fentanyl here, and if we did get fence and a lens of the drug market here, it would just be ten times worse for people who are at high risk. —— if we did get fentanyl on the drug market. can you briefly say what you
11:08 am
think the answers might be to this crisis? there will be lots of discussions today about different services we could introduce in scotland, and we need a package of lots of different things. some of those things we do not yet have in scotland, but the things we do need massive improvement, and one of those things is our treatment service, our opiate replacement therapy programmes, and in particular our methadone programme. asa particular our methadone programme. as a country, we have managed to heavily stigmatise a life—saving medication, so people on a methadone prescription are being made to feel like they are a failure for receiving medication. so ultimately, out receiving medication. so ultimately, our services need to be much better at retaining and engaging people when they need or want treatment and we need to make sure those services are accessible and that they are meeting people'sneeds. thank you very much indeed. well, a huge amount to think and talk about there. in this crisis, it is a hugely complicated situation, not something that the scottish government, the scottish drugs forum
11:09 am
01’ government, the scottish drugs forum or anyone else will be able to solve in the short term. thank you very much, james. the four democratic congresswomen told by president trump to go back where they came from have held a joint news conference to hit back at his comments. representatives alexandria 0casio—cortez, ilhan 0mar, ayanna pressley and rashida tlaib, said he was using racism to deflect attention from his failing policies and urged americans "not to take the bait". here's our washington correspondent, david willis. facing accusations of racism and xenophobia, president trump is not backing down. spelling out his message in capital letters, let anyone be in any doubt, and going on to attack the democrats for closing ranks around the four women. "the dems were trying to distance themselves from the four progressives," he wrote, "but now they are forced "to embrace them. "that means they are endorsing socialism, hate of israel and the usa." minutes later, at a joint news conference, the congresswomen —
11:10 am
three of whom were born in the usa — hit back. he's launching a blatantly racist attack on four duly elected members of the united states house of representatives, all of whom are women of colour. this is the agenda of white nationalists. some people think it's controversial. a lot of people love it, by the way. downing street has called the president's language completely unacceptable. but while some republican lawmakers have been critical, the silence from senior party members has been deafening. the question now for more moderate republicans going into next year's presidential election is what constitutes a crossing of the line. david willis, bbc news, washington. both conservative leaders have confirmed that the so—called they believe that the so—called irish backstop will need to be removed from any
11:11 am
future deal with the eu. they were speaking during a leadership debate organised by the sun newspaper. any such move would mean ruling out a fundamental part of theresa may's deal that would keep the uk closely aligned to eu customs rules, so that the border between ireland and northern ireland could remain open with a frictionless border in the absence of an all—encompassing deal. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is at westminster for us. norman, if they are both ruling the backstop out, what does that mean? that is not going to go down very well at all in europe, is it? i think it means the prospect of having to leave without any agreement increase, because i think agreement increase, because i think a lot of people had hoped it might be possible to secure some sort of time limit to the backstop, and some brexiteers have even mooted the idea of trying to get an end date for the backstop. the eu have said it is only a temporary arrangement, so if
11:12 am
we can only agree a date. but that might have been a way to get the deal over the line. last night, both borisjohnson deal over the line. last night, both boris johnson and jeremy hunt rejected that idea outright, with jeremy hunt even saying it was dead. another possible compromise was creating some sort of mechanism which would enable the british government to unilaterally leave the backstop. that also has been rejected, so we are in a position really where both men, whoever is successful, they are going to have to negotiate an entirely new deal in a very, very to negotiate an entirely new deal in a very, very narrow to negotiate an entirely new deal in a very, very narrow window, because there would only be three months from when they take office to the deadline of october 31, and that is presuming the eu is even prepared to consider another deal, and it has fuelled the fears of former
11:13 am
remainers and opponents of boris johnson that we are now heading towards a no deal. the attorney general suggested that boris johnson seem general suggested that boris johnson seem to be eternally knocking down all the possible compromise options. the moment you solve one problem, they will put up another obstacle. ina funny they will put up another obstacle. in a funny way, boris johnson absolutely confirmed this in yesterday's debate. when challenged and confronted, he radicalised even further and excluded any possibility of trying to negotiate some way out of trying to negotiate some way out of the backstop at all. it had to go in its totality. you could argue that mrjohnson and mr huntarejust you could argue that mrjohnson and mr hunt arejust taking you could argue that mrjohnson and mr hunt are just taking this tough line as a sort of marker ahead of the negotiations. the trouble is, once you have said you will not tolerate the backstop, it is very ha rd to tolerate the backstop, it is very hard to back down from that, and it seems very hard to back down from that, and it seems very hard to sell that to their own party members now. thank you very much. the leading candidate to be the next european commission president says
11:14 am
she "stands ready" to further extend britain's withdrawal from the eu "if there is a good reason". the european parliament votes later today on the nomination of ursula von der leyen for the job of president of the european commission. meps will take part in a secret ballot, and ms von der leyen will need an absolute majority. let's talk to damian grammaticas, who's in strasbourg for us. there was quite a response in the chamber when she said what she said. i could not hear what she said. it sounded like boos initially, and then cheers. what went down? when mrs vander der leyen addressed the parliament earlier, she came to brexit, and when she came to brexit, she said that would be the decision of the uk, but she regretted it and respected it. at that point, there we re respected it. at that point, there were cheers from the brexit party
11:15 am
meps. she went on to talk about the current withdrawal agreement and her views on an extension. there were cheers at that point from the meps, the pro—europea ns of cheers at that point from the meps, the pro—europeans of the block in the pro—europeans of the block in the centre when she was talking about the possibility of extending, and this is what she said. the withdrawal agreement concluded with the government of the united kingdom provides certainty where brexit created uncertainty. in preserving the rights of citizens and in preserving peace and stability on the island of ireland, these two priorities are mine too. however, i stand ready for a firm extension of the withdrawal date should more time be required for a good reason. applause
11:16 am
in any case, the united kingdom will remain our ally, in any case, the united kingdom will remain ourally, our in any case, the united kingdom will remain our ally, our partner, and our friend. applause well, what she did not mention was that backstop issue that norman smith was just talking about. i think you can take from what she says about ireland that the eu is sticking to its guns and she is sticking to its guns and she is sticking to its guns and she is sticking to that eu position that there has to be that backstop or something similar in the deal. she also laid out a broad swathe of her priorities if she is in charge of the european commission, things that greater ambition and climate change, greater ambition and climate change, greater efforts across the eu for things like a minimum wage, and an employment scheme, a carbon board attacks, and all of those were things that drew a pretty sharp response from the brexit party leader nigel fire raj. this is what he said after she spoke.
11:17 am
i come back to a place that has been humbled and humiliated. the european council stitch up as vendor displays impotence until today, when you have got some real power if you choose to use it. what you have seen today is an attempt for the european union to take control of every single aspect of our lives. she wants to build a centralised, undemocratic, updated form of communism that will render nation state parliaments, where the states controls everything, where nation state parliaments... where nation state parliaments... where nation state parliaments will cease to have any relevance at all. i have to have any relevance at all. i have to say, from our perspective, in some ways, i am really rather pleased, because you have just made brexit a lot more popular in the united kingdom. thank god we are leaving.
