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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  July 18, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines: a stark warning about the impact to the uk of a no—deal brexit from the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier. this document is the only way to leave the eu in an orderly manner. and if we just left, if we just tore up the membership card? the uk would have to face the consequences. at least 20 people are reported to have died in a fire arson is suspected. at an animation studio in the japanese city of kyoto. arson is suspected. the brother of the manchester arena bomber will appear in court later for the first time since being flown to the uk from libya. labour sacks baroness hayter as shadow brexit minister
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for comparing jeremy corbyn‘s leadership to the last to the last days of hitler. primary school children are being refused support for mental health issues despite a growing need for help. and coming up in sport — the open is under way in county antrim with one of the home favourites, darren clarke, holding an early lead. good morning and welcome to the bbc news at nine. the official who led the eu's brexit negotiations, michel barnier, has issued a stark warning that the uk would have to face the consequences if it opted to leave with no deal. he also again stressed there could be no re—negotiation of the existing brexit withdrawal agreement. mr barnier was speaking to the bbc‘s panorama programme.
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both contenders to be the next prime minister, boris johnson and jeremy hunt, have declared mrs may's deal dead and have signalled their willingness to leave the eu without an agreement. norman smith, our assistant political editor, is at westminster for us. good morning to you, norman. this is going to make very uncomfortable listening and watching for many people, isn't it? not least of the two leadership contenders, who have said that they can be the person to make a breakthrough, to change things and we negotiate. already there has been a ferocious reaction to some of the supporters, certainly a borisjohnson, to some of the supporters, certainly a boris johnson, accusing to some of the supporters, certainly a borisjohnson, accusing michel barnier of trying to threaten britain. he is pretty dismissive of the suggestions that britain could leave with no deal, something both the leadership contenders have mooted. michel barnier said he is not impressed by that kind of threat and if britain did go down that road, it would be a who suffer the
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economic and financial and human consequences. he is adamant that there will not be any reworking of mrs may's deal. his views is that thatis mrs may's deal. his views is that that is it, it is as good as it will get, and there is no point britain complaining the deal has somehow been foisted upon them, because britain agreed to the deal. this of course at precisely the moment where we know that mr huntjohnson have said mrs may's deal is dead, and in mrjohnson‘s pace, with a bit more determination and ambition and ambition and optimism that he can get a better deal, and mr hunt staying with his skills as a business negotiator, he can get a better deal. michel barnier is saying, in effect, forget it. the deal is the deal and it is not changing. have a listen. this document is so important and i recognise it is not so easy to read. 600 pages. because we have put into this document with the uk, not against the uk, with the uk, the legal answers to each and every
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point of uncertainty created by brexit. that is the point. that is why this document is the only way to leave the eu in an orderly manner. and if we just left, if we just tore up the membership card? the uk would have to face the consequences. indeed. michel barnier says that europeans never really took mrs may's negotiating threat of leaving without a deal seriously. why? because britain never really made any serious preparations for leaving without a deal and, by the way, mrs may never even threatened to leave without a deal. and you get from this programme a sense, frankly, that eu leaders were pretty dismissive, borderline contemptuous, of the british approach to the negotiations. this was frans timmermans, the vice president of the european commission. the first time i saw public
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utterances by david davis, i saw him not coming, not negotiating, grandstanding elsewhere. i thought, "oh, my god. they haven't got a plan." that was really shocking, frankly. then the damage... if you don't have a plan... we see it, that time is running out, you don't have a plan, it's like lance corporaljones. "don't panic, don't panic!" running around like idiots. borisjohnson has dismissed michel barnier‘s comments and jeremy hunt has responded pretty aggressively, saying the eu was putting politics before economics, and that if britain was forced to leave without any sort of agreement then that would backfire. i think the mistake that we have made from the uk's side is we thought in the end the europeans would be rational economically
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and they haven't. they've thought of brexit as a political issue and they have thought about the political future of europe and that has mattered to them. if we had a no—deal brexit, they seem to think at the moment that we would come on our knees, we would come rushing for a deal because of the economic facts of life, but actually no deal for us would also be political. we would have european neighbours that had deliberately chosen to make the uk poorer and that would change and harden british attitudes to europe for a generation and i don't think that's something wiser heads in europe actually want. so tough words from jeremy hunt and tea m so tough words from jeremy hunt and teamjohnson. so tough words from jeremy hunt and team johnson. why does it leave us? frankly, it probably leaves us trundling ever more speedily towards no deal because the upshot of the programme appears to be that the eu are in no mood to rework mrs may's deal and we know that mr hunt and mr