11:18 am
ms von der leyen had just said she wa nts to ms von der leyen had just said she wants to give the european parliament more powers to initiate legislation. her vote will be later today at the end of the day, and it is not yet clear whether she has enough votes in the chamber to be passed. thank you very much, damien. the headlines now. the number of people in scotland dying from taking drugs hasjumped bya dying from taking drugs hasjumped by a quarter, giving scotland a higher drugs death rate than the united states and any other eu country. for american congresswomen attacked by president trump say he is using racism to distract from his failing policies. the woman nominated to head the european commission says she would be willing to extend the brexit deadline. and in sport, the head coach of new zealand says the cricket world cup should be shared at future tournaments of the final is decided by such fine margins again. the kiwis lost to england because they scored fewer boundaries in sunday's
11:19 am
final. arsenal captain laurent michel knee is very hurt over his stand—off with the club. he has refused to travel on the club's preseason tour of the us after his transfer request was refused. and england are on the verge of a semifinal spot at the net bill world cup semifinal spot at the net bill world cu p after semifinal spot at the net bill world cup after beating jamaica. scotland and ireland are struggling to make it's the latter stages of the tournament. more at around half past. at least four people have been killed and dozens more are trapped in the rubble of a four—storey building which has collapsed in india. it happened in the country's financial capital of mumbai. it's the second time a building has collapsed in less than 10 days there and follows the torrential rains in the city. at least three million people have been displaced across north and north—eastern india as the monsoon takes lives and destroys homes. storms and floods have ripped
11:20 am
through areas of nepal, bangladesh and india, killing more than 130 people. gareth barlow reports. southern asia underwater as the annual monsoon unleashes a deluge of rain. more than 100 people have been killed. with homes inundated and travel disrupted, more bad weather is on the way. translation: for four days there have been floods. we did not get any relief or tarpaulin sheets. we are drinking water from the river. we asked the government to give us relief materials so that we will survive. all of us are staying on this embankment with goats and cattle. across the region, millions have been displaced. in bangladesh, 18 people killed by lightning. in nepal, at least 67 killed by torrential rain. in india, more than 1,800 villages swamped in one state alone. translation: the river is flowing above the danger level. every hour it is
11:21 am
increasing two to three centimetres and there is a possibility of the water level rising further. the monsoon season lasts until september, meaning more rain and storms, more death and devastation. "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind". the immortal words of neil armstrong as he took his first steps on the moon, 50 years ago this week. 0n16thjuly, 1969, nasa launched apollo 11, inspiring millions of people who watched the mission unfold on television. further missions landed 10 more men on the moon, up to 1972. so why haven't we been back since, and what plans are there to return? tim muffett has the story. we choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things — not because they are easy, but because they are hard. president kennedy wouldn't live to see his dream fulfilled, but injuly 1969, 600 million people
11:22 am
watched in wonder. tranquillity base here. the eagle has landed. when it landed, we all sort ofjumped up and shouted, we did it! keith wright, who now lives in dorset, had good reason to be thrilled. this is me inside the top of the saturn v... he worked at the kennedy space centre, designing experiments that would go to the moon. a passive seismometer which was there to detect moonquakes, and the other experiment was a laser reflector which was used to bounce back laser beams sent from the earth, to measure the distance from the earth to the moon. keith left another legacy. two of the brackets that held the solar arrays on the seismic experiment were going to be thrown away on the moon, and our nasa principal engineer suggested that we sign the back of one of these brackets. i signed my name and drew a little union flag,
11:23 am
because we had actually had 27 british engineers working on the experiments. and my signature and the union flag is on one of these. the us flag has disintegrated. the ultraviolet light will have just ruined it, and it will have just broken up. but, hopefully, our union flag drawing is still there. there he is putting his foot out... that's fantastic, i remember. jean was gripped by the moon landing. it kickstarted a fascination with space that now spans four generations of her family. her grandson, dan, runs kielder 0bservatory, in northumberland, where the family have gathered. the moon is something you look at all your life. it's beautiful. but imagining people being on it, it is so hard to believe. why are you interested in space? because there's still lots to be discovered about it, and i love it because it's where our home is. the technology that they used
11:24 am
was less sophisticated than the mobile phone that's sat in your pocket. but itjust makes you really excited about now we've moved on so much as a civilisation since then, in terms of technology, what can we achieve next, where can we go next? it's fascinating. that was the thing on which those men were walking 50 years ago. it's hard to believe, isn't it? it doesn't look solid. it looks as though, if you stood on it, it would just go through. it's marvellous. a constant presence for every human. for a select few — a temporary home. anna foster is at the national space centre in leicester. we canjoin we can join her there. we canjoin her there. how are we can join her there. how are they marking the anniversary there? hello. every single day of the week, this place is about space, the moon, and it is always packed full of school groups. there are lots of those here today as well. they have
11:25 am
a new exhibition looking at britton's role in the space race. you are just hearing about it there. it is not something you think about very often. and this is the american thought rocket above me. it says do not push, but let's see what happens. this is the thor rocket, and alongside me, this blue silver one is blue streak. this was britton's first entry into space, if you like. the british interplanetary society, and they were looking at how they would get to the moon. the americans did it first, and obviously they did it again. hello, jason. i feel we are about to be engulfed in a cloud of smoke! you area engulfed in a cloud of smoke! you are a nasser ambassador. tell me about yourjob. are a nasser ambassador. tell me about your job. it are a nasser ambassador. tell me about yourjob. it is about enthusing people about space. but judging by the huge reaction here today, people don't need too much enthusing? exactly. people are naturally interested in space
11:26 am
travel. as a species, we like to be pioneers and explore. you can see that now, look at this huge cloud of smoke. i will move out of the way slightly. this is a mock—up of the fantastic jet slightly. this is a mock—up of the fantasticjet propulsion slightly. this is a mock—up of the fantastic jet propulsion rockets slightly. this is a mock—up of the fantasticjet propulsion rockets at the bottom, and what it does really well as demonstrate the science that goes into this. we think about the three men that first walked on the moon, but there were hundreds of people involved in that. absolutely, yes, and in the states alone, about 400,000 people worked on the apollo programme. the three astronauts rightly get the credit for taking that voyage, but it took a whole nation, essentially, to get behind the programme. and when we look at what is happening now, what happens in the next 50 years, going to the moon fell out of fashion. they have still only been 12 men on the moon. we have not been there since 1972, but there are plans to return? yes, and a nasser's artemis programme, the goal is to get the first american woman to walk on the moon
11:27 am
in 2024, and essentially establish a sustained lunar programme by 2028. we will use all of that to get the first crude mission to mars by the 20 405. first crude mission to mars by the 20 40s. why do you think it is that those extraordinary pictures of the launch, the first words that neil armstrong uttered when he stepped on the lunar surface, why do they still, because they do, don't they, send a chill through you, even now? absolutely, because it wasn'tjust an american achievement, but a human achievement. when i give talks in behalf of nasa, i say this is not only the greatest technical achievement, but collaboration achievement, but collaboration achievement, and people still limit to this day. i still get chills, and i was not even alive for that! we we re i was not even alive for that! we were talking about the school groups that come here, all the children. i bet you are asked many times today, how can i become an astronaut and go to the moon? is it achievable?m how can i become an astronaut and go to the moon? is it achievable? it is absolutely achievable. follow what you love. if your lover science and
11:28 am
engineering, pursue those. to become a nasa astronaut, you would have to be really good at one of the scientific or engineering disciplines, but you also need a thirst for knowledge, you want to explore things. i always tell students, if you love to learn, nasser might have a spot for you. what about you ? nasser might have a spot for you. what about you? is this on your agenda? do you want to go to the moon one day? i want to go to the moon, mars, i want to see it all. i wa nt moon, mars, i want to see it all. i want to help the next is taking that step to achieve their goal. what was interesting back in 1969 was the fa ct interesting back in 1969 was the fact that nasser saw the astronauts, they went on that world tour afterwards, so they could feel like it was close to them, but nasa made a point of emphasising the support tea m a point of emphasising the support team as well, and all those jobs people to get involved in. exactly. there is a saying that if in rocket science you get 99.9%, you get an f grade. you fail. so all these
11:29 am
people, in a small way, contributed to the apollo programme, but added altogether, it made the programme a success. altogether, it made the programme a success. everyone's individual achievements were definitely appreciated. thank you, jason, who is a nasa ambassador. it is 50 years today since the launch. we still have the rest of the week to look forward to with the anniversary on saturday of the day, 50 years ago, that man walked on the moon, and they are looking forward to it so much here in leicester. thank you very much. and at 17:30 today, you can put your questions to dr helen sharman, the first british astronaut in space. helen made history in may 1991, when she became the first british astronaut, after answering a radio advert searching for people to send to space. she spent eight days orbiting the earth, living and working on the mir space station. she was the first woman on the mir space station as well. if you have a question for helen, send it in via text on 61124, tweet using the hashtag #bbcaskthis, or email askthis@bbc.co.uk. now, if you have been celebrating england's success
11:30 am
in the cricket world cup, then spare a thought for new zealand who have lost out on another accolade this week. a road in wales has stolen the title of the world's steepest street from previous record holders in the new zealand city of dunedin. guiness world records announced the winner as ffordd pen llech in the town of harlech. the street in wales has a gradient of 37.5% at its steepest point, compared with baldwin's street's mere 35%. you could say that they had been u nfa i rly you could say that they had been unfairly holding the title for a long time before the street in wales was measured. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. for many of us, it is bright and sunny out there at the moment and it will be another warm day. there is some cloud across northern parts, particularly at the manchester area
11:31 am
and into scotland. that will gradually break up, the best of the sunshine as to the south, keeping it until the afternoon. the chance of isolated showers for wales and eastern england later on, still the potential for showers in scotland and northern ireland, could be on the sharp side. through this evening and into tonight, still a few showers across central areas, it will thicken up across scotland and northern ireland bringing showery outbreaks of rain for wednesday morning, overnight temperatures getting to 13 or 15 degrees. 0n wednesday, still outbreaks of rain for scotland and northern england. sunnier down towards the south—east, the highest at 25 celsius.
11:32 am
hello, this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines: the number of people in scotland dying from taking drugs hasjumped by a quarter — giving scotland a higher drugs death rate than the united states and any other eu country. four american congresswomen attacked by president trump say he's using racism to distract from his failing policies. he is launching a blatantly racist attack on four duly elected members of the united states house of representatives, all of whom are women of colour. this is the agenda of white nationalists.
11:33 am
some people think it's controversial. a lot of people love it, by the way. the woman nominated to head the european commission says she'd be willing to extend the brexit deadline. i stand ready for further extension of the withdrawal date, should more time be required for a good reason. facebook launches a new tool to target scammers and encourage the reporting of fake adverts. and coming up: the ground breaking surgery to separate conjoined twin girls — we hear from two of the doctors involved. sport now — and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here'sjohn. good morning. whilst england continue to bask in their first cricket world cup win, the head coach of new zealand says the trophy should be shared if the tournament is decided by such fine margins in the future. sunday's final against england finished level after 50 overs
11:34 am
and in the subsequent super over — with england winning by virtue of scoring more boundaries on the day. gary stead says that when games are played over a seven—week period, and can't be separated on the final day — then perhaps a draw is the fairest result. as for england — their focus is already on the ashes, and a summer of double success. the five match test series against australia starts at edgbaston on 1 august, and they believe their first men's world cup win can be a springboard for further success. i literally can't wait for the ashes but we also now the aussies are going to be a tough test after losing the semifinal. the guys really are looking forward to it. six weeks to go, six test matches, we pop. england are one the verge of a place in the semi—finals of the netball world cup. they emphatically beat jamaica
11:35 am
in liverpool yesterday, in what was their first real test of the tournament. they'll guarantee a semi—final spot if they beat trinidad and tobago on wednesday. scotland and northern ireland both lost, and will now struggle to make it through to the latter stages of the tournament. and the big sporting events are coming thick and fast — with the open championship at royal portrush starting on thursday. it's a home tournament for rory mcilroy, who broke the course record there aged just 16. he plays his opening two rounds with the new us open champion gary woodland and england's paul casey. it's the first time royal portrush has hosted the open since 1951, and the opening shot will be hit by another northern irishman — darren clarke. the political climate until recently, there were never going to come here. ithink recently, there were never going to come here. i think from recently, there were never going to come here. ithink from how recently, there were never going to come here. i think from how far we have moved on from the good friday agreement, they weren't going to bring a tournament this big when we had those troubles going on. to see
11:36 am
them being as brave as they have been to bring up here has been wonderful. the arsenal captain laurent koscienly is "very hurt" by his row with the club — that's according to his friend and former team—mate 0livier giroud. koscielny‘s refused to travel on arsenal's pre—season tour of the united states after his request for a free transfer was refused. the 33—year—old has been criticised by fans and is facing disciplinary action from the club. he is very hurt by what is happening and he is an emotional person. i hope that both sides will find the best agreement. i note that the club gave him the opportunity to play at arsenal, it was a big opportunity for him to show his quality in the premier league. i think he has a lwa ys premier league. i think he has always been grateful about that. and respectful to the club. i don't
11:37 am
understand how we are getting to this situation and i feel very sad for him because he is a great person. the media wants to give him a bad image, i'm pretty sure that we don't know everything in this situation. you can read plenty more about potential comings and goings on the bbc sport website today. potential signing for west ham, £45 million. that is all from me, plenty more to come later on. from today, victims of online scams will be able to access help and support, through a new service being launched by citizen's advice. facebook is also introducing a new reporting tool, to make it easier to identify and remove fake adverts. graham satchell reports.
11:38 am
sharon is just one victim of a massive and growing fried. she saw a post on facebook, fronted by the bbc‘s carol kirkwood, advertising a new way to lose weight. i wouldn't normally have bought diet pills off the internet, but because it was dear carol, why would i not believe her? yes, you trust her. yes. sharon says she is embarrassed to have fallen for the scam, but she is also angry with facebook. it's false advertising, and i feel, much like with a newspaper, they would have a say in whether your advert was ok to be posted, and i just feel that facebook should take that into account and do the same. this is utter garbage. we first reported the fake ad featuring carol last month. i think facebook need to take more responsibility for items and adverts that are appearing on their platform. if people are allowed to put any old trash out, it has got to be monitored somewhere
11:39 am
along the line. so what is being done? today, facebook are launching a new reporting tool. if you think an ad is a scam, you can press the icon. a dedicated team at facebook will investigate the ad and take it down. our responsibility as a platform is to ensure that we're doing our very, very best to enforce the removal and the reduction and the eradication of this scam activity. you say you are doing your best to take them down. they are still there. they are there every single day. people are being defrauded, people are losing money, people's lives are being ruined every single day, and in the end, it is your responsibility. we will never give up if we think there are more things we can do, and the reason we can never give up is that these fraudsters and criminals, they don't quit either.
11:40 am
as well as the new reporting tool, facebook have given £3 million to citizens advice for a new online scam service. they are doing it because they were sued for defamation earlier this year by martin lewis. his face has been used on thousands of get—rich—quick scams. martin has welcomed today's news, but says, in the end, social media giants will have to be regulated not as platforms but as publishers. until we have government taking responsibility and starting to point the finger and give real laws on the social media company and the online advertising giants, well, then we're still unprotected, and it shouldn't have taken me to sue facebook to get the actions we're having today. someone in power in politics should have been doing this far before that. the government is looking at the regulation of social media sites, but despite today's changes, there will be many more like sharon who will lose money, because the scale of online fraud is enormous. facebook told us they removed 1.8 billion pieces of scam content globally in the first three months of this year.
11:41 am
two years ago, conjoined twins safa and marwa were born in northern pakistan. they were joined at the head — a condition which occurs just once in every 2.5 million births. now, british surgeons have successfully separated the twins over the course of three major operations, lasting more than 50 hours. this morning, bbc breakfast spoke to two of those involved — paediatric neurosurgeon 0wase jeelani and professor david dunaway, who is a plastic and reconstructive surgeon. these are extremely rare cases. at great 0rmond street, we have previously successfully separated two such sets. so we had the experience to deal with these cases, there are only a few hospitals around the world with this track record. we were asked for help when the girls were three months of age, a neurosurgeon from peshawar called me and wanted us to take over the care. that is what we do at great 0rmond street, so we did it.
11:42 am
obviously, you guys and the others who are working on this are extremely skilful, you know yourjob inside out. and yet, you are taking part in a series of operations which are so high—tech, so difficult to get right. there must have been a sense of being involved in something which, as we are seeing now, the eyes of the world are on this. so interested to see what goes on and whether it is successful or not. yes. i think, from our point of view, it is really great that we can show the skills of great 0rmond street hospital and the teams that we work with. really showcase british medicine at its best. and i think this is something that we really do well in this country. working in a team, in a fashion that allows us to undertake these omplex operations, relying on the skills of nurses, surgeons, clinicians, the scientists and engineers that help plan this in such an effective way. what really comes through is
11:43 am
the size of the team. also, in watching these sort of films, there is a series of them coming this week and we will show them throughout the week on bbc breakfast as well, it is the fact that you particularly have become quite emotionally engaged in this story, the life of these two young children. is that something you thought would happen? did that develop over the course of the work? it happened over the course of the work. perhaps for this particular set, i was emotionally a little too involved. it was just the circumstances of when they were referred, what we had to go through to raise the funding and bringing them across. so by the time they arrived, we were already very invested in this family and these girls. and the journey, whilst they have been with us, it has not been straightforward. the whole experience, you know, the whole experience was very intense.
11:44 am
you can find out more about this amazing surgery by visiting the bbc news website, or staying right here on the bbc news channel for the second part of the twin's story on the news at five. former political party britain first has been fined more than £40,000 by the electoral commission for "multiple breaches of the law". it was ordered to pay £44,200 in total for not keeping accurate financial records, failing to declare donations and not having its accounts audited properly. food banks in the uk say they expect their busiest summer ever as they struggle to deal with ever—increasing demand. the trussell trust, which runs a network of food banks, says demand soared by 20% last summer. it's expecting a similar increase this year when the school holidays start. andy moore reports. morecambe bay food bank — just one of the centres that delivered 1.6 million food parcels across the country last year. they are gearing up for their busiest time of year,
11:45 am
the summer school holidays, when they prepare lots of food parcels especially for children. during the school terms, the children are actually getting the school meal during the day at school. so obviously during school holidays, there isn't the provision for the extra meals, and that puts an extra strain on the families. extra money needed for childcare can also put pressure on poorerfamilies during the holidays. the trussell trust is launching an appeal for funds and food donations. it is also calling for changes to policy. the main issue that we see, which we're calling for a change with, is the five—week wait that people have to endure until they get their first universal credit payments. it's big, structural measures that the government needs to address in order to put an end to this crisis. the government says families on universal credit can get advance payments from day one
11:46 am
so no—one has to wait. it also says 95% of claimants are paid in full and on time. andy moore, bbc news. in a moment, we'll have all the business news. but first, the headlines on bbc news: the number of people in scotland dying from taking drugs hasjumped by a quarter — giving scotland a higher drugs death rate than the united states and any other eu country. four american congresswomen attacked by president trump say he's using racism to distract from his failing policies. the woman nominated to head the european commission says she'd be willing to extend the brexit deadline this is the business news. average wages grew more strongly in the year to may — seeing the highest rate of growth since 2008. employers are having to pay staff more to attract or hang on to skills and experience amid a tightening labour market.
11:47 am
the figures come despite economic uncertainty around brexit. the european low cost airline, ryanair, says growth in passenger numbers will slow next year because of delays to the boeing 737 max aircraft after two fatal accidents. meanwhile pictures have emerged on twitter of a ryanair 737 max which suggest the aircraft might be rebranded. the images show its name has been replaced by 737—8200. the man in charge of improving uk railways says a " fat controller" type figure, independent from government, should be in charge of day—to—day operations. the former boss of british airways, keith williams, said governments should be in charge of policy and budget decisions, but not manage the system. let's get more on those jobs figures that show a rise in earnings, and the overall unemployment rate holding steady.