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johnson are not interested in mrs may's deal, which seems to leave the only other viable route, no deal. may's deal, which seems to leave the only other viable route, no deallj just want to ask you about another political story that we mentioned in oui’ political story that we mentioned in our headlines, labour sacking baroness hayter for comparing jeremy corbyn‘s leadership to the last days of hitler. she was talking about a bunker mentality. how problematic is this going to be forjeremy corbyn? a lot of people will be saying that if he took the sort of action against anti—semitism that he has taken against baroness hayter, one of his critics, then labour wouldn't be having so many problems. of his critics, then labour wouldn't be having so many problemslj of his critics, then labour wouldn't be having so many problems. i think thatis be having so many problems. i think that is exactly the point. when you hear this story, at first glance it sounds as if jeremy hear this story, at first glance it sounds as ifjeremy corbyn is cracking down on anti—semitism by sacking baroness hayter, who compared the atmosphere in his office to the bunker in the film the last days of hitler. it sounds like jeremy corbyn is trying to stop that kind of language, which i suppose he
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is. but the person who made those comments has been one of mr corbyn‘s most prominent critics over anti—semitism and baroness hayter is anti—semitism and baroness hayter is a member of labour friends of israel. and she signed that letter demanding an inquiry in the wake of the panorama programme, and paradoxically too many people what this will look like is mr corbyn seeking to take out some of his more prominent critics, and if anything it seems to be more likely to harden the schism in labour ranks over the anti—semitism row and mr corbyn‘s response to it. norman smith, thank you very much for that. and in the next 20 minutes or so, the office for budget responsibility will issue a fiscal risks report, looking at the possible impact and consequences of a no deal brexit. we'll be hearing from the chairman of the obr, robert chote, after 09:30.
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0ur economics correspondent, dharshini david, is here. tell us what we can expect and remind us who the 0br is and how much weight we can give to their forecasting. the office for budget responsibility is an independent body set up by the government about a decade ago to forecast the chances of growth and also public finances. this is their regular stock—take of the nation's finances, what are the challenges coming up, what is our strategy and how healthy are we? it is normally one for the geeks but the focus today is on what they are going to say about the possibility ofa going to say about the possibility of a no—deal brexit, because we haven't had that kind of assessment from them. they are expected to say that the economy is likely to shrink in the event of a no—deal brexit because of the disruption that may occui’ because of the disruption that may occur because of that and other factors around that. and also alongside that that it could be bad news for public finances because more money will be needed to support the economy and also of course we will be getting in less in terms of
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tax revenue, all against the backdrop of the dispute between the chancellor and jacob rees—mogg about whether or not no deal might boost altering our economy in the short term. that will be the focus but there is a lot going on apart from that in the report because they will be looking at longer term trends. we are all getting older and older people cost more to look after and bring in less money in terms of tax. those challenges. that climate change is another thing as well. and also the government's attitude towards fiscal management. what does that mean? you hear borisjohnson and jeremy hunt talking about how they may want to splash the cash if they may want to splash the cash if they become prime minister. it is a check to them that actually this is the reality. for the past ten years oi’ the reality. for the past ten years or $0 the reality. for the past ten years or so we the reality. for the past ten years or so we have had austerity and we have been on a good path in terms of getting burrowing down, but now you wa nt to getting burrowing down, but now you want to make these pledges and plans, and this would be the cost if you do that. thank you very much. that report is coming up at 9:30am.
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at least 20 people are reported to have died in a fire at a famous animation studio in kyoto in western japan. police believe the fire which broke out this morning at a building belonging to the kyoto animation company was started deliberately. 0ur correspondent in japan rupert wingfield—hayes joins me now. what are officials saying that about the latest figures they have in terms of the death toll and do they have any idea why this fire started? the death toll is a little confusing. the figures we have now are seven confirmed dead and i7 showing what the japanese police call no vital signs. what happened injapan is if you have not had a doctor signing a death certificate, they will not officially confirm it asa they will not officially confirm it as a death. that what it looks like very clearly now is 2a people have been killed in this fire so far. that may not be the end of it
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because according to police there are still a number of people unaccounted for. the death toll could go even higher. it appears that when they got into the top floor, the third floor of this building, the last couple of hours and finally put out the fire, they found at least another ten fatalities on the top floor. in terms of causes, the police are saying this was a deliberate act. they have a man in custody, a 41—year—old man, in hospital. they say he deliberately started this. they say he brought a can of petrol and he spread it around the bottom of the building. and certainly they have a suspect in custody. what his motivation might have been is very unclear at the moment. this man is not associated at all, they suspect, with the company and our understanding is that he came from a town near to tokyo appear in eastern japan and nowhere near kyoto. rupert
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wingfield—hayes in japan for us, thank you. the younger brother of the man who bombed the manchester arena is due to appear in court in the next hour. hashem abedi has been charged with murdering the 22 victims of the attack. abedi, who was detained in libya two years ago, was extradited to the uk yesterday. simonjones reports. back in britain — hashem abedi. born in manchester, he is now facing charges relating to the manchester arena bombing. escorted to a south london police station yesterday afternoon after being flown in from libya. this extradition is a very important step in the investigation into the manchester arena attack. this awful terrorist attack took place two years ago. it led to the murder of 22 innocent people, including an eight—year—old girl. my thoughts at this time are with the families and friends of those victims. the bomb was detonated by salman abedi. he was caught on cctv moving the bomb parts
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in the days before the attack. at this time his brother was out of the country, but hashem abedi has been detained on an arrest warrant for the murder of 22 people, the attempted murder of those injured, and conspiracy to cause an explosion. hashem abedi is expected to make his first court appearance here at westminster magistrates court. he will be the first person to be charged over the bombing. it is likely to be a brief hearing before the case is transferred to the crown court. but the lawyer representing the families of some of the victims says the trial must not delay the inquests which are due next year. the inquest should take place as soon as possible, because the families, the bereaved families, should be at the heart of the process, and it shouldn't be derailed for criminal proceedings. but two years after the attack, for the families nevertheless
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an important day in the quest for answers. simon jones, bbc news, westminster magistrates court. let's cross to westminster magistrates court and speak to our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani. i understand that hashem abedi has arrived there this morning. tell us arrived there this morning. tell us a bit more about what the proceedings will be today and about why it has taken so long to get to this point. that is right. he arrived a few minutes ago in a police van brought from southwark police van brought from southwark police station in south london, which is the main detention centre, holding suite, for people charged with terrorism offences. when he gets to court this morning, it is likely to be a fairly swift proceeding. in effect at this stage of any serious trial, the job of the magistrate is to confirm that the person who has been arrested and is being held by police is that there on the charge sheet. the charges will be outlined to hashem abedi in court and it doesn't necessarily have to make any comments in relation to them. if the magistrate
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is satisfied that the charge wa rra nts is satisfied that the charge warrants a full trial before a jury ata warrants a full trial before a jury at a crown court, the magistrate will then authorise the case to be transferred to the old bailey for unwed management. it is only in a couple of weeks' time that we will get a real sense of how long a possible trial of hashem abedi will be and critically the value of that trial, whether it will be here in london at the old bailey or somewhere else in the north west. we are somewhere else in the north west. we a re really somewhere else in the north west. we are really at the early stages these proceedings. it has taken a long time to get here. i think 20 months by my reckoning, quite simply because of the very complex political instability in libya itself. when the crown prosecution service authorised hashem abedi to be charged, and an extradition request went in, at the time, in late 2017, there was a question hanging over who exactly they would be dealing with in terms of the government in libya. the libyan
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government in libya. the libyan government effectively agreed it had to recognise an extradition arrangement with the uk, because thatis arrangement with the uk, because that is what governments tend to do, but after that there was a number of other legal obstacles in the way, not least whether or not hashem abedi was a libyan or british national. these things happen all the time and exhibition arrangements around the world. they take an awful long time to get him into court. this is just the start of the process. i don't expect a great deal to happen this morning. it will be ina to happen this morning. it will be in a couple of weeks that we get a sense of the timescale of the trial. that has critical questions for the future of the inquests which are due to start in the spring of next year. if this trial is to go on longer than that, it may be a case of the inquests being delayed. thank you very much. dominic casciani. the headlines at nine o'clock:
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a stark warning from the eu's chief brexit negotiator that the uk will have to "face the consequences" if it leaves without a deal. at least 2a people are reported to have died in a fire at an animation studio in the japanese city of kyoto — arson is suspected. the brother of the manchester arena bomber has arrived at court — yesterday he was flown to the uk from libya. two of the three local heroes are out on course with rory mcilroy to join them in the next hour in the opening round of ireland's first open championship for 68 years. england confirm their spot in the netball world cup semi finals with a chance to finish in first place in their group group to come tonight. a must win test match for england's women who trail australia in the ashes ahead of today's start in taunton. murano stories a bit later. thank
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you. see you soon. a bbc investigation suggests there's been a significant rise in the number of uk primary school children referred to mental health services over the last three years. the royal college of psychiatrists describes the figures as deeply worrying. our special correspondent, ed thomas, has more. i think it is going to take the death of a child before people start taking it more seriously. i think the government needs to decide whether they want us to be social workers and mental health workers or educators. the bbc has been hearing from schools across the country about the mental health of their pupils. when you have a child in year 4 who is talking about self— harm or talking about suicide, that's shocked a number of staff. regularly talking about suicide, wondering what it would feel like, and having those conversations quite regularly. freedom of information responses from 46 health trusts across the uk indicate the number of referrals
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made to child mental health services by primary schools for those aged 11 and under increased by nearly 50% over the last three years. some headteachers say securing support for pupils can be a challenge. external resources are reducing rapidly because of financial constraints. cams was the urgency needed. it has taken two years and we are still waiting for an assessment for a child who has experienced extreme mental health distress. primary schools can't solve everything. we need help. the department for education said it was determined to improve mental health services, and by 2024, 345,000 more children and young people will have access to specialist care. ed thomas, bbc news. tens of thousands of passengers every year enjoy a trip down the river thames onboard the historic little ships.