11:48 am
here's what the figures show: earnings — excluding bonuses, rising at their fastest pace in more than a decade in the three months to may, rising by 3.6%. the overally unemployment rate held steady, as expected, at 3.8%. that's its joint—lowest since january 1975. the number of people out of work fell by 51,000 to just under 1.3 million. some economists say firms are still hiring, despite uncertainty, because they can more easily lay off workers later, rather than making longer—term commitments to investment. tej parikh is chief economist for the institute of directors. the challenge and a tightening labour market, firms are having to pay more to keep more of their staff, aren't they? that is right.
11:49 am
at the moment we are seeing high competition for workers, meaning that businesses up and down the country need to compete by increasing their wages. however, what we are seeing at the moment is we would expect wages to be further higher given the tightness in the labour market. we know that smaller businesses are finding it critically harder to increase their margins to increase wages because of high cost and productivity challenges. firms still seem quite keen to hire, some suggest that it is because hiring workers is easy, you can take them on and find them more easy, it is easier than investing a lot of plants, machines, factories and things. is that fair? over the last ten years, since the financial crisis, there has been a lot of uncertainty for businesses and it has been increasingly hard to make
11:50 am
decisions around machinery and technology. therefore, more businesses have tapped into a very flexible labour market we have to hire workers to increase their output. the community needs certainty and progress on brexit, but they also need support to help them invest and put the decisions over the line as well. that will have the added bonus of raising the productivity of their forums, allowing them to push their wages even higher. what does that mean from a response from the bank of england? from a response from the bank of england ? they from a response from the bank of england? they figure if we have more money in our pocket, we will go out and spend more. increases in wages are precursors to higher wage levels down the line because it means people go out onto the high street and spent more. however, we have heard recent communications from the bank of england that they are pretty much on a holding pattern with
11:51 am
interest rates given uncertainty around brexit. even if there is a no—deal outcome, that is a high chance they might actually lower interest rates in that situation. thank you forjoining us. in other business news: the world's largest education publisher has taken the first step towards phasing out print books by making all its learning resources "digital first". pearson said students would only be able to rent physical textbooks from now on, and they would be updated much less frequently. the british firm hopes the move will make more students buy its e—textbooks which are updated continually. facebook‘s planned libra cryptocurrency is facing further opposition — with the us treasury secretary warnung about its potential criminal use. steven mnuchin told a press conference it could be used by "money launderers and terrorist financiers" and said it was a national security issue. he was "not comfortable" about libra, joining president donald trump and the us central bank in voicing concern.
11:52 am
ag barr, owner of irn—bru, saw its share price dive by 24% after a profits warning. the company says trading in the first five months of its financial year had been below expectations — with profits coming in 10% below last year. let's show you what that has done to the current share price, still hovering about 24% lower. concern about profits but it really does show you how nervous investors are. let me what how it has done to the wider market. these are the numbers as they stand. you are up—to—date, we will see you later. rose brown was 12 when she was hit by a drink driver who mounted the pavement,
11:53 am
driving into a group of walkers. two others died in the accident and rose lost her ability to speak. now aged 21, she's studying drama at the national star college in cheltenham, which has teamed up with rada, the royal academy of dramatic art, to create a bespoke digital voice to transform her ability to communicate. iam i am rose brown, i got a iam rose brown, i gota brain injury when i was 12 after a hit and run accident. i cannot walk and talk, i talked through a computer. roseis talk, i talked through a computer. rose is a drama student at the national star college which provides specialist education support and residential services to young people with complex disabilities. the
11:54 am
couege with complex disabilities. the college has teamed up with the royal academy of dramatic art and they have been creating a bespoke digital voice to transform rose's ability to communicate. graduate, tash, has been chosen to create a new voice for rose. they are about to meet for the first time. hello, i'm tash, so lovely to meet you. now tash can start the task of recording her voice. everyone deserves the right to speak, everyone deserves a voice. to be able to give that to somebody isjust amazing. to be able to give that to somebody is just amazing. tash to be able to give that to somebody isjust amazing. tash has finished recording her voice are now all the sound bites will be sent to america, to one of many companies headed by tim banal. those recordings you have made, we will take each of the 1600 sentences and we will label them
11:55 am
with really detailed descriptions of the speech so we will label every vowel and consonant. now the voice needs to be created and all rose can do is wait. we are back at the college, rose's voice has been developed and we are about to hear it for the very first time. ready? here we go. what do you think? that your voice! is that what you wanted? it's got such a good cockney accent as well. amazing. i can see you on eastenders next. rose's grandmother and aunts have travelled to be here as rose unveiled her new voice.
11:56 am
hello, my name is rose. it sounds cheeky, just like you. i think she's happy. as voice technology improves, hopefully, more people can take part so in the future, anyone who has lost her voice from a disability can also benefit. a video has emerged of six rafters plunging over a waterfall in the us. the group missed the warning signs at the 0hiopyle state park in pennsylvania. they thankfully only suffered minor injuries, which an offical put down to their life jackets. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. not as horrific in the weather, we have some site in parts of the uk at
11:57 am
the moment. there is a bit more cloud further north in england, wales and scotland. a good deal of sunny spells across the uk, that is at the scene in hitchen in hertfordshire at the moment. for the rest of today, we will keep the sunny spells for most of us. still a bit more cloud over scotland and northern ireland, chance of an isolated showers this afternoon. we could also see a few showers across wales, may be midlands and the east of england. a warm day, maximum temperatures at 24 degrees, 27 in the south—east. through the evening we will keep the clear skies, one or two showers. a full moon tonight but also a partial lunar eclipse, about 65% of the moon being covered there, happening around 10:30pm this evening, look to the south—east low
11:58 am
on the horizon. plenty of clear skies for many of us, but there will be more cloud moving into scotland and northern ireland, overnight temperatures 11 to 15 degrees. to wednesday, low pressure is moving in from the atlantic bringing an u nsettled from the atlantic bringing an unsettled field. high—pressure holding on down towards the south and east so there will be sunshine. increasing cloud, you strengthening wind moving its way through northern ireland. it's going to feel a bit fresher to the north—west, temperature about 13 to 18 degrees. meanwhile, for england and wales, temperatures still on the high side, 23 to 25 celsius. thursday, like low pressure is that they are, the weather fronts will push the way eastwards so thursday may well start of cloudy, some outbreaks of showery rain which will tend to clear away to the east for england and wales to
11:59 am
give us some franchise. scotland and northern ireland however, there will be some shells which could turn heavy iron thundery. a thresher feel, particularly with each fairly strong wind in the north and west. 0n strong wind in the north and west. on friday, some showery updates can be heavy and even fun day.
12:00 pm
you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's midday and these are the main stories this morning. the number of people in scotland dying from taking drugs has jumped by a quarter, giving scotland a higher drugs death rate than the united states and any other eu country. four american congresswomen attacked by president trump say he's using racism to distract from his failing policies. he is launching a blatantly racist attack on four duly elected members of the united states house of representatives, all of whom are women of colour. this is the agenda of white nationalists. some people think it's controversial. a lot of people love it by the way. the nominee to be the next president
12:01 pm
of the european commission says she'd be willing to extend the brexit deadline. i stand ready for further extension of the withdrawal date should more time be required for a good reason. facebook launches a new tool to target scammers and encourage the reporting of fake adverts. that's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind. the words of neil armstrong as he took his first steps on the moon, the mission launched 50 years ago today. and i'm at the national space centre in leicester as we will look back at that extraordinary moment in history, but also explore the huge and little known british contribution to the apollo 11 mission.