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the oldest boat in service dates back to 1892, while another took part in dunkirk. however, the department for transport says new safety regulations could mean they have to be rebuilt, but owners say the costs involved will force them to scrap the boats. robert hall has been investigating and he's on the thames right now. good morning from the princess reader, who has been carrying passengers up and down the river thames to kew gardens and hampton court since she was built on the isle of wight in 1926 and she has got a proud military history as well because you it is one of two battle from this little fleet he went over to dunkirk and rescued hundreds of soldiers from the beaches there. that is the past and today we are talking about her future and the future of a lot of other vessels like her. it is very uncertain so i took a trip on the rev yesterday to find out more. —— on the river.
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# and the weather is fine and you know it's a sign # for messing about on the river. welcome aboard the connaught, a passenger vessel built a century ago and like her sister ships, still plying her trade on the 2a—mile route from central london to hampton court. they are actually a unique design and they were built for the thames. when the tide is out at low water they can get under the bridges which are low in this part of london. and they allow passengers still to have access to these historic routes which, as anyone who has been on them, are actually quite magnificent. river steamers launched for a tourism boom during the reign of queen victoria also saw military service. the connaught was called up as a hospital ship during world war ii. newsreel: in the event of air raids over the thames, it will be the river emergency service, the rems that will come
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into action with its personnel of trained nurses, stretcher bearers and complement of doctors. this is a statue of a gentleman by the name of william... the old river boats were designed to carry their passengers in comfort and some style. by the 1960s, the river was buzzing with traffic. but now modern safety standards are about to catch up with the last survivors from the original fleets. for vessels like this, the new regulations could mean a virtual rebuild. the connaught, for example, would lose one of her most distinctive features, this saloon at the rear of the vessel. it would be cut off, the deck would be re—plated with bulkheads put underneath, and the family who own her and two other vessels say it will cost them half a million pounds per boat. they simply can't afford it. dan adams is connaught‘s skipper and tour guide. he says the safety review threatens his livelihood. it's not practical to do it and it would send the company out of business.
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and in turn, if they go out of business, i go out of business because i would no longer have a job. outside there was sympathy amongst his passengers. if these boats are good enough for dunkirk, they're certainly good enough for us. i think it would be a terrible shame. if it's managed all these years and it's perfectly safe, why keep changing things? the report's authors say there is room for manoeuvre but they have to stay on course. where there is room for discussion is on whether at different parts of the thames, say further upstream, where there is less hazard. in the tidal stretch, if you like, that survivability is really important in bringing those older boats up to the same standards that new boats are constructed to. the recommendations go before parliament later this year. the future of these river veterans hangs in the balance. robert hall, bbc news, on the river thames.
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of course the companies that run these boats and the people in them go back generations and one of them is with me now. danny, you have four boats on the river. how long have you been in this line of work? over 40 yea rs you been in this line of work? over 40 years now. we have got some pictures of your boat in richmond when the river was steaming. why are these metal so special to you? they are part of our national heritage, to be perfectly honest. some of them have lasted over a century and they have lasted over a century and they have carried probably 7 million passengers. they are actually coming to my mind, especially the one we are standing on, a national treasure. the coastguard and maritime agencies say they are sympathetic but safety is paramount and they think about things that have happened in the past, maybe the marchioness, and they say that cannot happen again and i guess you accept that? what i cannot accept is
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that these vessels have carried 7 million passengers safely and the safety record speaks for itself, frankly. what would be the impact if you had to carry out their work that i described in that report?m you had to carry out their work that i described in that report? it would be devastating. we cannot afford to cut the decks of these vessels and re—saloon them. it would be financial suicide. where does that leave you? we have parliamentjust over that people are on your side but the agency seems pretty firm. we will have to scrap them. one vessel meets the criteria and the other three will be scrapped and we will be out of business effectively. the upriver service, which has run for the last century, and last year carried 55,000 passengers, would no longer be in existence. obviously there are other services and other things people can do, but this is special? we are unique because we
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are the only company that operates west of westminster bridge, the bridge in front of us going up to kew. that would be the end of that, the end of the story. so all you can do is sit tight, hope for the best? hope for the best and keep lobbying. i don't intend to go out of business. i will fight this but as long as it takes until we get the results we want. danny, thank you for talking to me. it is not the ideal day. you can see the rain on the lens. but we are going to be on the lens. but we are going to be on the river today talking to more people and back on the connacht later for people and back on the connacht laterfor a trip down people and back on the connacht later for a trip down to hampton court there maybe you can join us then. from a slightly damp princess frida on the thames, back to you. definitely messing around on the river today with that kind of weather! thank you. in a moment we will have the weather forecast but what has got victoria derbyshire got coming up on her programme at ten o'clock? good morning. fireworks alone in theirface. head butted,