12:02 pm
good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the number of people who've died in scotland because of drug use has risen to over 1,000 in a year, for the first time, according to new official figures. it means the country's drug death rate is now nearly three times that of the uk as a whole, and is higher than that reported for any other eu country and the united states. 1,187 drug deaths were recorded in scotland last year. that's a 27% increase on the year before, according to the national records of scotland. it marks the largest number of drug deaths ever recorded in scotland. james shaw has this report. when i think of all the drugs i've taken over the years, there's no crying left. i've run out of tears. an open mic event for drug users in dundee. sylvia fox started taking
12:03 pm
drugs at the age of 14. now she only uses the heroin substitute methadone, and recognises that her addiction caused a lifetime of risk—taking. once, i was found in the street, just in the middle of the road. i must‘ve just been walking and collapsed. and the other time i was in the house and i had again injected, i think it was morphine at that stage, and i had 0d‘d. last year, dundee had the highest rate of drug deaths, but the problem affects all scotland's major cities. in areas like this piece of waste ground in the centre of glasgow, the chaotic nature of drug use does start to become apparent. the boss of one organisation which supports drug users is a former deputy chief constable, and now wants some decriminalisation. enabling some of the things that at the moment we cannot do around drug testing, around indeed treatment centres, and the like, would be sensible, progressive measures that
12:04 pm
would enable us to have a more effective approach to drug harms than we are currently able to do under the current framework. that may be a controversial view, but demands for change are likely to become harder to ignore. we can talk to james now in glasgow. these figures really are shocking. what has been the reaction to them? well, it has been, i think, some recognition that we knew that some scale of figures like this was going to come, but the fact that it is just as high as it is, way over 1000, really has surprised and disturbed people. ithink 1000, really has surprised and disturbed people. i think there was the expectation it would be more than 1000. that is the first time that has ever happened in terms of drug—related deaths in scotland, but the fact it is 1187, nearly 1200,
12:05 pm
has really surprised people, and i think it has made some people realise that, as the scottish government says, this is an emergency, it's a crisis, action needs to be taken, but i guess the question really is, what can be done to solve a problem which is so deep—seated and so complicated? to solve a problem which is so deep-seated and so complicated? and what are the factors behind the increase that are being identified? it is obviously a complicated picture, but what particularly is being looked at? one of the most significant things is the fact that older people now form a very large proportion of those dying of drug related deaths in scotland. 0ne third are over 45. so we are talking about people who may have been taking drugs for 30 years or maybe even more than that, back into the 19805, even more than that, back into the 1980s, when they were young, when they were teenagers, what some people call the train spotting
12:06 pm
generation because of that film about heroin users in edinburgh in the 1980s. that seems to be significant. we are talking about people who may have had their health we by years of taking drugs, so it is the cumulative effect of all those years of ill—health and drug—taking, and the other thing is that there are a new drugs coming into the system, coming onto the market here, so—called benzos, including one called itazolam, which, when taken in combination with drugs people are already using, could have complicated side—effects. so it is a difficult picture for the authorities to address and try to deal with. thank you very much, james. the leading candidate to be the next european commission president says she "stands ready" to further extend britain's withdrawal from the eu "if there is a good reason". the european parliament votes later today on the nomination of ursula von der leyen for the job of president of the european commission. meps will take part in a secret
12:07 pm
ballot, and ms von der leyen will need an absolute majority. damian grammaticas is in strasbourg and has this update. when ms von der leyen was making her pitch earlier, she mentioned brexit, and said this would be the decision of the uk, but she respected it but regretted it. at that point, there we re regretted it. at that point, there were cheers from the brexit party meps. she went on to talk about the current withdrawal agreement and her views on an extension. there were cheers at that point from the meps, the pro—european bloc in the centre, when she was talking about the possibility of extending. this is what she said. the withdrawal agreement concluded with the government of the united kingdom provides certainty where brexit
12:08 pm
created uncertainty. in preserving the rights of citizens and in preserving peace and stability on the island of ireland, these two priorities are mine too. however, i stand ready for further extension of the withdrawal date should more time be required for a good reason. applause in any case, the united kingdom will remain our ally, in any case, the united kingdom will remain ourally, our in any case, the united kingdom will remain our ally, our partner, and our friend. applause do what she didn't mention was that backstop issue that norman smith was just talking about. i think you can take from what she said about ireland that the eu is absolutely sticking to its guns, she is sticking to that eu position that there has to be that backstop or
12:09 pm
something similar in the deal. she also then laid out a broad swathe of her priorities if she is in charge of the european commission, things like greater ambition and climate change, efforts across the eu for things like a minimum wage and unemployment reinsurance scheme, a carbon border tax on all of those, things that drew a pretty sharp response from the brexit party leader nigel farage. this is what he had to say after he heard her speak. i come back to a place that has been humbled and humiliated. the european council stitch up has rendered this place important till today, when you have some real power if you choose to use it. what you have seen from ursula von der leyen today is an attempt for the european union to ta ke attempt for the european union to take control of every single aspect of our lives. she wants to build a centralised, undemocratic, updated form of communism that will render
12:10 pm
nation state parliaments... where the state controls everything... where nation state parliaments... where nation state parliaments... where nation state parliaments... where nation state parliaments will cease to have any relevance at all. i have to say, from our perspective, in some ways, i am really rather pleased, because you have just made brexit a lot more popular in the united kingdom. thank god we are leaving! ms von der leyen had just said that she wants to give the european parliament more powers to initiate legislation. now, hervote will parliament more powers to initiate legislation. now, her vote will be later today at the end of the day, and it is not yet clear whether she has enough votes in the chamber to be asked. back to you. damian grammaticas in strasbourg. let's go to norman smith in westminster.
12:11 pm
both conservative leadership candidates have confirmed they believe that the so—called irish backstop will need to be removed from any future deal with the eu. they were speaking during a leadership debate organised by the sun newspaper. any such move would mean ruling out a fundamental part of theresa may's deal that would keep the uk closely aligned to eu customs rules, so that the border between ireland and northern ireland could remain open with a frictionless border in the absence of an all encompassing deal. let's go to our assistant political editor. norman, they are saying something thatis norman, they are saying something that is not going to go down well in strasbourg, and we were just hearing there from potentially the new european commission president talking about something that will not go down well here. how do you draw these strands together?” not go down well here. how do you draw these strands together? i think the truth is, both the tory leadership contenders have given an almighty great shock to the prospect of no deal. many people thought some sort of tweaks on the backstop could have possibly provided some sort of mechanism to reach an agreement. indeed, some leading tory brexiteers
12:12 pm
had suggested that if the eu would agree to a deadline, and end date for the backstop, that could have been sold to parliament, and the eu might have even been prepared to concede it. that is now off the table, which has led some of the tory remainer to suggest that every timea tory remainer to suggest that every time a compromise is mooted, the tory leadership contenders keep knocking them down, pushing as ever closer towards no deal. this was dominic grieve this morning. the moment you solve one question they will put up another obstacle. ina funny they will put up another obstacle. in a funny way, boris johnson has absolutely confirmed this in yesterday's debate. when challenged and confronted, he radicalised even further and excluded any possibility of trying to negotiate some way out of trying to negotiate some way out of the backstop at all. it had to go in its totality. and for good measure, both men also ruled out another idea which has been mooted, of trying to create some sort of mechanism which would enable the uk
12:13 pm
to quit the backstop of its own accord. so it seems as if both men have in effect consigned the backstop and therefore mrs may's deal to the dustbin, which means when they take over, they will have at the most three months, until 0ctober at the most three months, until october the 31st, to try to come up with some new agreements, when there is no sign that the eu is prepared or willing to start all over again and try and broker a new deal. it is possible this is also some sort of bluff to try to crank up the pressure on the eu in the hope that eu leaders will blink at the last moment and agree to some totally new deal, but if they have miscalculated here, then it is very hard to see how both men can now agree to anything remotely like the backstop, whichjust anything remotely like the backstop, which just seems to increase the prospect of leaving with no deal. thank you very much, norman. more on today's main stories coming
12:14 pm
up more on today's main stories coming up on more on today's main stories coming up on newsroom more on today's main stories coming up on newsroom live on the bbc news channel. anti—as well online. for now, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. see you soon, goodbye. the four democratic congresswomen told by president trump to go back where they came from have held a joint news conference to hit back at his comments. representatives alexandria 0casio—cortez, ilhan 0mar, ayanna pressley and rashida tlaib, said he was using racism to deflect attention from his failing policies — and urged americans "not to take the bait". here's our washington correspondent david willis. the president of the united states... facing accusations of racism and xenophobia, president trump is not backing down. spelling out his message in capital letters, let anyone be in any doubt, and going on to attack the democrats for closing ranks around the four women.
12:15 pm
"the dems were trying to distance themselves from the four progressives," he wrote, "but now they are forced "to embrace them. "that means they are endorsing socialism, hate of israel and the usa." minutes later, at a joint news conference, the congresswomen — three of whom were born in the usa — hit back. he's launching a blatantly racist attack on four duly elected members of the united states house of representatives, all of whom are women of colour. this is the agenda of white nationalists. some people think it's controversial. a lot of people love it, by the way. downing street has called the president's language completely unacceptable. but while some republican lawmakers have been critical, the silence from senior party members has been deafening. the question now for more moderate republicans going into next year's presidential election is what constitutes a crossing of the line.