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punched, kicked. just some of the incidents reported by firefighters, police officers and nhs staff trying to do theirjob. new figures suggest that every day 31 people are arrested for a tax on emergency service workers yet last year harsher sentences of up to 12 months in prison were introduced to act as more of a deterrent. should the government to toughen the legislation further? also on the programme: the manchester legend of the 80s shaun ryder will be live in the 80s shaun ryder will be live in the studio about getting the happy mondays back together for their greatest hits tour. join us live at ten o'clock on bbc two, the bbc news channel and online. now we can catch up channel and online. now we can catch up with the latest weather details with simon. good morning. we start this morning with quite a bit of cloud and outbreaks of rain in central and eastern areas. that will
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mostly clear away and most of us today will be looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers. some other shower was in northern ireland and scotla nd shower was in northern ireland and scotland will be heavy and maybe even thundery into the afternoon. you can see that cloud disappearing from eastern parts of england and wales. there will be some sunny spells and some showers dotted around in northern and western areas and temperatures today getting up to about 20 to 24 celsius. a little bit fresher but better yesterday. this evening showers continue in northern parts with clear skies elsewhere before further cloud and rain makes its way in from the south—west on the early parts of friday morning. temperatures down to ten to 14 and the rain in the south—west will spread eastwards. a pretty wet day in store for many of us. goodbye.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: a stark warning from the eu's chief brexit negotiator — that the uk will have to "face the consequences" if it leaves without a deal.
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at least 20 people are reported to have died in a fire at an animation studio in the japanese city of kyoto — arson is suspected. the brother of the manchester arena bomber will appear in court later — for the first time since being flown to the uk from libya. labour sacks baroness hayter as shadow brexit minister for comparing jeremy corbyn's leadership to the "last days of hitler". primary school children are being refused support for mental health issues — despite a growing need for help. we're going over soon to the office of budget responsibility where they're releasing their forecast
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of the impact on the uk economy of a possible no deal brexit. the old br was set up by the government in 2010 to provide independent economic forecast. we will be back with that very soon. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. let's start with a story that a lot of people have been watching and reading online. a bbc investigation suggests there's been a significant rise in the number of uk primary school children referred to mental health services over the last three years. freedom of information requests reveal a near 50% rise in referrals from pupils aged 11 and under. the college of royal psychiatrists describes the figures as "deeply worrying". danni worthington is a head teacher in halifax, west yorkshire. speaking on bbc breakfast, she described the mental health issues she has seen in schools. it can manifest in many different
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ways, but a change in behaviour, but what we've seen on a regular basis is children in high levels of distress, whether self harming or hurting other people, or it may be just that they go into themselves, very quiet, subdued, changing of effort into their work, and we sort of have to pick up on those and make the necessary referrals and put the necessary support in for those children. i think what people will find most shocking about this is we often talk about mental health problems among teenagers and adolescents, older kids, but you are a primary school head teacher, and you're dealing with kids... how young are you seeing these sorts of issues? i've seen it in children as young as four or five. right into reception? right into reception. how does that manifest? generally through behaviours, sort of aggressive behaviours and through key stage one we see children being violent towards themselves or violent towards others. so you've seen a four
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or five—year—old self harm ? yes. and it's shocking, isn't it? how do you deal with that? with great difficulty, if i'm honest. i have a fantastic team of staff at school. we are very supportive of one another. we are very professional and deal with the child and the family and then at the end of the day we cry together. i used the word heartbreaking. absolutely. without a shadow of a doubt. but also with that, going through that, there is the emotional trauma that this baby, really, is going through. this emotional trauma, obviously, that you are experiencing, but you also have to help the parents as well. and address that relationship as well. do you have the time to do this? do you have the resources? it is very difficult. i do have the time because i make the time because for me that is the absolute... one of the most important things as part of myjob,
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but i have to do all the other things another time. they do not go away, so the pressures on school are still huge. it is very difficult because of the lack of funding that we are getting in schools, to be able to juggle everything that is being put on to schools, placed into schools to deal with. now, people have been expressing alot of concern about this story — it's one of our top stories today. the world health organization has declared the ebola crisis in the democratic republic of congo a "public health emergency of international concern". the move may encourage wealthy donor countries to provide more cash. but the who stopped short of saying borders should be closed, saying the risk of the disease spreading outside the region was not high. the outbreak in the democratic republic of congo has killed more than 1,600 people. speaking on radio 4's today programme, drmike ryan, assistant director general
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for who emergencies, explained why the world health organisation had decided to make the declaration. a year into the outbreak the committee that advises the dg saw some worrying signs of disease extension, despite excellent efforts and improvements in the response, the reinfection of two workers recently and the difficulty in raising resources have all led the committee to advise the dg to declare a public health emergency of international concern. but using that language does what? is it in effect an appeal for more funds internationally? the main use of the international health regulations is to create a platform for collective action between countries to contain the spread of disease. in that sense this is a call to action. it is a call to action for further intensification of the response on the ground and improve coordination of all efforts at national and international level. one thing that people might assume that you would do is to ban or restrict travel and trade into the democratic republic of the congo but you have not done that. why?
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we believe that the closing of borders in fact will drive a problem underground. there are many hundreds of thousands of crossings of international borders in the region. to shut down those borders would cause tremendous economic hardship, it would cause a reaction to the response, and will in fact not work because people will use unapproved crossings. what we need is people using approved crossings with proper screening so we can pick up any suspect cases and this has been working up to now for the last year. and is it possible to screen on the scale necessary to give people reassurance that people who have got or are carrying cannot leave the drc to neighbouring countries or indeed fly anywhere else in the world? again, we have to remember that while ebola is a major emergency and many people have been infected,
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the vast overwhelming of people have no exposure to ebola, we have screened with our colleagues and the government have screened more than 72 million people in the last year, so screening is working. we obviously always try to improve it. we need to communicate more effectively with people who are crossing the border because they are being disrupted but the disruption of screening is much less than the disruption of closing borders which again would cause economic hardship and unnecessary tensions. this is the feed we are getting from the 0br. we will not linger on that but we will try to pick out the key headlines from this report and bring them to you as soon as possible.
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water firms must cut customer bills by an average of 50p and invest an extra £6 million every day over the next five years under plans unveiled today. water firms must next five years under plans unveiled today. waterfirms must cut next five years under plans unveiled today. water firms must cut customer bills by an average of £50 and invest a n bills by an average of £50 and invest an extra £6 million every day over the next five years. here's another one that a lot of people have been talking about. senate minority leader in the us, chuck schumer, has called for an investigation into faceapp, which alters users' photos to make them look older or younger. thousands of people are sharing the results of their own experiments with the app on social media. privacy concerns have been raised about the russian company which developed the app after it went viral in recent days. faceapp has previously denied the allegations. in a letter posted on twitter, mr schumer called it "deeply troubling" that personal data of us citizens could go to a "hostile foreign power".
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there's a lot of interest in the race to be the next leader of the conservative party and prime minister. well, injust five days, the uk will have a new prime minister, and last night the two remaining candidates made their final pitch for thejob. borisjohnson remains the front runner to succeed theresa may, according to polls, but foreign secretaryjeremy hunt says he isn't ready to accept defeat. talking to bbc breakfast this morning, mr hunt was challenged to explain how he would negotiate the brexit deal with the eu if he was leader. i don't think it's a very constructive attitude to say that if we are going to solve this problem its the deal we have, take it or leave it, especially when that deal has already been rejected by parliament three times. wiser heads in europe will recognise it is in both site's interests to find a solution to this problem. it is not in europe is like interests to have the shadow of brexit hanging over it for months and months and so i think
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when we have a new prime minister in place, if we sent someone to brussels who goes with the right attitude, looking for a win win, understanding what has gone wrong before, understanding the european red lines as well as other red lines, then it is possible to do a deal. i do not see it is easy but i think it is possible and i think thatis think it is possible and i think that is what people want us to do. people would want a clear timetable of how and when this is going to happen and at the moment we have the new commissioner, the european commission, who said that she would understand extending the deadline if necessary , understand extending the deadline if necessary, so there that possibility, so you cannot rule that can you? i look forward to working with her in a constructive way and i think she will bring a constructive approach to this issue, but in this country people want to resolve this as quickly as possible and i think
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the outstanding issue, really, in the outstanding issue, really, in the deal that we have, is over the northern irish border arrangements and we need to come up with a plan that guarantees the peace process, the belfast good friday agreement, which has been one of the biggest achievements of the last two decades, and i think we can be very proud of that, but one which allows britain to pursue an independent trade policy. if we go with some constructive ideas as to how to resolve that problem... what ideas might you have, in ramin's terms? so many people find this difficult to understand. it is a complex issue but at the heart of it is when goods go from one country to another and you do not have a free trade agreement then you have to have customs checks and that is why at heathrow we have different channels, red, green and blue, depending on whether or not those checks are
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needed, and what we need to do is find a way of having those customs checks without having physical border infrastructure that could be blown up by terrorists, people seeking to disrupt the good friday agreement. so tell me... primarily by getting people to register the goods they are transferring from one country to another on the internet in advance and doing those checks in the factories at both ends but not on the border, and that is what happens for example on the swiss border where the vast majority of trucks carrying goods between france and switzerland are not actually checked because they do the checks at both ends, so it would be something like that. a headline coming from the office for budget responsibility report, britain's economy could be pushed into a recession and real gdp could
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fall by 2% by the end of next year in the event of no deal brexit. that is what the 0br is saying in that financial report. some crime figures, knife crime figures hit a record high between 2018 and 2019, up 8% on the previous year according to figures released by the office for national statistics. the number one most read is that warning on the impact of no deal brexit from michel barnier the ego's chief brexit negotiator. at number eight is a possibility of young drivers being banned at night. to improve road safety and england. he graduated license system to distract
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new drivers. 0ne graduated license system to distract new drivers. one in five drivers are involved in a clash with an idea of passing their test. —— micro within a year. fake news, youtube says that conspiracy theorists who believe the earth is flat have been using youtube to promote their message. they say that youtube has been key in helping them to spread their message but the company says it is taking action to prevent the conspiracy theorists from reaching a large audience. if you have a look at that on the most watched it tells you why youtube and how youtube has been used to spread this message. that's it for today's morning briefing.