12:16 pm
an update on our headlines. the number of people in scotland dying from taking drugs has jumped by a quarter, giving scotland a higher drugs death rate than the united states and any other eu country. four american congresswomen attacked by president trump say he's using racism to distract from his failing policies. the nominee to be the next president of the european commission says she'd be willing to extend the brexit deadline. sport now, here'sjohn watson. good afternoon. while england continue to bask in their first cricket world cup win, the head coach of new zealand says the trophy should be shared of the tournament is decided by such fine margins in the future. sunday's final finished level after 50 overs and in the
12:17 pm
subsequent super over, with england winning by the virtue of scoring more boundaries on the day. the manager says when games are played every seven—week period and cannot be separated in the final day, perhaps a draw is the fairest result. as for england, their focus result. as for england, theirfocus is already on the ashes and a summer of double success. the five match test series against australia starts at edgbaston on org the first, and they believe their first men's world cup win could be a springboard for success. i can't wait, i literally can't wait for the ashes. but we also know that the australians will be reeling from losing their semifinal, so we know we will have a tough test, and the guys are really, really looking forward to it, yeah. six weeks to go, six test matches and off we pop. england are on the verge of a place in the semifinals of the netball world cup. they emphatically beach a maker in liverpool yesterday in their first real test of the tournament. they will guarantee a semifinal spot if they beat trinidad
12:18 pm
and tobago on wednesday. scotland and tobago on wednesday. scotland and northern ireland both lost and will struggle to make it to the latter stages of the tournament. less tha n latter stages of the tournament. less than a month now until the new premier league season. loads of sites out on pre—season tours, and the manchester united manager all gunnar saw skier has dismissed tra nsfer gunnar saw skier has dismissed transfer rumours about his two biggest stars. united are in australia at the moment. both paul parker and romo lulu calc you are pa rt parker and romo lulu calc you are part of the touring squad, despite being heavily linked to moves to real madrid and inter milan respectively. he says he cannot wait for the season to start so the speculation ends. you know, the day we start the league, i'm sure everyone here will give absolutely everything for manchester united. we are going to have a strong team with players who wa nt to have a strong team with players who want to give everything, and there are always rumours, speculation about man united players, but when the league starts, we batten the
12:19 pm
hatches down and we will stick together as a team. not long to go. plenty more on the bbc sport website this afternoon. find out more on all of those stories, at the usual address. i will be back with your next update at around i will be back with your next update ataround 1:30pm. i will be back with your next update at around 1:30pm. see you then. see you then, thanks. ryanair has said it will be forced to cut the number of summer flights it operates next year blaming further expected delays before the boeing 737 max is allowed to fly again. the airline was due to recieve delivery of 58 of the planes before next summer, but now expects to receive just over half of those. the boeing 737 max has been grounded since problems with its software were linked to crashes in indonesia and ethiopia. at least four people have been killed and dozens more are trapped in the rubble of a four—storey building which has collapsed in india. it happened in the country's financial capital of mumbai. it's the second time a building has collasped in less than 10 days there and follows torrential rains in the city. at least three million people have
12:20 pm
been displaced across north and north—eastern india as the monsoon takes lives and destroys homes. storms and floods have ripped through areas of nepal, bangladesh and india, killing more than 130 people. gareth barlow reports. southern asia underwater as the annual monsoon unleashes a deluge of rain. more than 100 people have been killed. with homes inundated and travel disrupted, more bad weather is on the way. translation: for four days there have been floods. we did not get any relief or tarpaulin sheets. we are drinking water from the river. we asked the government to give us relief materials so that we will survive. all of us are staying on this embankment with goats and cattle. across the region, millions have been displaced. in bangladesh, 18 people killed by lightning.
12:21 pm
in nepal, at least 67 killed by torrential rain. in india, more than 1,800 villages swamped in one state alone. translation: the river is flowing above the danger level. every hour it is increasing two to three centimetres and there is a possibility of the water level rising further. the monsoon season lasts until september, meaning more rain and storms, more death and devastation. "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind". the immortal words of neil armstrong as he took his first steps on the moon 50 years ago this week. 0n16thjuly,1969, nasa launched apollo 11, inspiring millions of people who watched the mission unfold on television. further missions landed 10 more men on the moon, up to 1972. so why haven't we been back since, and what plans are there to return? tim muffett has the story.
12:22 pm
the saturn five was the most powerful rocket ever built, and also the tallest. at mission control, the team was ready and waiting. t -15 and counting. thousands of people gathered at kennedy to see them take off. we have recreated the bbc tv studio from where these extraordinary pictures were broadcast live 50 years ago, and this was the moment everyone was waiting for. ten... nine... ignition sequence start. six... five... four...
12:23 pm
three... two... 0ne... zero. all engines running. zero. lift off. we have a left. 32 minutes past the hour, lift off on apollo 11. tower cleared. let's take a closer look at the rocket. it's made up of three stages, and each played a key part in getting astronauts to the moon. the first stage had the most powerful engines. it did the heavy lifting, getting the massive spacecraft off the ground. and this apocalyptic site, as we see it trapped by airborne cameras and high—flying aircraft... here comes first stage separation now, speed about 6000 miles an hour. there is just a big blotch of smoke in the sky over the cape as apollo 11 is on its way. 0nce its way. once the first stage had served its purpose, it separated, falling away into the ocean. from there, the second stage fired, and carried the rocket almost into orbit. the third
12:24 pm
stage finish thejob, rocket almost into orbit. the third stage finish the job, pushing the apollo spacecraft on its way to the moon. for the three astronauts inside, they had safely made it through one of the most dangerous parts of their mission, but they real challenge was yet to come. well, another perfect launch of the kind we have come to expect, and i think it is humbling to remember that the first man on the moon are on their way. anna foster is at the national space centre in leicester. they are marking the anniversary or week. 0ver they are marking the anniversary or week. over to you, anna. another first for you, actually. where we are now is a brand—new exhibition that does not open to the public till tomorrow. this is dedicated to briton's role in the space race, which we don't often think about, but britain had an early flourishing space programme before the war. this was a spacesuit which was designed, and which has never been seen until now, but they put it together as part of this
12:25 pm
exhibition at the national space centre in leicester. 0ne exhibition at the national space centre in leicester. one thing you heard there was it was all about the moment, the race to the moon, but it was also about what we were going to learn from it, the experiments, science and what will come next. you are in charge of communications here and have brought this wonderful globe. tell me about this, because this is originalfrom globe. tell me about this, because this is original from the 60s. talk me through it. yes, this is incredibly special, a bit of a collectors item. some of these ended up collectors item. some of these ended up in the astronauts' homes. this made by a man up in the astronauts' homes. this made bya man in up in the astronauts' homes. this made by a man in cornwall in the 19605 that obsessed about the geography of the moon even before we we nt geography of the moon even before we went there and designed these globes, and so it's really forensic in terms of the detail, the painting of it, and where we landed, as you said, we just scratched the surface. so we went there to prove it could be done, an expedition at all costs to beat the soviet union. but we landed near the equator here. you have the sea of tranquillity here, where apollo 11 landed. we have only
12:26 pm
scratched the surface. the last astronaut there was a scientist, and then we did not go back. so we really, really want to go back. we have evidence of things like water ice. now that is the bit right down at the bottom, the crucial bit to look at next. this is the really interesting bit. we want to go there, we want to put humans there, nasa say, in the next five years. we will have people landing on the south pole would the artemis programme. they think there are resources there, the ability to keep people alive, and we want to understand the science, where it came from and how that helps us understand our own place in the solar system. one thing this globe highlights is the immense craters which buzz aldrin and neil armstrong had to negotiate when they landed on the sea of tranquillity. they had about one minute to feel left when they landed? yes, they were down to they landed? yes, they were down to the last few seconds. neil armstrong cool as a cucumber, but all of mission control were turning blue. he had this boulder field and craters, and he was looking for a safe place to land. luckily, he just
12:27 pm
found it on touchdown, and everything was fine. the anniversary is on saturday. a lot of people excited about that. and also, if we talk to the doctor with us and tara hayden, both from the open university, it looks like you have something in your hand which is unassuming, but this is a piece of the moon, a 1.3 kilos chunk of the moon. this is not a piece, it is the piece, the biggest piece of moon rock in this country, and i am very pleased we are able to share it with your audience, and we are really looking forward to unlocking all the mysteries that the moon holds for us by studying these moon rocks. this came from a meteorite, so how do we know it was from the moon, not something else floating around out there? are very good question that often gets asked, but we are very fortunate in that we have lots of samples collected by the apollo astronauts, so we know what the moon is made up of, and we compare these meteorites that have landed on earth but where once on the moon, they
12:28 pm
show extreme similarities with those rocks collected by the apollo missions, but not quite the same. that is actually the fun bit about studying meteorites, because we don't know where on the moon they might have come from. and that is the thing, because we know so little about it. you are just starting out your career in space geology. would you like to hold? of course! i adore this rock. i get excited every time i hold this rock. it is amazing. i feel so privileged to be part of this community. tell us what you are hoping to learn from rocks like that. you already have your eye on the skies, and there are meteorites you are looking at? yes, i'm looking at lunar meteorites and trying to look at the water in them. we know a lot about the water in the rocks brought back on the apollo missions, and there was a significant amount of water found in them. we want to know if there was a similar amount in the lunar meteorites, because as we heard, they can come from anywhere on the surface of the moon
12:29 pm
and tell us if the polls are representative of the moon or not. it is really exciting to be part of. thank you to all of you, and it shows you perfectly that even though we have learnt so much about the moon in the last 50 years, there is still an awful lot more out there to discover. thank you very much. at 5:30pm this afternoon, you can put your questions to doctor helen sharman, the first british astronaut in space. helen made history in may 1991, when she got the job after answering a radio advert, and spent eight days orbiting the earth on the mir space station. if you have a question for helen, send it in via text on 61124, tweet using the hashtag #bbcaskthis, or email askthis@bbc.co.uk. now it's time for a look at the weather. high macro, joanna. thank you very much. 50 years on from that launch, there is, believe it or not, a lunar