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northern ireland's first 0pen champoinship in 68 years has been a fitting affair so far. darren clarke struck the first tee shot, claimed the first birdie and he's been one of those leading in the early stages of round one. let's go to royal portrush and speak to our reporter adam wild. adam, local knowledge seems to have been important so far. the opening morning is always very special but this has been something else. seasoned professionals, pundits, professionals, all saying they have never seen scenes like it. at 6:35am this morning when darren clarke, northern irishman who lives here in portrush, hit that opening tee shot, there were huge crowds. this is the first to sell out in 0pen history. huge crowds on the
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opening tee has darren clarke at that opening shot. what a way to start. he went on to birdie that first hole, that part four. he has gone out in 34. he is at the top of the leaderboard. he hasjust gone back at two under par. the frenchman is up there as well. he was leading out on his own but he has dropped a shot and he is own to wander. you could hear a huge roar across the course for andrewjohnston, a very popular player indeed. getting an eagle at the long tarmac size. at the top of the leaderboard, the irish amateur playing with darren clarke is up there as well on two
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under par. a lot of local interest at the top of the leaderboard. under par. a lot of local interest at the top of the leaderboardlj under par. a lot of local interest at the top of the leaderboard. i can senseit at the top of the leaderboard. i can sense it looks like two layers of that year at the moment. how might the weather affect those later? in terms of getting any sort of advantage? it is very pleasant at the moment. it is the first time i have had my jacket the moment. it is the first time i have had myjacket off for a couple of days. it is very nice this morning with blue skies but i suspect there may be some more difficult conditions on the way. it is meant to get rather trickier around lunchtime. the reigning champion is going out in the next few moments and then rory mcilroy, northern ireland personal best of a golfer, is going just after tenney m. they will help to get most of their golf done before the condition setting. tiger woods, who doesn't go out until the pm, may get some very
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tricky conditions here at portrush. as always conditions are changeable. thank you. there's full commentary of the open on radio 5 live throughout the day. you can watch the best of the action in the highlights show tonight on bbc2 from 8 o'clock. the open and one particularface dominates the back pages this morning. we wa nted we wanted to show you the sun
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because of the headline. steve bruce appointed the newcastle manager yesterday. it seems there is a great deal of controversy on tyneside. meanwhile another team who play in black and white stripes have made a significant signing. italian championsjuventus have completed deal for dutch centre—back matthijs de ligt from ajax. juve have paid an initialfee of £678 million for a player who helped ajax reach last season's champions league semi—finals and he's signed a five year deal. england have qualified for the semi—finals of the netball world cup with a group game to spare. the roses got off to a slow start in liverpool but saw off trinidad and tobago by 72 points to 46. they'll face south africa in their last group match this evening before the semi—finals on saturday. you may recall england's layla
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guscoth was injured earlier in the netball world cup. she's offered us an update on how she's doing on instagram this morning. she praises the doctors at the clinic who operated on her achilles. and has backed her team—mates before their game against south africa tonight. you can watch the match on iplayer, the red button and the bbc sport website and app from 8 o'clock this evening. england begin what is a must win test match in the women's ashes this morning in taunton. 6 points to nil down to holders australia after losing all three of the one day internationals, they can't afford to lose any more game in the multi—format series. we are going to have to play in a certain way but it is important that we don't try to win the test match in the first hour, it is about breaking it down session by session and winning the little battles. there will be times we will try to be positive, but sometimes we will have to absorb some pressure, play the game situation and hopefully get a win. don't forget sportsday tonight on bbc news at 630. full round up of day one of the open. but that's it for now.
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a few more lines coming out of that 0ffice a few more lines coming out of that office for budget responsibility report, quantifying the impact on the public finances over no deal no transition brexit scenario. heightened uncertainty and declining confidence would deter investment while higher trade barriers with the eu would weigh on exports. together these would push the economy into recession with the pound falling sharply. real gdp falls by 2% by the end of next year its forecast says. higher trade barriers also slow growth and potential productivity while lower net inward migration reduces labour force growth. the imposition of tariffs and the depreciation of sterling —based inflation and squeeze real household incomes, but 0br says the monetary
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policy committee of the bank of england would cut the bank rate to try to support the economy. the 0br is an independent public body set up by the government in 2010 to give independent economic forecasts, so we are going to bring you much more analysis of what it has been seeing in this fiscal risks report this morning. another piece of breaking news about arrests in lancashire. two men arrested on suspicion of terror offences after those raids in accrington. 0ne managed 34 is being held, police say, overan accrington. 0ne managed 34 is being held, police say, over an alleged terror plot. preparation or instigation of acts of terrorism. a second 33—year—old suspect arrested on suspicion of the dissemination of terrorist publications, following raids in burnley. 0ne terrorist publications, following raids in burnley. one man arrested after a raid in accrington, the second arrested after raids on
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burnley, carried out early this morning. the police saying they want to reassure people that there is no immediate threat to local people. that is coming from lancashire police and northwest counter—terrorism officers, saying i recognise events like this can cause people to worry and impact on why their public confidence but i want to reassure people, says the superintendent, better information and intelligence leads us to believe there is no immediate threat to local people. the 0br fiscal risks report being issued this morning talking about the impact on the uk economy of a new deal and no transition brexit scenario. heightened uncertainty and declining
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confidence deterring investment while higher trade barriers would weigh on exports and real gdp falling by 2% by the end of 2020. the mp who led the campaign for tougher sentences for people who attack emergency service workers says the changes haven't been enough of a deterrent. six months after the new law came in, more than 6,500 arrests have been made in england and wales. james vincent has the details — a warning, this report includes violent scenes and the moment an officer is assaulted. right, i'm now recording, it's the 8th of february at 9:52am. i went to have a polite chat as my role as a community support officer and, unprovoked, he attacked me. carlos archer's attacker is serving seven months in prison after being convicted of two charges, including assault on an emergency worker. hiya, you all right? the new law is designed
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to protect ambulance crews, firefighters, police and pcsos. bbc research shows there was more than 6,000 arrests in england and wales under the new law in its first six months. my two kids asked me, "daddy, who did that to your nose?" i had to put it into terms they understand, and goodies and baddies is the old—fashioned way, and unfortunately a baddie decided to break daddy's nose when daddy weren't looking. in the first six months of the law, the metropolitan police said it made 1,283 arrests. west yorkshire police made 504 arrests, and, in the west midlands, the number of arrests was 497. the new law means tougher sentencing for those convicted of assaulting an emergency worker, with the maximum sentence raised from six months to 12. firefighter dave gillian was the victim of an attack like this in west yorkshire. he's not sure the deterrent is strong enough. it's a personal view, but i'm not convinced this is going to change anything. i think these people know that what they're doing is wrong and they could get into trouble for it, so i'm not sure
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any extra legislation's really going to stop it. the police federation in west yorkshire wants a minimum sentence to help stop people attacking those that are there to help others. james vincent, bbc news. philip hammond has been reacting to the 0br fiscal risks report on the impact on the public finances over no deal brexit with no transition, seeing real gdp would fall by 2% by the end of next year and the economy could go into recession. philip hammond has been issuing some very serious warnings about the impact of ano serious warnings about the impact of a no deal brexit and says he greatly fears the impact on the economy and public finances of the kind of no deal brexit that is being discussed. we have heard from the eu as well about the impact of the no deal
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brexit, seeing the uk would have to face the consequences as well. much more on this and i am. we have had a bit of clyde with outbreaks of rain affecting eastern parts of england but the rain is moving into the north sea and things are improving so for many of us there will be sunshine and showers. some of those showers could be heavy and maybe even fund any. a few bright spells in between. sunshine coming through. a few showers in north—west england, north wales. temperature is 22—25d for england and wales, fresher than it was yesterday and breezy when you have those showers. tonight we will continue with a few showers and clear spells before the next batch of cloud and rain were sent from the south—west into the very early hours of friday morning. during friday the
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rate is going to spread north and east were done could be quite heavy for a time through the day. it will be replaced by showers which could be replaced by showers which could be heavy and thundery during the afternoon.
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hello. it's thursday. it's ten o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. a stark warning has been given to the next conservative prime minister — borisjohnson orjeremy hunt — that the uk would have to face the consequences if it opted to leave the european union with no—deal. this document is the only way to leave the eu in an orderly manner. and if we just left, if we just tore up the membership card? the uk would have to face the consequences. with votes needed to be posted today in the leadership contest, what do young tories think of underdog jeremy hunt? has he done enough to win them over?

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