12:30 pm
eclipse taking place tonight, a partial lunar eclipse, and i think you will have a fighting chance of seeing at around 9:30pm or 10:30pm this evening, and you there should be clear skies ahead for much of this afternoon, plenty of sunshine, plenty of one. 25—26d. showers could break out across the west of the uk, and this evening, some clear spells. some patches of cloud around as well. later in the night, more generally cloudy conditions in northern ireland in western scotland, with outbreaks of rain. increasingly brisk rain here as well. this wet and breezy weather will slide eastwards tomorrow, and they could be lightning and thunder mixed in with that wet weather. but for eastern scotland and southern and eastern england, it should stay predominantly dry. sunshine turning hazy is high cloud streams in. temperatures continuing to dip during thursday. for friday, we could see pretty wet and windy
12:31 pm
weather. shipped hello. this is bbc newsroom live — with joanna gosling. the headlines: the number of people in scotland dying from taking drugs hasjumped by a quarter — giving scotland a higher drugs death rate than the united states and any other eu country. four american congresswomen attacked by president trump say he's using racism to distract from his failing policies. he is launching a blatantly racist attack on four duly elected members of the united states house of representatives, all of whom are women of colour. this is the agenda of white nationalists. some people think it's controversial. a lot of people love it, by the way. the nominee to be the next president of the european commission says she'd be willing to extend the brexit deadline i stand ready for further extension
12:32 pm
of the withdrawal date, should more time be required for a good reason. facebook launches a new tool to target scammers and encourage the reporting of fake adverts. the head of the world health organisation has said the confirmation of an ebola disease victim inside the city of goma in the democratic republic of congo could be a game—changer — requiring a heightened global response. goma is a major trade crossroads and sits right on the border with rwanda. more than 1,600 people have died of the disease in eastern congo in the outbreak that began a year ago. it's now the second biggest outbreak ever. let's talk to tariq riebl, who is from the international rescue committee and is on the ground in goma, democratic
12:33 pm
republic of congo. thank you forjoining us. how concerned are you about this development? we are definitely very concerned. in some ways, this has been inevitable and we have been planning for this for a long time. we were expecting it to arrive in goma much earlier, and the fact it hasn't happened has been a surprising. however, now that it has, everyone is ramping up efforts. the responses from the world health organization and other agencies are working to do with this one case and to make sure that goma as a whole is prepared if there are any other new cases reported. are you confident that the this one case can be contained? it's always difficult to say, it's very early on, the case was detected on a sunday. contact
12:34 pm
tracing is under way, the process by which we list the number of people who might have been in contact with this person. that process in itself ta kes this person. that process in itself takes time. already, there have been vaccinations in goma yesterday, more today, so we are hoping we carry containers. unfortunately, with a case such as this person who has moved over a vast distance, a lot of details only, now in day by day so we don't have a full picture yet. so what is now and then about where the picture who has got a bowler has come from? we know he has come from dry on active zone of transmission to the north of goma. he spent time predominantly in a different city for the past few weeks, were the majority of cases have come from. he
12:35 pm
passed through another city on his way to goma so he was definitely in areas where there is active transmission. we do not know exactly if all the different cases there, who are the way here, we are almost certain of them. as i mentioned, this does take time and everyone is filling all the resources they have to be able to contain any further spread from this one case. once an outbreak takes hold, how difficult is it to contain it? this has already been going on for about a year now. it's extremely difficult to deal with, the security environment, just a big numbers. as i mentioned, there are two cities affected, there are a number of difficult to access rural locations. and thenjust difficult to access rural locations. and then just the amount of resources you need. we have been running at a frantic pace for
12:36 pm
basically one year now, that is tiring for everyone but we are trying to redouble our efforts. this is definitely a challenging situation. in terms of the prognosis for somebody who contracts ebola, what is it like now? how much better is treatment compared to what it used to be, has there been much progress? many of your views will be familiar with the biggest outbreak of ebola in west africa a few years ago. since then there has been a number of significant advancements. we have different treatment methods being used here for patients in ebola treatment centres. most importantly, we have the vaccine that has been used and has been shown to be successful for those people vaccinated in time. it has severely reduced the risk of people facing contamination, it even helps people that are vaccinated in terms of their survival chances. thank you
12:37 pm
for joining of their survival chances. thank you forjoining us. let's return to one of our top stories: today marks 50 years since the apollo 11 mission launched — sending three men 240,000 miles away, on a mission to walk let's return to one of our top stories: on the surface of the moon. our correspondent, jane o'brien, is at cape canaveral in florida — from where apollo 11 blasted off on its way to the moon. they will be retracing the steps no doubt, jane, and remembering the attention they would have been feeling at the start of this mission all the time ago? reporter: right now, 58 years ago, they were actually testing the emergency detection systems. —— 50 yea rs emergency detection systems. —— 50 years ago. we are really getting a sense of the excitement and build—up taking place all those years ago. behind me, we actually have the saturn v rocket similar to the one that actually took the rockets to
12:38 pm
the moon. i have never stayed close toa the moon. i have never stayed close to a rocket in low light before but ta ke to a rocket in low light before but take a look at the scale of this thing, it absolutely massive, bigger than the statue of liberty. when it was fuelled, it weighed 2 million pounds. top speed was miles an hour. when it took off, the astronauts we re when it took off, the astronauts were sitting on that tiny capsule on the end, the bit that said united states. so when you talk about the tension and how vulnerable they must have been feeling, i think that gives you an idea ofjust how vulnerable they actually were when they took off 50 years ago. i'm told they took off 50 years ago. i'm told they actually had steak and eggs for brea kfast, they actually had steak and eggs for breakfast, which is a bit of a fatty meal, i think i would have them indigestion on such a busy day but each man to himself. studio: and the drama when they took
12:39 pm
of on at the moment of landing would have been extraordinary, we obviously know it was a success, but the moment they were preparing to touch down on the moon, they had 60 seconds of feel left— that must have cost a bsolute seconds of feel left— that must have cost absolute angst back at mission hq? reporter: indeed, that is so much about this entire mission that was touch and go. as you say, we now know it was a success. it wasn't a mission and highly supported at the time. don't forget america was in the grips of the cold war with russia. when president kennedy announced the space race, it was a great moment of length for america, the vietnam war was going on, the average family farm was living on just $8,000 a month and a lot of people ask what was the point of sending people to the man, it cost too much, the money could be better spent. it was extraordinary to
12:40 pm
think, given now, that this was an incredible achievement of technology and human endeavour that led to so many technological advances for people, not just in many technological advances for people, notjust in america, but around the world, like the internet, environmental awareness. it is amazing to think that at the time this was being questioned, much like its being questioned today because president trump announced plans to send people back to the men by 2024. it was a nerve—racking achievement, the last mission to get people on the last mission to get people on the moon was in 1970, there has been a huge gap. but i think this moment has been generating fresh excitement foran has been generating fresh excitement for an attempt to get people back to the surface of the men. studio: and that iconic sentence spoken by neil armstrong when he stepped on the menu. even that was not off the cuff, everything had been thought about, everything had been thought about, everything had been carefully planned prepared?
12:41 pm
reporter: those words are actually etched in the glass behind me. but he said that is one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. the shiny thing with the gold to tin foil, non—scientific term is coming from me, that is actually a lunar module that is similar to the one that neil armstrong landed in. look at the tiny size of that, it's incredible to think that something as flimsy as that could actually land on the moon. that was the vehicle from which he took that small step but giant leap for mankind. as you say, everything was planned, perhaps the biggest was that nassar remember to pack the cameras which meant we got all those iconic pictures back here and we can still look at them 50 years later and say my goodness, what an incredible achievement. —— nassar.
12:42 pm
let's return to our top story now — figures out this morning show that scotland had the highest rate of drugs deaths of any country in the eu last year. 1,187 people died — that's nearly triple the rate of the rest of the uk. scotland's public health minister joe fitzpatrick said the country faces an "emergency" — and new approaches are needed to save lives. these are shocking figures and every one of these are a tragedy for the individual, theirfamilies, one of these are a tragedy for the individual, their families, out one of these are a tragedy for the individual, theirfamilies, out of their communities. that is why we are determined to take action, a public health approach to save lives andi public health approach to save lives and i call in the uk government to support us in these actions. why has this happen? why this huge increase? and i like it is absolutely devastating, every single one of these lives that have been lost. i have set up a drug test task force to look at why the numbers are so high and what we can do to turn it
12:43 pm
around. that is my focus, and what we can do to reduce these numbers in the future. it is an emergency and we need to take action. what is the remedy for this emergency?‘ we need to take action. what is the remedy for this emergency? a public health approach where we treat people as human beings, and we look to do everything we can to support them throughout their recovery. right now, there are substantial barriers to a public health approach. one example is the proposalfor approach. one example is the proposal for safer consumption rooms in glasgow, the evidence is clear that it would save lives, that is currently being blocked by the home office and i would really encourage them... if nearly 1200 people is not an emergency, what is? so i think it is time to wake up and take action andi is time to wake up and take action and i call on the uk government to do that. when it comes to things like save consumption spaces, there seems to be traditional opposition that seems to legalise drugs. we be on that kind of criticism?|j
12:44 pm
that seems to legalise drugs. we be on that kind of criticism? i totally understand the discomfort people feel about things like that, consumption rooms and portuguese styles of treating addiction. people are dying, nearly 1200 people, we have to move on and we have to take actions without the evidence has shown that it works and save lives and that is what i have asked the task force to do. from today, victims of online scams will be able to access help and support, through a new service being launched by citizen's advice. facebook is also introducing a new reporting tool, to make it easier to identify and remove fake adverts. graham satchell reports. sharon is just one victim of a massive and growing fried. she saw a post on facebook, fronted by the bbc‘s carol kirkwood, advertising a new way to lose weight. i wouldn't normally have bought diet pills off the internet, but because it was dear carol, why would i not believe her? yes, you trust her? yes!
12:45 pm
sharon says she is embarrassed to have fallen for the scam, but she is also angry with facebook. it's false advertising, and i feel, much like with a newspaper, they would have a say in whether your advert was ok to be posted, and i just feel that facebook should take that into account and do the same. this is utter garbage. we first reported the fake ad featuring carol last month. i think facebook need to take more responsibility for items and adverts that are appearing on their platform. if people are allowed to put any old trash out, it has got to be monitored somewhere along the line. so what is being done? today, facebook are launching a new reporting tool. if you think an ad is a scam, you can press the icon. a dedicated team at facebook will investigate the ad and take it down. our responsibility as a platform is to ensure that we're doing our very, very best to enforce
12:46 pm
the removal and the reduction and the eradication of this scam activity. you say you are doing your best to take them down. they're still there. they're there every single day. people are being defrauded, people are losing money, people's lives are being ruined every single day, and in the end, it is your responsibility. we will never give if we think, there are more things we can do, and the reason we can never give up is that these fraudsters and criminals, they don't quit either. as well as the new reporting tool, facebook are giving £3 million to citizens advice for a new online scam service. they are doing it because they were sued for defamation earlier this year by martin lewis. his face has been used on thousands of get—rich—quick scams. martin has welcomed today's news, but says, in the end, social media giants will have to be regulated not as platforms but as publishers. until we have government taking responsibility and starting to point
12:47 pm
the finger and give real laws on the social media company and the online advertising giants, well, then we're still unprotected, and it shouldn't have taken me to sue facebook to get the actions we're having today. someone in power in politics should have been doing this far before that. the government is looking at the regulation of social media sites, but despite today's changes, there will be many more like sharon who will lose money, because the scale of online fraud is enormous. facebook told us they removed 1.8 billion pieces of scam content globally in the first three months of this year. in a moment, we'll have all the business news. but first, the headlines on bbc news: the number of people in scotland dying from taking drugs hasjumped by a quarter — giving scotland a higher drugs death rate than the united states and any other eu country. four american congresswomen attacked by president trump say he's using racism to distract from his failing policies. the nominee to be the next president
12:48 pm
of the european commission says she'd be willing to extend the brexit deadline president donald trump withdrew the united states from the nuclear deal with iran last year and has imposed ever tightening sanctions designed to force tehran back to the negotiating table. as more iranians are being dragged into poverty, the bbc has been given rare access to iran. our correspondent, martin patience, has been in tehran — looking at the impact of the sanctions on ordinary iranians. while in the country, filming access was controlled — as with all foreign media — the team was accompanied by a government representative at all times. donald trump has called for maximum pressure on iran. they queue this
12:49 pm
charity, one of tehran's poorest neighbourhoods, is getting longer. 100 kids a day are coming for a free lunch. sanctions have caused the price of meat and vegetables to more than double. their parents don't have the money to feed them at home. everyone in a iran has been affected by the american sanctions, but it's the most vulnerable here that have been hardest hit. doctors believe that muhammad suffered from a rare genetic disease. he can't lift his spoon but he is too weak to carry a skill bag. his family cannot afford the medical test that would diagnose his illness, its increased 300%. his mother wants mercy for her sun.
12:50 pm
translation: i took him to the hospital last monday, the neurosurgeon said i have to pay roughly £1000 for my sons genetic test. i ask how i was supposed to pay that money, he said he did it now and i was just lucky. pay that money, he said he did it now and i wasjust lucky. america's strangling iran's economy because it said that tehran is spreading chaos in the region and wants to develop nuclear weapons, accusations that iran denies. people here have adapted to sanctions before but iran's currency is increasingly worthless as the us it took set off from the global community. this mechanic says it real hard to get spare parts from overseas. in the past 12 months, his income has
12:51 pm
halved. translation: we start working on at the college and then they get stuck here. i have to work all dayjust to get by, i cannot afford to take any time. turan feels cornered by america, abandoned by europe. some iranians blamed government corruption for damaging the economy. but in the tightly —controlled media, that is really covered, it the man on the front page who gets the man on the front page who gets the blame. this man says a third of his colleagues have already lost theirjobs. translation: we don't want to fight so translation: we don't want to fight so why does president trump sent his warships to the middle east? does he wa nt to warships to the middle east? does he want to start a war? if there is a war, people will dry and nothing will change and everyone will lose.
12:52 pm
donald trump seems to think that the iranianss' anger but sanctions will put pressure on their leaders to compromise. but the men working here so compromise. but the men working here so that he has actually done the exact opposite, even those opposed to the government are now rallying behind the flag. back at the charity, the kids wash up. iran is resourceful and resilient. but these sanctions are the tough as it ever faced, they were supposed to target the regime but it's the poorest that will sell for the most. and that means the most vulnerable like mohammed will fall victim. the man tasked with working out how to improve britain's railways says a new, largely independent body should be created to oversee the entire network.
12:53 pm
keith williams, the former chief executive of british airways, is due to publish his final recommendations in the autumn. his review follows criticism of the way the franchising model is run. our business correspondent, victoria fritz, was at manchester piccadilly station this morning — finding out what all of this could mean for passengers. i just want to show you these boards. for once, i suppose, for passengers, it looks like all of the trains are on time. wind back the clock a year or so, and those boards were an absolute disaster. this was happening right across the country. we were in the middle of a crisis on britain's railways. everybody was blaming everybody else for theis whole fandango. for this whole fandango. and the government the ordered a review into the entire system. and the government then ordered a review into the entire system. the man in charge of that, keith williams, he is a former ba executive, the chairman now ofjohn lewis, he is in charge of that review. he is going to be outlining some of his thoughts in bradford a little bit later on today.
12:54 pm
he has given the bbc a bit of an exclusive preview of his thoughts so far. we said back in february that franchising it, in its existing format, needs to change. that is the result of a number of things, actually. it is a recognition from the operating companies themselves that franchising wasn't working for them, it wasn't working for them economically, in many cases, or giving them the flexibility to run the railway that they wanted to run. equally, from the dft side, it wasn't giving them a railway that worked for them. so, take both sides together, both sides recognised that franchising needs to change. what we're looking at, and we still have options on the table, is what do we need to change it to? what i would say is that it needs to change to something that will work the passenger. so, that's keith william speaking there. he wants to put passengers very much at the heart of this business, the heart of the future of the railways. will he deliver?
12:55 pm
let's speak to tony miles, from modern railways magazine. we have seen review after review after privatisation. is this one going to be any different, or will it be on the shall for the rest of them? the nervousness is already that the government will find it too difficult and just move everything to the left and slide in the williams review at the end. the challenge for the government is to be bold enough to accept the things keith williams is going to recommend and to implement them, and some of them might be difficult for the government to accept, like having less control directly of the railways. what do you make of all of this? do you think of the railway system should benefit from greater independence from government? because that is his central promise, really, from this review. one of the things they are saying at the moment is actually the government is more controlling of the railways now than it was when they were nationalised and british rail pretty much got on with running the railways. now, if a company here wants to change the time of a train by a couple of minutes, it has to go to the government to ask for
12:56 pm
permission to do it. so freeing up that control and allowing the companies and the rail industry to do the best thing will be a good thing — yes. let's hope so. thank you very much, tony. that is the major challenge, isn't it? keith williams is doing this review, he will be reporting back to the government in september this year. the big question is whether he will also be delivering for customers. what a difference a day makes. is that england was cool today. there isa that england was cool today. there is a lot of sunshine, pretty warm today. for the vast majority of the country, mainly dry and sunny, one or two showers for the western areas, some could be on at the heavy side but most will miss them. temperatures at 21 services in aberdeen, perhaps up to 26 in the
12:57 pm
south—east. tonight sees some dry conditions and are clear spells, good news if you plan to turn your eyes to the skies for a partial lunar eclipse, a 65% eclipse for the men, maxis at about 10:30pm in the evening. into the night, we see thickening cloud and outbreaks of rain starting across northern ireland and scotland by the end of the mind. into tomorrow, we see a frontal system making progress bringing some fairly heavy bursts of rain and brisk winds as well. the further east you are, it will be a fine stuck to the day. high cloud will turn up the sunshine hazy. some rain could be on the heavy side, could be fun that lightning, and brisk winds along the band of rain.
12:58 pm
for the eastern half of england, there will be more cloud, still a bit of warmth, temperatures around 25 degrees. into thursday, that band of rain will progress eastwards, patchy rain into east anglia and a south—east. behind that, some showers, some heavy, possibly thundery. a cooler day for many, still getting up to 23 or 24 to the south—east. into thursday and friday, another frontal system, this one could bring a doze of really wet weather, including in the southern areas. brisk winds as well, staying fairly unsettled as we head into the weekend, though perhaps a little drier as you get to sunday.
12:59 pm
1:00 pm
50 years since the launch of apollo 11, we'll retrace the astronauts' four—dayjourney to the moon. five, four, three, two, one, zero. all engine running. lift off. we have a lift off. the start of a voyage that would redefine humanity's view of space — days later, man first set foot on the moon. 50 years ago the saturn 5 took the command module, the lunar module, three of us to the moon. we landed, explored, got back up again, rendezvoused, came back. we'll relive that historic moment and bring you the start of commemorations on this 50th
1:01 pm
anniversary.

57 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on